35 Burst results for "jennifer poet"

A look at small satellites

Innovation Now

01:06 min | Last month

A look at small satellites

"Cubesats are a small class of satellites that employ off the shelf technologies and can be launched for a fraction of the cost of a full sized satellite. Here's on win. An aerospace engineer at nasa ames research center who tests interesting payloads for qb sat flight opportunities. I work on spacecraft technology demonstrations for these small spacecraft. Failure is an option. It's where you learn from your mistakes and you improve on the next round. And so we're all about taking these risks with these calculated risks with these technologies. So it's all about innovating these technologies and bringing more capabilities to these small sets as humans. Were so interested to see what's out there. What can we do as technologies become increasingly miniaturized. Cubesats could carry instruments to explore other worlds or communicate more efficiently swarms of cubesats could work together to give us a big picture understanding of the places we train about exploring for innovation. Now i'm jennifer. Poet

Nasa Ames Research Center Jennifer
Fresh Clean Air

Innovation Now

01:09 min | 3 months ago

Fresh Clean Air

"Of the byproducts of racing is combustion fumes that can cause blue like symptoms including severe headaches nausea and dizziness. These maladies are a problem for anyone at any time but pose particular hazards on a racetrack when cars are moving at high speeds working with nasa racing engineers adapted a space technology originally designed for an atmospheric satellite project to create a filter that removes ninety nine percent of all airborne particles providing drivers with fresh. Clean air the compact lightweight filter is part of a compound system to remove noxious gases and other materials from the air. The driver breeds wind tunnel experts at nasa's langley research center then helped engineers develop a mechanism to deliver the cooled. Filtered air directly to a port in the driver's helmet the cleaner air virtually eliminates the carbon monoxide poisoning. The drivers refer to as getting gassed and without the prolonged co exposure. This nasa spinoff helps protect racecar drivers from at least one of headache for innovation now. I'm jennifer poet.

Headaches Nausea Nasa Dizziness Langley Research Center Headache Jennifer Poet
The Right Tools

Innovation Now

01:08 min | 4 months ago

The Right Tools

"Prior to installation of the robotic tool stowage unit nassau's robotic external leak locator was stored inside the international space station. The tool is an important unit. Used to help astronauts identify dangerous ammonia leaks in the space station's cooling system but deploying the robotic nose was a complicated process that was dependent on the availability of an airlock involved waiting an additional twelve hours to allow the gas analyzer to clear itself of internal gases and required astronauts to travel outside the station. The newly installed robot hotel is now the leak locators home and the leak. Location process is much more streamlined. As long as dexter. The canadian space agencies robotic arm is available. Dexter can use the tool to detect ammonia leaks eliminating the need for astronauts to perform the same task during the spacewalk. Meanwhile the external storage unit provides a warm protected place for critical tools like the leak locator to be stored until they are needed again for innovation now. I'm jennifer poet.

International Space Station Nassau Dexter Jennifer Poet
More than Empty Space

Innovation Now

01:20 min | 5 months ago

More than Empty Space

"The friday after thanksgiving and for nasa that means it's black hole. Friday this is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. A black hole is a fascinating astronomical object with a gravitational pull so strong that nothing not even light can escape it matter and radiation fall in. But they can't get out. Nasa telescopes like hubble new star and nicer bring the universe into focus letting astronomers identify monster black holes in nearby galaxies but with nasa's x ray observatory scientists have discovered evidence that thousands of black holes are located near the center of our own milky way galaxy. Most black holes are the remnants of large stars that die in a supernova explosion but even bigger black holes can result from stellar collisions matter swirling around supermassive black holes creates bursts of light that echo in nearby dust clouds these traveling signals could serve as new. Cosmic yardsticks marking the distance of a black hole from earth intrigued. Empty your shopping cart. Then checkout nasr's black hole gallery just don't let the name fool you because a black hole is anything but if d space for innovation. Now i'm jennifer. Poet

Nasa X Ray Observatory Jennifer
Aviation Human-in-the-Loop Simulation Studies - FAA

Innovation Now

01:05 min | 7 months ago

Aviation Human-in-the-Loop Simulation Studies - FAA

"Stabilized approach for landing is based on the pilots interpretation of certain visual clues for every three nautical miles flown over the ground the aircraft should descend one thousand feet but pilots must control speed, calculate descent rates and use precision instruments to ensure they're not landing too high to fast or out of alignment with the runway. FAA researchers are testing pilot reactions to various approach and landing scenarios by putting actual pilots into flight simulators at the William. J Hughes Technical Center the simulators can be programmed to mimic different conditions. Information is collected about the pilot's ability to recover, and whether the pilot had adequate data in the cockpit to make safe decisions about landing. The research will help determine the kind of training pilots need and the effectiveness of new instruments in the cockpit because a stabilized approach and landing is the best way to avoid a loss of aircraft control for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet

