19 Burst results for "john updike"

Author Michael Murphy on 'Golf in the Kingdom'

GOLF.com Podcast

14:12 min | 1 year ago

Author Michael Murphy on 'Golf in the Kingdom'

"This is Alan ship. I am delighted to be joined by Michael Murphy author of Golf in the Kingdom still going strong eighty nine Michael. Thank you for doing this well. It's a pleasure. You have such a unique place in the game Euro Golfing Kindo as in your early forties. I'M NOT GONNA say it was a Lark but it was a you're not you're not a Gulf writer. You're not a novelist it just emerged from you in ever. Since you've been this Oracle you've been this grand old man of letters in the game you you tell shape how think about it. So are you still tickled that all these years later people are still finding this novel enjoying it? Well I I love it. I could say channel that because it was not only the first book I wrote the First Book I never tried to ride and I started it as I was turning forty and it was published in one thousand nine hundred ninety two forty seven years ago so when I was forty one so here we are now forty eight years later and it has. His Life Taught Me. I could ride so that in itself was an enormous pleasure and a big force to shape by subsequent life. I never thought of myself as a writer. My brother Was the designated writer in our family might and he had been a successful novelist and my grandfather had delivered John. Steinbeck and Salinas or you and I were both born and You know rules can get us. Signed the kids growing up and I was supposed to be a doctor and Than the more for me Thought I'd be a psychiatrist. And then got to Stanford and found myself in class on comparative religions of that led me to the philosophy and the way of life that shaped me ever since when I was nineteen and twenty but never along the way there was thought. Start writing books so anyway. When I sat down to write this book really did come in a flood. And it's Been living in me ever since I've written eight books now but that one If it were to be one of my children Children it would be among my books. It was my first child by far the most successful and I would say influential. Books are mysterious things. I like to say sometimes. Ufo's identified writing objects you W os or you are os. Son identified reading objects that can open worlds to people. And that's what's actually happened with this book with golf in the Kingdom one of the things about our shared hometown of Salinas which is just a dusty little farming community in the Central Valley known to John. Steinbeck doesn't have that much else to recommend it. It's not that far from pebble. Beach Golf links which figures prominently in my life story and and was important part of Gulf education. So tell us about your early days of playing pebble with with your brother and of course guys would haunt the Cosby Klanbake back. When he was really a big deal with Hogan snead Nelson and Bing crosby's the star in the world so is important from Stamford but it starts with your golf education before that while. That's right I mean we've had very fortunate childhoods you and I and my brother and Yes we would there be there at the crosby so I get to follow Ben Hogan around and watched him up close and personal before and after his accident. Which was in I guess January of Nineteen forty-nine so he missed that whole year in the hospital but he used to partner with Bing crosby and that was fun and Johnny Weissmuller who was the Great Olympic champion of became Tarzan. And the movies anyway. It was those great events and of course plane pebble which to this day remains by far my favorite course and it has to be. I mean there's of course in the world I think more beautiful than pebble. There are others that when you look at them would be beautiful. But to match the incredible range of moods it gets into with the shifting light the shifting fog the filaments of fog that cut across the fairways and all but anyway quyen pebble seen Some of the players in particular Hogan up close definitely was an influence on on golfing. The King wrote about it will hoge himself makes a handful of cameos in the text. Including what was it? The moved you so much about him well his magnetism on the course then he won eight out of eleven majors. He played over that period from forty eight to fifty through fifty three and he After the accident he paid just eighteen tournaments through fifty-three thickening one ten of them. He won virtually every major so he was the top of the game. He was to golf then way. Tiger Woods has been also the quality of his presence and when he would crack this out Just by the second hole at pebble for those who have been developed. Now it's then built up but there was a big field of practice in the pros as well as the onlookers. Got To sit down and watch him. Maybe there'd be hundred. Fifty people big big arena there watching him practice and it was a sight to behold because he had an immense repertoire of shots to fade to draw low high and the silence and that meant a huge impression on me and. I'm sure that as I sat down to write though I didn't plot the book or shape the book deliberately around him that influence. I'm sure was like an acorn growing into this conscious. Us of what the game could be as a kind of If you WANNA call it Yogi you can call it contemporary. You can call Chamonix even exercise golf itself is what in the eastern martial arts. Would you could call a Kata which is a series of movements. That trigger it is said are esoteric anatomy that is the complete person we are both in the flesh and in our soul are in the consciousness itself and golf swing. You could argue is an unnatural. Act It's not like running or throwing which are species learn to do and could do To survive. But you don't take a tee up a ball and hit it at the on charging tiger you know as a member of the tribe so it's an acquired skill that requires the most gypsum concentration and commitment to play it. Well and for this reason he and other reasons it evokes corresponding states of mind which can be interfered with with strong emotions whether rage or grief or sorrow which can produce by this fiendish challenge to get this small ball into this tiny hole and to go after four five hours over the course of four miles. You know. It's on the face of an absurdity. A why are we doing this? And that can occur to while playing. Why am I doing this but you do it? And you have these incredible pleasures and experiences and then as I've discovered through Responding to the book experience you have to call super-normal Mr Cool or cold. In other words the game can do that and It helps to be in a beautiful place like Pebble Beach. The you bring to this conversation. Just leaps off the page. I mean that's I think why the book is in bird because as you say it's this pursuit of ours is is maddening. It makes no sense but we do it anyway. And we were able to put a voice to having a correspondent. Brad faxon about the book and he said what I love about it is it made it okay to to speak of these things and you gave us in vocabulary to this experience at the golfers of had. But I you can get those tools so you matriculate to Stanford and as a fellow Salinas Person. I know it's not the most open minded place to Nag towns little conservative. But you have sort of a life altering experience stafford and what exactly happened well. I was so inspired by this professor. Frederic Spiegelberg he them a born and raised in Germany and Taught was teaching Stanford Comparative Religions so I got exposed to eastern philosophy and meditation contemplation than and particularly the world view of Indian philosopher. A named Sheera window who had been educated in England very elite education. His family had instructed his patrons in England never to let him speak any Indian language so he wanted to English but he was a philosopher and writer kind of a renaissance figure and developed a worldview. That's been the most basic influence on me. There are many influences of prompted me to do what I've done and of course the mystery is. Why chose this story? I could have gotten so many other directions but I consider myself very lucky. A Norman Mailer. The writer argued that every aspiring writer is given one free one by God and that was my free one and it was the first one and it in turn golf in the kingdom has shown me that this birth of new capacities is much more common than most people realize because immediately upon publication people started letting me know about their mystical experiences called experiences on golf courses. I wrote the book on some inspiration but I if you had asked me then that people would be having experiences you know immediately lawyer. New York wrote to me and was just couldn't get over this book. It helped him understand that. How on this particular occasion he'd been standing on the T. of four hundred yard and there were no players between him and his forces have been the green said he could see clear. A ball marker the size of a dime on this whole quarter of a mile away. Two of his playing partner couldn't even see the green. I got it was there. So he wondered. Is this the sort of thing you're talking about or a woman rights to me right away and says the yearbook helped me in? Because not long ago I was playing the eighteenth hole of at my Country Club as the sun was setting and when we got to the green the sun had set but it was still shining through the green and I felt that maybe this was some after glow on my is some retinal shock or something but when they went into the clubhouse who shining through the walls and it shown like that for three days and I was in an exaltation and thank you for writing the book because I found author who bite understand this experience so when you then I started getting these things. It pushed me in the direction of seeing the genius of sport to elicit this experience but not reported by sportswriters very often. You know there've been a few writers who have glimpsed this John Updike. He recognized this and Bernard Darwin. You know the great writer grandson. Charles Darwin he read the links of either down one of his short stories. I mean he certainly could see it. The mystery of golf by Arnold Hall Taint. So there's been a vein of golf writing that shows this power of the game not only to enchant but to reveal these capacities so that in turn has led me into other sports. And so I've been out to meet with coaches and players of ever since about what you would call the inner game of Sport and that Inter has led me to appreciate how prevalent it is in everyday life but not commonly discussed and recognized until recently. Thank you God for giving me go for the Kingdom as my first book.

