35 Burst results for "jeff brady"

United Arab Emirates spacecraft blasts off from Japan

Latino USA

00:54 sec | 3 weeks ago

United Arab Emirates spacecraft blasts off from Japan

"Arab Emirates has launched its first spacecraft. A probe headed for Mars. NPR's Jeff Brady reports. The craft was launched from a space centre in Japan. After the launch Countdown in Arabic in a Japanese rocket launched the unmanned spacecraft. United Arab Emirates named the probe a mall or hope. Project director Amron Sharrif says in a promotional video that the Emirates Mars mission delivers a message of hope to young Arab people the same way we used to generate knowledge in the past. You can generate knowledge today and in the future to serve humanity. The craft is expected to reach Mars next February, as the Emirates celebrates 50 years since the country was founded. Once they're the probe will study the planet's upper atmosphere and monitor it's changing climate. Jeff Brady NPR news

United Arab Emirates Jeff Brady NPR Mars Amron Sharrif Japan Director
Absent From Stimulus Packages: Overhauling Energy, Climate Programs

Environment: NPR

04:22 min | Last month

Absent From Stimulus Packages: Overhauling Energy, Climate Programs

"Some countries are literally printing money to rescue their economies from the ravages of covid nineteen. The UN and some others argue that some of that money should be spent to fight climate change. The European Union has a plan to do that. The US so far does not despite the fact that this country has a tradition of overhauling our energy sector to promote economic recovery. Here's NPR's Jeff Brady. Consider President Franklin. Roosevelt's new deal a century ago, electricity may not come to mind, but a big element was building massive hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River then the government paid woody Guthrie to write songs about. Colonial. Power returning our. Law. The legacy of those dams is mixed. They forever changed the environment, but they also brought electricity to rural America during the Nineteen Twenties and Nineteen Thirties about ninety percent of the US. Farms had no electricity. Ted Case is executive director of the Oregon. Rural Electric Cooperative Association his Co. up. Members exist because the new deal brought utility, Poles and power lines down many miles of dusty Rhodes and connected homes to the grid that day was the most incredible day for a lot of families when they finally got to throw. Throw that kerosene lantern out the window which many people did decades later? President Obama was sworn into office amid an economic downturn. His stimulus plan included ninety billion dollars that helped reshape the US energy landscape. It's an investment that will double the amount of renewable energy produced over the next three years solar and wind grew quickly, and now the cheapest source of electricity in some places, but hundreds of thousands of renewable energy jobs have been lost. Scientists say carbon emissions must be reduced dramatically to avoid the worst effects of. Of Climate Change, that requires significant changes at a time. The country already is spending a lot of money about three trillion dollars on relief packages so far Julian brave noise cat is with the group data for progress. It is irresponsible from like a very basic good government perspective to not have any of that money. Go to Queen Energy and fighting climate change noise cat says money should be spent creating jobs to build retrofit houses install rooftop, solar and deploy electric vehicles. Heather reams also is concerned about climate change, but. But her politics are more conservative and market focused. If we're talking about if you'RE GONNA put taxpayer money someplace, put it where you're going to get a good return, and that is in clean energy. Reams heads citizens for responsible energy solutions. She says there are bills. In Congress. That could become stimulus programs even with an administration that shows little interest in climate change they do recognize the economic value that clean energy brings the jobs that brings particularly to a lot of red states, so I think the business certainty. Trump's if you will any kind of political challenges, another idea has the support of some conservatives and big oil companies taxing carbon dioxide emissions I. Think it's fair to say that carbon taxes are economists favorite way of addressing climate change Yona. Marinescu is an economist at the University of Pennsylvania, but she says this would be a bad time to levy new taxes. She suggest the government invest lots of money in clean energy upfront, and then Levy carbon tax to pay for it when the economy recovers, it's one idea among many the point. Is that climate? Climate Change arguably is the biggest problem humans face now and fixing. It requires sweeping solutions at a time. The US's spending lots of money. It's a sad time, but also an opportunity to do investments that perhaps we didn't have the Mo-jo to get our act together and do before. Sometimes it takes a good crisis to finally move in a whole new direction just like the new deal. Here's what's different. Though after the Great Depression and the two thousand eight recession, the country had presidents who believed in fixing the big energy problems of

United States Queen Energy Covid UN European Union Nineteen Twenties Jeff Brady NPR Marinescu Rural Electric Cooperative Ass President Franklin Heather Reams Woody Guthrie Ted Case Columbia River
Coronavirus will trigger biggest ever plunge in energy demand, emissions: IEA

Morning Edition

06:41 min | 3 months ago

Coronavirus will trigger biggest ever plunge in energy demand, emissions: IEA

"The corona virus pandemic is delivering the biggest shock to the global energy system in seven decades according to the international energy agency NPR's Jeff Brady reports plunging demand for energy is hitting fossil fuels especially hard global energy demand will fall by six percent this year seven times the decline after the financial crisis ten years ago I E. a projection show oil and gas hit hard but demand for coal falls by an extraordinary eight percent the largest decline since World War two the agency says renewable energy fair as well while among grows much as in the past the IEA projects electricity generation from wind solar and hydro power will increase five percent the agency says all this will reduce harmful greenhouse gas emissions that lead to climate change by almost eight percent the largest annual decrease ever recorded though emissions will rebound in an economic recovery unless countries focus relief packages on boosting clean energy Jeff Brady

NPR Jeff Brady IEA
Coronavirus Relief Efforts To Help Energy Industry Stall On Capitol Hill

NPR's Business Story of the Day

02:30 min | 3 months ago

Coronavirus Relief Efforts To Help Energy Industry Stall On Capitol Hill

"How should the United States helped the energy business? The oil industry has more petroleum that it can sell. The solar industry warns that up to half. Its jobs could be lost this year and rescue efforts in has so far stalled. Npr's Jeff Brady is on the line from Philadelphia. Jeff Good Morning Good Morning. What is the president promising to do for the energy industry well? He has instructed the secretaries of Energy and Treasury to come up with a plan to make money available specifically to the oil and gas industry. It's not really clear what that means. A Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin says the administration is looking at federal loans for the oil industry. There's been talk of the government. Buying a bunch of oil. The Energy Department already is making space available for lease in the Strategic Petroleum Reserve and that takes oil off the market. That's pretty important now. Because there's a huge glut of crude around the world. Demand is way down people aren't traveling and part of that. Glut of oil is coming from other countries like Saudi Arabia. And there's also been talk putting anti dumping tariffs on that oil but none of these ideas have really gained any traction themselves. Maybe part of the problem is there's so many different ideas. But what does the industry itself want? And that is even difficult to answer. Because it's not one monolithic oil industry in this country. There are hundreds of companies of different sizes. They have competing interests for example. Some of them would like to see reduced federal royalties for drilling in the Gulf of Mexico Mexico or on federal land but that really does nothing for drillers in South Texas who are working on private land they might prefer government loans. A few states are taking action on their own. Texas and Oklahoma are considering mandatory production cuts. That would be pretty extraordinary. Some states are giving oil companies more time to pay taxes One of those states is Louisiana. That is where the Democratic Governor John Bel Edwards. He expressed frustration the Just last week that the oil industry wasn't included in some of these federal relief packages. Obviously that would be helpful to the industry and it'd be helpful to stay slack Louisiana That are is relying on that particular industry and economic sectors. We are at one point. Congress did consider appropriating three billion dollars Philip. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve but Democrats block that arguing that if lawmakers are going to help the oil companies they should help renewable energy

Strategic Petroleum Reserve Jeff Brady United States Energy Department John Bel Edwards Saudi Arabia Secretaries Of Energy NPR Louisiana Mexico Mexico President Trump South Texas Steven Mnuchin
Ten years later: The Deepwater Horizon disaster

Morning Becomes Eclectic

01:00 min | 4 months ago

Ten years later: The Deepwater Horizon disaster

"Today marks ten years since the deadly explosion occurred on the deepwater horizon oil drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico eleven workers on that rate lost their lives in crude oil flowed from the under water well for nearly three months NPR's Jeff Brady examines what's been learned in the decade since one of the largest environmental disasters in U. S. history the consequences of that accident and spill are still felt along the US Gulf coast today the disaster cost oil giant BP sixty five billion dollars and lead to tighter regulation of the offshore oil industry but even now environmental groups say regulators especially under the trump administration are too cozy with the industry retired Coast Guard admiral Thad Allen was the incident commander for the government's response what is the single most important change was made was a requirement to have well containment equipment available as a condition of the permitting but apartment of interior that equipment is standing by in the industry says it could respond to a similar incident much faster now Jeff Brady NPR