FAA J Hughes Technical Center
FAA looking to make traveling with lithium batteries safer

Innovation Now

01:22 min | 1 year ago

FAA looking to make traveling with lithium batteries safer

"When in doubt leave it out the FAA is working to make traveling with Lithium batteries safer? This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future. They're in your smartphones tablets cameras and laptops the lithium batteries which power everyday devices can catch. Fire if overheated or damaged and on a plane in flight the fire could be catastrophic to better protect passengers and crew the FAA is conducting research at the William J Hughes Technical Center. That will help mitigate the dangers from batteries. Researchers look at how hot batteries might get and how much and what kind of gases are produced. They document precursor events that indicate that a battery fire might occur such as smell or a tablet screen that suddenly changes color to help passengers and flight crew. Preemptively identify concerns. Information from testing is used to develop safety plans and procedures to properly handle the air transport of batteries by standing the potential hazards of lithium batteries. The FAA is better able to keep the fully charged public safer when flying for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer. Poet

FAA William J Hughes Technical Cen
Storm Trackers

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Storm Trackers

"Today's meteorologists have a plethora of ground based instruments to help forecast the weather but some new satellites no no larger than a shoebox may help us see the big picture in great detail. This is innovation now. Although today's weather experiments provide is an enormous amount of weather information none provide a global view of what's happening inside a storm measuring how water and air move you've thunderstorms globally is essential for predicting severe weather so nasa is testing a new type of weather satellite to fill the gap rain rain. Cube is a technology demonstration satellite that could provide a real time look inside storms. The satellite's antenna sends out chirps chirps or specialized radar signals that bounce off raindrops and send back a picture of what the inside of a storm looks like but rain ncube isn't meant to track storms all alone. Many of the tiny satellites could be inexpensively launched into orbit flying together the rain cubes could relate updated information about storm movement and effectively predict amounts of rain snow sleet and pale anywhere on the globe hello for innovation now. I'm jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the national institute of aerospace through collaboration with nasa.

Nasa National Institute Of Aerospac
3D Printed Sensors

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

3D Printed Sensors

"These three d. printed sensors could be used for a variety of space applications. This is innovation now. Bringing bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future mahmuda sultana and her team at nasa's goddard space flight center or working on advancing technology capable of syncing minute concentrations of gases and vapour as well as measuring pressure and temperature and transmitting that data via wireless antenna nanna sensors are known to be highly sensitive and laurie source however the fabrication process is very complex and labor intensive. We try to address these issues by using an automated <hes> three d. printing process it offset printing process developed upped by our collaborator at northeastern university. The printing process applies nanomaterials layer by layer to create tiny sensors. A suite eight of sensors could be printed on one platform and scientists could then use these devices smaller than a cell phone to create sensors that monitor astronaut health or give us information about the environment on planetary bodies for innovation now. I'm jennifer poet. Innovation <music> now is produced by the national institute of aerospace through collaboration with nasa and is distributed by w h._r. v.

Nasa National Institute Of Aerospac
Plotting Antarctic Ice

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Plotting Antarctic Ice

"Three hundred trillion green photons of light were sent to the ground as set to began. It's mission to monitor senator earth's changing ice. This is innovation now. Bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future. It was a sleepless night for the computer. <unk> programmers tasked with analyzing the first photon cloud from is set to but nasr's ice cloud and land elevation satellite to demonstrator that both the satellite and the sole instrument on board were working together as designed by timing how long it takes aches individual photons to leave the satellite reflect off the surface and returned to the receiver telescopes on the satellite nasa can precisely measure surface surface heights below within a few hours of receiving the first plots of the antarctic ice sheet. The deputy project scientist was texting screen shots of that height data to the rest of the team and i sat to had successfully demonstrated its ability to provide the precise measurements researchers searchers will need to monitor even small changes in earth's ice sheets glaciers and sea ice overtime for innovation somewhere. I'm jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the national institute of aerospace through collaboration with nasa.

