23 Burst results for "jim collins"

Settling In With Your Budget

You Need a Budget

04:20 min | Last week

Settling In With Your Budget

"You stop paycheck to paycheck, get out of debt and save more money. Earlier. Just after Mother's Day when you're supposed to do this at least here in our gardening zone I. purchased. Thirty two tomato clients twenty nine of which survived and dare I say thrived. And while I wasn't always. Of the mind that they would make it, they did they outgrew the not sturdy little green polls you can buy from big box. center stores and I will not do that next year I'm going to get something sturdier for those massive plants but needless to say we ended up. I think thirty, eight, twenty I can't remember exactly too many tomato plants. And what do you do when you have too many tomato plants you have too many tomatoes and that is exactly what happened to me and Julie. So we did what everyone did during a pandemic and we started putting things up and in this instance, these tomatoes. So the other day. I'm sitting there with a whole bunch aromas and we're doing this thing where you cut them in half you broil them in the oven for a moment and that's supposed to allow you to kind of pinch off the tomato skin and then you take that and you process it more and you ended up with. Think we ended up with that one doing some salsa. As I started the process, I kinda rinse them. I'd cut him in half I lay them skin side up on a cookie sheet I put it in the oven for five minutes. I'm watching it closely not to burn them I, pull them out, and then you have to let them cool. Weather Cooling I'm doing the next sheet I'm pinching off the skins once they've cooled down, I'm having to pull out the little white stem thing in there. And quickly like first or second cookie sheet in there were many many cookie sheets still to go. I told you. So this is GonNa take forever and she said. She said something very wise because she's. She gets to the. Essence of things quite adeptly. And she said Oh Jesse with canning, you just have to settle in. And that phrase is just kind of rolled around in my head since then and of course, while I'm sitting there pinching. Tomato. Skins off of half sliced Roma tomatoes ready for some, can't, salsa. I'm thinking about budgeting and I'm thinking about you good listener viewer and I'm thinking. Wow. Budgeting. Sometimes, with budgeting, you just have to settle in we get excited we plant all. Probably too many plants, but it's spring. It's not hot that are no weeds yet and we're excited plus we were at the store and we saw these different varieties and we're just were jazzed right so we get everything going. You put it in the ground at first. You don't even think things are working, but then the pace really starts to. Your excitement starts to take as the plants are growing, and all of that is like with any new endeavor. Here is the topic of conversation. So in any endeavour, we're going to be talking about. This. Period of initial excitement but once Wayne's and I'm just sitting there slicing my fifty. You know. Not. Fifty five, hundred, fifty, thousand. So many tomatoes and as I'm sitting there slicing the next one see no end in sight. I'm giving the wise counsel you just got to settle in and so it is with budgeting in particular that pernicious little beasts that is paying off debt. You have to find a pace where you just almost you call it out at the beginning and you just recognize you know what? We're going to be here a little while and that's what Julia was saying. She's like Oh we're canning were processing or cutting these things we're doing all these steps were standing in the kitchen sink. We're going to be here a little while we might as well just settling. Sodas with budgeting you're going to be here awhile when you've got a big goal that you want to tackle on audacious Harry goal like Jim, Collins says. Givens has big big hairy audacious goal like paying off all your debt finally, getting rid of your student loans saving up enough money for a house down payment in a market where housing just keeps. Going on a terror.

Julie Julia Oh Jesse Givens Roma Wayne Harry Collins JIM
"jim collins" Discussed on The Fine Homebuilding Podcast

The Fine Homebuilding Podcast

02:12 min | Last month

"jim collins" Discussed on The Fine Homebuilding Podcast

"They call it here use the provincial designation. There's granular a, which is like a pit run gravel brain you're is more open graded. So it has very little fines drain super quickly and your wedding that water down into the subsoil and letting it percolate into mother nature and into the ground and re recharge the watercourse. So Everybody thinks I'm going to be pulling weeds like crazy though polly merrick joining sand that they have now that you sweep in the joints and kind of gold blues together wants water activated. It's like that only again, it's more of an open graded. Joining Material. Let's the water through. So I, think that's probably what I would lean towards yet. It has been so great talking to you Jim Collins. Thank you Patrick thank. was everything you hoped it would be I was nervous curse IT I. Know I I'm hope I didn't ramble too long now. Now. I did want to You can see I'm wearing my keep craft alive t shirt which. Ah God from my father's Day pick So The One thing I wanted to really. Show here. Is Teaching. Everybody out there be readers, listeners, builders contractors teach your kids as young as you can. About swinging out hammer dig shoveling the dirt, get your hands dirty. Stretched that little rubber band. It's in their brain and teach them about that. It's okay to you know hurt themselves in hit themselves with the hit the nail you might hit your thumb and really. Teach kids as young as you can that it's okay to get dirty and build and enjoy that process. It's a see. I'm getting a little. True Man, it's true and we need to remind people more of that. It's our job is to teach your kids that stuff of course, the technical in the trade education when they get into the high school into college level in all that fantastic. But if they don't have it in their in their idea and their mindset from.

polly merrick Jim Collins Patrick
"jim collins" Discussed on The Fine Homebuilding Podcast

The Fine Homebuilding Podcast

02:23 min | Last month

"jim collins" Discussed on The Fine Homebuilding Podcast

"You're if you're a custom home builder, you're building a multi s for somebody. Do you think they're going to want to Redo the driveway in five years because it settled as it entered the excavation of garage probably not it it should have the same attention that everything on the inside of us. I'm very I'm very precious about the outside. Yeah. Yes tons of money. It's tons of money. It's a massive amount of money and again, Ilda right from the first time, right? And I can't imagine and impresses your your neighbors too much when they see your sunken driveway in front of your garage, right? That's the first thing they see when they come up to the house wants that yeah, it is. It is. Yeah. Yeah. So I'm I'm guessing that local geology plays a huge role in how hard scape sound landscapes are constructed. What is some some of the potential problems that you look for when you're walking the site of a proposed project or? Your own house. You know when when when you're buying whatever what do you look for? I think again like I said, drainage is freaky. which way is the water coming from and going to look up the hill look down the hill. And then thinking about the designing, you want and the space that you want Think about it in four seasons. That's a very, very important thing we're here in Ontario. So like New England, we have pretty diverse changes from winter to summer. Shade is important. especially, everybody's at understandably concerned about Uva some protection for their kids in their family and things like that. So you know maybe you don't WanNa. Cut that tree down. So quickly because it's giving you yet, it's dropping little. You know fruits for that two week period in the fall but the other you know eight months of from spring to fall giving tremendous shade it's. Reducing your heat load on the roof. You know all that kind of stuff. So looking at Sei conditions before you touch things very, very important as there anything that you would just run away from if you're looking at a house if you saw ledge, for example, poking out of the ground, would that concern you or are there other things that might send you the other way? No. No. Because there's nothing. That I think, can't be engineered around like I said some of the geotechnical products that I. Do. Tremendous.

Ilda WanNa New England Ontario
Mark Toft  How to Build an Authentic Brand in an Insincere Age

