20 Burst results for "jesse thorn"

Alex Winter on how he and Keanu Reeves brought George Carlin's touching cameo to 'Bill & Ted Face the Music' (spoilers!)

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

06:10 min | 3 weeks ago

Alex Winter on how he and Keanu Reeves brought George Carlin's touching cameo to 'Bill & Ted Face the Music' (spoilers!)

"Jesse Thorn. Our guest is Alex Winter you probably know him best as bill from bill and Ted along with Keanu reeves he starred in bill and Ted's excellent adventure bill and Ted's bogus journey and the brand new movie bill and Ted face the music. Alex is also a director who's made several documentaries. His latest just came out a couple of months ago it's called show biscuits. It features interviews with former child stars about how their time working in the entertainment industry affected them. Let's get back to the conversation. There's a lot in this in this movie also about parenthood and the ties that bind to their and in particular how children kind of actualize the dreams of their parents in some ways for good and bad. I saw that theme also and show Biz kids. Your documentary that made me wonder if you saw parallel there to do you find that particularly compelling. I was raised by two artists. My parents were modern dancers. My mom had company in London, which is where I was born in my dad ultimately had a company in the Midwest. which is still going on when we moved to the states house quite young. I started out as a child actor professionally by like nine or ten I was working professionally by twelve thirteen I was in two long running probably shows back-back. Took me all the way into college so. My relationship to. My parents and to my family and the complexity of that and this idea of I wouldn't call destiny. That's the sort of of the movies that. But you know this idea of expectation and what is your life supposed to be, and of course, it's never going to be that and it shouldn't be that and and and how do the children affects the parents? How do the parents affect the children and of course now I'm a dad and so how'd now it's a triple layer cake right And Those are all those drams or fusing together and crazy ways and I had really wanted to make a film that allowed people who had experienced this firsthand meaning people that come up as child actors. I wanted them to be able to express the very nuanced layers of of that experience. Intimately I just had not seen that done and I had. you know obviously had done it myself in private, but I'd never kind of attacked at. So you that was very satisfying to be able to make and it was really odd to try to make show Biz because for the first time about ten years ago I couldn't find financing and it was exactly the concept. So it was very very strange to. Lovely. But strange to start making the film, shoot a bunch of interviews go away, make bill and Ted be dealing with you know Ted's problems with his dad our issues with our daughters live and our destiny that didn't end up the way it was supposed to in how did that impact everybody and you know, and then of course, like acting for the first time gangs I left act the acting business in after doing Dylan Ted to really Very consciously, and so acting again and I'm making a movie about child actors about parents and their children and it was it was like Oh did this all really need to happen at once was that necessary? I my Gosh. Every aspect of my entire life right now. So Yeah it was lovely and heavy Frankly yeah. Tell me about that decision to kind of I. Think you said, disappear for a minute and then come back and be doing more behind the scenes work than acting. Well. We talk about it in in show Biz kids and it's really not uncommon. It's. It's you know I had started acting I had a very, very public life from around ten years old to about twenty five on nonstop even through college. I was still acting on TV and doing commercials and TV shows. Nonstop and after bill and Tattoo amid and other film called freaked I was just psychologically. I was just worn out and I knew. That I was not I had some friends around me that were crashing hard at a couple that actually died. It was a pretty heavy scene. For Lot of us that had come up because we're all around the same age. So a lot of us were trying to transition from from you know sort of youth in the business too young adult business. We're not having the best time of it and and at the same time I gone to film school and was very very committed to my work as a writer director But it you know for me, I needed to make a conscious decision to get out of the public eye and just go live some normal life and I didn't feel like I'd really gotten to do that through pretty. Formative Adolescence and postal license and. Evan Rachel Wood speaks about this really well in the in the movie sodas will we? All everyone had the same experience I was sitting across from Diana Kerry, the hundred year old woman who was baby peggy, and she literally laid out my entire life story was completely jaw dropping. And that's what had happened to her when she had to really figure life out and she had to get away from the business and. And just be in the world and that's what I did I left. I left my acting representation and I moved and started a production company in London and I just shot commercials and wrote scripts and had a kid and live like regular Joe and. Got My head together and did some growing up and when I felt comfortable again, I started training again to act that was a while ago I just wanted to act for myself I didn't WanNA act. NAFTA, worry about it for paycheck I trained for a long time and it was just coincidentally had started kind of rumble back into life. But it was really lovely. It was a great way to come back can't owner. He's like, what am I, very, very dearest and closest friends in the world and. Everyone on that sat was family and if they weren't, they were really gracious and very happy to be there. So it was extremely sweet environment to step back into but Yeah, it was fun. But I I guess I needed the twenty five year break I I took it.