Nasa Senator Nasr National Institute Of Aerospac Project Scientist
Contributions to Aeronautics

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Contributions to Aeronautics

"We all benefit from Nasr's contributions to aeronautics from the cockpit to arrival terminals NASA is with you when you fly why this is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shape our future thanks to advancements in aeronautics developed by NASA. Today's the aviation industry is better equipped than ever to safely and efficiently transport both people and cargo to their destinations streamlined find bodies quieter engines techniques for preventing icing and lightweight composite structures all trace their origins back to NASA research. Even air traffic controllers rely on NASA developed procedures and computer software tools today NASA continues its aviation heritage with a strong commitment to dramatically reducing environmental impact while maintaining safety in more crowded skies new quiet supersonic onic technologies have the potential to make faster than sound air travel overland possible for everyone the D._n._A.. Of the entire aviation in industry is infused with NASA technology and NASA flies with you every time you take to the skies for innovation now. I'm Jennifer poet off. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through Collaboration with NASA and is distributed by W H._R..

Nasa National Institute Of Aerospac Nasr
Satellite Farming

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

Satellite Farming

"The farmers have been using self driving technology for over a decade in part due to collaboration between NASA and John Deere there. This is innovation now. G._P._S. was a new idea when John Deere began using the technology to measure crop yields and how farmers determine seed productivity but John Deere wanted to go further unfortunately G._p._S. could be off by up to thirty feet so the company began developing self guidance that was accurate to an inch or so their new radio signal system however was expensive and not always reliable meanwhile researchers at NASA's Jet Got Propulsion Lab. We're working to stream satellite data in real time via the Internet in two thousand four John Deere contract with NASA to link the two technologies modifying their G._p._S. receivers to tap into Nasr's global network of ground stations and incorporate. J._P._L.'s A._P._L.'s software although John Deere now relies on its own guidance system the accuracy that came from the company's partnership with NASA years ago is what drives today's autonomous agricultural equipment worldwide for innovation now. I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation Chanelle is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through Collaboration with NASA and is distributed by W H._R..

John Deere Nasa National Institute Of Aerospac Nasr G._P._S. J._P._L. Thirty Feet
Smaller than a Cell Phone

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Smaller than a Cell Phone

"These three D printed sensors could be used for a variety of space applications. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future moody, sultana and her team at NASA Goddard Space Flight center or working on vanishing technology, capable of syncing minute concentrations of gases and vapour as well as measuring pressure, and temperature and transmitting that data via a wireless antenna Nanno sensors are known to be highly sensitive and Laurie source. However, the fabrication process is very complex and labor intensive we try to address these issues by using an automated three D printing process, it offset printing process developed by our collaborator of Northeastern University. The printing process, applies nanomaterials layer by layer to create tiny sensors a. Of sensors could be printed on one platform, and scientists could then use these devices smaller than a cell phone to create sensors, that monitor astronaut health or give us information about the environment on planetary bodies for innovation now. I'm Jennifer poet. And ovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w. HR V.

Nasa Goddard Space Flight Cent National Institute Of Aerospac Sultana Laurie Source Nasa Northeastern University
Flexible Aeroshells

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Flexible Aeroshells

"If you want to explore the solar system, he might need to pack an umbrella. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future, as a spacecraft enters a planet's atmosphere at high speeds, a pressure shock wave forms, generating intense heat in front of the spacecraft a type of heat shield or ERO shelf is needed to protect the craft and that rigid heat shield must fit inside the diameter of the rocket, but NASA is testing a new technology that could squeeze a much larger ERO shell into a rocket without the need for a larger rocket adept or Nasr's adaptable, deployable entry placement technology is a foldable device that opens to make a round rigid heat shield the umbrella like mechanical design uses flexible carbon skin, stretched over deployable, struts, which become rigid when fully flexed the skin is made. Of carbon yarn woven in three dimensions resulting in a durable fabric able to withstand high temperatures adept recently passed its first flight test. So the managing team at NASA Ames research center is moving forward. Full speed ahead for innovation now. I'm Jennifer poet innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w h r v.

Nasa Nasa Ames Research Center Nasr National Institute Of Aerospac
NASA Takes to the Skies

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

NASA Takes to the Skies

"We all benefit from Nasr's contributions to 'aeronautics from the cockpit to arrival terminals. Nasa is with you. When you fly, this is innovation now, bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. Thanks to advancements in 'aeronautics developed by NASA. Today's aviation industry is better equipped than ever to safely. And if fishing really transport both people and cargo to their destinations streamlined bodies, quieter engines techniques for preventing icing and lightweight composite structures all trace their origins back to NASA research, even air traffic controllers rely on NASA developed procedures and computer software tools today. Nasa continues its aviation heritage with a strong commitment to dramatically reducing environmental impact while maintaining safety in more crowded skies, new quiet super. Onic technologies have the potential to make faster than sound air travel overland possible for everyone? The DNA of the entire aviation industry is infused with NASA technology, and NASA flies with you. Every time you take to the skies for innovation now. I'm Jennifer poet ovation. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w. HR V.