The $100 MBA Show

09:59 min | 2 months ago

Mark Toft How to Build an Authentic Brand in an Insincere Age

"Guests. Teacher is mark. Toft and marked off is going to be teaching you how to build an authentic brand in an insincere age. Everybody is trying to project their brand on social media on Youtube with Webinars, beating their chests with bravado, and it's just falling on deaf ears how you stand out when everybody's trying to brand themselves and. Look like they're winning will that's why we brought on Mark Toft to teach you how to build a branding strategy. The actually works that's real and Authentic Marta is a chief strategy officer and Co founder of the narrator group and he's an absolute branding expert. He was the lead digital writer on the staples easy and project. He has over twenty five years of experience in business and branding, and he wants to give you a gift today a great lesson on how to focus and craft a brand that matters into these noisy world. We got a lot to cover in today's guest lessons. So let's get into it. Let's get down to business. This message is brought to you by windows and HP everyone has a different way to work whether it's typing on a computer sketching out notes with a pen or accessing all your stuff on your phone with windows HP. You'll have all the tools you need to work the way you want. So whatever you do, make it you with windows and HP see how windows dot com slash HP. We brought on Mark Toft today to teach you a great lesson on building an authentic brand a brand that stands out brand people talk about a brand that really has a message and resonates with people they say brand or your brand is what other people say about you when you're not around, let's make sure they say, well, we want them to say it's your job to craft that narrative. So GonNA, hinder over a mark to t shoe his guests lesson on doing just that. Back, to rally the lesson, give my takeaways but for now, take it away mark. Hello everyone. This is mark talked I'm grateful join me today I'll be teaching you about why brand authenticity is critical to success and three things that all authentic brands do. So let's get down to business. Before we dive in. Let's pause on that word branding a lot of businesses get knotted up by especially start-ups. Here's a helpful and pragmatic way to think about it. If you pulled five people aside at your company and ask them what you do and why you. Would you get five different answers? This. Is the kind of challenge branding solve. But the truth is at a lot of what passes for branding materials and consultation are thickening agents meant to make businesses feel they've paid for something substantial complex defying an order to profit Tim Ferriss has called it. But branding is in fact, very simple. You don't need pages of charts and graphs to define it just a few words or a sentence. Branding. Is what you stand for and what people experience from your products and services. It's not what you claim to be. It's what you are. Your brand is your purpose advertising takes that purpose and assembles it into compelling story. That's twenty five years of frontline branding and advertising experience packed into a few words. But why is authenticity important to branding? Because the temptation to tweet or share things on social media in order to be accepted has never been greater. In a sense, we're all performing for each other like never before. Judging by our music or movies social media, not to mention her branding and advertising being true to ourselves. As novel we're after we want to seem to be true to ourselves want the appearance of authenticity. Than the fact. The wise words of Simon Sinek provide good corrective branding is an exercise and trust building. He says when we fake our way to trust that trust will eventually collapse. One level of brand authenticity relates facts. Is that cookie made with natural ingredients is that watch rolex a knockoff? Now this kind of authenticity isn't unimportant. But it's only a starting point. It's like telling people your height or your eye color. These details don't penetrate to who you are were to who your brand really is. It's easy for companies to get hung up and telling the history of their founding. In exacting detail they feel they have to recite information about their origins founded in this year by these two people humble beginnings in a garage or basement. I'm not saying these things should be hidden, but they frequently don't matter. When you think of authenticity branding, think of it, this way brand authenticity is believing in and delivering on what you claim about yourself and your products and services. It's your brand's essence not it's facts or its features. And this gets us to the first thing that all authentic brands do they're built on a clear purpose. In the movie office space and Unhappy Employees named Peter Gibbons, guts, sufficient his cubicle and fights the desire to throttle the CO worker who tells him must be having a case of the Mondays. It's funny because many of us have had jobs like peters bad jobs jobs that seem to have no function other than to make us move paper around in dream of the day will quit. Meaninglessness is deadly for brands because humans are wired for purpose, employees leave jobs when they don't find sufficient meaning pay and benefits are rarely the cause. You can't capture your purpose with long mission statement and pages of brand strategy employees and customers need something clear simple and true. They can go back to again and again. My partners and I call it the hill you defend it's the first and the final ground on which you stake the life your business. Their other popular ways to describe the same basic idea. Jim Collins argues that all successful companies adhere to a hedgehog concept. They succeed by finding and focusing on one thing that they do really well. Simon Sinek talks about the golden circle and starting with why The center of the Golden Circle is a brands reason for being it's why. Don't be afraid to embrace a seemingly humble purpose that you can actually live out rather than a high falutin purpose that has little relation to the products or services you provide. One Young Entrepreneur I met was launching a firm dedicated to sustainable architecture, her passion and her intelligence. Clear. Although. Her purpose was staring right in the face building better buildings that is buildings that are more affordable and more beautiful and friendlier to the environment. She was clinging to a phrase that she had fallen in love with. We're going to change the vernacular architecture. She told me do you know what that means? Neither do I. Should be more likely to find her company's authentic purpose by thinking of it this way. Could someone call her office and say? Hello I'd like to buy a change in architectural vernacular please. nope. But they could call and say I like to commission a building that's better and more efficiently designed. A strong purpose answers a lot of questions and even help inform business decisions. Why should we design packages this way? Why are we expanding into these markets or reaching out to these customers? Why are we aging our cheese like this? Or for employees, why do they perform their work this way or not another way? Because that's what a company dedicated to. This purpose would do. Think of Fedex with their purpose of guaranteed on time delivery. United. Airlines being the friendlier line. Now they've lost their way it seems in recent years but that purpose at one time catapulted them to being the number one carrier in the world. The second thing that all authentic brands do is they seek conflict. As. Social creatures most of us try to avoid or minimise conflict that's perfectly rational but conflict is at the heart of good stories and it's also at the heart of effective branding and advertising. Most products and companies are created out of conflict. To take a prosaic example, a busy parent is confronted by an unhappy teenager whose favourite redshirt is fading in the wash. It's a problem that needs to be solved. Tied Color Guard offers a solution, a detergent that doesn't fade reds and other bright colors even after multiple loads of laundry. The importance of conflict and branding and advertising is often overlooked. Ultimately, address in resolving conflict is why people will pay for your products or services. Conflict interestingly can help you locate and focus your brand purpose if you're struggling to pinpoint. If you're not sure how to express your brands purpose think of the conflict or the problem solve for customers. Finally the third thing that authentic brands do is they cause with caution. Not long ago people greeted with this news KFC announces buckets for. The Cure. You don't really need to learn more details to sense the approaching doom. Kentucky Fried Chicken Partner with Susan G Komen to donate fifty cents to cancer research for every bucket of chicken ordered. Funding, breast cancer research is, of course a noble cause. KFC simply wasn't the brand to do it at least not in this way. Maybe they could have donated money directly without making it depends on the consumption of fried chicken. The campaign was met with House of disapproval and was quickly withdrawn. The public is onto brands looking for cheap grace. Your customers. Dishonesty sensors are set to high. They're quick to see self interest masquerading as selflessness, and they're ready to pounce on publicize instances of inauthentic.

Mark Toft HP Simon Sinek KFC Toft Youtube Chief Strategy Officer Writer Tim Ferriss Jim Collins Fedex Co Founder Peter Gibbons Kentucky Peters House Susan G Komen
PARE Things Down - Jeff Bajorek

Daily Sales Tips

02:08 min | 7 months ago

PARE Things Down - Jeff Bajorek

"Here's Jeff pejorative with his tip this week. So how are you supposed to sell when you feel like? Everything's going sideways right. When you feel like you're in a time of crisis you know what that feels like. If you don't know what that feels like then you will at some point and if you do know what that feels like then you may need to be reminded of a few concept's that will help you right the ship when things. Just don't feel right. I've come up with an acronym now in my defense. I'm not really an acronym guy but this one kinda presented itself. When I was having a conversation with a friend of mine so I thought it was good enough to go with but when things are going awry you need to pair things down. P. a. r. e. pair things down like cut out the unwanted stuff in. Keep the stuff that you need to focus on. Pair pause assess reflect execute. You need to pause. You need to stop need to give yourself some space. You need to think clearly which means you need to shut off many distractions as possible so you can understand what is necessary in. What is unnecessary? When you pause you can then assess what needs to be done once you know what needs to be done and make sure you keep your priorities. Two three or fewer. If you've got more than three priorities you've got zero priorities. Jim Collins says that an I lean on that in times like these once. You've assessed what needs to be done. And you've got that list. It's very short. You can reflect on the best way to execute. What is going to be your plan who needs to be involved. What needs to be done? Who's doing what right? This is your planning phase. You're planning exercise in once. You've got the plan it's up to you to execute. Do not get distracted. You can't afford to get distracted. The reason that you narrowed your priorities down to three was so that you wouldn't get distracted execute mercilessly on those three priorities and once you've got that execution done things should become clearer. If you've executed in things are still not quite where they need to go back. Pair it down again. Pause assess reflect execute. This is how you lead in your customers. Need you to lead right now.

Jeff Pejorative Jim Collins P. A.
Got Kids At School? Then You Need To Listen To This!

FlashCast By PDB, With Phil Di Bella

09:21 min | 10 months ago

Got Kids At School? Then You Need To Listen To This!