Dylan Ted Alex Winter Jesse Thorn London Director Nafta Keanu Reeves Evan Rachel Wood Midwest. Diana Kerry Peggy Writer JOE
Fresh update on "jesse thorn" discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

00:04 sec | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "jesse thorn" discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"From my house in Los Angeles Bullseye I'm Jesse Thorn. We are as they say, living in the Golden Age of television pick pretty much any platform and you'll be able to stream a drama that just a couple of decades ago would have topped every critics year end list game of thrones. Madman ozark whatever. I submit to you that even in A. As stacked as the one that is before us on every streaming service we have. The show Fargo is really something it gets titled from the Coen Brothers movie at the same.

Jesse Thorn Los Angeles Fargo
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from Google from Connecticut California from Mississippi to Minnesota. Millions of businesses are using Google tools to grow online learn. How Google is supporting businesses in your state at Google dot com mm slash economic impact Bullseye with Jesse Thorn is a production of maximum fund dot Org and is distributed by N._p._R.? It's Bullseye. I'm sharing mighty sold Mirage Infra Jesse thorn my guest is the musician amid Jellab whose band is called Jason Kane. I'm at Sudanese born in London raised in the U._S.. Based in Brooklyn and he started the way a lot of musicians do as a session musician he was part of the backing band for acts like Eleanor Free Burger and Caribou before before heading out on his own. His music reflects a little piece of all that mixed together. You can hear Afrobeat Funk Brooklyn Indie rock vibes. There's a dash of electronic mixed in but let's stop talking about the music and listen to it and I think of the people here on my journey how they help bring now two parts when I do Ooh that's yes Dan. I've seen canes new album to pay if it's my first introduction into your work and I'm really enjoying it. I can't believe that you've been around for so long and I've never heard of you so good so for someone like me. Who's just you know discovering your work? How would you describe this album? How is it different? I'm from you either work. I feel like this one is a bit unafraid. Previous albums. I've made have been pretty honest but this one was was really the most honest you know and it expresses my authentic self in the best and clearest way so far on previous records I would talk about the same stuff that I talk about underpay but I would always kind of zoom out a little bit and I would would make things a bit vague you know because I thought that was that was much more of a universal message. If I wanted instead of talking about a very personal thing I would boil it down to like what emotions I was talking about in kind of express those emotions instead and with this album I I felt like that wasn't really satisfying for me. You know I should really talk about my personal experience. You know with with a lot of clarity you know a lot of people who are like me who've grown up outside of the country where they come from or were they came from <hes> they tend to feel alone so I know that when I hear something that I relate to when someone sings or I read a book that expresses this feeling that I relate to I I get inspired and I don't feel alone so I felt like I needed to do that. When you talk about being more honest about who you are? Who are you for people who don't know who you are? How would you describe who you are well? I'm I'm a a Sudanese American. My family's from Sudan and we emigrated to the United States in nineteen eighty nine. I was five years old and I grew up traveling a lot. You know my father was a politician in Sudan and the reason why we emigrated here was because he was exiled from the country after oriented but she had overthrew the the government in one thousand nine hundred nine and so my family had to start all over and I I spent every four years moving to another place you know as my parents kind of settled into a new line of work and figuring out where they wanted to finally settle in the United States and along that time I also would go back to Sudan stay there for three months of the year after I finished school you know to keep connected to my. Family my sisters and my mom and I would go every summer so I kinda grew up with his very confused identity and I didn't really quite understand where I

Google Sudan Jesse Thorn United States dot Org Brooklyn Mirage Infra Jason Kane Connecticut Minnesota London Dan Eleanor California Mississippi three months five years four years
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Support for NPR and the following message come from marvel studios. Black Panther now nominated for seven Academy Awards including costume and production. Design score original song all the stars performed by Kendrick Lamar and Ciza and best motion picture. Bullseye with Jesse thorn is a production of maximum fund dot org and is distributed by NPR. I'm Jesse thorn. It's bullseye. It's balls. I I'm Jesse thorn. My guest Barbara Kruger is artist. She works in text mostly big, bold, letters usually in white over a ribbon of rat. The text is often superimposed over black and white Phobos pictures that look like they could have come from mid century advertisements the messages say stuff like your body is about oh ground or we don't need another hero. Or don't be a jerk. If that doesn't ring a bell yet, you can find thousands of samples of her work on the internet. Maybe the fonts and colors remind you of something the supreme logo that Instagram filter. It all started with Barbara Kruger. But have you seen Kruger's are in person? She does a lot of installation work these days, that's a fancy way of saying that her work just kind of consumes entire rooms huge rooms giant walls. Big block letters taking up every inch of every flat surface. You can see phrases like belief plus doubt, equal sanity cell phones, whose body whose beliefs her work, isn't prescriptive, est. It's almost an experience it asks you to engage with the.