Nasa Nasr National Institute Of Aerospac Onic Technologies
Autonomous Agriculture

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Autonomous Agriculture

"The farmers have been using self driving technology for over a decade in part due to collaboration between NASA and John Deere is innovation. Now GPS was a new idea when John Deere began using the technology to measure crop yields and how farmers determine seed productivity, but John Deere wanted to go further. Unfortunately, GPS could be off by up to thirty feet. So the company began developing self guidance that was accurate to an inch. Or so their new radio signal system, however was expensive and not always reliable. Meanwhile, researchers at NASA Jet Propulsion lab, we're working to stream satellite data in real time via the internet in two thousand four John Deere contract with NASA to link the two technologies modifying their GPS receivers to tap into Nasr's global network of ground stations and incorporate Jay. APL's software, although John Deere now relies on its own guidance system. The accuracy that came from the company's partnership with NASA years ago is what drives today's autonomous agricultural equipment worldwide for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V.

John Deere Nasa Nasa Jet Propulsion National Institute Of Aerospac Nasr APL JAY Thirty Feet
A Day on Saturn

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

A Day on Saturn

"Exactly how long is a day on Saturn. The answer. It turns out was hidden in the rings. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future the link of day on Saturn has long been a mystery the planet has no solid surface with landmarks to track as it rotates, and it's unusual magnetic field hides the planet's rotation rate as the interior of Saturn vibrates, however, the rings of Saturn detect those movements creating waves instruments on Nasr's Cassini spacecraft examined the icy rocky rings of Saturn in unprecedented detail before the mission ended in late twenty seventeen a team from Nasr's Ames research center, and the university of California Santa Cruz have used the Cassini data to study the wave patterns in the rings and calculate the length of day. Researchers. Now that a year on Saturn is equal to twenty nine earth years. And now the team is excited to report that the link of a Saturn day is ten hours thirty three minutes and thirty eight seconds for innovation. Now. I'm Jennifer poet innovation. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V. Visit us online at innovation now dot US.

Nasr National Institute Of Aerospac University Of California Santa Ames Research Center Nasa Thirty Eight Seconds Thirty Three Minutes Ten Hours
Rain Cube

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Rain Cube

"Today's meteorologists have a plethora of ground based instruments to help forecast, the weather, but some new satellites no larger than a shoebox may help us see the big picture in great detail. This is innovation now. Although today's weather experiments provide an enormous amount of weather information, none provide a global view of what's happening inside. A storm measuring how water and air move in thunderstorms globally is essential for predicting severe weather. So NASA is testing a new type of weather satellite to fill the gap. Rain cube is a technology demonstration satellite that could provide a real time. Look inside storms, the satellite's antenna sends out Chirps or specialized radar signals that bounce off raindrops and send back a picture of what the inside of a storm looks like, but. Rain cube isn't meant to track storms, all alone, many of the tiny satellites could be inexpensively launched into orbit flying together. The rain cubes could relate updated information about storm movement and effectively predict amounts of rain. Snow, sleet and pale anywhere on the globe for innovation. Now. I'm Jennifer poet. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA.

Nasa National Institute Of Aerospac
Telling Time on Saturn

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

Telling Time on Saturn

"Exactly how long is a day on Saturn. The answer. It turns out was hidden in the rings. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future the link of day on Saturn has long been a mystery the planet has no solid surface with landmarks to track as it rotates, and it's unusual magnetic field hides the planet's rotation rate as the interior of Saturn vibrates, however, the rings of Saturn detect those movements creating waves instruments on Nasr's Cassini spacecraft examined the icy rocky rings of Saturn in unprecedented detail before the mission ended in late twenty seventeen a team from Nasr's Ames research center, and the university of California Santa Cruz have used the Cassini data to study the wave patterns in the rings and calculate the length of day. Researchers. Now that a year on Saturn is equal to twenty nine earth years. And now the team is excited to report that the link of a Saturn day is ten hours thirty three minutes and thirty eight seconds for innovation. Now. I'm Jennifer poet innovation. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V. Visit us online at innovation now dot US.

Nasr National Institute Of Aerospac University Of California Santa Ames Research Center Nasa Thirty Eight Seconds Thirty Three Minutes Ten Hours
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"If you want to explore the solar system, he might need to pack an umbrella. This is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future as a spacecraft enters a planet's atmosphere at high speeds, a pressure shock wave forms generating intense heat in front of the spacecraft a type of heat shield or ERO shelf is needed to protect the craft and that rigid heat shield must fit inside the diameter of the rocket. But NASA is testing a new technology that could squeeze a much larger era shell into a rocket without the need for a larger rocket adept or Nasr's adaptable deployable entry placement technology is a foldable device that opens to make a round rigid heat shield the umbrella like mechanical design uses flexible carbon skin stretched over deployable struts, which become rigid when fully flexed the skin is made. Of carbon yarn woven in three dimensions resulting in a durable fabric able to withstand high temperatures adept recently passed its first flight test. So the managing team at NASA. Ames research center is moving forward full speed ahead for innovation. Now. I'm Jennifer poet innovation. Now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA and is distributed by w HR V.