Mexico NPR Jeff Brady Thad Allen Commander Jeff Brady Npr U. S. United States Gulf
10 Years After Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Industry Says It's Better Prepared

Environment: NPR

03:38 min | 4 months ago

10 Years After Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Industry Says It's Better Prepared

"Ten years ago an explosion on the deepwater horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico killed eleven people and oil gushed into the Gulf for almost three months today. Offshore drilling is more regulated but has enough been done to prevent another accident. Here's NPR's Jeff Brady one of the biggest changes since the deepwater horizon accident is on the Gulf coast near Corpus Christi Texas at the Dockside Facility of marine well containment company with the wind blowing. Ceo David Nickerson shows off five capping. Stacks similar to the device that finally stopped crude flowing into the goal. Each one of them is about as tall as a two story building the heaviest one the largest one that we have which is over here ways almost as much as forty full-sized. Suv's Nickerson says for big oil companies. Put up a billion dollars to create the company in two thousand ten six more joined sense then. The company's only job is to respond to the next well blowout when they give us the word go. We can get offshore with the cabinet stack. Hopefully at the well capped off within the matter of a week right. So that's about ten times faster than it took the shut off flow during deepwater horizon. If they can't stop the oil right away. There's a fleet of equipment to capture it. Put it in tankers and bring it onshore ten years ago absolutely none of this existed. All of this has been built directly responsive horizon incident. This is on the response side. There's also been changes to prevent an accident including stricter regulations. The Obama Administration created the bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Director. Scott on Gel recently offered members of Congress a positive view of what the bureau has accomplished. We've made our regulation safer when comparing the past six years of inspection data. We've increased the number of inspections by twenty six percent increase the number of inspections per facility by eighty six percent increase. The number of inspectors by twelve percent but before on Gel was a regulator of the offshore oil and gas industry. He was a cheerleader for it. Here he is as Louisiana's lieutenant governor at a rally praising the oil industry and taking this dig at the Renewable Energy Business America is not yet ready to get all of its fuel from the birds and the bees and the flowers and the trees among those who want the US to transition to cleaner energy. More quickly is Diane with the Environmental Group. Oshii Anna she says. Under President Trump an on Gel. The bureau is too cozy with the industry it regulates we've also seen the trump administration rolling back. Some of the far too few safeguards that were put in place as a response to the horizon rolling back things like key measures of the well control. That complex rule was designed to prevent future blowouts and give drillers detailed requirements. They must follow to safely drill in offshore. Well Eric Melito. With the Industry Group National Ocean Industries Association argues that changes during the trump administration strengthen not weaken safety for the past ten years. The industry has had a laser. Like focus on improving and enhancing NHS now. The question is whether enough has been done retired. Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen. Was the incident commander for the government's deepwater horizon. Response the question over the years. Is it safe to drill? My answer is that's not the question because there's no risk free way to extract fossil fuels from the earth and says it is safer now but we won't know if regulators and the industry are adequately prepared until the next accident.

Gulf Scott Ceo David Nickerson Jeff Brady Dockside Facility Of Marine Corpus Christi Texas Industry Group National Ocean Mexico Thad Allen Oshii Anna Donald Trump NPR Obama Administration Eric Melito Congress Commander Environmental Enforcement Dire
10 Years After Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Industry Says It's Better Prepared

NPR's Business Story of the Day

03:38 min | 4 months ago

10 Years After Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill, Industry Says It's Better Prepared

"Ten years ago an explosion on the deepwater horizon drilling rig in the Gulf of Mexico killed eleven people and oil gushed into the Gulf for almost three months today. Offshore drilling is more regulated but has enough been done to prevent another accident. Here's NPR's Jeff Brady one of the biggest changes since the deepwater horizon accident is on the Gulf coast near Corpus Christi Texas at the Dockside Facility of marine well containment company with the wind blowing. Ceo David Nickerson shows off five capping. Stacks similar to the device that finally stopped crude flowing into the goal. Each one of them is about as tall as a two story building the heaviest one the largest one that we have which is over here ways almost as much as forty full-sized. Suv's Nickerson says for big oil companies. Put up a billion dollars to create the company in two thousand ten six more joined sense then. The company's only job is to respond to the next well blowout when they give us the word go. We can get offshore with the cabinet stack. Hopefully at the well capped off within the matter of a week right. So that's about ten times faster than it took the shut off flow during deepwater horizon. If they can't stop the oil right away. There's a fleet of equipment to capture it. Put it in tankers and bring it onshore ten years ago absolutely none of this existed. All of this has been built directly responsive horizon incident. This is on the response side. There's also been changes to prevent an accident including stricter regulations. The Obama Administration created the bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement Director. Scott on Gel recently offered members of Congress a positive view of what the bureau has accomplished. We've made our regulation safer when comparing the past six years of inspection data. We've increased the number of inspections by twenty six percent increase the number of inspections per facility by six percent increase. The number of inspectors by twelve percent but before on Gel was a regulator of the offshore oil and gas industry. He was a cheerleader for it. Here he is as Louisiana's lieutenant governor at a rally praising the oil industry and taking this dig at the Renewable Energy Business America is not yet ready to get all of its fuel from the birds and the bees and the flowers and the trees among those who want the US to transition to cleaner energy. More quickly is Diane Hoskins with the Environmental Group. Oshii Anna she says. Under President Trump an on Gel. The bureau is too cozy with the industry it regulates we've also seen the trump administration rolling back. Some of the far too few safeguards that were put in place as a response to the horizon rolling back things like key measures of the well control. That complex rule was designed to prevent future blowouts and give drillers detailed requirements. They must follow to safely drill in offshore. Well Eric Melito. With the Industry Group National Ocean Industries Association argues that changes during the trump administration strengthen not weaken safety for the past ten years. The industry has had a laser. Like focus on improving and enhancing NHS now. The question is whether enough has been done retired. Coast Guard Admiral Thad Allen. Was the incident commander for the government's deepwater horizon. Response the question over the years. Is it safe to drill? My answer is that's not the question because there's no risk free way to extract fossil fuels from the earth and says it is safer now but we won't know if regulators and the industry are adequately prepared until the next

Gulf Scott Ceo David Nickerson Jeff Brady Dockside Facility Of Marine Corpus Christi Texas Industry Group National Ocean Mexico Thad Allen Oshii Anna Donald Trump NPR Obama Administration Diane Hoskins Eric Melito Congress Commander
Federal Support Ends For Coronavirus Testing Sites As Pandemic Peak Nears

All Things Considered

00:57 sec | 4 months ago

Federal Support Ends For Coronavirus Testing Sites As Pandemic Peak Nears

"York federal support for corona virus testing sites around the country will end of Friday at least some will shut down as a result NPR's Jeff Brady reports the federal funding was designed as a stopgap until states develop their own community based at testing sites the federal government help set up testing sites last month a focus on healthcare workers now FEMA says states can take over those programs in Montgomery County outside Philadelphia that means the federally supported site will shut down Dr Valerie Arkush is the county commission chair and says the feds provided testing supplies and access to a lab in this site came with the contract with lab core who accepted two hundred and fifty samples from the site every day so there's just no way that we can replace either of us are because says local hospitals now have their own testing sites but she says it's disappointing the federal helpful in just as the region heads into a surge of cases Jeff Brady NPR news

NPR Jeff Brady Fema Montgomery County Philadelphia Dr Valerie Arkush York Federal Government
Trump meets with oil company executives