Jesse thorn Barbara Kruger NPR Kendrick Lamar marvel studios Academy Awards Ciza
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Back to bullseye. Jesse thorn here with me. Now, Susan orlean she writes for the New Yorker has done for about thirty years, a bunch of other publications as well. Her books include the orchid thief Rin tin, tin and Saturday night. Her newest tells the story of the Los Angeles public library and so much more. It's called the library book hits bookstores this week. The arson investigators event eventually decided that arson had been the cause of the fire. Who was the person who was accused of having started. A young man in his twenties named Harry peak who was, I guess, predictably a wannabe actor, Aaron, boy, you know, did odd jobs, parked cars, that kind of thing was well what what happened was he had told a number of friends that he had started the fire. So very quickly once there was a reward associated with anyone having providing a tip for solving the fire, one of his friends, good to have friends like that came forward end basically connected the fire department to him and they began following them around and ended up interviewing him to figure out whether. His boasts of having sort of the fire were were in fact true because he was a charming liar. He was from every description I had from anybody. He was in a mentally likable guy, charming and just a crazy fibber own would just fifth about stupid things. Not just fifth, you'd say where where have you been say? I was having drinks with share, you know, he just couldn't tell a straight story and his friends would were exasperated by him. And at the same time also said he's a really good guy would give you the shirt off his back. And that was interesting to me. They all use that exact expression. He would give you the shirt off his back. He was beloved and also drove them crazy. So in a way, this is what might be called a true crime narrative, I guess. And I wonder if you felt pressured by the fact that you were telling a crime story too. Have narrative that resolved comfortably to provide an answer to the question. I did. I, first of all, I thought I'm gonna solve this, which is. Utterly vain. I mean the, there's no way that as civilian with no access to the evidence and no knowledge of how to investigate an arson would be able to crack the case..

arson Jesse thorn Susan orlean Los Angeles Harry peak Aaron thirty years
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:27 min | 2 years ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It's bullseye. I'm Jesse thorn. I'm so excited to welcome. Susan orlean back to our show. Susan is a staff writer at the New Yorker. She's also appeared in vogue and Esquire on this American life. She's the author of eight books covering topics like New England Saturday night in America, an orchid fanatics. The last one the orchid thief ended up being the basis of the Academy Award nominated film adaptation. Susan is disarming interviewer a meticulous researcher and a beautiful writer. These days she lives here in Los Angeles where we make our show and being an author and reader, she has visited the beautiful historic central library here. Dozens and dozens of times. Her latest book is about that library and its history and particularly about the devastating fire that almost demolished the library nineteen Eighty-six. The book is also kind of a pay on to libraries everywhere, or they mean to her with us. And why? Every library is a vital institution. The book is called the library book. It's one of my favorites. I've read this year, Susan, orlean. Welcome back to bullseye. Always happy to see you. It's great to be with you, Susan. What is your relationship with libraries personally, other than you're obviously financial relationship. One would hope. Well, I grew up going to the library that was very much a part of my childhood. My parents were great library goers they didn't really believe in buying books. They've, I think they felt like, why would you buy a book? You go to the library and borrow the book and if it's not in you, put your name on a hold list and you get it when it's available and they were born on the depression, and I'm sure that's a lot of it, which is that buying books seemed a bit of an indulgence that wasn't necessary. I grew up going to the library a couple times a week with my mom, and I found it absolutely magical. It was not like going to a bookstore or twice store. It would partly because there was no money, there was no financial relationship. And when your kid, the idea that you can have anything you want is really intoxicating at a library is on a real short list of places that welcome everyone including kids who are hassle right. Well, and I do think that in the last twenty years, we've as a society become more and more conscious kind of call it. The Starbucks affect. We've become conscious of how there's home and there's your workplace, and there's kind of a desire for another place somewhere to go somewhere. To see other humans and just sort of share the space with them. It's, I think it's why people go to co working spaces. I think it's why people go to public parks, even if they've got a backyard. There's something very special about being somewhere around other people in your, not there to interact with them. You're just sharing the space with them. And that's definitely some equality of libraries. I mean, they're, they're closest analogue is probably a public park. You know, there's serve their things to do in a park, and there's, you know, God knows what that the city offers, but sometimes it's just kind of nice to be there and there are other people there. It's also a space that we share with a variety of people. It's not a mediated group of people. It's an chance that you're going to encounter a huge range of people, which for some it's kind of discomfiting. But for. For other people. You could make the argument that it's kind of an opportunity to really see your community you ever for the New Yorker for thirty some years. And you're a New Yorker for a long time. How did your experience of living in Los Angeles compared.

