18 Burst results for "jason lusk"

"jason lusk" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:02 min | 3 months ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on KOMO

"Mother, Danita Sinclair filed a wrongful death claim against the city of Seattle late last month, saying city leaders created a dangerous environment and allowing chopped 1/2. That's almost Cole Miller, Portland police declared a riot in that city again. Overnight. Protestors setting fires Outside one of their precincts in Detroit, destroyed security cameras. At one point, officers thought there was some sort of explosive device left outside, it turned out. That was not the case. Washington's covert 19 count now eclipsing. 60,000 after 705 new positives were reported yesterday and his goggles Brian Calvert reports. These numbers are taxing everything from medical care to your trip down the grocery aisle, the costs of the pandemic Well, it's certainly costing jobs. It's taking a toll socially and mentally. And as you probably noticed, your grocery bill has been slowly rise, they were ableto produce as much meat as we're accustomed, Tio we're down about 40%. Agricultural economist Jason Lusk says that's translating to an 11% increase in some places up to 25% in other places for meat and poultry prizes, and it's all happened since February, not just higher prices for me, but in many cases, you're not finding the selection you're used to. And it's not just meat egg prices are up 10%. Breakfast cereal, 4%. Even wine, beer and spirit. Prices have gone up a little. You can blame the higher prices of the supermarket on a couple of things. Slower production that's causing delays in the supply chain and increase demand of the store is more and more of us feel safer by eating our meals at home. Brian Calvert camo News Your transit drivers rallied outside the King County courthouse yesterday afternoon, saying they need better safety measures during the pandemic. Driver Eric Perlman has taken a lead without pay because, he says, too many passengers won't wear face covering. I can't knowingly drive these people putting him in danger. The transit Union says Metro's not doing enough to keep bus drivers Is and passengers healthy. King County says it relies on voluntary compliance by customers rather than denial of service. We hope you can be a hero today with our wishes in flight drive to benefit to make a wish foundation donate.

Brian Calvert Eric Perlman Jason Lusk Cole Miller wrongful death claim King County Danita Sinclair transit Union King County courthouse Portland Seattle Washington Metro Detroit
"jason lusk" Discussed on KOMO

KOMO

02:19 min | 3 months ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on KOMO

"I believe that the city let me down. Let my son down there lived a community down. Anderson's mother, Danita Sinclair, filed a wrongful death claim against the city of Seattle late last month, saying city leaders created a dangerous environment and allowing chop toe happen. Again. That's comas. Cole Miller reporting. Washington's Cove in 19 count has now eclipse 60,000 cases after 705 new cases were confirmed yesterday. Almost Brian Calvert reports. These numbers are taxing everything from medical care to your trip down the grocery aisle, the costs of the pandemic Well, it's certainly costing jobs. It's taking a toll socially and mentally. And as you probably noticed, your grocery bill has been slowly rise, they were ableto produces much meat. As we're accustomed, Tio, we're down about 40%. Agricultural economist Jason Lusk says That's translating to an 11% increase in some places up to 25% in other places for meat and poultry prizes, and it's all happened since February. Not just higher prices for me, but in many cases, you're not finding the selection you're used to. And it's not just meat egg prices are up 10%. Breakfast cereal, 4%. Even wine, beer and spirit. Prices have gone up a little. You can blame the higher prices at the supermarket on a couple of things slower production. That's causing delays in the supply chain and increase demand that the store is more and more of us feel safer. By eating our meals at home. Brian Calvert camo news. Metro Transit drivers rallied outside the King County courthouse yesterday, saying they need better safety measures during the pandemic. Driver Eric Perlman has taken a leave without pay because he says, too many passengers. We're not wearing face coverings. I can't knowingly drive these people putting them in danger. Transit Union says Metro isn't doing enough to keep bus drivers and passengers healthy. King County says it relies on voluntary compliance by customers rather than denial of service. Well, it took almost two months, but crews have just finished clearing out a large rock slide that shut down part of Highway 20 for nearly two months. The rocks and trees came down June 10th in Iraq Port crew spent the past month reinforcing the hillside above the highway to help prevent another slide. There was a large fire and Maple Valley yesterday it started as a brush fire and quickly moved to an abandoned house on southeast 241st Street. Also burned were multiple vehicles and an abandoned house trailer. No reports of injuries..