All Things Considered

00:48 sec | 4 months ago

Trump meets with oil company executives

"Zidan met today with oil industry executives whose companies have been hurt by low prices NPR's Jeff Brady reports trump said he thinks Saudi Arabia and Russia will soon to go she didn't end there ongoing price war the executives gathered at the White House included the heads of Exxon Mobil chevron and several other smaller companies most delivered praise for president trump's effort to encourage Saudi Arabia and Russia to cut production and boost crude prices some have called for tariffs on oil from the two countries trump says he's not planning to do that now I think president Putin and the crown prince wants something to happen badly certainly terrible for them what's happening to environmental groups criticized the meeting saying trump should instead focus on helping unemployed oil workers and making clean energy investments to address climate

Zidan NPR Jeff Brady Donald Trump Saudi Arabia Russia White House President Putin Exxon Mobil Chevron President Trump
TC Energy going ahead with Keystone XL pipeline

NPR News Now

00:35 sec | 4 months ago

TC Energy going ahead with Keystone XL pipeline

"The controversial keystone pipeline is another step closer to being billed. Npr's Jeff Brady reports that Canadian company behind the project says it has made a final investment decision to build the long delayed project the keystone L was first proposed more than a decade ago. Once built it would move crude from Canada's oil sands or tar sands region to steal sitting Nebraska environmentalists and others have long opposed the pipeline because the oil it would transport requires more energy to produce. That means it emits more harmful greenhouse gases that contribute to climate

Keystone L Jeff Brady NPR Nebraska Canada
States Take The Wheel Promoting Electric Vehicles

Environment: NPR

03:45 min | 5 months ago

States Take The Wheel Promoting Electric Vehicles

"There are nearly one and a half million electric vehicles on. Us ROADS EV boosters concerned about climate change say many more are needed with little happening at the federal level. Npr's Jeff Brady reports that they're having success getting states to help at a parking lot. Just outside Trenton. New Jersey were standing next to Pam. Franks Orange Chevrolet volt and I picked orange not because I like the color orange but because I wanted the car to be noticed. Frank heads the coalition that got a new law passed a New Jersey. Recently more on that in a minute but first we're going for a dry people like to say gas pedal. Yeah see now accelerator. Frank says her. Little Orange Bolt reduces her carbon footprint. It's quiet and it's fast. I better slow down and we're going to get ticket. We stop at a public charging station. And Frank tells me about her groups big success New Jersey's new law includes up to three hundred million dollars in rebates over ten years to electric vehicle buyers and it's not just any rebates cash on the hood rebate and the law sets ambitious goals in twenty years. Eighty five percent of cars sold a New Jersey half to be electric. It calls for new charging stations around the state to overcome range anxiety. That's the fear of cars. Battery will run out with no place to charge among the supporters where electric utilities. They've been seeing weaker demand for electricity because of more efficient appliances and lighting more vs means more Trinity Sold Chris. Budzynski is what the Utility Company exelon exciting one because outside of California. It's probably the biggest piece of legislation that we've seen that supportive of clean transportation. This has the federal government seems to have taken a backseat in advancing. Evt's there are federal tax credits up to seventy five hundred dollars but only for the first two hundred thousand cars manufacturer sells GM and Tesla already hit that ceiling along with New Jersey other states or helping the EV market notably Maryland Minnesota and Oregon Budzynski. Says all this is good for utilities does represent one of the most significant or more significant opportunities for us probably over the course of the last hundred years with the exception of the introduction of air conditioning not everyone is happy. Oil Companies. Stand to lose gasoline sales. They've opposed some state. Efforts often echoing arguments from consumer advocates. Like Stephanie Brand she directs New Jersey's division of Rate Council and Defense Utility customers interests. Most of those customers can't afford an electric vehicle because the cheapest electric vehicle at this point is about thirty thousand dollars often state programs allow utilities to collect rate payer money to build things like charging stations brand says. That's not fair. Because poor rate payers are subsidizing wealthier. Ones who can afford an E. V. Electric car advocates point out that everyone benefits from cleaner air and there are studies showing a lot more on. The road could actually reduce rates but until you reach a critical mass of electric vehicles. You're not gonna see those effects brand. Her concerns were addressed in New Jersey's legislation. Money from a fund already dedicated to public benefits will be used for the EV rebates elsewhere debates like this will continue as more states seek to boost electric vehicles. In fact pam frank plans to take her orange bolt and her coalition to neighboring states in the Northeast. Very

New Jersey Pam Frank Trenton E. V. Electric United States Jeff Brady Federal Government NPR Budzynski Stephanie Brand EVT Tesla Northeast Rate Council Utility Company GM
Wind has surpassed hydro as most-used renewable electricity generation source in U.S.

Morning Edition

00:54 sec | 5 months ago

Wind has surpassed hydro as most-used renewable electricity generation source in U.S.

"For the first time in the U. S. electricity generated from wind has exceeded hydropower as NPR's Jeff Brady reports that makes wind power the top renewable source of electricity in the country when power has grown steadily over the past decade thanks to government tax credits while hydropower from dams has long been the largest source of renewable energy that changed last year according to the energy information administration hydro power can fluctuate from year to year depending on precipitation it's been down the last few years little hydro power has been added to the grid in recent years while the wind energy business has been booming more wind was added in twenty nineteen than in any other year except twenty twelve the EIA projects renewable power overall will continue to grow and that by next year more of the country's electricity will come from renewable sources than both nuclear and

NPR Jeff Brady EIA
Proposals To Ban Fracking Could Hurt Democrats In Key States

Environment: NPR

03:43 min | 6 months ago

Proposals To Ban Fracking Could Hurt Democrats In Key States

"Top Democratic presidential candidates Bernie Sanders and Elizabeth Warren both call for a ban on fracking. This is the controversial technology that has helped create a major oil and gas boom which president trump often brags about on the campaign trail as voters in New Hampshire head to the polls today. NPR's Jeff Brady took a look at the debate over this divisive issue. Here's a message Bernie. Sanders was delivering even back during the 2016 campaign. We've got so put an end to that position. Is One reason. Olivia free. Wild was recently at the University of New Hampshire holding a clipboard and stopping students. Clementines I do. She's a volunteer with the New Hampshire Youth Movement and the Sunrise Movement which has endorsed Sanders. A student scrambled a class. I ask free. Walled about concerns than an anti fracking candidate could alienate moderate voters in the general election. She says she gets that that question. A lot especially from people in my parents generation. I just hear them being scared and I hear them not. Knowing the full scale tale of the crisis we're facing scientists warned that carbon emissions must be reduced quickly to avoid the worst effects of climate change for free walled and fellow activists. The solution and is a complete transition from fossil fuels. The oil industry has taken notice. We hear the noise. The energy debate of the chatter the American Petroleum Institute. TV Ad shows a millennial age man at a diner watching protesters in the street. Then it argues the oil and gas. The industry is part of the climate change solution to natural gas. The US is leading the way in reducing mission. That's true in the power. Our sector where natural gas is replacing carbon intensive coal fracking has made guest cheap and plentiful Mardi Durban with the US Chamber of Commerce Global Energy Institute says banning fracking would interrupt that progress and cost jobs that I five years. So you're going to lose. Nineteen million jobs around the country trie. That's based on a chamber. Study that predicts job losses well beyond oil and gas fracking ban supporters though. Imagine a much different future with a big big increase in renewable energy jobs. Durban and others in the oil industry aren't trying to change activists minds instead. They're focused on moderate and swing Ling voters. Who could decide the next election in a closely divided country. The middle of the electorate understands our needs for energy itself for it to be affordable for ought to be reliable and to clean. But there's a problem getting that message to moderate and swing voters now. Pollsters say they aren't really thinking about a candidate's climate. I'm it changed your energy policies. Mita Patel in suburban Philadelphia is a good example right now. She's undecided sure. Who is the other candidate that I'm comparing trump against Patel voted for trump in two thousand sixteen and Barack Obama before that asked about how a candidate's abuse on fracking will affect her choice. Tell says she's thinking more about the cost of health insurance now. That's the first thing because that does affect a lot more people people like energy and everything. It's going yes but everyday life is affected by health but in Pennsylvania natural gas is big business and trump won the state by less than a percentage point in two thousand sixteen democratic leaders worn a nominee that vows to ban fracking could lead to another trump. Win In this November. Jeffrey N._P._R.