Golf Writer John Updike Salinas Steinbeck Bing Crosby Michael Murphy Partner Ben Hogan Pebble Beach Oracle Alan Bernard Darwin Tiger Woods Charles Darwin Country Club Brad Faxon Stanford Johnny Weissmuller Cosby Klanbake
David Rabe Reads John Updike

The New Yorker: Fiction

07:04 min | 1 year ago

David Rabe Reads John Updike

"High David so I know some other ideas came up but updike was pretty much the first writer you thought of Reading for the PODCAST. Why was that He's been he's sort of been in my mind for. Since I started writing or thought about writings he he was always meaningful to me. And then there's a period of time where I stopped reading him. I just willfully stop because I felt like it was the only way to right the way he just doing it and so I just stopped I can remember talking to friends and I would kind of even develop some harsh opinions of of him that were really authentic on some level right based on just the need to Kinda separate. What for you is at the heart of his appeal Yeah I mean it's funny way. We we have you know. There's kind of a cross of backgrounds in a way. I think I just trip. I remember like he wasn't that much older than me. When I was in college? He was being published regularly New Yorker and everybody Where I was living at the time? I'm in college. You know who was interested in writing was very attuned to the New Yorker and he was published very young. I'm not sure what he started in the New Yorker in his early twenties. Yeah so you felt well. It's possible he's done it so that's sort of. It's been part of my brain for a long time. I think his these inhabited part of it for a long time and at that point in college. Were you thinking of writing fiction and not place. Yeah Yeah I started the whole creative. Things started wanting to be an actor. I thought then the college I went to didn't have a theater department but but we had a a professor teacher priests teacher who is really very good and you is a published poet which was significant to us but he had a class so I was in for like three years and it was all prose or poetry and the first story. You thought of reading was Updike's the sandstone farmhouse which was too long to read on on the podcast. What made you pick the other side of the street? I heard that similar in a way in in terms of the territory and It's it's a smaller version of similar work. I think but that hallway. He can mash the present with the past and keep it very alive and not seem forced to. It's just something that I admire and do you. I think the other side of the street is is very characteristic of updike or is it more off the beaten path for him I think it's characteristic in a way but it's kind kind of off the beaten path in its small us in its But he does that very well. So that's the that was why I picked it really right. Well we'll talk some more after the story free and now here's David Rabe reading the other side of the street by John. Updike the other side of the street for that. His lawyer told Faucet you need a notary public in this state. They're the ones who handle car title. Changes Faucet hadn't lived in his home state for forty years and only his mother's death had brought him back. He was taking possession of his meager inheritance inheritance cleaning out her sad cramped apartment. He lived far to the west and the climate and vegetation and even the quality of light light here in. Pennsylvania seemed strange. The afternoon light was dying in the windows. The Leaf is trees in the courtyard below. Where sinking into a well of darkness s with a silvery November glitter as if after an ice storm Leeming on their upper twigs? He looked in the phone book under Notary Republics and one listed at two six two Chestnut Street Hayes. Ville leap to his I a woman. Georgina are Mueller. She answered the phone and sounded excessively cheerful and helpful but perhaps that was just the regional manner which he had slowly lost. He suggested that ladies it was their the transaction must wait until tomorrow but she told him going that extra mile with him the way people in Pennsylvania did no. I'm open here until L. A.. Lot of people you know can't get to you except in the evenings you'll need the car title the Insurance Card Your own driver's license and what we call the short certificate it'll say short certificate letters testamentary across the top. Yes I they have those. My lawyer gave me plenty. Now let me tell you how to find my house. You come out the afraid Pike. I Know Faucet Taller I used to live across the street at two sixty one did you though. What did you say your name was? He told her but it rang. Nobel was a longtime ago. He apologized just after the war. I was a child. We moved away when I was twelve. Is that a fact. Well it's still a house to be proud of Brubaker. Sold it you know. This name meant nothing to him. A younger couple has bought it and sold off the back. Half of the lot really. It wasn't that big a lot in the first place. The Vegetable Garden had been down there. and his mother's Rove peonies and the ESPECIA- This shingle chicken house which is grandfather had had built and the little fenced in yard where his grandmother used to be had chicken with a hatchet on the stained old stump within the chicken house there was a liquid clucking and musty stench of chicken. Dong and there were fascinating. Glass egg scattered about in the Straw. OUGHTA give the stupid hands. The idea of laying. Well I know George in Mueller side. But that's how they do things. These days the crowd the houses in in this is considered a desirable neighborhood. It always was also told her. That's why grandfather bought the place back in the twenties. I'll be there around seven. I got to get a bite to eat. I've been lugging junk all day. There was no need to tell her about all this but perhaps he was gaining back. garl- is local manner faucet new the way but was slightly confused by the traffic lights which had multiplied to play in Hayes valley since he was last there a mall spread itself where there had been field. A new high school flat and low reminded need him of an airport. Along the low side of Chestnut street trees have been cut down on the curb pushed back without the trees his his old street had a baroness that made the houses some frame. Some brick appear exposed and