Susan orlean Los Angeles Jesse thorn Academy Award Starbucks staff writer Susan Esquire New England America researcher writer twenty years
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"You're listening to bullseye. I'm Jesse thorn here with me. Now. Kyle Gass and Jack black of Taneja STI. They made a new animated series entirely hand-drawn and voiced by the band. It's called post-apocalyptic. Oh, the first episode is up now on YouTube, this new web show and album where Jackie you have drawn all of the pictures if the animation is and it is a very today, she's d- plotline. Yeah. Watch. Yeah. Yeah, it was a good. Thank you. Hope you liked it. It feels like you guys saying rather than trying to please everyone slash perhaps even be successful on other storms that like you have gotten to a point in your life where you're just going to do this thing that you love in exactly the way you want to. Well, I mean, when we first started off, we were like, let's just do a a little Anna Matic a little sample. Then we'll shop at around to to you know your net flicks your Amazon, your HBO. Someone will scoop it up and pay for this thing to be animated properly. Do all the hard work and nobody did even though we had made what we thought was a little nugget masterpiece. Like, are you kidding me? Nobody wants the Taneja these series animated series. Okay. You know what, though we love this so far we're just going to go ahead and make it just like this. Anna Matic sort of half baked and we were thinking we're just gonna. Do like six mini ten minute web Soad's we started, but then yeah, but we ended up, but once we finish, we like this is like a movie. This plays as a move in we when we played it for friends and family that Kyle's birthday. And let me tell you. I know they're friends and family. We, we get a nice response, and if felt like some of our best. It did feel very pure though. There was no notes network. No, it was just three of us in a little room like this. When you say the three of us, you mean me you and John spiker. John spiker producer extraordinaire. Yeah. As you say, you don't forget about today stick so. If you so don't for you, but you know, we, we're going to do a different album. We had a plan to do a different concept album, but we looked at each other when it was time to get down to business, and we're like, this is not the album for our time. We actually have to do the post apocalyptic concept rock opera because of these these times demand it. And that's what we did. Oh my God. Are they playing off. Kyle Gass Jack lack Taneja, Steve. Thank you so much for on bulletin shown. Thanks. Thanks for having. Today. She she's d folks. Post-apocalyptic oh, the animated series is available to stream now on YouTube. The soundtrack drops early next month. They're also kicking off a huge tour all over North America. We'll have links today. It's on the bullseye page at maximum fun dot org. Time. Now,.

Kyle Anna Matic Kyle Gass YouTube John spiker Jesse thorn Kyle Gass Jack Jackie Jack black Soad North America HBO Amazon producer Steve ten minute
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:52 min | 2 years ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Judge John Hodgman rule that is off. Welcome back to bullseye. Jesse thorn. My guests are Jack black and Kyle Gass of the Banten Asia's d they're back. Got a brand new animated series called post-apocalyptic. Oh, the first episode just premiered on YouTube. I had a friend in college who was a pretty standard nerd, wonderful guy. And one year I'm going to say it was my sophomore year, his junior year. He just appeared with this album that he had written and recorded in his dorm. Nobody knew nobody knew. I mean, I knew he had a guitar. That's what I knew. I knew he had a guitar and it was quite good. And he had just one day decided essentially to be shameless. You know, like that there is this. I, it's very much much easier to not make record a heart. Felt records in your dorm room and and then share it with people like recruit a band and play shows? Yeah, I remember just being awed by that. I, I'm kinda odd by it. I don't even know the guy that's that's a lot to do from zero from scratch. I mean, when I think about my favorite song writers do think of the the raw emotive honest people like, you know, you're Elliott Smith's your your Nick Drake's. These of the songwriters that that really pull at my soul at my heart strength. I think once in a while, I mean like the ballot of all even might be funny, but we do kind of go deep, we go real, we go back. We go down to the source of of who we are. But yeah, there's always a bit of of of comedy wink. It makes it just okay. We need it. We can't. Yeah, I, I've made peace with that. I, I don't mind at all. I love that the road we've chosen. Fun wrote. In fact, even in my side projects, they all they end up being kind of funny ish. It's just seems like why will because there's also a great tradition of of rockers that have a good sense of humor like, you know, diamond, Dave dudes just funny though song ACDC early, especially. Yeah. Well, I mean, one of the things that Taneja she's music is kind of in dialogue with is the ridiculousness of big rock music. And one of the things that is. Great about Taneja St. is that it is never been mockery of the ridiculousness of rock of big rock music, but celebration of the ridiculousness of big rock music. I think you've, I think you've used stumbled on a very important concept. Yeah, I think you can't really not like your subject. Well, yeah, then it becomes something else. Yeah, then you really, I, I don't know that minute becomes parody. There you go. But yeah, we celebrate. We do make fun of of Satan, though Satan in music is just absurd, ridiculous and hilarious. And we've had a lot of fun with that over the years. But there is also something great about Satan. He's powerful. Jack, we were talking about your aspirations to performance when you were a kid, and I do have a clip of you in a television commercial. It is. This is a commercial for pitfall Atari twenty six. Harry starring Jack black was before we ever met. Last night. Pitfall, Harry by giant scorpion man-eating crocodiles, just.