Donald Trump Bernie Sanders Mita Patel Us Chamber Of Commerce Global New Hampshire Jeff Brady University Of New Hampshire NPR President Trump United States Elizabeth Warren New Hampshire Youth Movement Durban
Lawsuit says Penn State football players threatened to 'Sandusky' teammates in hazings

All Things Considered

00:57 sec | 7 months ago

Lawsuit says Penn State football players threatened to 'Sandusky' teammates in hazings

"A former Penn state of football players says he was subjected to violent and sexual hazing and P. R.'s Jeff Brady reports the player is suing the university his former teammates and the coach for unspecified damages former Penn state football player Isiah Humphries filed a lawsuit in federal court Monday claiming he and other lower classmen were hazed by fellow players and the coaches knew but didn't stop it among the allegations the lawsuit claims older players threaten to quote Sandusky younger players referring to former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky he's serving up to sixty years in prison for sexually abusing children Humphrey says when he complained a player threatened to kill him and coaches forced him off the team Penn state says that investigated the claims and found they were unsubstantiated the university says the local prosecutor also declined to file charges Jeff Brady NPR news

P. R. Jeff Brady Isiah Humphries Jerry Sandusky Humphrey Penn State Prosecutor Penn Football
Trump Officials To Overhaul National Environmental Policy Act

Environment: NPR

03:42 min | 7 months ago

Trump Officials To Overhaul National Environmental Policy Act

"The trump administration is expected to announce sweeping changes to one of the country's most consequential environmental laws. Today under the proposal federal agencies wouldn't have to consider climate change when approving major new projects like oil pipelines highways. We've got NPR's Jeff Brady with us to explain. Jeff Good morning tell us more about Sir this change what it is expected to do. Yeah this lies called the national environmental policy. Act It's better known by its acronym Nipah and it's been around for fifty years. It requires your special agencies to consider the environmental effects of proposed projects before approving him. Now doesn't say that the agency has to choose the least polluting option. It just says that they have to think about the environmental consequences and that gives the public the opportunity to see what the government is doing and how it arrives at its decisions and Nipah. It also gives the public a chance to a comment on those decisions and it also gives environmental groups a chance to comment over the years through a series of court decisions and as some of these issues have become more complicated The need for process has gotten long up to six years. That's because some of these big projects like a gas pipeline or big highway. They have a a lot of environmental consequences to consider. Okay so that's what the law is and what it has done previously. What's the change about? Why is it happening now? Since these these industries have long complained about The time it takes to get through the process it's expensive They want these regulations streamlined. And that's what the trump administration is proposing to do here. Some of those groups led by the. US Chamber of Commerce have long been working with the administration to rewrite the regulations. We haven't seen all the details yet but they're gonNA come out later this morning. And there are some early indications of what they've come up with one big issue is whether an agency has to consider the cumulative environmental effects of a project and think about an oil pipeline under these changes the agency would count only the environmental effects of building that pipeline environmentalists agency. You should also have to count all the oil. That's flowing through that pipeline. They argue that not doing that. Makes it very difficult plan plan for climate change so anytime you lift regulations. I mean fair to say the industry is going to be pleased with this change. Oh Yeah from early indications you can definitely say they're very pleased with this They don't like the direction that the Nipah cases have been heading in courts They've There have been some recent decisions about Oil and gas drilling on public land and about pipeline construction where judges has said that agencies must consider climate change during the process That adds all that complication. And there's another big change that we're gonNA see here Companies would be allowed to conduct their own environmental reviews Christie gold fast. She's with the Center for American progress and she was an environmental the official during the Obama Administration. Here's what she had to say about that. This is clearly a conflict of interest to just say to the company. Go ahead and and tell us what the environmental impacts are going to be. Does anyone believe that's actually going to result in information that the public can trust or that we can use is in the future to make wise decisions right. self-regulation is always sort of problematic so once these changes are announced what happens then. What president trump? He's expected to make this announcement himself at the White House later this morning. And there's GonNa be a public comment period but there's a question about whether this will ever even take place because there's is going to court challenges and then we don't know if it's GONNA become finalized before the November election alright. NPR's Jeff Brady on this news today. Jeff thank thank you for explaining it to us. We really appreciate

Jeff Brady Nipah NPR Jeff Good Us Chamber Of Commerce Jeff White House Government Official Obama Administration Center For American Progress Christie President Trump
Energy Regulator's Order Could Boost Coal Over Renewables, Raising Costs for Consumers

NPR News Now

00:53 sec | 8 months ago

Energy Regulator's Order Could Boost Coal Over Renewables, Raising Costs for Consumers

"Federal regulators delivered a victory to coal and natural gas companies in the mid Atlantic Atlantic region. NPR's Jeff Brady reports. New Federal Order will help companies that operate fossil fuel power plants and hurt renewable energy and nuclear generators. There's that receive state. Subsidies amid climate change concerns some states subsidize carbon-free renewable and nuclear power fossil fuel companies. Say That's not fair in a competitive headed if market president trump campaigned on helping the coal industry now. His appointees to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission or Firkh are delivering on that promise specifically in the thirteen states and the district of Columbia that participate in a regional power grid. FURKA is setting a minimum price for all forms of electricity. This will raise utility the bills and keep coal and less efficient natural gas plants operating that otherwise might have closed environmental groups plan to challenge the order in court.

Federal Energy Regulatory Comm Atlantic Atlantic Jeff Brady NPR Donald Trump President Trump Columbia
New federal rule will hurt renewables, help gas and coal

NPR News Now

00:53 sec | 8 months ago

New federal rule will hurt renewables, help gas and coal

"Federal regulators delivered a victory to coal and natural gas companies in the mid Atlantic Atlantic region. NPR's Jeff Brady reports. New Federal Order will help companies that operate fossil fuel power plants and hurt renewable energy and nuclear generators. There's that receive state. Subsidies amid climate change concerns some states subsidize carbon-free renewable and nuclear power fossil fuel companies. Say That's not fair in a competitive headed if market president trump campaigned on helping the coal industry now. His appointees to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission or Firkh are delivering on that promise specifically in the thirteen states and the district of Columbia that participate in a regional power grid. FURKA is setting a minimum price for all forms of electricity. This will raise utility the bills and keep coal and less efficient natural gas plants operating that otherwise might have closed environmental groups plan to challenge the order in

Federal Energy Regulatory Comm Atlantic Atlantic Jeff Brady NPR Donald Trump President Trump Columbia
"jeff brady" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

90.3 KAZU

08:10 min | 10 months ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on 90.3 KAZU