Updike David Rabe Pennsylvania Changes Faucet Faucet Hayes Valley Writer Professor Ville Mueller Side Brubaker Rove Pike Nobel Dong Georgina John George
"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

05:19 min | 3 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"That's that's just perennial. There's a very interesting moment isn't there when he's teaching how to use the chopsticks, then he puts his hand over hers and then he, he says, she almost looks frightened, and he can see that he's a big man with big hand and the might hurt I, I'm not using the exact words, but that's, that's a fascinating little intimation of that cruelty that saw was close when people expose themselves to each other like this. Yeah, there's always the potential for that turn and become so wounding and so frightening, and and he, he invokes that at that point though, of course, in a context in which is not going to happen in steady. And there's also the one from where he introduces that seeing, you know, he's talking about how he he, what he gets from being with Jane asus feeling of sort of like being magical on weight less than he can float around and what does Jane get while she learns how to use chopsticks, she gets. Yes, that is surely a piece of comedy against men. He gets from her is this sort of extraordinary moment of sexual and remanded completion fullness? And then what can he cast surround for the quivalent sort of man's blaming? Isn't it? That's and that's at least I taught her chopsticks. I know. But you know, because he's such a roomy writer, he's I'm sure making that point. That's a funny thing. And yet he also manages to make the one does field pleased when one learns to use chopsticks for the first time and the sort of trial, it becomes a lovely, comedy surgeon, lovely comical story. It's so not a tragic story. He's not a very tragic writer. Really. I didn't think though, you know that comedy. Well, I've always I was think comedy is as biggest tragedy. Yeah. Well, it's just a minor tragedies, a great tragedy. Just minor one, the great tragedies. Yeah. Yeah. So do you read the story? Do you think STAN looking back is is looking back only with that, you know, sense of nostalgia, or do you think he feels regret or shame or any of those. Any of those negative feelings when he looks back at this there. I don't think he feels shame. I think that Updike is quite coolly realistic about that. Actually, there is just no evidence that he feels shame what he feels and what Updike writes. I don't think he writes shame. Yeah, chilly, very well very much. He doesn't. He's not very interested in it, but what he writes so exquisitely in that scene is that searing sense of the loss of youth which can't be negotiated with you. There was no other choice which could have ended up with him not being middle-aged that it doesn't matter who each away went or whether he moved to New York. All became an artist. You still grow old and the women who wants open themselves to you are available no more, but that's the Sixty-six-year-old man's anguish at. Aging rather than forty, whatever he is in the story. Yes, I think so. That's what he feels just the anguish of the lovely use and love and sex in the middle of young life that can't be had back. Yeah, but she gets the last word and and it's a generous word and once felt all the way through. And I think STAN has felt that Jane is a very generous person. She gives herself, she gives herself kindly and that awkwardness in her. Perhaps it's, you know, she's no sexual gymnast when feels that is what she's quite shy. That one moment I had to read when she kisses his penis and that sort of shy and surprising and he feels he can't Dimond offer. He can't. He can take what she gives. That's a lovely thing in him by the way. That's a nice. Moment. Yeah, another man might demand it. He's he's not. He's not a be storable a tall, but she's a generous woman. And at the end, her gesture when she meets her old lover is generous. Sort of let him off. Don't say things we'd be happy for me. Yeah, he's all you have to do. And I suppose one might think his thought that women in middle age with the, you know, she has another child and she sort of got what she wanted and what he longed for in her. He can't have. He can't have it back. So so funnily enough, the women, the woman does get the last word in this story and sort of got what she wanted only not in him will thank you as a. That was a pleasure. Thank you. Debra..

Jane asus STAN writer Jane Updike New York Sixty-six-year
"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

04:48 min | 3 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"Responsibilities of mortgage and family and children while they're women in the case of Monroe at home on the bed, trying to write stories, and nobody wants to tell the story completely in reverse, but it's worth remembering that this is hard to. Yeah, I think I think if you want to make a case for this being an offensive story about women. It isn't Jane. You look at its Carol? Yeah, Carol. Who who is never described, you know, we get all of this descriptive nece about Jane. What we hear about Carol is only that she's bothered by her grey hairs varicose veins and given that they're in their early thirties, yes. Yes, that's a little. Perhaps. It was have three children in quick succession, but yes, but we don't get much of an image of her. She has glasses. She's a bit. She described in very practical yon romance. Turn us. Yeah, and she's appropriate for him. That's that's. That's right. No, I, I sorta glance that she would be a trustworthy partner and mother to my children. My estimate was sound. He's never bought flowers for. Yep, that's. I mean, Perot Carol, that's fun. Yeah, but navy. She was like that stories have to tell the truth. They're all people who resemble that thing. And if we, if the duty of storytellers is to go round, rendering the profound in a lives of all women and they're suffering, they'll they'll have a problem with some. I think what what Updike sitting out there is that's what stand thinks she is may not be what she, it's stand Caesar. Absolutely. Because you know, Deborah to curse to me actually, that we never know why he ends up with alpha and maybe in the meantime, while he's been visiting Jane in New York, Carol has made it Peru mind leave somebody else. It's Yep. Yep, we, we never know, and that's and that's not the story that STAN can tell. This is a first person story, so we can only trust STAN or not trust. Yes, yes. The women are hot ticket and self possessed enough. I mean, Jane really in this story, Jane is self possessed enough to convince us that STAN does not have the last word. He's not to be untrusted. He's not an unreliable nature on the country. Of course. You know, there's a slight of hand and he's he's a sublimely good marriage in fact. But there are. Gaps around his account of things which are deliberately left by the writer in which we can supply other versions of what happens. Right, right. And as he keeps saying, STAN keeps saying there's a missed that rises up in front of his eyes when he thinks about Jane and he he's seeing through a mist in a sense. Yeah. Yeah, yeah. What do you think so much emphasis put on how off kilter and a symmetrical she is, you know, bony on top wide on the bottom. You know, all of these things that are unbalanced about her. And even in the description you quoted earlier where she's got extra hinges in her arms and she's checking herself, lose parts. I mean, she sounds almost like a robot. There's something kind of strangely mechanical. I, I haven't. I haven't read it like that. And you know, I've been, I've been a naive Rita in all of that thing that he makes much of because I've just been thinking, I know I know that can picture. I couldn't picture. What is that funny thing as if she were checking his flus I and the way later on she does she, she actually grabs. She rests the hand, her own hand on the ball of her shoulder and gives it a squeeze in I, I see it. So I haven't thought hard enough which of course with Updike I should be thinking about exactly how women to read backwards from that to me to mean very recognizable. A symmetry that people have an, I kind of love him, making it lovely and making it desirable instead of perfection instead of wanting dreary symmetry, but, but what could it mean what what's I mean? I suppose it might curious in to this thing I raised the becomes more and more parent as the story goes on that what Jane is in the love affair. Four is the very opposite of what STAN is in the love affair for he wants glamorous Arabian nights, new. New York with its, you know, its thrills and it's it's cynical artists however much he's afraid of them..