Jack black Jesse thorn John Hodgman YouTube Harry Kyle Gass Banten Asia Elliott Smith Nick Drake Dave one year one day
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It's bull's eye. Jesse thorn next up on the show. Paul Reiser he's a legendary stand up comic alongside Helen hunt. He start on the hit sitcom mad about you, which he also created. He's been acting a lot lately. He's on Amazon's red oaks on stranger things. He was in whiplash. He's also the creator of a really interesting TV series called. There's Johnny when we talked last year. It had just premiered on Hulu. The show takes place in the early seventies and it centers around a fictionalized version of Johnny Carson and the tonight show it follows. Andy played by Ian Nelson as he pines for and eventually gets a job on the show and this clip from the pilot. Andy decides to write a letter to Johnny Carson asking for an autograph photo for his parents. And while he's at it for job, Andy gets the autographed photo. And a letter he thinks is an invitation to come work on the show. So just like anybody else would he packs his bags hops on the bus and goes from nebr-. Ska to LA and tonight show please. You want to save the tonight show. Yes, sir. I have this letter here. You know what? Time it is short. It's it's five to eleven. Right. Right? It's eleven o'clock at night. Yes. Well, I know this sure isn't starts to eleven thirty, but I figured I'd get here. While you're yanking, my chain. The show starts at eleven thirty on television, right? They don't make it at eleven thirty. They make it at five thirty. So there's nobody here, but me and you and maybe a raccoon. Full rights are welcome to the polls. I am happy to have you on the show. Thank you. You appeared on the tonight show in the p- in polyester suit. At least it looked like your first time around hurting me. Hurt me with the fashion. We should Apollo. Yes, they might have been some polyester involved. Yes, I was once in a while, somebody will post that come across that clip in and I cringe because it's I look like I'm seven years old and my style is so not only is it so long ago that my style has changed. But on that night, it's the biggest thing in the world for a young comic to get on tonight show. And I think I was so deliberately slowing myself down to not race that I'm almost like running like I'm stuck in maple syrup. It was so slow. Man, I was either in some alternate universe or I was wildly overcompensating. But yeah, I like to think we're funnier. Now, let's take a listen. No, no, really why I was visiting my parents recently. Do you know my folks? No, my father, this is absolutely true of my father is he has a new hobby. Now he's got a winter hobby that he enjoys. It's called walking around the house and shutting off the heat for no reason. The man shots off it's freezing, but see, he really believed that if he cuts down his oil bills than starting tomorrow, America's gonna stop importing from the Middle East. It's a great sentiment. It's a nice responsibility. I just I don't know if one person is going to turn around the economy. You know, I don't think the prince of Saudi Arabia's up in his office going well. I don't believe this. It's that same guy in New Jersey. This is unbelievable. Well, I feel like for an entire generation or actually multiple generations of comics. Johnny Carson was like, withholding comedy. Dad, like there's as he has this quality, the very rare quality for a broadcaster of being both being both withholding and warm at the same time. I never found him withholding I, it's funny, I, I did it a lot..

Johnny Carson Paul Reiser Andy Jesse thorn Saudi Arabia LA New Jersey Helen hunt Hulu Amazon Middle East Ian Nelson America seven years
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:06 min | 2 years ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It's bullseye. Jesse thorn. My first guest is w Kamau bell now Kamau and I go way back like close to twenty years when I was still doing this show at UC Santa Cruz. Kamau was a young up and coming comic in the bay area. He actually wants co hosted the show with me. I mean, for real way back anyway. He's gone from hosting at the punchline in downtown San Francisco to having specials and comedy albums, and touring bunch in two thousand twelve. He got his own TV show totally biased with w. Kamau bell on FX and FX axe totally biased was kind of a talk show, kind of political satirical show too. But unlike say the daily show Kamau wasn't really inclined to get out in front of the audience and give the man what for from his perspective. He actually let other people on staff do that come out just kind of asked questions. Funny ones, serious ones, ba- MU. Used ones, and that was what made the show really special today. He hosts another show, it's called United shades of America. It airs on CNN. It's a great show. It's actually up for an EMMY this year in the unstructured reality programming category last year he won it. And I like to think that that is because come out is such a wonderful host. United States is basically a show about asking questions about warmly engaging with everything that the United States is in the same way that a guy like Anthony bourdain would travel cross continents to elevate and explore the traditions of some remote cultural group. Kamau does the same thing right here in the US. He covers issues and people in our country who I guess you can say, aren't used to getting a lot of nuance, news, coverage, folks like six or Appalachian coal miner families, or in this clip inmates at San Quentin prison in northern Cal. What would you say is the biggest surpri would think they were surprised people on the outside about being in Saint Clinton? The name itself is not the characters that produces they actually produce positive people now, yes, some people come in and couldn't read right spill. Now you walk around their seniors now. You don't have cell phones. You need somebody to be walking around to be the. Oh, yeah. Ain't no doubt. I need somebody who's who's nicknames, Wikipedia. Sticking information keeps you aware. You know, they make us think that will steal plot of some out of gas humanity because other than that, we just be numbers on the numbers on the numbers. On the boy, what you're sentenced on? Seven. How long you've been here? A my fortieth year seven to life and you own your forty years. What if you. Wow, Saint they sit everyone I get. Now. Come out and welcome back to bullseye. It's nice to talk to you again. I'm glad to be here. It's been a while. Thanks for having me back on you. Well, I mean, you're pretty much emeritus at this point. Super-senior the time fifteen years ago when you drove to Santa Cruz to co, host the show with me, you pretty much earned a lifetime pass. Well, you know, and I could see even back then I was like, this guy's got something going on. So I'm gonna. I'm gonna invest in this young man and. Come out. I question for you. You are one of the biggest dudes. I know. I don't think you're quite as big as comedian Steve Agee. But besides that, I'm not that tall my way the same minimum at that doll. I think you're the second biggest dude. I know you're like what you're like. Six, four, six, five, something like that. I'm six, four in the flesh since six, six with the afro, but I'm six. Four. If you measure into the afro. And I'm about like as I say, you know, you know, I say to fifty and I realized that was before I had kids. So, yeah. I'm I'm basically Charles Barkley size when he was in his prime, not at the end, but in his prime and your broad-shouldered you're not, you're not a dad bod'ed..