"Support this NPR station from NPR news this is All Things Considered I'm ari Shapiro and America these Kelly throughout his time in office president trump has tried to help the coal industry is rolled back environmental regulations he's pushed for subsidies and yet coal fired power plants continue to close today's casual to a major coal company run up by one of trump's biggest supporters and here's Jeff Brady reports on the bankruptcy of Marie energy in the Murray energy lobby in Saint Clairsville Ohio there's a photo of founder Bob Murray with president trump giving two thumbs up and in Murray's big corner office there's a replica of airforce two signed on the wing by vice president Mike pence there's also a constant hissing sound at seventy nine years old Bob Murray suffers from a lung condition that requires him to be on oxygen he says it's not related to his business check for that and it's not as a vendor was working in the coal mines which I did for seventeen years underground every day Murray built his business over decades and now says it's the largest underground coal mining firm in the country he accomplish that by buying other coal companies now a combination of large debts and a declining call market has forced them into bankruptcy my goal is to keep the company that keep it together for my employees as part of Marie's agreement that lenders his nephew Robert Moore will become president and CEO Murray will remain as chairman despite president trump's campaign promise to help the coal business dozens of coal power plants are shut down since he was elected Murray doesn't blame trump for his company's bankruptcy he says the administration has been helpful in rolling back environmental regulations Murray specifically asked for most of them including replacing president Obama's clean power plan and withdrawing from the Paris climate agreement but Murray says the coal industry needs even more help the government should be stepping in keeping coal fired generation in existence it's done nothing Marie once the federal energy regulatory commission or for contest subsidize struggling coal plants he says Cole with its fuel stored on site is more reliable the natural gas that has to be piped in hand renewable energy that only generates when the sun is shining in the wind blows so far regulators in grid operators have not been persuaded wearable crisis resiliency reliability and apart people want to freeze in the dark that is a prediction Marianne hit of the Sierra Club regex frankly this is just a scare tactic for those who want to try to take our country backwards into a twentieth century energy economy it says now the world needs renewable energy that doesn't contribute to climate change she says US power grids are managed by knowledgeable engineers focused on keeping electricity flowing every time a coal plant is proposed for retirement their job is to make sure that as that coal plant retires that our lights will stay on and there will be any threat to the reliability of our electricity coal miners represented by the United mine workers of America that will likely will suffer because of this bankruptcy industry analysts Natalie Biggs with wood mackenzie says Murray was one of the last remaining companies contributing to the union's pension fund you know without Murray energy a lot of the retired coal miners are gonna you know find themselves potential in a difficult situation when it comes to the pensions the union is asking Congress for help meantime US coal consumption has fallen to its lowest level in forty years as more utilities and states commit to energy with lower or no greenhouse gas emissions Jeff Brady NPR news Saint Clairsville Ohio earlier this month to business partners of Rudy Giuliani were arrested on their way out of the country they're accused of violating federal campaign finance laws part of the scheme allegedly involved funneling more than three hundred thousand dollars from a shell company to a super PAC supporting president trump we've been talking with some experts in election law and many of them are surprised not the size of the donation or the attempt to cover up the source of the funds those things are actually pretty common their surprise the love part us and Igor Fuhrman didn't cover their tracks better because there are options for people who want to completely obscure big political donations and here to talk about that is Robert McGuire of citizens for responsibility and ethics in Washington welcome thanks for having me our colleague Jeff Brady talk to left partners before the arrest and here's how he explained the donations this is actually the first couple times that I really started doing some bigger donations because I wanted to get notoriety from my energy company and I thought it might be a great way to you know play with the big boys as you call it now its so called energy company appears to have just been a shell company created weeks before the big donations but if you imagine the parties came to you and said here's what I want to do and I want to hide the money what would you have advised well you know America first action for example the super PAC they gave to house a five oh one C. for social welfare arm the doesn't have to disclose its donors it's run by essentially the same people out of the same address it is nominally a social welfare organization that's supposed to do things that benefit the community but these function essentially as stealth political groups that have the benefit of not disclosing the donor so the easiest way for them to have avoided the situation the now find themselves in is just to have given to that arm of the group there's obviously difference in transparency between the super pac on the one hand in the C. four on the other hand is there also a difference in how these groups can spend that money there is sort of on paper their rules for these groups and how much political activity they can engage in but the rear he is that in practice these groups can act essentially as stealth political committees they can spend millions of dollars to buy tens of thousands of apps for months and months and months out before an election and not report that spending to the Federal Election Commission unless it's thirty days before primary sixty days before general but there's also they can give grants to other politically active five one C. fours and count that as social welfare activity and that creates this turn where you see sort of daisy chains of groups they give grants to each other to offset their political spending so there's sort of a a wealth of options for these groups to make sure that they are maximizing the amount of money they're spending on politics without disclosing any donors so if I'm trying to donate half a million dollars to a campaign in order to buy some influence and curry favor with the candidate but I don't want the public to now is there any way that the candidate can find out because because I want them to know that I'm a big supporter there is right that is actually the key of dark money so we're not talking about no one knowing who is behind the group we're saying the public doesn't know but the candidates know who's funding these groups given that there are these more secretive options available why do you think left harness and eager freemen allegedly gave in a way that was so easy for them to get caught well I think if you listen to the clip it kind of gives some indication of they weren't sophisticated political donors they realize the reality that is if you are a major donor you are buying access to powerful people and indeed there are photos of them with very powerful people ranging from the governor of Florida to the president himself precisely what they didn't know so much as how to cover their tracks and it's unfortunate that there are much more sophisticated political donors that know exactly how to do that and make sure that the public doesn't know who is funding these groups and who is being repaired once these people are in office but it seems that in this case we had two people who it just sort of dove in head first and ran into the reality that there are ways to do this where you don't get in situation where they are now Robert McGuire.

The World Is Facing a Climate Crisis and Global Leaders Aren't Doing Enough About It

Environment: NPR

03:28 min | 11 months ago

The World Is Facing a Climate Crisis and Global Leaders Aren't Doing Enough About It

"World is facing. A climate crisis and global leaders aren't doing enough about it. That's the message coming from. The millions of people expected to take part in climate climate strikes across the globe. Today the walkouts are being led by students and one student in particular sixteen year old Swedish activist gratitude Berg the climate and ecological article crisis is a global crisis the biggest crisis humanity S. ever face and if we don't manage to work together to cooperate and to to work together despite our differences that we will fail will be out. One of the biggest walkouts expected to happen open in New York City today. NPR's Jeff Brady is following this from New York according Jeff Good Morning Okay. Let's start with gratitude. Berg because this is a sixteen year old girl who managed she convince some massive school districts including New York City to let kids walk out for a day. How did she get this this movement off the ground in she. We started about a year ago with her school strike for the climate and she did this all by herself outside the Swedish parliament. She got some attention on social media and her climate China's trade is spread across the globe and I think it's because she has this clear and very direct way of talking about climate change which can be confusing and she doesn't have any problem standing in front of powerful people and telling them that they need to do more to the to to fix the changing climate. What what's the scale. We're expecting for these marches. Today's just major cities like New York or we expect rural areas as well. Yeah is looking like it's going to be a pretty big. Protests is there are protests expected in more than one hundred countries organizers think is going to be the largest climate strike yet and here in New York of course the school district is giving students excused absences absences the that's going to boost the numbers I've also talked with people in very small towns who were just a few dozen people are expected and their events like this happening running everywhere all over the globe so you said they gratitude. Berg is is so compelling in part because she is so clear. What are these? What are these kids demanding? They have a pretty specific list of demands and those were summed up. I would say pretty succinctly at a Capitol Hill press conference this week by Seventeen Year Old Baltimore activist US Nadia Nassir respective indigenous land sustainable agriculture protecting biodiversity environmental justice and adjust transition shen away from fossil fuels and towards renewable energy and sometimes activists here in the US shorthand this by calling for Congress to pass a green new deal. That's the proposal proposal that was crafted by Progressive Democratic lawmakers and it calls for an extraordinary overhaul of the of the economy and eliminating greenhouse gas emissions so far for those that legislation hasn't gone anywhere in Congress so as these young people have gone to Capitol Hill as we as we heard that young woman there. What's the response. We're getting our lawmakers listening. Do you think they got a lot of praise. From Democrats. climate change is a big issue for Democrats more than Republicans but it did spar with some Republican lawmakers who support President Trump's plan to withdraw from the Paris climate agreement seventeen year old Seattle Activists Jamie Margolin asked one congressman how he'll respond to his grandchildren and asked if he did get enough to address climate change. She called his position that the climate agreement will hurt. US competitiveness shameful and cowardly NPR's Jeff Brady. Thanks so much

New York Berg New York City Jeff Brady United States NPR Jamie Margolin Congress President Trump Jeff Good China Congressman Seattle Nadia Nassir Democrats.
"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

"I've been drinking Budweiser for forty some years you don't really want coffee in your beer and mandir stays like did you want to try it absolutely not well you can't please everyone Jeff Brady NPR news Philadelphia and you're listening to All Things Considered from NPR news just ahead on All Things Considered refugee agencies say scores of migrants have drowned off the coast of Libya again highlighting the failure by regional leaders to address the dangerous migrant sea route right now let's check traffic with Julie definition is still clear in the motorcycle Raqi in San Jose south than eighty five after union Avenue loans the S. U. V. either the center divide now big back up though to Winchester Boulevard up to the end north Bates a motorcycle collision on north won a one after Petaluma Boulevard south and that's how the right lane now you're in slow traffic as usual from alpha gin Santa Rosa north one one before Hearn couple vehicles around of lanes Albert solid from golf course drive to the deputy forty Q. ET thank you Julie that report was brought to us by unbound dot org support for KQED comes from Pacific catch featuring a summer menu with platters of ceviche okay and shellfish on ice from their fish bar new west coast style sushi tacos and fresh pineapple cocktails Pacific catch of west coast fish house and the Lawrence hall of science featuring dinosaurs in motion visitors can engage with Connecticut life sized metal dinosaur sculptures to learn about science art.