"Today I have the wonderful Nicholas. Who's just finished grade? Twelve twenty nine teen at Brisbane Grammar Nicholas Nicholas is a son of a very good friend of mine and a very talented young man who has a lot of wisdom to share. So we're going to interview Nicholas today in hopefully that Any any of you that have got kids going through school especially those this year that are going to finish grade twelve. We want you to play this to them. And here's some great insights from a young man has done remarkable remarkable things and we'll go into some Even more remarkable things Nicholas walk into the shot. Thank you for having me Yeah yeah this is really cool. I love to shed some of my wisdom now. Great great to have you so again. Keep a relaxed. It's easy it's all good. Kids have been interviewed. I I'd like to keep this all unscripted as you know there's nothing in front of us I'm just GonNa ask you some questions. Don't be nervous to speak from the heart and remember that it's all about trying to help people Better themselves especially. There's a lot of parents that listen to this and a lot of kids now going through obviously grade twelve and doesn't matter what they've gone through grade twelve it also helps anyone wanNA school So tell me you finished grade. Twelve twenty nineteen. How does it feel first thing that comes to mind? I kind of lost actually like I've done really well and and I can pretty much do what I WANNA do. But I've no idea like what path when I go down in life. I have no idea what I'm passionate about yet. I've just really vague idea. Yeah that I want to go into business but I don't know like whereabouts. It's very yeah and that's okay right and one of the things I tell my kids and my kids are eleven. Nine nine is you know You don't have to have all the answers you don't have to have all the answers and it's so refreshing to hear somebody just finished grade twelve. Say I don't know exactly exactly where I WANNA be. But you have an idea businesses. Obviously something you're passionate about and you interested about Tell me go back to school tummy. What's one of the most challenging things that you remember from school? I guess like the the hottest thing to me was learning how to study like when I went to the grandma I was like a straight say student. I'd no idea like what I I needed to do to get to like is and then I guess like a lot of hard work and a little trawling Aragon neither and that was the hardest thing for me coming from like a state school that was like a big lead and then the that's that's the biggest jump. Yeah now that's great and yet my son's very similar obviously not as old as sure when Ali went from a private school Holy Spirit and went to church in grade one And of course now in year twelve years later view he found exactly really something he went from being top of the class. The bottom of the class and And he had to work very hard and of course you've worked very hard because let's say that Nicolas is achieved amazing amazing Results at grammar in the top ten percent of this country which is obviously very proud for himself Obviously himself must importantly and then overseas family family as well and I think number one from Nicholas's If you do the work you get the results And it doesn't matter what you start it's where you finish. And he came into grandma being says Kennedy Grandma In the top two percent in the country run. That's exactly right like I was in the bottom twenty eight percent of my cohort and I guess like that really acted like as a dry to me. I really wanted to improve so I I studied like four hours a night for like four four years and then I like sort of gradual progression in Mike Reid's feed at how the system worked and then I ended up doing extremely well. And that's a I didn't inspiring so tell me what drove you to study those four hours because there's so many people in this world today that the results won't do the work and one thing I love about you Nicholas. You've done the work and that's inspirational and a great message for people is you. Don't get the results without the what. What drove you? What were you thinking when you said I have to do that with because this is a lot of people out there that are not prepared to study for hours? I guess like demanding that I was driven by was just really wanted their respective my peers. Like I was at the bottom like a felt like I was a nobody like when I was at primary school like I felt like us being noticed like aboriginals good but then I went to grammar and I'll just like the bottom and I guess like it eventually really got to me. I was like I can't do this anymore. I wanted to make something of myself. I'm here so I worked really hard. And then eventually started getting ceramic awards. And then Ozzie proud of myself awesome and and you know and and I think the key message out of that is very simply you had a vision yet vision of what you want it to be and what you want to achieve and you did the work and side enough. You need to do the work. Tell me what's a highlight view in your Schooling ruling is you know twelve years of school. It's now thirteen years. You didn't have to say this now. They do but You know e- what was the highlight fear. The highlight for me was really doing sport. Whoa like I found that? It was a great way to manage stress so I did. I did cross country and swimming. I did about twelve hours of training a week and that really stopped me from burning out and it like kept my mind's clear and stuff and I made a lot of friends through that as well so I found that to be really like good for me mentally. Yeah awesome awesome. Tell me how important friends at school my friend because I talk about it with the kids at the people in that circle that you keep telling me how did they firstly high important where they and how did you go about choosing the right people in your circle They really like the friends that I picked will like extremely smart and they were like a lot smarter than me and I guess that sort of setup that I wanted to be and I constantly try to improve to get to that level and then because of that I worked. I decided to work harder. And I got their advice and seek their advice and I'd say having a good group of friends extremely extremely important if you want to do well and Jim Collins says the famous Jim Collins says you the some of the first people you've got around you. Things are talked about in oversee the flash caused sees you are prodigy the people that you keep your Angie that company because it's all about mindset you have to have this positive mindset constantly to be the best that you can be and remember that whilst you can be in a competitive if situation Like Cherchi like grandma in skokie there in competitive situations all the time and that comes with a lot of stress comes with a lot of issues and the rest of it. The true focus should be on how they think about themselves and how they want to be the best semi. How did you deal with the pressure? of what comes with an elite school Manley just through sport. Lack is related endurance. Sports like swimming and cross country. 'cause like I found on that they really take your mind. The work like physical pain. Like if it about everything. And you'll really focused like breaking your pay bay and instantly takes your minded the stress of like trying to do well. I guess going to competitive school. A lot of people are trying to get up in the ranks and that that sort of like it can get you like mentally and I think doing sport is like the biggest cure for that and not losing it. People just like being humble and then not like like going crazy some great advice as the said Nicholas is a very was young man Nicholas Tummy message that you would give to people at You doing great twelve this year. What would what would be some of the learnings that you would say? Because I said Iowa said that wisdom comes with experience experiencing g can be was your a lot wise and the people going through grade twelve this year. What what messages would you give? The people that are starting told this year I'll say like work is in everything on like in twelve. I like completely shut out a lot of family and friends to do well and I regret doing a lot because like I got really lonely in a bit depressed like three twelve and that sort of sodomy so I guess if there's one thing to take away is definitely where cod but don't like shut other people out. Yeah great message there. Isn't it because you do need people around you and you still need to have. I always talk about Nicholas Professional personal and family and it doesn't matter whether it's Great Levin Grade Twelve whether it's university whether it's business whether it's everything and it's messages I've missed in the past and not learnt from I've let now but didn't didn't listen to in the past. was you still need that balance of personal professional no and family. So I'm going to finish our interview and you've been amazing and short listeners. Love this but I want you to think about one thing you want to achieve. Personally the one thing you want to achieve family and one thing. You don't shave in terms of business in your bitten. This year will obviously be something like university What is one thing that you wanna do and achieve so when we were sitting here in one year time what does twenty twenty look? What was the number one successful thing in terms the family suddenly and in terms of professionally which is work schooling? I think I need to look closer with with my family like I feel quite disconnected from the now just finishing it twelve like. I didn't even know how old my sister was turning. And she's like birthdays tomorrow. Thousands of weird and then so I guess like I would really want to spend more time with them on the stand the more

Nicholas Nicholas Brisbane Kennedy Grandma Nicholas Tummy ALI Mike Reid Nicolas Ozzie Skokie Jim Collins Iowa Manley Angie
Why is Chester Hanks, AKA Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson’s Son, Like This?

Who? Weekly

05:40 min | 10 months ago

Why is Chester Hanks, AKA Tom Hanks and Rita Wilson’s Son, Like This?

"This is chester. Hanks big doc big up the whole island massive cowboy Chattanooga coming from that Golden Globes to- amongst Mexican and. I'll watch I mean it's not the worst thing he's ever done. I think that's the best way to put it. That's the best way to put it. It's the worst thing he's ever done as any Tom Hanks fan longtime hang longtime Tom. Hanks Fan knows Chad. Hayes is the kind of loose puzzle piece in the whole thing of it all yet. He's the son of Tom and Rita. They have their oldest son sons. He's a rapper slash actor slash instagram user and people often he comes up sometimes and then he goes away and then he comes up then he goes away and he's currently coming up because he was at the golden goal to this parents he also like recently in the past four years got sober and had a kid so like his life was just very drama and now it's a little bit less drama. He's wingless academian more less wrapping and more acting and he sort of quieted down down. Yeah everyone could see less of him but that sort of a good thing whatever right but everyone forgot about him and then he was front and center at the Golden Globes last night. Everybody I was like. Oh yeah remember like Tom. Hanks son who's like a little bit yeow unexpectedly Tom. Hey brought the whole. They brought the whole all clan there today all the kids. They brought the kids with Tom. Tom Hanks's other kids. His his non-readers children his children. Even his non on reader children are invited. Children were on. Hank's is a Non Rita Child. It's only they're not talked about over for to their their Colin Hanks as an unruly child. Elizabeth is a Non Rita Child and Truman and chat are Rita Children. But we only read our about chat chester as we really only care about him. Jim Collins Boring Elizabeth is an actor the end. Truman is just to Truman's a little too young to have actually had his coming out party. You know we focus on the real like relevant Tom. Hanks news is aiming to say. Rita Wilson commented on this video of chat doing his thing and he said maybe the best laugh of the night crying laughing. I'm Oh boy it's like. She's so supportive. Wilson is Rita. Wilson is the Hollywood version version of. He's so talented. I'm so proud of talented talented. Don't comment directly about what Chet Hayes is doing like they're really not like getting they're not really we see their pr person is like just. Don't just don't talk about it. It's fine Rita's. Night was not without drama of her own. She she needed a laugh. She tweeted around God win was. When did she tweet this around the Golden Globes the Golden Globes start at noon? La Time so this was probably around six am she between my hair and makeup is person is one hour and twenty minutes late next week hair and makeup is still not here trying to be then next week booked this person in September hair and makeup. Still not here. And if that's like not bad. She went over to instagram because the woman loves to cross platform tweeted a instagram picture of herself with like her hair. That looked slightly curly. Not Not blown out not done up and said we're I don't even have the link but like the version of those tweets again. My hair and makeup person is late. I this is about one thirty. La Time is when she tweeted and she said what you look like when your hair and makeup person for the Golden Globes as one and a half hours late even though you booked him in September will leave one hour to do hair and makeup. What the only leave him what she's like? How will I do this? One in one hour. Will you know when I saw that night. And she figured it out she looked great loved. Always pulls is through. Julianne Moore commented. Oh my God I feel you. Michelle pfeiffer commented heart. Kate Bosworth commented. Oh that's the craziest feeling healing and of course the most Christie comment which was I cannot go on until I know who I have no life. It's like who the fuck needs to know who the makeup artist test is. Like Rosanna. arquette is on a different planet and just as beauty love you bravo Rose rose rose. Rose Rose Clap Clap Balloon. Peace sign for ransom. Wow that's really funny Roseanne Arquett. What's happening Rita Wilson? And I'm not saying this about evidence like Bu- via unnamed sources but also also these tweets themselves like she's kind of a monster I mean. Come on no. I feel feel like celebrities like love her but Jesus Christ yeah I mean. The rumor mill is grinding out. News that she's a bit of a monster but that's okay not not everyone I mean especially. You're a monster. When you're married to Tom Hanks just by comparison? Let's juxtaposed these two people. You come across across as a little more monstrous whenever your husband is saying. It's true like the sacrifice you make by being married to Tom. Hanks that you come off as a monster. Because it's like Mr Rogers is why people are like you know. I Love Fred but his wife was a bitch Da. She was a baby. She was slightly mean. Once you know but I I do feel like looking at read those tweets. I'm just like what is hurt. What's your damage? Lady looking at those three tweets.