Jane STAN partner Perot Carol Rita New York Monroe Updike Deborah writer Peru
"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

03:49 min | 3 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"His car could get blown up by HAMAs because of his secular politics by Fatah off because of his collaboration reputation by railways because he's there. That's the New Yorker radio hour for WNYC studios listened wherever you get your podcast. So Tessa, I was reading a review in the London review of books by James would actually of Lexa fluff the collection. The story appeared in and he said this about the book, the stories are set in what the publisher calls classic Updike territory, which may or may not be a region you want to revisit. If updike's earlier work was consumed with wife. Swapping. His late work is consumed by style Joe for it. In the majority of the stories, a man now in his sixties and sheltering inside the leathery love of a functional marriage. Usually a second one fund recalls an old girlfriend or rather an old lust since this is how the women are chiefly celebrated. So obviously he's one of those people who has sometimes criticized writing about women. Do you think that's a fair description of this story? How would how would you answer that? It's Hof fair. I mean, though I, I kind of want to resist the critical part of it. Yeah. All right, as have their story. The however, however compati- it grows. No, that's probably not true. There probably are some writers who have you know three or four different modes, but if you can do what you do and you just do it so well, it adds to the truth of the world. So if I mean that he's description of this sort of leathery older age, looking back with nostalgia, Ron on on youth. That's where a lot of find ourselves pointing. And and on the other hand, just to generalize -able experience in the so intensely and crucially set in particular America in particular decades, looking back on particular of a decade. So it becomes much becomes a record in the way that will the best fiction does the finest kind of subtlest record of time in a moment. And as that time recedes, it gathers if the right is good enough, it gathers force for rita's rather than losing it. But as as for the other little job of James would about it, being lust, rather than love. If lust is this good, then what's wrong with it. Description of Jane that she wasn't playing, but she wasn't a conventional beauty either. That was something asymmetrical about not just a snob to hold bony face all of that when she just two arms and hands a pit too long with an extra hinge to them, somewhere had gestures involved. A lot of sudden retraction and self stroking as if she would checking herself a loose parts, do you know? I actually thought when I was reading that I thought I wonder if men right the best man a few men right better about the appearances of women than I can think of women writing about the appearances of men, women right brilliantly about men, but it's as if this is sort of blur of power and role and status and relationship that stops that seeing which is the same as painters painting. See women, they've spent centuries looking them seeing them. That's the male gaze, but we might..

Jane James WNYC updike HAMAs London review of books publisher Fatah Tessa Joe America Ron rita
"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

05:56 min | 3 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"Sunday morning, men's tennis group for me and the Methodist choir for Carol. Jane's appeal was exactly that she was not home that she was a splendid elsewhere. New York City did not miss me. It did not occur to me that she might once explaining away a weepy mood. Jeffrey had a fever. She did not think she should leave him with Brenda from downstairs. So we sat together in our clothes in the room with the view the tops of the button. Woods Jane let Trump. Yeah, but you haven't been racing downstairs everyday to the mailbox? Hoping for a letter from buffalo. Her lettuce to me directed to my office at the plant somehow Borden embarrassed me as well as putting a funny look on the face of the department, secretary as she delivered one addressed in Jane's sprawling round handwriting to my desk, the struggles of the gallery to survive head glimpse some opening of Robert Motherwell Jeffries progress school. The details of her world when I was not there seemed meager and unreal the details of my own mighty strange by painting a life, less lonely than hers. In buffalo, I had everything I needed for life. Except for her. My New York girl tucked into my consciousness like a candy after dinner. I come into my pillow. I have nothing much to say. I told her accepted. I adore you. Adore implies a distance, doesn't it? Jane? Had a stern face. She reserved for people who came into the gallery just loiter on a cold day. She clumsily stubbed out her cigarette smoke down to the scarlet filter in a fashionably rough clay ashtray on her stack of art books. She had caught Jeffries cold and kept clearing her throat. You don't want to hear. I assured her about which child of mine has had his bicycle stolen, which dog has died. I don't all how Carol had a flat tire doing the car pool or how drunk soon. So got it. Some of the sewn so's dinner party. This woman, you almost left Carol for who still see her. I'll feel what's worth sometimes big occasions. We will put a good face on it. Life must go on. I suppose that's what it must do. Yes. I was not comfortable with the tug of this conversation and went to the front windows. Wondering if this was the last time I would ever see these treetops to the north. There were few skyscrapers just a low recession of streets and domestic windows hit might almost have been buffalo along Seneca street. For this Al, the're person. You really put yourself out. You tried to leave Carol for her. Hit displeased me suddenly that Jay new, these women's names. I suppressed the impulse to explain that. I had seen how thea functioned as a suburban housewife, a mother that I could envision her fitting into Carol slot. I knew all the phone and she would bring with her Jane's furniture walls impalpable. It was the city itself, the universe of anonymous lights. I did and I swore I'd never try it again. It was too painful for everybody. Jeffrey begun to call in the other room, a dry delicate, only child's cough and Jane went into him. I heard memory as she rubbed his bag. She began to sing. I had never heard her sing. She had a sweet voice reedy, but true with an unforeseen -able. Hillbilly twang to it. Hugh all my sunshine, my only sunshine, she sang softly. So Geoffrey, you make me happy when skies a gray. After a while the boy asleep, she came back to me and unhurriedly moving about with a high haunch ungainly grace of deer. She took off her clothes. We made love on her phone rubber sofa with shaky chrome legs. And afterward. We ate through six, toasted bagels and two half pints of cream cheese. This may have been the last time I slept with her, but I doubt it. We phased out very gradually. The extruded aluminium business was facing onslaught of fresh foreign competition from South Korea and Taiwan. After all we done for them, I'm buffalo became more involving and complicated both at work and on the social front. And I stopped rigging trips to New York. Out fear and I had been married for close to fifteen years when I saw Jane again in Rochester road Chester of all places in the middle of winter, at one of the entrances to midtown plaza where they have the clockwork puppet shows Christmas was over and the seasons snowfalls have been compressed to a block. She corrugated ice hard as iron. Jane was accompanied by a blown boy..