Philadelphia Libya San Jose Petaluma Boulevard Julie KQED Jeff Brady NPR Bates Hearn Lawrence hall of science Connecticut
"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

"Much such as Seattle and Tacoma for the second year in a row, the number of people working in the US solar energy business has declined NPR's. Jeff Brady reports and annual survey from the solar foundation shows eight thousand solar jobs were lost in two thousand eighteen there are two main reasons for job losses. The Trump administration placed tariffs on solar panels last year, and there has been uncertainty over state policies and big solar states such as California and Massachusetts Ed Gila land with a solar foundation says there was job growth in twenty nine states. Mostly those where solar energy is still emerging, for example, Farda glue by almost eighteen hundred jobs. It is now. Second behind California and the number of total jobs in the solar industry. Overall, Gilliland says the number of solar jobs is expected to grow this year with uncertainty over tariffs and state policies mostly resolved, Jeff Brady NPR news, US Trade Representative Robert lighthizer is in Beijing where he'll join trade talks later this week Chinese and US negotiators are working on trade disputes ahead of a March first deadline that is when President Trump has threatened to increase US tariffs on Chinese goods. He's insisting that Beijing drop, it's unfair trade practices. I'm korva Coleman. NPR news in Washington. Support for NPR comes from NPR stations. Other contributors include curiosity stream a documentary streaming service from.

NPR US Jeff Brady Trump Beijing California Seattle Tacoma Robert lighthizer korva Coleman Gilliland Washington Massachusetts Representative President
"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:50 min | 1 year ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

"That. Craig Keller is an exception. People weren't happy about what was going on. And the way the protesters were treating other people demonstrators even clashed with police at the state capital and a local shopping center in many here saw that as rude, but fewer than six percent of those arrested. We were from North Dakota says Morton county Commissioner Cody Scholz, a lot of troubles and problems that happened were created by people that are no longer here. So there is no reason for anger at our neighbors and friends, and I think that's part of the healing process as well. Schultz says the protests cost his county nearly forty million dollars for police fire repairing damaged infrastructure cleaning up protest camps and prosecutions that dwarfed the county's half million dollar emergency fund. So the state legislature picked up most of the tab. It can afford to do that. Because North Dakota's oil business is booming. The Dakota Access pipeline is moving more than a half million barrels of oil a day and Ron Ness with the North Dakota Petroleum Council says despite the protests two years ago, the oil industry is expanding. We're building pipelines here every day, and they may not all be the size and magnitude of the Dakota Access pipeline. But there are various. Construction projects pipeline projects happening in North Dakota on a daily basis. North Dakota's oil production is growing so fast. The state likely will run out of pipeline capacity next year, which is one reason energy transfer recently announced it plans to expand its Dakota Access pipeline. So that it can transport even more oil Jeff Brady NPR news, Bismarck, North Dakota. This is NPR news,.

North Dakota North Dakota Petroleum Council Craig Keller NPR Jeff Brady Cody Scholz Bismarck Ron Ness Schultz Commissioner forty million dollars million barrels million dollar six percent two years
"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

01:41 min | 1 year ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KCRW

"And a local shopping center in many here saw that as rude, but fewer than six percent of those arrested. We were from North Dakota says Morton county Commissioner Cody Scholz, a lot of troubles and problems that happened were created by people that are no longer here. So there is no reason for anger, you know, at our neighbors and friends, and I think that's part of the healing process as well. Schultz says the protests cost his county nearly forty million dollars for police fire repairing damaged infrastructure cleaning up protest camps and prosecutions that dwarfed the county's half million dollar emergency fund. So the state legislature picked up most of the tab. It can afford to do that. Because North Dakota's oil business is booming. The Dakota Access pipeline is moving more than a half million barrels of oil the day and Ron Ness with the North Dakota Petroleum Council says despite the protests two years ago, the oil industry is expanding. We're building pipelines here every day, and they may not all be the size and magnitude of the Dakota Access pipeline. But there are various. Construction projects pipeline projects happening in North Dakota on a daily basis. North Dakota's oil production is growing so fast. The state likely will run out of pipeline capacity next year, which is one reason energy transferred recently announced it plans to expand his Dakota Access pipeline. So that it can transport even more oil Jeff Brady NPR news, Bismarck, North Dakota. This is NPR news, and this is morning edition on KCRW ahead.

North Dakota North Dakota Petroleum Council Cody Scholz NPR Jeff Brady Commissioner Bismarck Ron Ness Schultz KCRW forty million dollars million barrels million dollar six percent two years
"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Cost about the same NPR's. Jeff Brady, stocks are trading mixed on Wall Street at this hour, the Dow is down seventeen points. The NASDAQ up twenty this is NPR from Kikuchi news, Ted Goldberg policy experts have been warning for years that California will face a shortfall up to two million educated workers in the near future. A report out this week suggests adults who've dropped out of college could be vital to filling that gap Vanessa run KANU has more four million Californians have taken some college classes, but dropped out. Before getting degree. That's according to the report from California, competes, policy and advocacy group. Four times as many women as men with some college are single parents and only half of black and Latino Californians who start college finish lawn day Josie runs the organization you look at the future of the state of California. And you think about higher education this being the escalator out of poverty? We can't get there. If we actually have whole populations that are affected by some of these broader trend Josie hopes having a clearer picture of who hasn't finished college can lead to more informed policies. I'm Vanessa in Kenya. Te-kuiti news, a six million dollar grant. From the US department of labor will help create two hundred and sixty temporary jobs in areas ravaged by wildfire in Shasta county. Kiki's Tiffany camhi has more the money is intended to create jobs that will clean up and repair wildfire damages from the car fire and other large fires in the county. The national dislocated worker. Grant was awarded to the California employment development department. This week department director Patrick Kennedy says the temporary jobs will go to unemployed workers in the affected areas. Like, the city of reading the car fire, burn more than two hundred thousand acres in and around reading and destroyed more than a thousand homes there. I'm Tiffany Cam. Hi, Katie news. There's more kick. You D news dot org. I'm Ted Goldberg. Support comes from bay area cancer connections, celebrating twenty five years of offering breast and ovarian cancer support bay area. Cancer dot org. Yesterday. President Trump addressed the disappearance of Saudi Arabian journalist, saying he had also spoken to the Saudi government about the situation. We'll have more about that story. Just ahead..

California Ted Goldberg NPR Josie Vanessa Jeff Brady Shasta county US department of labor Saudi government Tiffany Cam President Trump Kikuchi Kenya Patrick Kennedy Tiffany camhi director Katie Kiki
"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Is winning. Author VS Naipaul also is is targeting Latino activists. Advocates allege a recent detention of a prominent local man who is undocumented is part of a pattern and David joys new book. The line that held us tells the story of an accidental murder in Appalachia. It's Sunday August twelve twenty eighteen the news is next. Live from NPR news in Washington non-royal Snyder one year after a protest. By white supremacists and others, in Charlottesville Virginia turned, deadly organizers are holding an, anniversary rally near the White House today NPR's Jeff. Brady reports, that police and city officials say they are confident they. Can maintain order even as counter protests are planned. Nearby police in Charlottesville last year were criticized for not being prepared this year the district of Columbia police National Park Service police and the secret service say extensive plans. Are in place to secure the event DC. Police chief Peter Newsham says his entire department will. Be. Engaged and one goal, is to keep opposing. Groups separate the unite the right to rally was originally planned for Charlottesville again that when a permit was denied the organizer move. The event to Lafayette square near the White House that rally is scheduled to. Start this afternoon counter protests are expected throughout the day Jeff Brady NPR news Washington Charlottesville several hundred people rallied at the university of Virginia last night many of them students faculty members protesting the heavy police presence. This weekend sandy houseman is with member station. W. v. t. app she's in Charlottesville The gathering began at the, university's, iconic, building the, rotunda where, protesters unfurled a banner reading last year they came with torches, this year they come, with badges security fences at the site. And the. Large number of police on handmade organizers uneasy and they. Quickly changed plans And so began a. Two hour March across.