Kamau bell United States w Kamau bell Santa Cruz Jesse thorn San Francisco EMMY Charles Barkley CNN Steve Agee Anthony bourdain Saint Clinton San Quentin America Wikipedia fifteen years twenty years forty years
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Coming up Randy Newman. He's been writing music for half a century. We'll talk about how he's changed his approach to songwriting over the years. What's easier now, what's harder. The also tell me whether or not he has hard time writing songs that speak plainly about his own personal feelings. I may have in the dishes psychological in the dishes or something that tilted me in another direction of not saying, I love you know, you don't it interested me less as what I say. Now, maybe it's that I couldn't think of things to say. Have a lo- love of meager or something. So also tell me about his family, his uncle who was an agent for film composers his three ankles who were film composers themselves, including how Newman a guy who inspired Randy to write music and wasn't afraid to ask for input every now. And then either he wants asked me, you like this melody and I was like ten years old. I said, don't. Then he asked me maybe I was a little older and said, do you think people like counter melodies. Then finally outshot I'll tell you about a very big rock, but totally breathtaking amazing, enormous rock. That's all coming up on bullseye. Let's go. It's bullseye. I'm Jesse thorn. It's a cliche, but it's also true. Rainy Newman doesn't really need an introduction. I mean, I can say Randy Newman to you and you'll probably start thinking about this. You've got a friend. Or this. Go. Or maybe this. Or maybe you don't even realize that he wrote this..

Randy Newman Jesse thorn ten years
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It's, I'm Jesse thorn my guests. Debra Granik wrote and directed the acclaimed two thousand ten film winter's bone after eight years. She's just finished her follow up. It's called leave. No trace. It's in theaters. Now. Ben foster who's one of the stars of the film gave a quote, and I'm paraphrasing in an interview, the heated about the movie. He said, he said that being on site with you was very intense because he had never worked with anyone who cared so much about every choice that they were making as director. And I believe he said that. And I don't think he was joking when he said, I'm laughing because it's intense, but I think he said like that each choice felt like someone's life was on the line might goodness. Do you feel that way when you're on sand. Well, the choices have to be performed very quickly. So when you don't have when you don't feel like you've had time to contemplate selling fully, you know, you feel like there's almost more risk associated with that. You're not thinking it through completely, but you have to decide right now and. You could feel regret, but you nonetheless, you've got to decide right now. And so I think possibly in the mix of what he's just what he said is that notion that you have to. Must take a deep breath kosher is and say, like, okay, I'm taking this gamble, you know. And of course, thank goodness. No one's life is really on the line. But the fact is, I think deciding. All day long in rapid succession of decisions, constructive feel like the starkness am? I am. I on the right track. Have I made the right decisions? And I think maybe what he's reading in me is that uncertainty that feels like Yikes. Yikes could be wasting a whole lot of peoples times if I'm making a whole set of decisions that don't pan out and don't yield something. I've just squandered a huge amount of people's time and energy, and they're putting a lot into this. I've got to do right by them, you know. So frequently director feels extremely responsible for coming through with something given that so many people are contributing to the to the process in the effort. I feel like a lot of people have an idea of what director does that is. Or maybe how a director is that might be fundamentally misogynist. And I probably include myself in that, like when I think of a director, not only do I probably think of a man, but I also think of somebody who has a way of being in the world that culturally I would associate with men, which is to say, like bossing people around, especially..