Jane Carol New York City Jeffrey Robert Motherwell Jeffries pro fever New York South Korea Trump secretary thea Brenda Rochester road Chester Jeffries Taiwan Geoffrey Hugh Borden
"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

02:30 min | 3 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"I told Jane in a gentle voice Chinese food and silvers shouldn't makes there's no big trick to it. I unwrapped her chopsticks and took a long freckled hand in mine. She seemed faintly frightened. I saw myself for a second in the mirror of her female mind. I was a man frightening with big prehensile hands. I told her, you rest, one of them here against that finger said the thumb holds it emplaced and hold the other between these two like a pencil, feel ability with this pinching motion. You can pick up anything from a single grain of rice to a chunk of sweet and sour pork. I can do it. She announced after, well, this is wonderful. Oops, damn rice is the hardest sort of put them together like a shovel. Over thirty. She said, I never thought I could manage chopsticks. I'd watch other people twiddling away and they seemed so debonair. Thank you, STAN. I accepted her. Thank seriously. I was proud. I doubt whether Jeffrey really got the hang of common denominators, but I want to think that to the day she dies. Jane will be at ease with chopsticks because of me. I am losing her. The missed that arose. When we first met surrounded by glaring blue scrolls threatens to swallow all the details, the chopsticks, the taxi cabs in the depths of night, my proud impersonation of a man buying flowers for a sweetheart. What else can I remember? We must have talked thousands of words, but of what our expertise was in quite different areas. And if we took too long about our marriages, we would trip upon the fact that hers was ended a mine was not. Once when after a long absence unusual, I entered her. She breathed in my ear, he's home, which almost unmanned me. It seemed so sad, an untruthful. My home was inequities, fill with the three children, the tired fincher the Saturday night, dinner parties. The.

Jane fincher finger Jeffrey
"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

02:04 min | 3 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"But she did lead me to an underground movie somewhere in the dreary thirties, and to play in the village about a group of dough paddock, sitting around waiting for their connection to show up. I kept hugging her during the play, its message of hopelessness of addiction seem to be directed at us into enlist us in the scattered troops of rebellion in those pre-vietnam years. But she pointedly did not respond as if asserting while her straying had tingled against my cheek, that my romantic sense of it all. Let me off too easily. The art movie had no plot that I can remember. There was a lot of grainy slow panning and some jumpy surrealistic collage, including a quick repeated at deflation that called Jane to exclaim softly at my side. Oh, the act was faked with photographs of a dildo and a young woman's face. Not matter of factly enacted for the cameras. It would have been a few years later for the time. It was daring as was Jane when in bed, not without awkwardness. She startled me by suddenly dipping her head to touch her lips to the tip of my erection, like a small girl yielding to the impulse to bestow a kiss on the bald head of a favorite dull. The kiss was quick and light and seemed to startle her as much as it did me. It remains in my mind, an isolated moment lit by a flower shop, low the moist, sheltered intimacy, expectant, soft-pedals. My didn't press her to repeat the gesture feeling. It stemmed from an overflow. I was in no position to force. I could take, but I couldn't Dimond. What did she get out of me. A lesson in chopsticks, we had wondered into a rather over decorated undelivered Chinese restaurant on Lexington avenue.

Jane Dimond
"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

05:39 min | 3 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"The morning moment kept overflowing on and on. Bark going crazy the way he does never getting enough. Jeffrey Jane son was with a friend or his father. And so this once we had the apartment to ourselves, I had spent the night daring the phone back at the hotel to ring Jane was close enough to mice is so that I could wear her blue robe. I could never have got into a robe of Carroll's. What I loved in Jane was her excess her muchness the hip so wide. She walked with a seesawing lurch. The seed Orie had that was always falling into my face, the angular Downey arms, the legs that stretch to the corners of the bed. It was a single bed. We had slept badly snoring in each other's faces dodging elbows. Her ex husband was an artist not successful enough to supply child support or for me to have heard of him, but not so unsuccessful that he had to abandon an autistic image of himself. I hated and envied and could not imagine her world of artists, their lofts and debauch is their self exemption from the rock of the ordinary there. Quick cynical, minds and mouth. There of the Woodley charm nine year old Jeffrey was DOE is and shyly polite, perhaps because I oversaw him when he was being put to bed at the moment of Jane's in my going out together, his tiny rooms won- tool window looked south upon the lights of midtown mounting in rectangular masses, higher and higher and Arabian nights view that made me grateful to have been granted a small illicit purchase. Upon such display such blender. Jeffrey was precocious school and Jayme was proud of that. Occasionally, he and I talked, my impression was of a slide disability toward me, a guarded hope. His mother's loneliness was in the air. He breathed an, I gave him a brief change of air. He was blunder than she English looking with a pointed chin and pale skin and rosy cheeks. Only his, our Brown eyes and black eyebrows gave evidence of another strain, his father's. He had read lots of Tolkien CS Lewis at school. He was having a little trouble with how to add unlike fractions of the men in the margin of his life. I must have been the only one with degree in engineering. You make the number so nicely. He exclaimed when I began to instruct him in common denominators, you've court to if they're not clear, they're worse than useless that kind of full you make with the closed top looks too much like a nine. But STAN, the fours in books, all closed, like Pat books got away with a lot. We can't get away with in real life. I told him paternally it was enchanting somehow to be cold standby, a child, the age of my own children. I was momentarily a member of this family, but the membership was woven of angel hair insubstantial with none of the weight of real family ties. I was temporarily magical to go with their magic. So precariously posed in midair here between the tops of the button would trees and the stats skyscraper lights. Jane's apartment was furnished with cheap chic, unframed out of series prints were tacked to the walls and instead of end tables, she simply used stacks of art books and catalogues. I felt unprecedentedly nimble in this apartment. Light-footed stealthy, stealing happiness from these rooms and then gliding out the door into the elevator. How loud it stores and gives seemed in that solidly sleeping building and onto the barren streets that with mysterious quickness yielded a roaming cab. It's third eye blazing. Adventures adventures with Jane. We had to eat off to the maintenance. Man. Finally, let us out of my hotel room. We were both famished and found an all night automate on east forty second street. It was like entering a hopper with a petty girl on my arm. Escorting Jane into any restaurant felt luxurious. We never found a head. I didn't like jostling with the fruity accented voices. The name places like bask and so on. But New York abounded with half empty no name restaurants where they were happy to see you. The maitre d' beamed at the site of Jane in her miniskirt and falling long hair. I remember a pricey Swedish Mogus Bogue in the east fifties and a steak place with Texas decor and big windows overlooking third avenue and a fish place with wooden tables somewhere south of Washington square. Broadway plays took too long to waste our precious time together on..