Charlottesville Jeff Brady Columbia police National Park White House sandy houseman NPR Washington Naipaul DC David Peter Newsham murder Lafayette square Appalachia Virginia university of Virginia Two hour one year
"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Have a lot of respect for mostly because of its coverage of local politics in sports that's npr's jeff brady in annapolis jeff thank you thank you jerry jackson is a sports editor at the baltimore sun he used to work at the capital gazette and that is where he hired a reporter named john mcnamara jerry jackson joins me now hey there how are you i'm all right thank you i want to start by asking how did you hear about the events unfolding about what was happening yesterday well i actually was getting ready to go to work in my cell phone several miss calls and it was from our offices in baltimore telling us that there was an active shooter in annapolis end they knew that you know i had a long tenure there and knew a lot of people so i started mmediately like any journalists started calling people to see if i could find some things in the second phone call i made i found out that one of my dearest friends had died and you know was was pretty rough yeah and this is john mcnamara yes yes he and i worked together for more than twenty years are deaths abutted one another john was the rock of his family and he and i had a great deal in common more both from big catholic family some he was the oldest of seven to nine so we just yeah we quit immediately why did you hire him in the first place what did you see him well he was on our news desk i and he loves sports and we are always talking sports and he really wanted to write sports that was his passion he was loved the university of maryland and just was an absolute basketball freak and he took a job at a smaller publication because it was in sports and when we had an opening he was the first person i thought out not only because of his journalism abilities but because i knew what a good person he was and you know when you're going to hire somebody on staff the size of ours which was back then about five to six people you need people that can get along with people and he was just a tremendous person everybody got along with some great and basketball was a particular passionate isn't he still played in a couple of times a week really yes we used to have the correct or something yeah yeah he played pick up ball we used to play a bunch of us the paper played every thursday at lunch before a few of us got a little too old john continued to play in some form or fashion because he just loved basketball they're asking you last talked to him just last week you know we work side by side for twenty some years and now i'm in a departments forty minutes away and we usually got together once a year to go to a horrible game and we were trying to decide on which day was best and alan fortunately we hadn't gotten together on a date yet this year may i ask giving you worked at the capitol because for twenty years yourself what went through your head when you saw the front page today i was just stunned i knew that the sun would put out a publication but i was just blown away that the capital would still produce a paper you know just blows you away that kind of dedication and commitment to putting that local news jerry jackson thank you no problem and i'm sorry for your loss thank you that is jerry jackson now of the baltimore sun formerly the capital gazette was speaking about his friend and colleague john mcnamara who died yesterday.

twenty years forty minutes
"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:56 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Have a lot of respect for mostly because of its coverage of local politics sports that's npr's jeff brady in annapolis jeff thank you thank you jerry jackson is a sports editor at the baltimore sun he used to work at the capital gazette and that is where he hired a reporter named john mcnamara jerry jackson joins me now hey there how are you i'm all right thank you i want to start by asking how did you hear about the events unfolding about what was happening yesterday well i actually was getting ready to go to work in my cell phone several miss calls and it was from our offices at baltimore telling us that there was an active shooter in annapolis and they knew that you know i had a long tenure there and knew a lot of people so i started mmediately like any journalists started calling people to see if i could find some things in the second phone call i made i found out that one of my dearest friends had died and you know was was pretty rough yeah and this is john mcnamara yes yes he and i work together for more than twenty years our deaths abutted one another john was the rock of his family and he and i had a great deal in common both from big catholic family some he was the oldest of seven to nine so we just you yeah we clicked immediately why did you hire him in the first place what did you see an well he was on our news desk i and he loves sports and we are always talking sports and he really wanted to write sports that was his passion he was loved the university of maryland and just was an absolute basketball freak and he took a job at a smaller publications because it was in sports and when we had an opening he was the first person i thought out not only because of his journalism abilities but because i knew what a good person he was and you know when you're going to hire somebody on staff the size of ours which was back then about five to six people you need people that can get along with people and he was just a tremendous person everybody got along with great and basketball was a particular passionate is east still played in a couple of times a week so really yes we used to have the correct anderson yeah yeah meet play pick up ball we used to play a bunch of us at the paper played every thursday at once before few of us got a little too old john continued to play in some form or fashion because he just loved basketball they're asking you last talk to him just last week you know we work side by side for twenty some years and now i'm in a departments forty minutes away and we usually got together once a year to go to morial game and we were trying to decide on which day was best and now well unfortunately we hadn't gotten together on a date yet this year may i ask giving you worked at the capitol for twenty years yourself what went through your head when you saw the front page today i was just stunned i knew that the sun would put out a publication but i was just blown away that the capital would still produce a paper just blows you away that kind of dedication and commitment to putting out local news jerry jackson thank you no problem and i'm sorry for your loss thank you that is jerry jackson now of the baltimore sun formerly of the capital gazette he was speaking there about his friend and colleague john mcnamara who died yesterday.

twenty years forty minutes
"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Is a newspaper they have a lot of respect for mostly because of its coverage of local politics and sports that's npr's jeff brady in annapolis jeff thank you thank you jerry jackson is a sports editor at the baltimore sun he used to work at the capital gazette and that is where he hired a reporter named john mcnamara jerry jackson joins me now hey there how are you i'm all right thank you i want to start by asking how did you hear about the events unfolding about what was happening yesterday well i actually was getting ready to go to work in my cell phone had several miss calls and it was from our offices in baltimore telling us that there was an active shooter in annapolis then they knew that you know i had a long tenure there and new people so i started mmediately like any journalists started calling people to see if i find some things and the second phone call i made i found out that one of my dearest friends died and you know was was pretty rough yeah and this is john mcnamara yes yes he and i work together for more than twenty years are abutted one another john was the rock of his family and he and i had a great deal in common we're both from the catholic family some he was the oldest of seven to nine so we just yeah we quickly mmediately why did you hire him in the first place what did you see him well he was on our news desk i and he loves sports and we are always talking sports and he really wanted to write sports that was his passion he was a loved the university of maryland and just was an absolute basketball freak and he took a job at a smaller publications because it was in sports and when we had an opening he was the first person i thought not only because of his journalism abilities but because i knew what a good person was and you know when you're going to hire somebody on staff the size of ours which was back then about five to six people you need people that can get along with people and he was just a tremendous person everybody got along with some great and basketball was a particular passionate isn't he still played in a couple of times a week really yes we used to have the correct or something yeah yeah meet play pick up ball we used to play a bunch of us at the paper played every thursday at once before few of us got a little too old john continued to play in some form or fashion because he just loved basketball may i ask when you last talked to him just last week you know we work side by side for twenty some years and now i'm in a departments forty minutes away and we usually got together once a year to go to horrible game and we were trying to decide on which day was best in now unfortunately we hadn't gotten together on a date yet this year may i ask giving you worked at the capitol for twenty years yourself what went through your head when you saw the front page today i was just stunned i knew that the sun would put out a publication but i was just blown away that capital would still produce a paper just blows you away that kind of dedication and commitment to putting out local news jerry jackson thank you no problem and i'm sorry for your loss thank you that is jerry jackson now of the baltimore sun formerly of the capital gazette he was speaking there about his friend and colleague john mcnamara who died yesterday.

twenty years forty minutes
"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Beater for salles the special agent in charge the nami field office of the bureau of alcohol tobacco firearms and explosives he says the assaultstyle weapons used in the shooting was purchased legally the firearm w lies in his event was burgess lawfully here in the state of florida just short of a year ago by the individual with harden was wrong law enforcement officials say cruise after firing a new five classrooms then allegedly dropped his weapon and tried to leave the scene of the shooting by blending in with other students he was apprehended about forty minutes later while the accused gunman is being held without bond npr's jeff brady says the suspect stood silently with his head down as he appeared for brief hearing today nicolas crews appeared wearing an orange jailed uniform his hands and apparently his feet were bound as he walked up to a microphone to talk to the judge she asked if he's nicolas jacob cruz and he said yes ma'am the judge readiness writes the state's attorney late at a brief time line of the school shooting cruises attorney offered no counter argument against why he should not be held than the judge said he would be held without bond npr's jeff brady the senators rebel vance a slew of immigration measures including president donald trump's proposed bill creating a to twelve year pathway for citizenship for young immigrants known as dreamers the failure of two republican into bipartisan measures to advance means there appears to be no legislation under consideration as the sixty votes needed that makes it unlikely lawmakers will advance any legislation in before a deadline next month when the deferred action for childhood arrivals program or daca is set to expire over to courts have ruled the administration's plans to shudder data are in.