Ben foster director Debra Granik Jesse thorn eight years
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

04:41 min | 2 years ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"To won't you be my neighbor is an honest portrait of one of the kindest most sincere people to have ever lived he talked with jesse thorn about the movie and how fred rogers lessons can make us better people today but before we get into that let's take a listen to a little bit from the movie in this clip we'll hear from margie whitmer who served as producer for mister rogers neighborhood she worked on more than two hundred and fifty episodes between nineteen eighty two in two thousand one we had a directed at once said to me you take all of the elements that make good television and do the exact opposite you have mister rogers neighborhood low production values simple set unlikely star yet it worked because he was saying something really important love is the root of every all learning all parenting all relationships love or the lack of what we see an ear on the screen is part of a week become morgan neville welcome to both sites great heavy on the show thanks for having me he made a lot of documentaries about rock and roll guys for a guy making a documentary about mister rogers kind of rock and roll though really yes how's that he had such it's funny as they by mr rogers such swagger it's amazing that he was so consistently who he was in every situation he was ever in and he had this attitude that he was going to try and change the world you know and it was radical in that way radical in the way that he was trying to get to the root of the thing back to the basics of things and i think that's how i thought of them you know that he was he was a rockstar it's almost scary to me the extent to which he appears to have been the man in his life who appeared to be on television i think maybe just because it makes me question the way that i the choices that i make in the world well it's funny i mean i think something that i'd say the majority of people expect is to be disappointed that i had many people when i told him i was making this film say to me please don't destroy my childhood basically please don't tell me there's something that's gonna make mr rogers fall from the alter like everybody else's phone from the altar and you know i didn't go into it with an agenda one way or the other but and it wasn't about that in the first place but you know the big secret about mister rogers is he's one of these rare characters who actually is not only as good as his television character but actually is more impressive than his television character but i think it says a lot about us that we have come to view people like that with suspicion because how could somebody be that good you know there must be some other shoe to drop on that and that in a way is kind of a lot of what the film's about which is how do we think about goodness you didn't call goodness him called kindness i think roger's would grace but those are the kinds of things that people kind of laugh at you know like being kind as like believing in rainbows and unicorns you know it's not it feels naive and quaint in a way and i feel like that is not how we should think about those things i feel like fred was a warrior for kind you you know know as he says in the film not pollyannaish stuff you know but honest to goodness pines that that's something that you have to fight for because we all take for granted that we're going to live in the neighborhood together and we can trade against that in how we behave every day but i don't think we should get on it there's a moment in the film a bit of archival footage of him being interviewed where he says you may think that.

jesse thorn
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:26 min | 2 years ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"It's bullseye jesse thorn next up chris stella alonso she's a veteran stand up comic and actress you might have seen her on her abc sitcom chris stella she was the creator the star and she also wrote and produced it alonso was actually the first latina ever to do all those things on one tv show she was born in a small town in south texas her mom was an immigrant whose visa expired krystelle remember having to hide her from the cops coming home every day wondering if her mom might have gotten picked up in the latest workplace rate christina was also really really poor growing up and that's something she talks about a lot in her comedy when we talked last year it was just after she dropped her netflix special lower classy it's a very funny owed to that time in her life she talks about poverty about immigration depression all with a warm smile and infectious laugh in fact i don't think you could find a warm or more infectious comedy performance than crystal in this clip from lower classy she's talking about how she never really thought about poverty and stuff as a kid until it came to her favorite band new kids on the block let's listen that was in fourth grade i realized i was poor because that was a really big fan of new kids on the block loved them right i couldn't afford to see them in concert right so i had this fantasy when i was a kid you know that i was going to meet them and they were gonna fall in love with me right no joke guys this was the fantasy fourth grade i was gonna be the made on their tour bus and i was going to clean things so good that they were gonna fall in love with me like in my head i thought they were going to get on the tour bus and they were going to be like oh my god who made that bed right there you know know what what i mean and then i would say i made that bed and they would be like we love you now and i'm like that was it that was in fourth grade crystal welcomed the bulls eye it's great having on the show it's good to be here thank you for having me that is maybe the single saddest stand up comedy i've ever watched anyone performing my entire life and i've seen a lot of stand up comedy thank you i told my wife the setup for that bit last night and she nearly started crying having had it related to her well you know yeah i know i know but that's kind of kind of like a that's what makes stand of cool is when you can actually make jokes about something that sad because everything can be funny if you have the right angle perspective to it you know but yeah i totally get it is this is this like something that you discovered along the way that you could actually just write jokes about the literal satis parts of your entire life yes it was actually one of those things where my life overall has been pretty sad.

jesse thorn chris stella alonso
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Support for this podcast and the following message come from google cloud during march madness the nc double a is using google cloud to turn data into insights and so can your business see how at g dot co slash march madness google cloud the official cloud of the nc double a with jesse thorn is a production of maximum fund dot org and is distributed by npr it's bullseye i'm jesse thorn actually required to say that so now that that has been said let's get down to brass tacks i've got a message for you from the one and only andrew w k be nice be honest party and don't hate on mr rogers those who would scoff at mr rogers or scoff at me perhaps more rightfully so all they're doing and i relate to this because i've done it too is distancing themselves from feeling because feeling is very intense and feeling that you're not in control of is even more intense takes a lot of courage to let your heart be open enough to be moved especially against your will so people keep things at bay people keep experiences at a distance especially if the person seems very intense all i'm trying to do is encourage people to trust me enough to let me move them to let this party power move them it's bullseye.

jesse thorn mr rogers google official npr andrew w
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