NASA National Institute of aerospac Nasr Ames research center
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"As wildfires rage out of control on the ground. NASA is using instruments in the sky to build a comprehensive picture of the fire below. This is innovation. Now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future. NASA uses earth observing instruments to monitor the impact. Wildfires have on both land and air quality. Here's Dr amber soya, senior research scientist at NASA, and the National Institute of aerospace NAFTA has a number of satellite that can look at pre-fire active fire and post fire activity modus is an instrument onto satellites Charon and this this mode instrument is used to look at actor. Fire detection can look at the health of education, but you can also look at fire scars. Another instrument that we can use is Colli ABI on the. Calypso satellite. It can look at not the horizontal extent, but the vertical extent of smoke through the atmosphere. And we can put this together with models to regret where the smoke is going, where it might come down public officials and fire managers use the NASA data daily to better manage this planet. We call home for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

NASA National Institute of aerospac Colli ABI National Institute of aerospac Dr amber soya senior research scientist Charon
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"From a rocket fuel tank to the tops of tall buildings. This NASA technology transfer literally stops shaking in its tracks. This is innovation. Now nearly a decade ago, NASA engineers realized the large rocket. They were designing for a trip to Mars, had a serious vibration issue. So a team at Marshall space, Flight Center set out to fix the problem. Here's Dan lockney, Nasr's technology transfer program executive who developed a damper system series of baffles in the fluid tank, the the fuel tank that allowed it to the to control the mass of the entire vehicle during launch and make it stop vibrating. Then we're looking at this rocket. We're thinking what else is tall and you don't want it shaking buildings after testing the device at Marshall's unique, vibration testing facility, a fourteen story building. They can shake the team began working with an architecture firm in New York City. And now that same. Device just had its first installation on the b. two building in Brooklyn. Brooklyn's tallest tower. There was a fun one to watch emerge over the course of just a couple of years from, hey, I got a problem too. I got an idea to who else could use it to the tallest building Brooklyn now has this device at the top of for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Brooklyn NASA tallest tower Marshall Marshall space Dan lockney National Institute of aerospac New York City Mars Nasr executive Flight Center
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"From a rocket fuel tank to the tops of tall buildings. This NASA technology transfer literally stops shaking in its tracks. This is innovation. Now nearly a decade ago, NASA engineers realized the large rocket. They were designing for a trip to Mars, had a serious vibration issue. So a team at Marshall space, Flight Center set out to fix the problem. Here's Dan lockney, Nasr's technology transfer program executive who developed a damper system series of baffles in the fluid tank, the the fuel tank that allowed it to the to control the mass of the entire vehicle during launch and make it stop vibrating. Then we're looking at this rocket. We're thinking what else is tall and you don't want it shaking buildings after testing the device at Marshall's unique, vibration testing facility, a fourteen story building. They can shake the team began working with an architecture firm in New York City. And now that same. Device just had its first installation on the b. two building in Brooklyn. Brooklyn's tallest tower. There was a fun one to watch emerge over the course of just a couple of years from, hey, I got a problem too. I got an idea to who else could use it to the tallest building Brooklyn now has this device at the top of for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Brooklyn NASA tallest tower Marshall Marshall space Dan lockney National Institute of aerospac New York City Mars Nasr executive Flight Center
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"From a rocket fuel tank to the tops of tall buildings. This NASA technology transfer literally stops shaking in its tracks. This is innovation. Now nearly a decade ago, NASA engineers realized the large rocket. They were designing for a trip to Mars, had a serious vibration issue. So a team at Marshall space, Flight Center set out to fix the problem. Here's Dan lockney, Nasr's technology transfer program executive who developed a damper system series of baffles in the fluid tank, the the fuel tank that allowed it to the to control the mass of the entire vehicle during launch and make it stop vibrating. Then we're looking at this rocket. We're thinking what else is tall and you don't want it shaking buildings after testing the device at Marshall's unique, vibration testing facility, a fourteen story building. They can shake the team began working with an architecture firm in New York City. And now that same. Device just had its first installation on the b. two building in Brooklyn. Brooklyn's tallest tower. There was a fun one to watch emerge over the course of just a couple of years from, hey, I got a problem too. I got an idea to who else could use it to the tallest building Brooklyn now has this device at the top of for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Brooklyn NASA tallest tower Marshall Marshall space Dan lockney National Institute of aerospac New York City Mars Nasr executive Flight Center
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"From a rocket fuel tank to the tops of tall buildings. This NASA technology transfer literally stops shaking in its tracks. This is innovation. Now nearly a decade ago, NASA engineers realized the large rocket. They were designing for a trip to Mars, had a serious vibration issue. So a team at Marshall space, Flight Center set out to fix the problem. Here's Dan lockney, Nasr's technology transfer program executive who developed a damper system series of baffles in the fluid tank, the the fuel tank that allowed it to the to control the mass of the entire vehicle during launch and make it stop vibrating. Then we're looking at this rocket. We're thinking what else is tall and you don't want it shaking buildings after testing the device at Marshall's unique, vibration testing facility, a fourteen story building. They can shake the team began working with an architecture firm in New York City. And now that same. Device just had its first installation on the b. two building in Brooklyn. Brooklyn's tallest tower. There was a fun one to watch emerge over the course of just a couple of years from, hey, I got a problem too. I got an idea to who else could use it to the tallest building Brooklyn now has this device at the top of for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Brooklyn NASA tallest tower Marshall Marshall space Dan lockney National Institute of aerospac New York City Mars Nasr executive Flight Center