Tom Hanks Rita Wilson Golden Globes Colin Hanks Rita Hank Chet Hayes Rita Children Chattanooga Rose Rose Instagram Truman Mr Rogers Kate Bosworth Julianne Moore Michelle Pfeiffer Elizabeth Chad Fred
"jim collins" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

The $100 MBA Show

03:58 min | 11 months ago

"jim collins" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

"I think you can have this type of environment where you are inclusive where you do accept everybody but do you have a few universal values that your company believes in and believe strongly about. They don't waiver when it comes to this an often these values are aligned with approx. Obviously you know Disney's a family friendly brand with the theme parks and the cruises then the movies and therefore the four letter word rule is congruent so well I believe that it makes sense if obviously these core values are non-discriminatory they're clear and communicated to everybody from day. One guys got more on today's topic. Today's must read episode. But before that let me give love to. Today's sponsor one is thanks to today's sponsor. Active campaign who makes a customer customer experience automation platform for growing businesses other blog. They have a post teaching entrepreneurs and marketing teams about how to build excitement around their products. Six and let's be honest. We all love a little hype. Excitement and inspiration in our lives for businesses introducing. A new product is tough. Eighty percent of new products fail fail. Active campaign can help businesses make their products succeed from the outset. For example they suggest collaborative work with an influencer. To gain their endorsement invoice. US research to build authority and Stanford something more than just your product. These are all email announcements which is a very inexpensive offensive and effective way to reach your audience. If you have a business that you market and you want to set up this type of campaign you can head on over to active campaign dot com slash one zero zero the NBA and start a free trial with that Eurorail. You can get a second month free a free migration from any other platform and two free. Are you one on ones to work with a member of their team to set up a hype campaign like we just talked about. That's active campaign dot com slash one zero zero NBA yea built. A last has so many great stories in this book so many I can't even scratch the surface in this short lesson. Listen it talks about how to set big hairy audacious goals in the book. He here's a story about. How bowling did that and how it almost made them go bankrupt? It talks about where Google stole the idea two other employees had dabble in projects. They are interested in in. Why was a crucial part of their success as well as many examples of how to embed your core core values in daily operations fantastic classic business book that you should pick up built to last by Jim Collins? Check it out. That's why it's on a you must read episode here on the show. Thank you so much for listening to today's lesson. If you love what you hear hit subscribe right now on. Whatever you're using to listen to this podcast yes that well you never miss the next episode also hitting subscribe you have access to all our archive episodes over fourteen hundred episodes? The only way for you to see all those episodes is the hit subscribe can go to our back catalogue and checkout all the different lesson topics and themes that we covered over the last five years. Plenty for you the chew on when you have ten minutes or so before we go on a leave you with this as a small business. Sometimes it's hard to relate to these huge companies. Companies like apple and Boeing and Walmart. But understand that these companies started out small to the had a handful of customers customers. They had one location may had one product. We all start somewhere and when people learn things along the way we shouldn't neglect them or just say hey this offer me. Because that's a huge company. They could be a value. They've learned a lot of things along the way that you maybe. You haven't experienced yet. That can help you prepare you for success. Don't don't do that because I used to do that. I said dismiss you know all that's a large company. That's not me no. There's lots of lessons you can learn. Thank you so much for listening. I'll check you into Mars episode. Dude I'll see you then take care.

NBA Disney US Jim Collins Google Eurorail Stanford apple Walmart Boeing
"jim collins" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

The $100 MBA Show

02:08 min | 11 months ago

"jim collins" Discussed on The $100 MBA Show

"Ooh One hundred dollars show. Because Amb business we take all the help we can get. That's why we deliver daily ten minute lessons for the real world. I'm your host. Your coach teacher teacher Omar's then home. Also the CO founder of the Hundred Dollar Mba complete straining and community online and. Today's episode is a must read episode honor mustard episodes. I share with you a book that I've read the has greatly influenced me as an entrepreneur. I share with you. It's insights takeaways and why you should read it too and today's raise must read is built to last by Jim Collins. Jim Cons of course is the bestselling author of good to great but this book was published in Nineteen Ninety Four Built Alas examines what lies beneath eighteen extraordinary companies companies. That have had amazing success. But more importantly he shares which principles and ideas have allowed them to be successful for a century. This book was a result of six years of research search. Jim Collins teamed up with Jerry Paralysis. And.

"jim collins" Discussed on The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

13:10 min | 1 year ago

"jim collins" Discussed on The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

"If you're going to attest you can't find yourself afterwards saying if the bullet well it didn't hit or is that because the bolt will never hit or is it because we did a bad job of it. If you're going to fire a bullet do it excellent yeah that that will you know that if it doesn't hit it's just not going to work as opposed to maybe it would've worked. You would've done it well so if the bullet is still have to bring the kind of excellence was to a to get a clean test. That's what they did. It was a really the ipod was a really nice thing. Even if it was a small thing then you get the calibration then there came this this point like wow this is validated dead kate huge Cannibal and of course that became what what apple's more note for today. Here's a really key point is it a different fly will no it's the same underlying fly will of kind of the architecture of these great products for the by where where the bullets accountable becomes the extension of the flywheel so that you can still build the overall momentum but with this bullet Canon ball extend chip and what history shows is usually the second cannonball from aboard the Cannibal process on top of an existing flywheel becomes the biggest part of the company Berry started in restaurants bullet. The Canon Ball hotels right apple started a personal computers. Both the Canon Ball Smart Martin handheld Intel started out at memory chips bought the cannibals microprocessors of beyond and so that's that notion of you've got the fly William Twenty anymore marching but then you're bought the cannibal and usually not always but usually theme parks to Disney right versus Phelps that second extension of the the flywheel that came in the bullets capable becomes the really big momentum in the company usually for decades that a lot I i. I know we're coming up on time here. So I two questions I wanna get you before we end to. It's going to appear like a non sequitur here but I wanNA know what's the best counterargument. You've heard too good to great so I'm an answer that at two sides of the coin one as I you mentioned earlier that say a company like circuit city fell is not my biggest a counter argument I could go back and always look at see you're looking at dynastic eras of performance. You're trying to make predictions ray young predictions exactly and also the basically if you could go back what companies fall is if there's a divergence for the principles that it actually if anything reinforces the principles rather than call a question so that that that's always been for me more of a source of curiosity of Slovenia Lord from I can actually go through each of our books. It's hey what would I criticize. If I were be the critic basically what other people have said what just would go away overnight in good to great I think the the fact that are only pattern that we selected on was stock Richards a pattern of stock church relative to the market. I think that was the right way to do the research from a clinical medical standpoint at the same time I also believe that if I were to stand back and I were to look at the built to last companies which came from trump for built elastic jerry ports that I did back in the early nineties and I were to look at the degree at sort of did this great marvelous of lectures mediocrity to way pass the market that lasted at least fifteen years but if he's doing way out you ask which set of companies had greater durance built Alaska's about but the built allows last companies did and and I have to ask myself what we're looking through different lenses so you're you're still just trying to what overall framework though I think the principles are totally sounded all but here's the thing that the built to last study how'd it put a premium on the importance of a purpose far beyond just making that notion of like what Bill Hewlett David Packard founded. HP later later it it grew too fast with acquisitions such but part of what glad to have a nearly fifty year run was interested. HP existed to make a contribution doc just to make Birdie. You'll get George. Merck medicine is for the patient is off for the Prophets. The prophets will follow our w Johnson Johnson jobs at the original. Jj Credo which way back with early twenties visionary for it's time to understand the context of its time the idea the Disney Eh Walt Disney was never about just trying to maximize profits. He was really trying to do something that would have a very special feel to it and again I would go to We've talked about a apple. I don't think apple was ever just about and so I think that if I kind of stand back and I say what did the built class visionary companies have that not all of the great companies is I think this sets of incredibly deep sense of responsibility ability to the world what they were doing there. Is that help guide them over very long periods of time. I don't believe anything is ultimately permanent the looking four and a half billion years the Sun Church or red giant spiders right so you have to live forever no yeah but he made a really big context but I think in in the business for corporate world if you can get a five decade rod of excellence after really really good. Do you think that's short the sort of like run of excellence. I don't know the numbers I don't know the numbers I'd have to before I could weigh in on that. I'd have to actually look look at statistics to be able to say what I can say. Is that the great CEOS that we ever studied managed for the quarter century and if you are not making decisions to hit a twenty mile march for a quarter quarter of a century if you are not building a company if you're just trying to built the flip or just make money during your tenure if you're if you're not thinking in terms of laying league foundation so the company can still be ahead a decade two decades three decades down the road. You don't deserve to lead if there is a shortening of the potential I think it has to do with the shortening of the timeframe decisions and so if you ask the question why do so companies get disrupted. Ask Ask yourself a simple question. How did so many smart people get disrupted was Ken Olsen at deck? Stupid question is what's the timeframe in which you're making decisions agents and if you if you said that we had twenty four consecutive years of being the head of the game you're GonNa make different decisions than if it's the next two years if in fact active short-covering than a potential contributor to that is the timeframe within which people are making their decisions which I wonder if the circles back a little bit as you were saying that it was sort of like trying to listen to you and assembled catching myself drifting towards our earlier conversation station where people were prone to fire cannonballs of versus sort of like sitting and waiting and just keep firing bullets and then not take that and I was is wondering if the timeframe for the the the performance measurement the timeframe that the person's under has an impact on that it goes your bullet today he is going to still be relatively small relative to what it could be in the future and we have multiple cases in history where what can of ball came a big bet at that time but it may not pay off for awhile. It's probably going to pay off because it was calibrated but if all you're trying to do was to maximize the returns in the next two years then you would never fire a huge all it's truly the fly will extension Cannibal you have to you have to think twenty years ran long-term thinking definitely plays into to I mean there's an arbitrage decision making where if you're thinking longer term you can do things that other people can't like do things that are first order negative second order positive especially if if you have competitors who are under pressure to do things that are I are reposited but might be second subsequent order negative the last question I wanted to end with today and I really I appreciate all the time you spent with us in our listeners is given what you've studied a bit leadership and people and this is going to be a big sort of like Harry very open ended question but you spent more time thinking about this and you've spent more time with leaders than probably anybody know in diving into the research. How do we develop not only young leaders? But how do we develop leaders first of all I I. I've learned a great deal about how it is entirely possible to build leaders and let me just go to the experience and experience I had that had a profound impact on my thinking about this for twenty twelve in in twenty thirteen I had the bruise real honor to serve as the class of nineteen fifty one chair for the study of leadership at the United States its Military Academy at West Point and I do not come from a military background originally but I always believed that I owe something to my country and I didn't serve when I was younger when the opportunity came they have this chair rotates every two years. Sometimes they have like a former general officer in the a chair. Sometimes they have somebody from the non-military world such as myself who hold a for two years and you can do anything you really want with this chair including interacting a lot with cadets and faculty anthony's story to place called West Point and I learned a huge amount in the West Point Journey for example Apple I came to the conclusion that my west point cadets for his in general happier than my Stanford. Mba students that I taught and I think it was really really interesting. I think it has to do with the fact that they are there. On the ethic of service that's meant that it's communal success. You never succeed alone and they know that and you succeed by helping each other and the whole idea that failure the opposite side of the coin of success is not failure. It's actually growth and you will fail at West Point. It is designed designed. You will fail and so you learn how to get through by helping each other and you learn how to get through by growing from your failures and you learn that early and you get tremendous this responsibility by the time you're twenty two twenty three twenty four years old when you're out and the thing that there are so many things I learned going to the West Point experience but one of the biggest things that I learned is this institution has been in existence for over two hundred years where it sees as its role in the world is to build leaders of character as I you get you get the young men and women who come in to West Point and that's like a factory and what comes out the other side are leaders. It's what they do and sure. Maybe you've got a range of just like in any field of life. There's a distribution of capabilities leaders. Come out at twenty two years old but that distribution bution stays shifted far to the right of what you might get out of a random sample of a whole bunch of other twenty two year olds which is the way you have to think about so I just did impure point with conscious attention it is entirely possible to build leaders and to do it systematically and to do it at a young age part of what happens for building leaders and I saw this at West Point and then later I saw when I did a study on education where I was looking at schools that went through an inflection to produce better results for kids in the most adverse environments that you could find and you would find a often a teacher who became a school principal and had to go from teaching till leading and they would grow into this leadership role so you could see that they would they would go and they would become a leader of the school and then as a leader of the school they'd create the Environment in which the performance for the kids would go up and you would have if these spectacular results. There's a in the turning the flywheel monograph which we talked about earlier. I give an example of a flywheel which is an individual visual elementary school on a military base in Kansas Public School led by a woman they deb Choson created a flywheel that took kids from thirty three percent reading rates to nearly one hundred percent and stayed there and she went from stepped into the leadership role in crew into that responsibility so Vistan Beck and I look at these are look at those great school principals that we studied in superintendents..