florida harden npr jeff brady nicolas crews nicolas jacob cruz attorney president special agent in charge donald trump forty minutes twelve year
"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:33 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And a string of negative news about trump and his administration rupert remains a supporter of the president so i don't regret voting for trump i regret maybe believing now as much in putting as much faith into a politician and we all know that politicians will say whenever you want to here to get into office trump still has more than three years in office so rupert is waiting before delivering a final judgment honor candidates performance jeff brady npr news nearly a third of african americans reporter experiencing discrimination when they've been to the doctor according to a poll from npr the robert wood johnson foundation and the harvard t h chan school of public health preps nowhere is that discrimination felt more profoundly than and sickle cell disease a disorder that primarily hits african americans cara so problematic that patients are dying younger now than they did twenty years ago here's jenny gold with the first two stories for our series you me and them experiencing discrimination in america for more than a year medina brock's avoided one room and her large jp rightly coloured san francisco house the bathroom on the second floor it was really hard to bathe in here i found myself not way the touch the walls the bathroom is where brock son karim jones died in 2013 he was thirty six years old and had sickle cell disease that means his red blood lead cells spent into a.

trump rupert president african americans robert wood johnson foundation jenny gold america medina brock jp karim jones jeff brady reporter npr harvard t h chan school of pub san francisco thirty six years twenty years three years
"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on KQED Radio

"My take her tweet is at the take away we'll be right back after these headlines live from npr news in washington i'm windsor johnston attorney general jeff sessions is testifying in front of the senate judiciary committee today on capitol hill democratic lawmakers are questioning him on a wide range of topics including the fbi investigation into russian metal ling in the us presidential election i have never had a meeting with any russian officials to discuss any kind of coordinating campaign in his opening statement sessions also discussed his agencies focus on fighting terrorism prosecuting hate crimes and attacking the the opioid crisis in the u s a man hunt is underway up and down the northeast corridor of interstate ninety five police are searching for a man after shootings in maryland and delaware that left at least three people dead and two wounded and pr is jeffrey reports the first shooting was just before nine a m at of business northeast baltimore where the suspect radi prince worked wilmington delaware police released a photo of the thirty seven year old man and a description of an suv he was driving a black gmc acadia authorities say prince has an address in family in the wilmington area and should be considered armed and dangerous police from maryland delaware in pennsylvania along with the f fbi are involved in the manhunt npr's jeff brady a hotel security guard wounded by a gunman who opened fire on a crowd of concert goers in las vegas is getting his first media interview npr's laura walmsley reports he's appearing on the ellen degeneres show he's compost says that it was an alert about an an open door at that sent him to the 30second floor of the mandalay bay that night a door that he found blocked with metal bracket suddenly compost says he heard rapid fire at first i took cover i felt a burning sensation i went to go lifting without leg up on us all the blood that's all i called it an on my radio the shots have and fired a hotel engineer had arrived to look at the door and compost says he yelled at the engineer and a hotel gas to take cover as more shots rang out authorities now believe that steven paddock shot compost around the same time that he began firing on the crowd at.

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"jeff brady" Discussed on Up First

Up First

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on Up First

"We're already pushing forward recovery housing teams were already pushing forward forces to be on the ground to implement the national flood insurance program policies as well and doing the inspections that we need so we're setting up in gearing up for the next couple of years all right with us now online from texas is anne pierce national correspondent debbie elliott also national correspondent jeff brady uh good morning to wealthy good morning jeff i'm going to start with you you are in downtown houston i understand what this about the southeast of downtown southeast of downtown what's going on what's a city like this one i mean it's early so i don't know what you've been able to to see well i saw what most important which is that we still have heavy rain here you know when this storm originally came through they were saying we could expect forty inches of rain in some places that is extraordinary and now they're saying fifty inches of rain and just think about that for a minute fifty inches of rain that is four feet two inches that's a huge amount of water air and only part of it has fallen now the ground is completely soaked and so anymore is just going to increase the flooding and make it even worse than it's going to continue through tuesday what are people doing i mean there are those presumably who left before got out of their homes or have now perhaps hopefully been rescued from their homes that are submerged under water wherever they felt better.

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"jeff brady" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Live from npr news in washington i'm jim hawk in houston rescue crews are still searching flooded areas of the city to evacuate stranded residents in pierre's jeff brady reports at least two people have died in the wake of hurricane harvey houston's nine one one system received over fifty six thousand calls in the fifteen hours after heavy rain started falling saturday night some residents were awakened by water in their home around the city there were dramatic scenes of people carrying what belongings they could salvage through water that was chest deep in some places texas governor greg abbott says three thousand state and national guard troops were deployed driving around the region is treacherous some freeways have been turned into rivers all flights were cancelled at both airports in the city the national weather service says more heavy rain is forecast to fall through tuesday jeff radi npr news houston new orleans is bracing for the heavy rains generated by harvey with a pumping system that's not one hundred percent operational i lean fleming of member station wwl reports officials are confident the pumps will handle the deluge new orleans mayor mich landrieu says crews have been working 24 hours a day to repair it pumps that failed during heavy rain earlier this month some neighborhoods sustained several feet of standing water he says the system is now ninety two percent operable we have more than enough to hand of what we think is coming our way of based on the forecast right now new orleans is expecting the heaviest rain to hit tuesday the twelfth anniversary of hurricane katrina and wednesday parts of southwestern louisiana or under voluntary evacuation orders and flash flood watches.

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"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The roads around here are flooded the delivery trucks couldn't get to the shelter to bring the food to them a lot of people are telling us they did not feel prepared for this but there were warnings of a of some kind of significant weather event that would probably affect he's an obviously there's going to be a lot more talking about this in the coming days but what my wrong did something go wrong you know there was a lot of debate m a before if a houston should be evacuating people in their looked like there was some disagreement chain governor abbot dent have some local officials about that and the people here were saying well you know this is houston we know how to deal with rain this is going to be a rainstorm no need to evacuate but today governor abac has said all that aside and at a press conference and here's what he had to say we move beyond uh whether or not there should have been an evacuation or not uh we are at the stage where we just need to respond to the emergencies and assessories the people of houston have but again is not just people run houston uh is in this large trying and that triangle region that he's talking about there's a huge area stretching from about houston two austin to corpus christi and to give you a better sense of how big that is if you drove around the perimeter would take you about nine hours to do that at just briefly jeff before we let you go is there any indication of when the weather will start to let up the heavy rain through tuesday and then it looks like it's going to start to let up after that but still showers in the forecast that's in pierce jeff brady in houston jeff thank you thank you now we're going to continue our coverage of the storm that's inundating parts of houston as we just heard by going to.

houston abbot dent abac austin jeff brady nine hours
"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:43 min | 3 years ago

"jeff brady" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"And paris jeff brady tells us at surprising to oil industry analysts typically gas prices rise this time of year but tom closer with the oil price information service has lower oil prices changed that recall about uh opec new reading of the market the oil cartel cut per production to boost prices but that didn't work because closer says other countries including the us increased production and fill the gap close us as prices could still go up quickly watch drop it's this summer we are long overdue for an event that impact you wish control imply sheesh such as a tropical storm in the gulf of mexico but in the future close sees the current dynamics continuing he expects oil and gas prices to remain close to where they are now jeff brady npr news global stocks rose monday afternoon proving outlook for japan's manufacturing wall street will have a shortened trading day today ahead of the fourth of july holiday the dow futures are up this is npr and this is wnyc in new york four minutes after 8 o'clock good morning i'm david i mostly sunny today a high of eighty eight degrees at seventy seven now in new york city and looking at the morning commute on i eighty in new jersey an overturned tractor trailer is blocking the westbound the ramp at exit sixty eight so watch out for some early morning traffic in that area a and c trains are running with delays new jersey lawmakers are heading back to threaten this morning to address the ongoing government shutdown the shutdown as a result of a dispute between governor chris christie and democratic leaders in the state assembly over whether to take revenues from a nonprofit health insurance company for state programs a top democrat leader in.

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