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"From a rocket fuel tank to the tops of tall buildings. This NASA technology transfer literally stops shaking in its tracks. This is innovation. Now nearly a decade ago, NASA engineers realized the large rocket. They were designing for a trip to Mars, had a serious vibration issue. So a team at Marshall space, Flight Center set out to fix the problem. Here's Dan lockney, Nasr's technology transfer program executive who developed a damper system series of baffles in the fluid tank, the the fuel tank that allowed it to the to control the mass of the entire vehicle during launch and make it stop vibrating. Then we're looking at this rocket. We're thinking what else is tall and you don't want it shaking buildings after testing the device at Marshall's unique, vibration testing facility, a fourteen story building. They can shake the team began working with an architecture firm in New York City. And now that same. Device just had its first installation on the b. two building in Brooklyn. Brooklyn's tallest tower. There was a fun one to watch emerge over the course of just a couple of years from, hey, I got a problem too. I got an idea to who else could use it to the tallest building Brooklyn now has this device at the top of for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Brooklyn NASA tallest tower Marshall Marshall space Dan lockney National Institute of aerospac New York City Mars Nasr executive Flight Center
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"From a rocket fuel tank to the tops of tall buildings. This NASA technology transfer literally stops shaking in its tracks. This is innovation. Now nearly a decade ago, NASA engineers realized the large rocket. They were designing for a trip to Mars, had a serious vibration issue. So a team at Marshall space, Flight Center set out to fix the problem. Here's Dan lockney, Nasr's technology transfer program executive who developed a damper system series of baffles in the fluid tank, the the fuel tank that allowed it to the to control the mass of the entire vehicle during launch and make it stop vibrating. Then we're looking at this rocket. We're thinking what else is tall and you don't want it shaking buildings after testing the device at Marshall's unique, vibration testing facility, a fourteen story building. They can shake the team began working with an architecture firm in New York City. And now that same. Device just had its first installation on the b. two building in Brooklyn. Brooklyn's tallest tower. There was a fun one to watch emerge over the course of just a couple of years from, hey, I got a problem too. I got an idea to who else could use it to the tallest building Brooklyn now has this device at the top of for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Brooklyn NASA tallest tower Marshall Marshall space Dan lockney National Institute of aerospac New York City Mars Nasr executive Flight Center
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"From a rocket fuel tank to the tops of tall buildings. This NASA technology transfer literally stops shaking in its tracks. This is innovation. Now nearly a decade ago, NASA engineers realized the large rocket. They were designing for a trip to Mars, had a serious vibration issue. So a team at Marshall space, Flight Center set out to fix the problem. Here's Dan lockney, Nasr's technology transfer program executive who developed a damper system series of baffles in the fluid tank, the the fuel tank that allowed it to the to control the mass of the entire vehicle during launch and make it stop vibrating. Then we're looking at this rocket. We're thinking what else is tall and you don't want it shaking buildings after testing the device at Marshall's unique, vibration testing facility, a fourteen story building. They can shake the team began working with an architecture firm in New York City. And now that same. Device just had its first installation on the b. two building in Brooklyn. Brooklyn's tallest tower. There was a fun one to watch emerge over the course of just a couple of years from, hey, I got a problem too. I got an idea to who else could use it to the tallest building Brooklyn now has this device at the top of for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Brooklyn NASA tallest tower Marshall Marshall space Dan lockney National Institute of aerospac New York City Mars Nasr executive Flight Center
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"From a rocket fuel tank to the tops of tall buildings. This NASA technology transfer literally stops shaking in its tracks. This is innovation. Now nearly a decade ago, NASA engineers realized the large rocket. They were designing for a trip to Mars, had a serious vibration issue. So a team at Marshall space, Flight Center set out to fix the problem. Here's Dan lockney, Nasr's technology transfer program executive who developed a damper system series of baffles in the fluid tank, the the fuel tank that allowed it to the to control the mass of the entire vehicle during launch and make it stop vibrating. Then we're looking at this rocket. We're thinking what else is tall and you don't want it shaking buildings after testing the device at Marshall's unique, vibration testing facility, a fourteen story building. They can shake the team began working with an architecture firm in New York City. And now that same. Device just had its first installation on the b. two building in Brooklyn. Brooklyn's tallest tower. There was a fun one to watch emerge over the course of just a couple of years from, hey, I got a problem too. I got an idea to who else could use it to the tallest building Brooklyn now has this device at the top of for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Brooklyn NASA tallest tower Marshall Marshall space Dan lockney National Institute of aerospac New York City Mars Nasr executive Flight Center