01:41 min | 2 years ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Support for this npr podcast and the following message come from trans union your credit health is so much more than a score that's why they help you stay on top of it protected and understand it get your report and more at trans union dot com slash npr well as i with jesse thorn is a production of maximum fund dot org and is distributed by npr it's bullseye jesse thorn laurie come martin is a stand up comedian she writes on conan she was on the road when she got the call that her dad was really really sick things weren't looking good she got on a plane to took time off of work she did everything that adult children are supposed to do in those situations but even as his health got worse she started to realize sometimes even when you're staring death right in the eye funny stuff can happen i have we have this one piece of hospice video where my sister is sitting with my sister and i are sitting my dad and she asked my dad you know what what do you want your grandchildren to know you know and my dad was sort of a you know i look at that video i'm like did he just realize then that he's dying it was very it was very awkward and yet we wanted to hear what he had to say and then he was about to talk and it was hard for him to talk and then my mom just burst into the frame and starts picking up like a candy wrapper that's on the ground in front of my dad on the carpet and she just ruins it bullseye.

jesse thorn martin npr
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"I am of your eisenberg join me on empires asked me another as we challenge contestants and celebrities to nerdy word games music parities and punter full trivia find his every week on the npr one app and wherever you listen to podcasts it's bowls are i'm jesse thorn my guest is kim deal the lead singer for the breeders in one of the founding members of the pixies the new breeders record all nerve their first in a decade drops march ii were you surprised him when your project started on a touring break from the pixies the breeders became a smash hit banned i mean in a way that the pixies even had never been as much as they were you were a successful working banned when i was thirteen i watched you on mtv in o was that surprising to you at the time um i think the surprising i don't know if that's the word as much as it is unintended i mean the break from the pixies thin was it was kind of you tell the like there were there were probably we're going to get back together that's what i was thinking any way and then it does go slowly like the the song the got on the radio canon ball in i'm using my brothers harmonica microphone cassettes like at the full gruber missed gina loggins in messina in there he and of course my brother has more monica mike firm of course as a sister you one plug it into the marshall you wanna start going truck clock or toot air disaster fund that's what you do to your brothers harmonica microphone so i mean and starting out with the with the feedback in the squeals and stuff you know but certainly not thing that one thinks okay now we got the top of this song ready for a smash radio hit you know or something so it is and it was certainly unintended that i mean i really liked it why i mean nobody thinks it's going to be on the radio or anything.

npr pixies mtv gina loggins jesse thorn kim
"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"Them for those who went the full cleared away that your deeds give hope and comfort women the that your deeds give hope and comfort the living it's balls i i'm jesse thorn next up the go team formed in the year two thousand in brighton england the band is basically the brainchild of a guy named in partner he recorded most of the band's first record by himself in his parent's kitchen it's called thunder lightning strike can you'll find our theme song on it a classic go team track has a lot of influence his hip hop marching band music noise rock sixty soul but what makes the band worth listening to isn't that it's some kitchen sink mix of genres every go team track has a unique voice it is almost open dhanra unto itself it's complex lou rough around the edges cookie sample based but still live sounding and maybe the most important ingredient is the people who contribute to the band the other voices that and brings in musicians from dozens of crowns and genres one of his longest running collaborators is the mc ninja she song and wrapped on every go team record including a latest semicircle which drops this week and she fronts the band live in concert let's you're a track from the record uh oh oh oh mm mm.

jesse thorn partner lou
Jesse Thorn interviews Dick Dick Cavett

The Turnaround with Jesse Thorn

06:44 min | 2 years ago

Jesse Thorn interviews Dick Dick Cavett

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"jesse thorn" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"You're listening to bulls i i'm jesse thorn we'll get back to my interview with paul reiser in a second but first another new culture show here at maximum fun it's called switchblade sisters it's hosted by april wolf she's the chief film critic at la weekly a really brilliant critic every week she talked to a different female filmmaker about their favorite genre movie we're talking about har scifi fantasy action exploitation she tells me there's something called bizarro everything in between the first episode is a past bullseyes gassed emily gordon who cowrote the big sick common it was in theaters recently she talks about the horror western bone tomahawk if you like bulls eye you'll really dig switchblade sisters the first episodes out now go subscribe open up your favorite podcast app search for switchblade sisters you're listening to bulls i i'm jesse thorn my guest is paul reiser he created the brand new comedy show there's johnny which premieres this week on hulu you know it to have an extraordinarily successful networks that come what you did you were both the starve it amoco creator um you make an nearly infinite amount of money and so your then freed of the thing that drives a lot of us in our work which is a continuing terror that of penury in other words yeah yeah we're gonna be broker something right and so did you then come to a part in your life where you had to decide like wait now i have to decide what i want to do uh well it's for that was the gist of of my my shortlived show a paul reiser so uh i had a really big hit show and i made you know a very comfortable amount of money that i don't have to worry about that and and the log line that i said accidentally which became the pitch was when you've when you realise you've gotten everything you've ever wanted in life and you're not dead yet thing.

paul reiser emily gordon johnny hulu jesse thorn la