Jeffrey Jane Lewis Carroll Orie Swedish Mogus Bogue New York Jayme STAN Downey Texas Broadway Washington square Pat Jeffrey forty second nine year
"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

05:08 min | 3 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"But an all night drugstore gleam two blocks away and fits of traffic on a mated. The avenue within a minute or two attacks materialized. Its roof, light signaling, rescue the driver, and I were usually chatty on these returns to my hotel. He was pleased to have a fair a. My tongue was oiled by sexual reproduction and a sense of escape those rights through the almost deserted city had a clean clicking feeling of getting back on track. Pulling up at the hotel paying the cabdriver walking in my warm shovel -ment past the noncommittal desk clogged into the elevator down the windowless corridor into the still expectant room. I rejoined a self who had been here all along. The bed was cool and tightly made with a mint on the pillow. Sometimes Jane came to my hotel once when I had left the room, dark non-typical of her arrival. She asked as I let her in is this where the orgies. Another time the same time, how many times with we couldn't open the door when it was time for her to leave, it was absurd and frightening, an invisible enforcer, trapped me with the living evidence of my crime. This was off to two AM long past time for Jane to be rejoined to her postal g self and to send the babysitter home. A woman in the apartment below would sit for her short notice assistant of single New York. Women existed egging each other on the long odds game men useful unattached Tetra sexual men with scarce scarcer here than in the hinterlands. Jane taught me this to her disadvantage for I rarely worried in the months between my trips to the city that she would not be there for me as glamorous and games ever. The mystery of the locked room was never completely solved. The moral standards of hotel management were obscure to me. I stammered guilty calling the main desk for what seemed many minutes of waiting Jane and I were prisoners together, fully dressed and physically wary. Finally, a black maintenance man turned the latch from the outside with a master key. He fiddled bemusedly with the obdurate in a northern chatted with us as if we were the most ordinary consecrated daylight couple who had ever required his expertise. We may dismiss society that old our, he and Jane hit it off, especially vying in theories on the mechanical puzzle. She said, I thought it might be like a subway turnstile. You needed a token. It was a revelation to me this we, our camaraderie of New Yorkers and the city's g. new. A way of folding Maya dull Trie into its round the clock hustle. Caroline. I had met in college, the university of buffalo, a math major. She was bright methodical compact and rounded. She had classes and thin serious lips. I saw it a glance that she would be a trustworthy partner and mother to my children. My estimate was sound. She was all I could reasonably ask for in a mate. We both studied too hard for much of a formal courtship. We just palled around and in our senior year agreed to get married. So to stop at one of Manhattan's flower shops and by an arm full of roses, all gladioli was a rite of manhood. I was undergoing for the first time. I was in a kind of limelight, playing opposite the veteran talion actress behind the counter with her faint moustache and frayed sweater and tightly wound iron grey bun into which yellow pencil had been thrust at a dramatic angle. All my senses heightened notch. I registered with a feverish keenness, the pedaled colors mast with their reflections in the black display window and the chil wafted out of the glass told refrigerator where the cut flowers were stored and the angry deaf gesture with which my co stop the pencil from the back of her head and scribbled the receipt before sending me out into the street with my green cone of blooms. Bearing flowers enlisted me in the city's anonymous army of lovers, a few bright doorways up Columbus avenue. I would stop at the liquor store for a court of wild Turkey, the most expensive brand of Borba within my sense of.

Jane Caroline university of buffalo Trie New York Manhattan
"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

03:27 min | 3 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"My two cog garage in Eggett spill and the new red Toro snow blower with which I tried to keep a path open through the fabled snows off Lake Erie at. Tell me about you. She smoked like someone who had never smoked before bringing the cigarette to her lips. With a flattened hand, the fingers tensely curve backward. She stubbed out the but in a chunky green ashtrays, if she were crushing stubbornly vital bug no time for that, sweetie. She said dismounting from the stool with an awkward hop has shoes at the end of her long, full fide legs were startling, shiny scarlet like red nails on black fingers. I hear people out front, maybe they're stealing the art. I should go encourage them. She added. I have a child to a nine year old boy, no husband, no call, no snow blower. But h. Field. This time, her hesitation and has had a clear import. It was my turn to make a move. It was my turn to be awkward. Would you would you like to have dinner tonight to to have better things to do bet you do. Somewhat to my disappointment. I full sole complications. She was not busy plans. Good to me. She said, brushing her hair back from one ear and thoughtful way. How about to you? You don't sound too sure. What about the boy? I'll get a sitter really on such short. Notice in buffalo sitters was sullen teenage girls off in a fourteen year old dream world or else. Grandmotherly women, widows and spinsters who were highly valued and had to be signed weeks in advance. I did feel UBS that the miss between us was thickening, really eight o'clock too late for you. I'll feed him and tuck him in his, the address. It's a walk from here and be afraid. It'll be fun. Jane lived on the west side, twenty blocks north of where she worked that night will one soon thereafter. I was amazed to discover that numbers of cops were cruising those streets at three in the morning. I had been fearful stepping onto Columbus avenue drowsy emerged from the warmth of her bed. How whispers of farewells still history. My is her last kiss was Evaporating. Under my nose. My whole body felt as defenseless slugs I left because of the boys, so he wouldn't find me there and he awoke and because of my wife who might have been telephoning the hotel frantic with some domestic emergency Carol had a nervous, clinging streak beneath her trim aplomb. I had let her into multiple motherhood and then kept running away. Now I had my own emotion, see the m. t. straight St., stretch two vanishing points around me a mugger to be cool. The mug as then could be waiting switchblade ready in any of the upright dark doorways behind any of the Brownstone stairs..

h. Field Jane Lake Erie Eggett Carol UBS fourteen year nine year
"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