West Point apple Disney HP Canon Ball Alaska Walt Disney Ken Olsen Berry Johnson Johnson Intel circuit city United States ray Richards Canon Bill Hewlett David Packard George
"jim collins" Discussed on The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

13:45 min | 1 year ago

"jim collins" Discussed on The Knowledge Project with Shane Parrish

"Them and then without is underneath this this notion of personal humility. I have to learn from this. Maybe at CAC all can help me grow as a leader right. That's a humility and a will which is I'm never gonNA stop and no matter what on on the fundamental principles we will never compromise and so that's the beauty of the humility in the will with the question of whether you really ambitious for so now if we kind of go back you were asking here's some great entrepreneurs in history you have heard Kelleher southwest airlines. If George Rathman of Amgen if Gordon Moore right Robert Noise of Intel if Sam Walton of Wal Mart J Willard Marriott Senior of Marietta Phil Knight of Nike Fred Smith Breath the Federal Express Bill Hewlett Dave Packard. HP We talked about Steve Jobs Walt Disney right one of the people who is one of the greatest entrepreneurs did it in the social sectors Wendy Kopp who founded teach for America and what what all these folks Sharon Communist they were entrepreneurs. Every one of them were entrepreneurs but look look at what they built. Every one of them built a company so they went from Startup entrepreneur to great company builders and if I go look at that L. Listen I could go make the list longer than this too but most of them did not have the crushing wilderness experience most of them did not hurt Cala her George Wrath Gordon Moore in the nineteen eighty semiconductor meltdown Sam Walton took a long time to get to his first few stores but I wouldn't say that that's a dominant pattern. Maybe we just WANNA grab onto that narrative right. They'd never owned comfort. If we're going through something humorous struggling to know that there's sort of lead on the other side of this there's hope I well yeah and I think that again it kind of goes back to this notion of the indomitable will channel into what the company company needs and the Cosby's. Let me talk about one one person who I think did go through something quite dramatic in her life or one of the great level five leaders as Katharine Graham Graham with Washington Post is one of the great chief executives of the last fifty years so you Katharine Graham never thought she was going to run her built. The Post that wasn't her object is wonderful book by the way personal history which if you're interested in kind of the interior development of a level five liter personal history is one of the Great Memoir Senate reads very honest and Katharine Graham husband Phil Gramm ran the post and it was her family's company company and and he committed suicide and all of a sudden her entire life. I don't even want to try to describe what she describes. In her book. Read the Tax Paxton Rome Book of what happened at that moment but there was also this was she was dealing with her own personal grief. There's the question of what happens to the post and and at that time there are people who are saying well Catherine who who who you gonNA bring into run it meaning what manner you going to bring into run it and in a wonderful almost aretha Franklin likewise. Thanks I think I'll do this myself. she grabbed onto it and drew into becoming a great chief executive give but what's interesting is that she felt that the post had a noble role in the world and she had to step up to guard guard and tact and leader and then what happens the Pentagon papers the Labor strikes massively difficult decisions her indomitable will bill for what she saw as the cause of the post even though she hadn't necessarily ever seen herself in this role it just pulled the level whole five ambition right out of her and she established herself as one of the great chief executives of the last fifty years and she really did steer the post through those very turbulent corpulent years classic level. Do you think that focus on the mission like that relentless diving into the mission moves your ego out of the way doc I kind of think of this as outcome over ego. It's much easier to go talk to somebody. WHO's an expert who knows something that I don't know if I'm focused on the mission enough focused on me being right? Yes and I think that actually two things that really play in there. One is focused on the you know the mission of the purpose of to the enterprise and and by the way I don't think that that always has to be as grand and noble it could be as simple as early. GET PEOPLE WANNA if people sent the freedom to fly around the country inexpensively reliably and create a great culture that people really love to be part of and at Southwest Airlines right I is but it's still in the end. It's about southwest airlines and what it's doing in the world and then you can have a companies like amgen where George Rathman wrote recruited out of Abbott let to do one of the very first biotechnology company startups. There's a very interesting case by the way if people are thinking about their own trajectory. Here's a guy that in his fifties had had at a corporate career three M. in like I think adhesives Orkney aren decide then moved over to Abbott and ran part of the kind of some some of the medical staff at Abbott and then in his fifties he's recruited into the birth of this new industry which is biotechnology kmby an explosion up new entrance and remarkable investors of thought saw him and brought him in so here's a guy with his corporate career who steps into one of the great wild the West Environments as an entrepreneur and ended up building. Probably at this point you know the earliest founded still out there great today the independent of biotechnology company. There's some other great ones too but it was very early and it's like seventy six when it was founded and Rathman of course had this incredible offense up what biotech could do and there's very interesting circle to the story he was he would defend Amgen's patterns. I mean he was like general grant out there. Just you will go forward and we will defend these battles no matter what he's very. US grant whites but in the end he knew that the what they were doing could affect lives and in the very end of his life he ended up being patient of the very key product APO that they bill and he would sit there and be worth getting his his bloodwork in there be other patients in there and you say yeah. I had a little something to do with this. You know so sure you could be doing something as you know last save the world and lives as airlines or he could be Amgen or he could be doing ipods or you could be the nobility of the post or could be making people happy at Disney or there's a lot of different versions. The key is you really are ambitious for that and now for the five really really begins and we live in an era where they're just as always there's a split right. Those who WanNa do built the flip and there are those who wanted to build till asked I've I have always been on the side of those who want to flaps do oh sorry go ahead so he's GonNa anyways well. I I had these questions for you. Go ahead. I I mean I can just go for hours. Let's have this a bit of a conversation because I am by the way I really have enjoyed your conversations with people what and what I really love about them is the desire to create a a conversational real insight happens that people can benefit from from and it's interesting. There's a couple of things I just. I loved your your interview. Barbara Oakley for example actually change some of the ways I go about my own learning of of course I can't I could never not Wanna learn from Howard marks. I mean he's just a fascinating the way he thinks about different pieces and cycles and locked and so forth but as you've gone through these one thing I've noticed in your interviews you come back to the the puzzles around decision making whether it be through the Lens of Behavioral Economics for how to think through the Lens of models models or how to think about complex systems you Scott Page and so forth but you come back to this kind of frame on getting better and better are at decision making an ripe and I've noticed that that's a theme that runs through a thread that runs through and I'm I'm curious. What do you know down from having all these conversations? It's like you're having Jefferson dinners like with all these people who think about decision making what do you know now that you didn't. I didn't know before you started these conversations that you're pretty confident of Abou- decision making about how to bake it better decision while I appreciate your generosity in terms of benefiting from some of the work that we've done I think with decision making we all make decisions and I think I went into this not the knowledge project but firms street writ large thinking that there was an answer to decision making there is a skill that I could learn and this is like ten years ago right where if I just learned this one thing I will all of a sudden I will know how to make better decisions and I think I've walked away going. There is no skill called decision-making making there's no skill called problem-solving. It's all contextual that doesn't sound very useful but it it is in a way if you think of life as well. What can I do with that information? Mission will now. I can intelligently prepare right so I I can try to anticipate the types of decisions that I will make and try to anticipate what will be relevant and so if you look at the the body of work that furniture streets created we're trying to create timeless knowledge on that timeless knowledge compounds so that as we learn more or we go deeper into a subject or Ashley Building upon something that we've already had our connecting it to something that we we already know about her talk about and then in that sense we strengthen the foundation that or on and the other thing. I think that I didn't appreciate as much with decision making is that if we don't draw attention to our process we can't get better because the process is where we make the corrections Riley and I went into this thinking and it was pretty naive of me which is like like Oh. I'm just going to create a big checklist of all these cognitive biases and you know when I make decisions. I'm I'M GONNA go through this checklist and what I found is cognitive. Biases are sort of great for explaining why we make mistakes in hindsight but they're not necessarily really good for preventing or anticipating mistakes in the future because what happens is any reasonably intelligent person sits down in front of this checklist and then creates all of these stories in their head about why overconfidence doesn't apply in this case or are. You know why there's limited. Data said is actually more relevant than I should give it credence to and I think that I didn't appreciate that. If we sort of a highlight our decision process when we are wrong and we will be wrong we can be wrong with good decisions or we can be wrong because of bad decisions and sort of separating nod is really important but going back and saying where am I consistently wrong and how do I get a how do I make that heard of my process my structure my environment so that if I'm making a repeated type hype decision I get better at it and the other thing is really highlighting. You're thinking we use the concept of decision journals with people and often what happens ends is people will start writing their decisions and they'll do it in advance and then they'll go back and evaluate them what they'll find and it's really humbling for people is that they were right but when they read the reasons they were right on the outcome but when they read the reasons they thought it would be right. They're not quite quite as right as they wanna be and then you have this mental sort of justification that goes on right well. I knew that this was going to play out differently or this was going to happen and and we we sort of convince ourselves that were right even though we're not right faced with this evidence and I think part of the process of getting better at making decisions. Is You know sort of unearthing this reality about you know were not as smart as we think we are and we can get better and how do we go about doing that. In a way aware we exist in a world where I think the baseline. If you WANNA stay the same you have to get better at making decisions and if you want to advance you have to get better faster faster than average your thoughts or reactions to that answer. I'd love to hear your yeah your tape so interesting with with Sison making and it's something I might might've been so many Howard marks at but it was one of the fundamental things I find trying to help people understand and to keep in mind myself. Is this the idea of your do not confuse decision process and outcome if I if I go to all high schools and just say what does the though one course that everyone should have before they graduate in the in the math and sciences areas it would be statistics probability and statistics because we live in a probabilistic world when our brains are wired for even people have been trained in statistics and probability make probabilistic errors all the time because Ah for whatever evolutionary reason we don't naturally think that way and so you can make the right decision and still have a bad outcome curb so you think about say medical decisions like if you go through personal as all of us well some kind of someone or live ourselves or somebody we love or whatever you're going to have to make decisions about treatment about drugs and side effects surgeries or whatever.