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"From a rocket fuel tank to the tops of tall buildings. This NASA technology transfer literally stops shaking in its tracks. This is innovation. Now nearly a decade ago, NASA engineers realized the large rocket. They were designing for a trip to Mars, had a serious vibration issue. So a team at Marshall space, Flight Center set out to fix the problem. Here's Dan lockney, Nasr's technology transfer program executive who developed a damper system series of baffles in the fluid tank, the the fuel tank that allowed it to the to control the mass of the entire vehicle during launch and make it stop vibrating. Then we're looking at this rocket. We're thinking what else is tall and you don't want it shaking buildings after testing the device at Marshall's unique, vibration testing facility, a fourteen story building. They can shake the team began working with an architecture firm in New York City. And now that same. Device just had its first installation on the b. two building in Brooklyn. Brooklyn's tallest tower. There was a fun one to watch emerge over the course of just a couple of years from, hey, I got a problem too. I got an idea to who else could use it to the tallest building Brooklyn now has this device at the top of for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Brooklyn NASA tallest tower Marshall Marshall space Dan lockney National Institute of aerospac New York City Mars Nasr executive Flight Center
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"From a rocket fuel tank to the tops of tall buildings. This NASA technology transfer literally stops shaking in its tracks. This is innovation. Now nearly a decade ago, NASA engineers realized the large rocket. They were designing for a trip to Mars, had a serious vibration issue. So a team at Marshall space, Flight Center set out to fix the problem. Here's Dan lockney, Nasr's technology transfer program executive who developed a damper system series of baffles in the fluid tank, the the fuel tank that allowed it to the to control the mass of the entire vehicle during launch and make it stop vibrating. Then we're looking at this rocket. We're thinking what else is tall and you don't want it shaking buildings after testing the device at Marshall's unique, vibration testing facility, a fourteen story building. They can shake the team began working with an architecture firm in New York City. And now that same. Device just had its first installation on the b. two building in Brooklyn. Brooklyn's tallest tower. There was a fun one to watch emerge over the course of just a couple of years from, hey, I got a problem too. I got an idea to who else could use it to the tallest building Brooklyn now has this device at the top of for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Brooklyn NASA tallest tower Marshall Marshall space Dan lockney National Institute of aerospac New York City Mars Nasr executive Flight Center
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"From a rocket fuel tank to the tops of tall buildings. This NASA technology transfer literally stops shaking in its tracks. This is innovation. Now nearly a decade ago, NASA engineers realized the large rocket. They were designing for a trip to Mars, had a serious vibration issue. So a team at Marshall space, Flight Center set out to fix the problem. Here's Dan lockney, Nasr's technology transfer program executive who developed a damper system series of baffles in the fluid tank, the the fuel tank that allowed it to the to control the mass of the entire vehicle during launch and make it stop vibrating. Then we're looking at this rocket. We're thinking what else is tall and you don't want it shaking buildings after testing the device at Marshall's unique, vibration testing facility, a fourteen story building. They can shake the team began working with an architecture firm in New York City. And now that same. Device just had its first installation on the b. two building in Brooklyn. Brooklyn's tallest tower. There was a fun one to watch emerge over the course of just a couple of years from, hey, I got a problem too. I got an idea to who else could use it to the tallest building Brooklyn now has this device at the top of for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Brooklyn NASA tallest tower Marshall Marshall space Dan lockney National Institute of aerospac New York City Mars Nasr executive Flight Center
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"From a rocket fuel tank to the tops of tall buildings. This NASA technology transfer literally stops shaking in its tracks. This is innovation. Now nearly a decade ago, NASA engineers realized the large rocket. They were designing for a trip to Mars, had a serious vibration issue. So a team at Marshall space, Flight Center set out to fix the problem. Here's Dan lockney, Nasr's technology transfer program executive who developed a damper system series of baffles in the fluid tank, the the fuel tank that allowed it to the to control the mass of the entire vehicle during launch and make it stop vibrating. Then we're looking at this rocket. We're thinking what else is tall and you don't want it shaking buildings after testing the device at Marshall's unique, vibration testing facility, a fourteen story building. They can shake the team began working with an architecture firm in New York City. And now that same. Device just had its first installation on the b. two building in Brooklyn. Brooklyn's tallest tower. There was a fun one to watch emerge over the course of just a couple of years from, hey, I got a problem too. I got an idea to who else could use it to the tallest building Brooklyn now has this device at the top of for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Brooklyn NASA tallest tower Marshall Marshall space Dan lockney National Institute of aerospac New York City Mars Nasr executive Flight Center
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"From a rocket fuel tank to the tops of tall buildings. This NASA technology transfer literally stops shaking in its tracks. This is innovation. Now nearly a decade ago, NASA engineers realized the large rocket. They were designing for a trip to Mars, had a serious vibration issue. So a team at Marshall space, Flight Center set out to fix the problem. Here's Dan lockney, Nasr's technology transfer program executive who developed a damper system series of baffles in the fluid tank, the the fuel tank that allowed it to the to control the mass of the entire vehicle during launch and make it stop vibrating. Then we're looking at this rocket. We're thinking what else is tall and you don't want it shaking buildings after testing the device at Marshall's unique, vibration testing facility, a fourteen story building. They can shake the team began working with an architecture firm in New York City. And now that same. Device just had its first installation on the b. two building in Brooklyn. Brooklyn's tallest tower. There was a fun one to watch emerge over the course of just a couple of years from, hey, I got a problem too. I got an idea to who else could use it to the tallest building Brooklyn now has this device at the top of for innovation. Now, I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with nessa.