03:57 min | 3 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"Days appointments had been kept. Extruded nonferrous metal, mainly aluminium alloy was all product combination. Storm window manufacturers were our big customers, but in the sixties aside line had developed in metal picture frames. And this brought me into contact with the lower echelons of the art world. I visited galleries to see what they needed and in one of them on an upper floor on west fifty. Seventh street, I met Jane. She wasn't playing, but she wasn't a conventional beauty either. There was something as symmetrical about not just her smile her whole bony face with its high cheekbones and powdered over freckles seemed a little tuck to one side when she gestured her arms and hands appeared to long with an extra hinge to them somewhere, head gestures involved. A lot of sudden retraction and self stroking. If she would checking herself loose parts. She kept flipping back a long straight hair, a dull reddish color that reminded me of pencil shavings and the cedar refrigerants that arises when you empty the shop. She were a beige knit mini-dress. I'm black pantyhose. Hips will wider and her thighs, fuller than one would have expected from the bony top half of her body. And this added to her touching or of being of balance there in the merciless brightness of the display space. The white walls held hasty obstructions, blue, pigment, smeared on white primed, convos all the same size and framed in thin cold rolled steel like a rove bar from mirrors. I'm not here to look at the paintings. I apologized just the frames to get an idea of what you need. I guess inconspicuous is what we need. She said, fluttering one longhand, the cruel wall, and then quickly resting the same hand on the ball of her shoulder and giving it a squeeze a lot of the artists comp stand. Any frames, they say, creates a mindset. They want it to look rough on a fighting the rectangle in any case. But we find she said, relenting with a heart, cutting crooked smile. The customers are reassured. If there's a frame it shows it's finished. The artist means it. I'm interested more in the flanges I said, but she knew already that I was interested in. I had gone stupid, something existed between us like a mist and those benighted days such an interest was considered not in front, but a datum to be factored into whatever one's life equation was at the time. Jane and I were both in our early thirties time for fresh calculations back in buffalo. I had survived with my helpless family to mulches infatuation non-explosive day new more. In the aftermath. I had adjusted downward my estimate of how much happiness I could extract from the world and of how much I could offer any woman. Not my wife. I was wised up and shy that then New York was another world, an infinitive restaurants and apartments in elevator shafts and human appetites. I wasn't too home until late tomorrow night. For the flanges. Jane said after a goal, key has attention and an alarm stare that first second burn through the the two arisen between us. You may be need to come into the storage room..

Jane rove New York buffalo
"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"When you're young, you mentioned to me that one of the things he wanted to talk about today was the way Updike has been criticized. For his writing about women. How does the story tie to that? So I chose the story deliberately to sort of test myself in push myself with this thing where I have heard much criticism. I've heard people say he hates women and everything in me doesn't recognize that doesn't see that. But I chose one deliberately where on the one hand, I think this is a story about the love of women, but I can read it with another bit of my head and imagine somebody else finding it deeply offensive. So it should be really interesting to talk about. Well, maybe we should listen to the story now. So we'll talk some more after the story. And now here's Tessa. Hadley reading New York girl by John Updike. New York girl. In those days. New York seemed as far from buffalo is Singapore does. Now. I used to take the train all eight stultifying hours of it or drive on route seventeen stopping off in Corning and Binghamton where we had clients and then coming down through the Catskills into Westchester county. Once you're in New York, I used to stay at the Roosevelt all the Biltmore right around Grand Central station. You were on another planet afar shore hit cried out few to establish another life. Time at home. So filled with the needs of the house of the children of the wife. Carol felt herself aging from her gray hair down to her varicose veins was here your own hours of it, and no one to tell you how to fill it. Once the.

John Updike New York Grand Central station Westchester county Carol Hadley Binghamton Corning Roosevelt one hand
"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

02:09 min | 4 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on The New Yorker Fiction Podcast

"That i needed to gird my soft and to go on the right this thing and that uh yet it whatever i felt that it you know i was i had to be as honest as i could and that i i really do have this experience of of the difficulty of conducting myself in the world as a as a grown up and i want us communicate all of that and and he was extremely helpful to me for that is continues to be well thank you matt thank you debra john updike was the author of more than twenty novels and a dozen story collections he went to pulitzer prizes to national book awards and the national medal of arts among many others updike published his first story in the new yorker 1954 when he was twenty two and went on to publish more than a hundred and sixty more before he died in two thousand nine at a seventy six matthew clams first novel who is rich was published earlier this year and 1999 he was acquitted in the new yorkers list of twenty fiction writers for the new millennium he's been publishing stories in the magazine since 1993 what does he your favorite writers on stage at the new yorker festival october six to eight you can attend conversations and panels featuring incoming poetry editor kevin young novelists edward saintaubin as aren't fec george saunders jennifer ican chairman alexi and more see the full festival lineup and buy tickets at new yorker dot com slash festival poor download the festival app he can download more than one hundred twenty previous episodes of the new yorker fiction podcast including one in which matthew plan rita story by charlestown prozia poor subscribe to the podcast for free in the apple podcast section at the itin store on the writer's choice podcast he can hear short stories from the magazine threat by their authors you can find the writers voice and other new yorker podcast on your podcast app tell us what he thought of this program on our facebook page for rate in view us in apple podcast on itn's the new yorker fiction podcast is produced by tilted off new yorker dot com i'm deb retracement thanks for listening.

debra john updike new yorker george saunders alexi writer pulitzer new yorkers poetry editor kevin young edward saintaubin chairman matthew apple itin facebook itn
"john updike" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:27 min | 4 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on KOMO

"The likes of john updike kurt vonnegut jack tara wack sixty three years later still going strong hafner claim to fight for the sexual liberation of women and us all through playboy many think he was just objectify women that debate may never end gloria steinem road an expose of her time as a playboy body maintaining he was really exist loyd thing women under the guise of protecting the first amendment or i personally would not want to go down in history as he hackel hugh avner was born in chicago in 1926 his parents both teachers from nebraska he served during world war two writing for a military newspaper before college that legendary publishing career hafner is revived by his third wife crystal and four adult children including cooper currently chief creative officer of the playboy company hafner will be remembered as more than an elderly gent in a silk road he changed the face of america this is jim ryan abc news dealey plaza the scene president kennedy's assassination on november twenty second 1963 two days after the president was shot lee harvey oswald was being transferred in the basement of the dallas police station when he too was shot to death he come bravely and nobly went out hayward hey without a hit the floor jim lavelle now ninety seven was the police detective in the white hat immortalized in images of oswald shooting after nightclub owner jack ruby was convicted of killing oswald fourteen boxes of trial evidence what did to storage untouched for decades when district judge brendon birmingham learned of the boxes it was like crystals he had not yet been born when ruby was strike but fought to have the evidence including some of rubies personal belongings transferred to a local jfk museum giving the public access to some of these documents that they have never had access to before is is something that very humbled to be a part of for sure fifty four years later rubies trial evidence becomes public of the sixfloor museum housed in the old texas rule book depository besides the documents jack ruby holster business cards and the brass knuckles he used to carry they may not sir shuttle any arguments about the details of the kennedy assassination but the artifacts help to complete the portrait of a key player in the city's darkest period jack ruby jim ryan abc news dallas.