amgen chief executive Katharine Graham Sam Walton George Rathman Kelleher southwest airlines Howard Southwest Airlines Washington Post Katharine Graham Graham Abbott HP Wendy Kopp Bill Hewlett Dave Packard Gordon Moore Wal Mart Phil Knight Steve Jobs aretha Franklin Walt Disney
"jim collins" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"jim collins" Discussed on Recode Decode

"And, and so, again, I go back to it's a it's a choice you can make us to which side you are on. Why did he get in? He'd never got into this because he just wanted to flip something or you know, it's to build something and to change things, and you can look, there've been tech leaders throughout history that have come down on the side. I don't see any reason why we can't have tech leaders today. They can come down on this side. All right, we're here with Tim Collins, he's the author of turning the flywheel we're gonna take a quick break now, and we'll be back after this. We're here with Jim Collins, he's the author of turning the flywheel, obviously, Jim is really famous for built to last good to great and how the my. He fall when you think about writing a book, the first book Bill to last. How does it you were talking about you're talking about enduring things that endures the ideas endure? So let's talk about some of the principles and endure that you'd still think endure, you know that you note in this book, obviously, using this flywheel concept, you understand your centrally saying, understand exactly, who you are. And how you make things happen. Right. And how one thing leads to another in a in a really cogent way. So let me maybe just take a moment to tick through a few of the principles that after no thirty years of, of work in research, and thinking about it. I'm highly confident in one should never say certain and today's world, but I'm highly confident will stand the test time one is the principle that level, five leaders have the potential to build greater things than on level, five leaders talked about that earlier. Second is the principle that it all starts, not, I with what you wanna do. But who you want to do things with the idea, I have the right people? Get the right people on the bus get the wrong people off the bus. Us get the right people in the right seat. Then figure out where to drive the bus because you may have to change over time. In the most important thing is having the right people. We talk so much about vision. That's great. But great vision without great people is irrelevant. And the orientation to know the where you build your cultures with your people choices. That's always how you build it. Another principle is the principle of embracing the genius of the end. When we look over time, we send the but right? This is like the idea of no buts. But we can find genius or the end. You know we can do preserve the core and stimulate progress. Right. We can do platform and responsibility. We can do growth and profitability, that's where the genius of the endless the discipline to turn the fly will, we there's the whole monograph on that the notions adding going on and and, and understanding it and building the moment, right over a long long period. A good fly will last twenty thirty forty years. And then when we kind of get out to the Bill to us, I'm not hitting all twelve just hitting a few to give some touch. Points when you the one of the things that's really interesting is that innovation is not one of the principals interesting because plane, okay because, you know, that's the God here, allegedly. So I agree with you. So what we found is that if you run the analysis, you don't find that the most innovative companies always win. Chat. Yeah. More important. In fact, tell us in Golder, and they're wonderful book, a will envision show that roughly only ten percent of the pioneering, innovators end up as the winners in the end and our research Morton, and I studied, this great by choice, also showed that we find is that there's a threshold level of innovation and you need to be at any given industry. But once you get above that threshold more more innovation isn't what distinguishes far more important is your ability to scale innovation rather than to innovate and put it scaling, the right innovations. The right big bets. There's a principle. We call fire bullets. Then fire cannonballs a write about it in the fly while monograph, and it wasn't great by choice with Morton, and I put together goes like this, you're an entrepreneur magin, you have a certain amount of gunpowder, big ship bearing down on you. You take all that gun powder..

Jim Collins Tim Collins Morton Bill Golder twenty thirty forty years thirty years ten percent
"jim collins" Discussed on Recode Decode

Recode Decode

01:59 min | 1 year ago

"jim collins" Discussed on Recode Decode

"We're back with Jim Collins, the author of turning the flywheel, we've been talking about a lot of things one of the things before we start to talk about sort of some more of the concepts. In the book, one of the things you and I just talked about were the idea of level, five leaders should explain that because it sounds like something. I've been banging the drum for for a while. Yeah. So one of the things we found in our in our research, is it? If you really asked the question what separated the really crate builders overtime from the as what separated a Bill Hewlett David Packard in a in a more and grove and noise and what separated George rathman and what separated we could go through the lesson Graham, Kevin Graham of the Washington house, too. I think is one of the greatest of all time and what you find is that it's not about the personality, right? As you know, I mean Katharine Graham's personality, wasn't the most magnetic, and charismatic shy. I mean, frightened. She described herself as frightened at times. And yet incredibly willful Packard Hewlett, two, very different human beings. More. Grove two very different human beings. So what, what, what are these great builders, share in common? And what we found is what separated them from those that, that were didn't build the great companies is this thing called level five. So think of it is the comparison level for leaders and the good grades at level, five dollars like explain all the layers in the moment. But that's the main level, one level, one well level. One is really good individual skill so level, one is about which levels, basically good technical skills. Individuals bills level tools about good team skills level three's about finding the learn to manage, which never done great that they're a lot of not good managers level, three level, four is about learning how to lead. But then there's this higher level the level five so we didn't find that the great companies had leadership in the comparisons, didn't boy found was the greatest leaders were the level five leaders and the comparisons were level force. What's the difference between the five in the four? The essential difference between the five and the four is the answer to simple question. What's the truth of your ambition? I mean what are you truly ambitious for?.

Bill Hewlett David Packard Kevin Graham Katharine Graham Packard Hewlett Jim Collins Grove George rathman Washington house five dollars
"jim collins" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

02:24 min | 1 year ago

"jim collins" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"But I mean, there's thinking fast thinking slow, there's there's there's a lot to decision making only part of which is is part of which were able to express with with language, but what story. Jim. This has been so much fun. I've highly encouraged people to read all of your work, but the newest and I think this is very very well. I don't think I mean, it is very important concept. The flywheel the expansion upon that so turning the flywheel people can find that. If we're books are sold. They can certainly find you at Jim Collins dot com. Many more questions to ask sometime, but I think this is a. Very solid session for me to reflect on. I've tons of notes sitting here in front of me have been trying to take my notes quietly. But is there anything else you'd like to say ask of people suggest any any parting words before we wrap up this conversation for now if I were to kind of step way back on everything. There's a line that JoAnne uses a lot which is life as people and we've talked about who lock great mentors, personal boards of directors and getting married after four days and great friendships and being unruly great level, five teams, and whatever. But you know, we get so wrapped up in all these things were doing or things we're trying to get done but life is really short. I mean, you know, that you to company after on the guy wrote a shortness of life and. And you know, when you sort of added all up, the one thing, I would everything we've talked about in this. I still think it all goes back to the first who life is people at life at its best is about to a meaningful things with people. You love hear hear time with loved ones. Pice implicity time flow state the ultimate -ly. It's the people and. Jim is there anywhere online? Besides Jim Collins dot com, where people might learn more about what you're up to or say, Hello..

Jim Collins Jim JoAnne four days
"jim collins" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

03:22 min | 1 year ago

"jim collins" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"They all have all these things over time that you can then use as data sets never a not really a business author. I just happen to have used companies as the method to study human systems because there's great data. And and so that's where the date is. And if you do that, and we have six thousand years combined corporate history and the research database pretty soon, you can start counting a lot of things. And then you can begin to say there's a substantial amount of quantitative evidence that adds up to a greater level of humility in these than those. And that's how you get there. Mask you about counting. All right. So we we have a number of books we talk about and we are gonna talk about some of them, but built to last has a subtitle. Successful habits visionary companies. I'm very fascinated by what might be the successful habits of Jim Collins. And this is a question about counting, of course of doing some the homework for this conversation. I have come across different ways that you seem to measure your time, and your days and love to explore that for for just a little bit to the I was I read that you had in this may have evolved or changed by this point. But a stop watch with three timers in your pocket. Canoe and that it was sort of indicative of creative teaching and other. But could could you explain that habit pleased for people who are well. So actually, let me tell you the story of how it began just three were about. And then how it's volved into something a little simpler, and a little more powerful what I do with every single day. So I don't want to pretend that I'm normal. Okay. So. Sky is not normal behavior. But this is this is it. So when I when I was thirty six years old. I made the decision that we can come back to this later if you wanna talk about big bets and doing scary things such as betting or career betting our lives in an ion entrepreneurial path, let me just kind of step back, and sort of share that were of this. So I was teaching at Stanford. And I it was a marvelous journey, and of course, at great mentors and learned how to do my research there. That's where Jerry and I did built to last. But I had a another mentor who encouraged me to think about whether I wanted to self directed path or not I used to say to my students because I thought preneurs ship and small business. I always said to my students. Why don't you do something on your own? I mean, why give over all your creative energies for somebody else's thing. At least challenge them to think about that. And I would say if you're really interested in business. You don't have to go to work for IBM to be in business. You can do your own so my students. This is the wonderful thing about Great great. students. They hold you to account. Right. They said well, right. What are you doing this entrepreneur? This doesn't look like a very entrepreneurial thing teaching these classes and being and I started thinking about it. About my town like betting myself. So I had this idea. We don't have to be at IBM to be in business. Why do I have to be at a university to be a professor?.