Brooklyn NASA tallest tower Marshall Marshall space Dan lockney National Institute of aerospac New York City Mars Nasr executive Flight Center
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"When fighting Alzheimer's time becomes precious and anew. Blood test might give patients years advance warning. This is innovation. Now, traditionally, doctors use invasive procedures like spinal taps and detailed brain scans to detect Alzheimer's disease. These methods are not only expensive but ineffective for early detection. And while there's some promising new treatments in development to combat the disease for many patients, these treatments come too late in the fight to make a difference. What's needed is a fast inexpensive tests that can catch the disease before it does irreversible damage. Now, thanks to research in the United Kingdom. A screening test may be on the horizon, a precursor illness to Alzheimer's called mild cognitive impairment leaves a trail of specific proteins in the bloodstream. Not all patients with MCI will get Alzheimer's, but based on research with a thousand volunteers, doctors have discovered that. Ten specific proteins from that set. When found together predict with eighty seven percent accuracy that Alzheimer's will begin within a year. A blood test to look for those proteins could be a valuable gift of time time to prepare time to do more advanced diagnosis, but also time to fight and perhaps someday to win for innovation. Now I'm Jennifer poet. Innovation now is produced by the National Institute of aerospace through collaboration with NASA.

Alzheimer Alzheimer's disease National Institute of aerospac United Kingdom MCI NASA eighty seven percent
"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"jennifer poet" Discussed on Innovation Now

"Spaces not silent and with the right tools and can here this symphony of sound this is innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that should vote for future while technically a vacuum space nonetheless contains energetic charged particles which are continually tossed to and fro by the motion of plasma waves unlike a roaring ocean surf these plasma waves create a musical chorus author as a spacecraft encounters one of these waves sensors can be used to record the changes in the frequency of the electric and magnetic fields scientists then shift the frequencies to the audible range and we can actually listen to the irri sounds of space out beyond the plasma sphere where plasma is relatively warm waves create chirps like a flock of noisy birds other waves traveling closer to earth where the plasma is much colder may sound more like radio static the energetic electrons literally whistle while they work by listening to these sounds scientists can determine how these waves and particles interact an learn how to protect our satellites and telecommunications in space for innovation now i'm jennifer poet innovation now is produced by the national institute of aerospace through collaboration with nasser.

nasser national institute of aerospac