president texas brendon birmingham hayward playboy john updike kurt vonnegut dallas sixfloor museum jfk museum district judge jack ruby jim lavelle lee harvey oswald first amendment kennedy dealey plaza jim ryan america chief creative officer cooper hafner world war nebraska chicago hugh avner sixty three years fifty four years 1963 two days twenty second
"john updike" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

MyTalk 107.1

02:42 min | 4 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on MyTalk 107.1

"In this an excerpt from their burdening of bob woodward and carl bernstein all the president's men ray todd its first pro profile on the john updike rare bradbury nozomi man so many people and i mean he was an icon in a pioneer and and the chichina class and i guess a lotta people just like what could never are always mad at him about this but the most successful magazine editor ever because within i mean that sold out that marilyn monroe assure i now and that was what 1950 fifty three eight than they're saying that within a year at its first issue it had ground to a circulation of two hundred thousand and by the 70s at its peak it reached a circulation of seven now yen yeah they marketing buzz buzz in had that the three most recognized american brands around the world the golden arches the coca cola symbol and of the playboy twenty years that are instantly recognisable anywhere you go in the world you'll know were there that's something yeah i really really his and um yeah i don't know i i did conley my dad is the dad your gear your guy died today because a key see when deer hunting with my dad of it is shack and my dad has all nineteen eighty two and below a playboy in out house okay and casey really really was just like any he said that i was going out to the bathroom all the time the out housing projects such fond memories of like of that decade of looking so follow and that was like 'cause butane of peak even we see induce yeah you could get playboy but anything that was anything more than playboy you know is all under the clung to their house was there so well that was very about him along delay there came a lawyer by in the 80s but was it they always said was at seventy though but much more it wasn't is classy there you go joy is that class say yes gucci huge yes tell us wiz larry flint's battle that hustler alhilal around pin us was a creditor bob who journey yeah the you want to see is all of yahoo is not easy you know who it is janet quest fight okay kiss huge aerial less but she really does it if you fire dishonesty having to weigh menu like women for their looks and pushy people.

bob woodward editor conley playboy larry flint yahoo carl bernstein president john updike marilyn monroe casey twenty years
"john updike" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

02:12 min | 4 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Well we were to that calling attention to it now mm known not really a writer is somebody tries to tell the truth right and your value to your society is a certain willingness to risk to risk being honest and so to be honest about this was part of the general job as i see it i think you found a lot of universal's in the particulars of your experience the psoriasis now like to ask you to read on a an excerpt of your chapter on psoriasis and i guess is john updike in this is a reading from his new book selfconsciousness psoriasis keep you thinking strategies of concealment ramified and selfexamination is endless you are you are forced to the mirror again and again psoriasis compels narcissism if we can supposed a narcissist who did not like what he saw in certain lights your face looks passable in slightly different other lights not shaving mirrors and rear view mirrors in automobiles are merciless whereas the smoky mirrors in airplane bathrooms are especially flattering and soothing once taste look says tawny as a movie stores flying back from the caribbean i used to admire my improved looks years went by before i noticed that i looked equally good in a lavatory glow on the flight down i cannot task reflecting surface on the street without glancing in in hopes that i've somehow changed nature and the self the great moya tease of earthly existence our each cloven into by fascinated ambivalence one hates ones abnormal erupting skin but his led into a brooding solicitous attention toward it one hates the nature that has imposed this affliction but only this same nature can be appealed to for erasure for cure only nature can forgive psoriasis the sufferer in his self contempt does not grant to other people this power.

writer psoriasis john updike moya
"john updike" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on Fresh Air

"Support for this podcast in the following message comes from swell investing in impact investing platform that aims to deliver profit as well as furthers swell identifies highgrowth potential companies that are working to solve today's biggest challenges light clean water disease eradication and renewable energy now people can invest in portfolios of stocks that a line with their values this is impact investing it's also good business invest in progress at swell investing dot com this is fresh air weekend i am teary gross today where featuring highlights from our weeklong thirtieth anniversary retrospective collecting interviews from our first couple of years i did many interviews with john updike over the years and i think my favorite is probably the one were about to here recorded a 1989 after the publication of his memoir selfconsciousness about all the things that made him selfconscious including his stutter and the skin condition psoriasis updike who died in two thousand nine was one of the most celebrated writers of his generation best known for his series of novels about the character rabbit angstrom his stories about the character henry back and his novel the witches of eastwick he also wrote for the new yorker he won the pulitzer prize the national book award a national book critics circle award but he tried to keep a relatively low public profile and was reticent to reveal much about his personal life to his readers until he wrote his memoir in the opening paragraph he explained why he uncharacteristically chose himself as the subject of a book shortly before the first of these personal mercer's was composed but several years after the soft spring martin showing them that it describes i was told perhaps injust of someone wanting to write more by agassi to take my life my load of oran heap of memories from me.

renewable energy john updike henry new yorker pulitzer prize national book award mercer psoriasis national book critics circle a agassi
"john updike" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

New York Times - The Book Review

01:37 min | 4 years ago

"john updike" Discussed on New York Times - The Book Review

"No i'm about can of the the energy that he draws from them i'm by it his marriage is more or less sexless at this point he resents his wife for the lack of physical contact he is i'm it if he has no intention of giving up his marriage but he's kind of looking for more at the same time and so it's unite it goes into john updike territory it's it's not it's not a breaking new ground auto it certainly not a sexless book of the at the play on words in the title who is rich the his partner in the affair this was a woman named amy she's a student at the artists colony that that he goes to and um she's married to a hedge fund geyer financier of of some sort whose em malta a millionaire many times over if not a billionaire and so it's um the partly about class resentment as as well so it's a lot of fund the beacons his kind of tear through its very well written sensing class resentment and then i landed relaxed although i say tank lady of sex and clashes have an owner not wanna follow you too closely on the podcast fresh stuff to tuck hello able have over there well it's uh it's not new it's new ash tough ranches miss recent novel the trespass her on which is might might entry into tana french territory i've been meaning to be her for a while and i said if you know very studiously meant to start at the beginning with the first spoke but when i finished the women in white i was really i was kind of adrift for a day which for me is like a long time to go without having decided landed on the next book.

partner john updike amy