IBM Jim Collins Stanford professor Jerry six thousand years thirty six years
"jim collins" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

The Tim Ferriss Show

01:47 min | 1 year ago

"jim collins" Discussed on The Tim Ferriss Show

"And so on from world class performers from many, many different disciplines, my guest today is Jim Collins, and this is a rare treat because Jim very very seldom does any media interviews whatsoever. I have wanted to speak with him for more than a decade. In fact, and it was worth the wait this conversation over delivered on every level. I can imagine. And I really hope you enjoy it as much as I did. So who is Jim Collins this mysterious reclusive mastermind polymath, Jim Collins is a student and teacher of what makes great companies tick in a Socratic advisor will get a better idea of what that means particularly in the beginning of the interview. Where he wants to ask me questions. So we do get to Jin story, but he wants to and wanted to even before we started recording ask few questions. So let me get back to the bio he is student and teacher, what makes great companies tick. And that is an understatement. You really has has delved into the data and a Socratic adviser to leaders in the business and social sectors. He's authored or co authored eight books that have together sold more than ten million copies worldwide. That's a lot of books including good great. Good degrade in the social sectors built to last. How the mighty fall Greek by choice and his newest work turning the flywheel which gets into all sorts of details about the self perpetuating some ways models behind Amazon vanguard, and so on fascinating concept, and very practical examples driven by a relentless curiosity, which you will get front row seats for Jim began his research and teaching career on the faculty at the Stanford graduate school of business where he received the distinguished. Teaching were nineteen Ninety-two in nineteen ninety five..

Jim Collins Stanford graduate school of bu Amazon advisor Jin
a16z Podcast: All About Synthetic Biology

a16z

10:07 min | 1 year ago

a16z Podcast: All About Synthetic Biology

"This episode general partner on the bio fund VJ punday, and I talk all about the field of synthetic biology with Jim Collins, professor of bioengineering at MIT and one of the pioneers of the discipline of synthetic biology. We talk about what engineering and designing biology really looks like when instead of engineering electrons, your engineering toggle switches for genes, including the scientific story behind the creation of that very first Jean toggle on and off switch. We also talk about the disciplinary differences and synergies between how biologists and engineers see the world what the engineering and design principles techniques or approaches that work best when applied to science how that looks different. When building a company in the space and thinking about for example, platforms versus products, and even how it's changing education in the field all the way down to middle school. So let's start at the very beginning. How did the field I begin to emerge? What's the sort of founding story behind Syn bio, you know, the very beginning. Really? Was the island of misfit toys, if you go back to the hundred ninety s the dominant story was genome effort, and what's interesting is the biomedical engineers did not play a major role in the genome effort in biomedical engineering departments the curriculum the research interests, more or less stopped at the tissue level and was only beginning to get interested in the cellular level in the late nineties. However as the genome effort was really picking up speed and beginning to produce these parts lists for different organisms. The leaders of the genome every began turning to the engineers and increasingly to physicist to figure out help them figure out how these parts put together. Can you explain what the missing information specifically? So the sequencing would lead you to the ability to annotate genome to identify coding regions identified the genes identify promoters. But couldn't really give you information about dental on networks that were making up these living cells, and what way with jeans. Proteins yarn a elements interconnected and leading to the interesting biology disease, biology, the notion even of network was not dominant or even prominent within Malacca biology. You said one thing that really struck me reduce said, it was not necessarily biologists. Computer, science physics you. Then had this effort to really try to pull the physician the engineers into molecular biology, and why them I think because we deal with complexity well to get after what became systems biology was the recognition that you needed to embrace complexity before the network, what was the predominant kind of idea you had really the fixation on the actions of single protein single jeans, and at the level of kind of integrating those you had pathways and you began to see efforts primarily out of Stanford beginning to use mathematical modeling that opened up the doors for folks like me to do basically systems biology, could you reverse engineer these networks, and let's actually explain what you mean by that reverse engineering large-scale now because that's. Not a concept that's native to Zonta box. It's an engineering. So it's a strong, electrical engineering kinds of the notion is that you have a system that's interconnected or wire together. And so the ample the could relate to many listeners would be the wiring system or the wiring setup of your house say you buy a new house, and you've got a circuit breaker box down in the basement. And let's say it's not labeled by the previous owners, just like my house, my so what do you do you go down? And you flip the different switches on or off. And you discover what they connect you. She a beginning to reverse engineer. The circuitry of your house, you then through additional experiments that you running the microwave same time with that. In fact, oh, those two circuits are actually interconnect even further that's not represented by that. And you begin to infer the underlying structure of the wiring diagram of your house. But our first response was to run away from that promise fast as we could because there were insufficient data to do in the late nineties. We just had microwaves appear technology that is no longer in vogue. But. Would allow you to survey thousands of genes and their expression states simultaneously with another given. So these are incredibly expensive, and when I got pulled in their only seven publicly available data sets. So the idea you could reverse engineer large-scale network is ludicrous, and what were those types of data that we're lacking. So there was largely expression data's in those days. It was really micro Ray. So we even though the technology used appear we didn't have those data sets. We didn't have a wetland. We didn't have the capability. And so we began to think about could you put together molecular parts in a network instead take a tinker as approach to molecular biology. So the depressions the output was the like how were you perturbing it them? Well, so on on. That's how we had no perturbation, right? Perturbation would be the going to kick the system where you're going to stimulate the system. Switch flip the light switch. Let's say you have your radio on and your kitchen upstairs volume on you're gonna run down says you're gonna flip the switch one by one until you hit the volume go off that's a pretty Bache to your circuit that allows you to map out the circuit. We introduced tech. Seeks to do that. But even before we get there we stumbled into what became synthetic biology. We said, okay. Could we instead of figuring out how these large-scale networks wired together, we put them together ourselves could we do it with intent? So could we design circuits with desired architecture and a desired function, and that's the key difference right in this entire approach that you're designing exactly we are. We are really doing biology by design in some cases, we're taking natural parts and putting them in noon, different ways. And other cases, we're building new parts, and then putting those together in new or even established architectures we spent about nine months thinking about what we wanted to build and we arrived at building genetic toggle switch and this was motivated by electrical engineering, where toggle switches, which are also called flip flops are as latches a very simple memory elements memory, which is can be flipped between zero one in the binary state or on off by a transient electrical signal. Toggle switches are at the heart of digital member. And we cycle through many different schematics and circuit diagrams and arrived at one that was basically mutually inhibitory network where we have two genes that are set up. So the always want to be on. But they're arranged to the trying to shut each other off. And we showed mathematically and computational that you should be able to have it as a by stable system, it either ones exists in state aging one is on gene two's off or state Beijing to his own gene one off and he principal. You should be will flip it between those states by translate delivering a chemical or environment. They would shut off your currently active, gene allowing the gene had been kept off by that active. Gene allowed to come on. Now would produce enough protein that would shut off the Gina had been on in. You can you stems and you flip from state to state of state means like electrical engineering except not electrons. It's now a wet circuit. But in this case, we actually did mathematical modeling computation, and now the next segue was I reached out to Eric is instead who was a program officer at the offset neighbor search who is run. Being a gene circuit modeling program. And I tell them what we're doing. I more or less called him once a month for every over six months, it could you give us money to try to build this in a lab, and he kept putting off putting off and I basically warm down. I said, you know, I think this could be really big, but we need to be able to build this and I'd like to see party program. And was the reason why wasn't clearly I mean clearly having an on off switch like that seems incredibly powerful. Why was it not immediately? Just because it seems so hard to do we had talked to about six or seven very serious molecular biologist who told us this couldn't happen. This couldn't work. They said for it to work. You're going to have to have a very tight off state to very tight off states. That's going to be impossible. You're gonna have to introduce a very large plasma the it's going to put a burden on the cell, the cells not going to like this foreign element the joke was they usually Patterson I hesitate boy stick to engineering because biology is really complicated. I mean, those do sound like reasonable concern. I had heard incredibly talented graduate student Tim Gardner who was a mechanical engineering train student at Princeton. Tim, presented our modeling. This is a famous in our meeting where he was more or less shouted off the stage by some very serious Mike about is including future Nobel prize winner who said it was impossible. This could not work part. Tim who was green and Michael biology had been a mechanical engineer who had designed autonomous helicopters to fly around. Princeton didn't know anything about you presented this engineering concert. Nonetheless in nine months, he had a functioning by stable toggle switch that the same time. We were doing this, Michael Ila woods and STAN Liebler who were to physicists sitting in. Both the physics department at Princeton and the micro biology department at Princeton, we're taking a remarkably similar approach to synthetic genes. Circuits completely independent of us. An ambulance toss in that we worked in e-coli with three different repress or proteins using dynamical modeling they worked in E coli with the same three repressive? Proteins using dynamic modeling and instead of screening a toggle switch that consisted of two genes. Trying to shut each other off they created what they call. Presa later a ring oscillators simile motivated by electronics, electrical engineering. They consisted of three genes in series. Eight tries to shoot a BB to showed up C C tries to show. Hey, those same parts just different same different circuit. They submitted to nature. We submit our nature. They end up being published at the launch the turn of the century in January late January in nature back to back the next week, the headed aditorial said, oh, you know, physicists beginning to move into Mike about it and says you should look back at those two papers because there's something interesting going the raising point about how everyone on the biology side thought this was impossible almost like the biologist some of them have an immune response against engineering. That's a great way to put a that seems to continue even today. It is when I have many, many, close, friends and colleagues who biologists. But I think within different academic disciplines as often too much tribalism. So the very common critique that we get to they're not biologist or they're not chemists or they don't know basic biology. Don't know basic emission, I yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. Yes. I don't think it's fair though. And I think that these problems really combine if municipal reproach and different perspectives. So we don't know the detail at the level that the biologists do

Engineer Princeton Mike Gene Tim Gardner Jean Jim Collins Middle School MIT Zonta Box Michael Biology General Partner Professor Beijing Nobel Prize Bache Physicist
"jim collins" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

01:49 min | 2 years ago

"jim collins" Discussed on NewsRadio 1020 KDKA

"What's happening? Jim Collins job, we got some hockey happening and a lot of goals happening again Kristie Tang and Phil kessel both score twice penguins. Beat the islanders six to castle added to assist as the pens made it two straight wins with another six goal outbursts that you got to string together some wins. And. Get back to clients and good hockey. And. Trying to get some ws castle ended up playing on Sydney Crosby slide after Patrick corn. Quist left the game. With an undisclosed injury said assisted on both kessel goals and scored one of his own that kessel setup. Riley Sheahan scored the other goal for the penguins. J Gansel had three assists. Casey dismiss twenty two saves. Mike Sullivan couldn't say after a foreign quiz injuries related to his recent concussion. Penguins are off altogether today. They cancelled their practicing cranberry they will be at Ottawa tomorrow night Thursday night football, Tennessee, beat Jacksonville thirty two nine. Derrick, Henry tie. Tony Dorsett sets record with a ninety nine yard touchdown run. Steelers erred Oakland Sunday afternoon. No, James, Connor Markey's. Pouncey says Stephen ridley's gonna come in handy. One hundred percent he's won a Super Bowl before. He's he's obviously had a lot of accomplishments in his career. He came last year and had over one hundred yards rushing. We got a lot of confidence in him as well. So we've got a good running back tandem. Then we'll see how that out at four twenty five kickoff on FOX college basketball tomorrow pit is it West Virginia. That's a noon tip off Robert Morris. Home against CNN at four Duquesne. We'll play Longwood Sunday at the Palumbo center. Robert Morris hockey home this weekend colonials will host Holy Cross. Tonight at seven am tomorrow afternoon at four a former pirate Jose castio was killed in a car crash in his native Venezuela. Another major league Luis Valbuena was with him and also died. Authorities say that their car appeared to a veered off the road trying to avoid a falling rock for the Wigner wellness center. Sports Astrum colony NewsRadio ten twenty Katie K. Sports, holiday, tips and wine stories from Paul Kristen.

Phil kessel Steelers Robert Morris hockey Riley Sheahan Tony Dorsett Luis Valbuena islanders Kristie Tang Jim Collins Wigner wellness center Quist Sydney Crosby Mike Sullivan Palumbo center Katie K. Sports Jose castio CNN Patrick corn
"jim collins" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

WAFS Biz 1190

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"jim collins" Discussed on WAFS Biz 1190

"Celebrate and why we honor those fallen heroes let me go to jim jim collins from michigan hey jim hey dan how's it going today good question for you is the age of fifty so i'm in i work for the department of corrections and which of law enforcement that'll would allow me to retire at four one day and drop without penalty the question i have is so security turned fifty five does that mean that if i turned fifty six dollars at fifty nine and a half i don't believe so if it's the plan that i think they're using you would be taxed on the money that you use obviously that wouldn't change you would you would have a benefit of using that money without the ten percent penalty and i believe that that continues it's not just for one year but you need to ask them that question to be certain because there are several different ways that an organization can do that with employees and you've got to make sure that you know which way they do it one way requires a certain amount of money to be given and that's locked in for five years or until at or until you're fifty nine and a half after five years assuming you're you're fifty nine and a half if you're not then it would be longer there are other there are two other ways that they can make that disbursement so you really have to ask them that question because i have no idea which one they're they're adopting okay 'cause i was it was somebody brought it up and it was an irs rule that that i was going by and i wasn't sure if i waited toss sex with that but still but i will check with my financial people that deal with my four one town that yeah yeah you need to check them i.

jim jim collins michigan irs five years fifty six dollars four one day ten percent one year
"jim collins" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

02:03 min | 2 years ago

"jim collins" Discussed on The Blog of Author Tim Ferriss

"I don't believe that there's any one particular you know i as a business person i love jim collins is good good great but you can also look at that and go oh this is fascinating because the companies that were originally rank good grade or now not so great not even existing so so you have to be willing to understand that there are lots of different stories and then you find your own within that so i give your book as i think it's i think it's very cool i think it's i think it's much more people have to have more respect for differences and right different ways of approaching problems is no one path no one path are there any books besides built from scratch that you've gifted a lot of other people or reread allot yourself so the book i tend to gift people is not has nothing to do is business it's a book by a writer called clive james and it's called cultural amnesia in first off he writes he is so learned that you just want to read what he has to say so he's and i assume he's not making this up but he says well you know i wanted to read proosed by didn't know french so i started with the larousse and start learning and you go okay anybody who can do that i'm interested in what he has to say but the book is interesting because it talks about to me it's interesting because it talks about how were to and the guilt around world war two particularly in europe infected the all of the sort of liberal arts world and the unwillingness to actually face into.

jim collins writer clive james europe
"jim collins" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"jim collins" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"The other thing that i want to quickly highlight is like any jim collins book there's just a ton of research he backs this up with key studies he backs it up with research from actual companies that's one thing i really like about his writing as is not just anecdotal he has a lot of examples to substantiate his claims so let's go in the end of the stage one hubris born of success so when we're talking about this first stage what we're talking about is that a company i guess the easy way to say would probably be a company has an ego problem worse successful because we do these specific things and they're going around touting map would call on says they should be saying is we are successful because we understand why we do these specific things and understand what conditions would prevent those from happening or that they wouldn't work any longer so understanding why the specific things is the important part he provides an example with motorola they invented the star tack cell phone which were the smallest phones in the world at the time using analog technology but at the time this is were digital was starting to come out and you can kind of see that phrase that he was saying were successful because we do these things but they're not understanding why they do the specific things and he talks about how the mount of impact that that hard and how that set them back yeah and is actually very interesting speaking about a company like motorola i mean for decades it has been praised as one on the very best companies and you might be thinking it's because most role that hidden reinvent itself like they kept on with the analog technology in the didn't go digital that's definitely a huge explanation but jim calls talks about how complacency is really not important i mean it's issues come up with a narrative saying that the company didn't change the way the shirt it's not a question about changing is not a question about in.

motorola jim collins
"jim collins" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

02:06 min | 3 years ago

"jim collins" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"Berger let's take a quick break and hear from today sponsor would have hiring could be easier more streamlined in less timeconsuming so even when you're busy you could still be smart about the way you hire with ziprecruiter you can post your job to over one hundred of the webs leading job boards with just one click then ziprecruiter puts its smart matching technology to work actively notifying qualified candidates about your jobs within minutes of posting so you received the best possible matches no wonder eighty percent of employers who post on ziprecruiter get a qualified candidate through the site in just one day find out today why ziprecruiter has been used by growing businesses of all sizes in industry to find the most qualified job candidates with immediate results and right now our listeners can post jobs on ziprecruiter for free that's rate free just go to ziprecruitercom investors that ziprecruitercominvestors one more time to try it for free go to ziprecruiter otcominvestors ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire all right back to the show all right how's everybody doing out there a you got pressed impatience the broader some with ya and today's podcast were covering jim collins book how the mighty fall and i really really enjoyed this book when we covered good agreed on the show stig in our very big fans of the book and i really gained a lot out of that and so i had high expectations but i was also a kind of expecting the here's maybe some of the same stuff and i was pleasantly surprised a really like the way that he lied this out and i think the thing that i like the most about this book was how simple it was it was just it was simple to follow it make complete sense he got straight to the point i'm kind of curious if you uh had a similar opinions the i don't know what you think about this one but i really like this book i thought it was a very good one yet you know perecent i think probably.

Berger ziprecruiter jim collins eighty percent one day
"jim collins" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"jim collins" Discussed on We Study Billionaires - The Investors Podcast

"You're listening to t i pay one of the biggest names in business literature is jim collins and we recently saw the billionaire jeff visas from amazon recommended jim's book built to last since were big fans of both jim collins and jeff basis we felt like the book would be a fantastic read that we could i share with the audience so in episode one hundred eleven we covered jim's book good to great the talked about all the fundamental attributes that made a great company but today's book built to last is the exact opposite uh jim talks about all the qualities that destroy a great business and what leaders can do to prevent such a dismantling from occurring jim call this is really a master of explaining why some companies are are performing and as we'll talk specifically about this episode why the my four and as a business person whether or not you're a leader employees or investor looking into the company is just so important for you to be able to identify and nothing like to highlight about this episode is the question from the audience at the very end of the episode and the question is about currences in our scottish and we talk about why you might agree or disagree on what's happening here with the frustration that precede about the us dollar and the potential impact of other currencies especially bitcoin you are listening to the investors podcast well we study the financial markets and read the books that influenced selfmade billionaire has the most we keep you informed and prepared for the unexpected.

jim collins jeff visas financial markets amazon us selfmade