Brian Calvert Jason Lusk Eric Perlman wrongful death claim King County courthouse Cole Miller King County Seattle Transit Union Tio Metro Iraq Port Maple Valley Danita Sinclair Anderson Washington
"jason lusk" Discussed on Cattle Current Market Update with Wes Ishmael

Cattle Current Market Update with Wes Ishmael

02:15 min | 6 months ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on Cattle Current Market Update with Wes Ishmael

"Lower Thursday apparently mostly hamstrung by rising political tensions between the US and China. The. Dow Jones Industrial Average closed one hundred and forty seven points lower, the S. and p. five hundred closed six points lower, and the Nasdaq was down forty three points. Recent slaughter data suggests the worst of covid. Nineteen packing disruptions may be over. In his latest comments, Jason Lusk agricultural economist at Purdue University, explains beef and pork, plants, or mainly back online, but are running at reduced capacity to social distancing of workers and other precautions. He has the worst of the disruptions occurred in late April and early May when slaughter running about forty percent below last year, but significant improvements have been made since then. For perspective the week ending may second might be the it in packing capacity when USDA estimated cattle slaughter at four hundred twenty five thousand head, which was thirty six point, eight percent, less or two hundred and forty eight thousand head fewer year over year by the week he may twenty third estimated slaughter, five, hundred, fifty, five thousand head, was fourteen point, two percent, less or ninety, two thousand head fewer than a year earlier. They're still an immense and growing backlog of Marta ready fed cattle, big gains, packing capacity suggested it may prove to be less than originally anticipated. In meantime longer fed cattle are racking up the per hit tonnage, the average driss dear wait for the week ending may sixteenth was nine hundred one pounds, which was five pounds heavier than the previous week and fifty two pounds heavier than the same week, a year earlier that according to USDA's slaughter of federal. Inspection report. The average dress, keffer way of eight hundred and thirty one pounds was two pounds heavier than the previous week and forty three pounds heavier than last year. That's your calendar market update for Thursday night and Friday morning, the twenty nine, th the May remember you can find more at www dot kelkar dot com this visual. Thanks.

USDA Jason Lusk US Purdue University Marta China
"jason lusk" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

02:06 min | 6 months ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on KCRW

"Production it was a finely tuned just in time supply chain pork is uniquely vulnerable to a bottleneck because pigs can easily be held for more than six months after birth any longer and the hogs grow too large more than three hundred pounds and processors won't buy them the system is built for certain size pigs to go to the processor and to be in the Barnes that's heather hill another multi generational hog farmer she lives in greenfield Indiana even by tweaking their diets and trying to slow down how fast they're growing the pigs are still going to continue to get bigger she and her husband sell thirty thousand pigs to market per year and typically send five hundred to six hundred pigs to slaughter each week but for now they're holding war pigs on the farm than they typically do so each load of pigs we can't sell it definitely creates a domino effect where we have a backlog of pigs if you will the pigs are being held back because meat packing plants are hobbled by the coronavirus crisis Jason Lusk is the head of the agricultural economics department at Purdue University the important thing to recognize is the concentrated nature of the meatpacking sector the fifteen largest pork packing plants process sixty percent of all hogs in this country and in times like this it means that if one of those packing plants go down it's a nontrivial share of our total production but it's not just one plant according to the food and environmental reporting network three meat packing plants and five processed food plants are currently closed because more than thirteen thousand meatpacking and food processing workers have tested positive for cove in nineteen less explains that at the current rate of diminished pork processing capacity the numbers add up quick yeah so if you take two hundred thousand hogs a day they're being left on the farm indeed you continue that on for a week then then that's a million extra pigs that would have gone to market but instead of staying on the farm for just one week of forty percent reduced capacity most farmers don't want to talk about the prospect of euthanizing their picks.

Barnes heather hill Jason Lusk Purdue University greenfield Indiana
"jason lusk" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

03:10 min | 7 months ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Territory so it's kind of oh wait sit back and wait and see what actually happens Jason Lusk we've learned a lot during the at least initial phases of of this pandemic we're learning how much this country has not been prepared in many different areas certainly the medical system hasn't been the political system hasn't been all we now on the verge of finding out that our food supply system isn't either white overall our food supplies you know responded remarkably well of course there is the initial stocking up phase we kind of came off that but I do think we're there are vulnerabilities are those areas are food processing sector in particular that rely a lot on labor and I think even from the onset of this a pandemic that's that sector I've had my eye on a particular meat because doing good times we have these large processing facilities operate low cost give us affordable meat after a consumer sector but they rely a lot on labor and just to give you a sense of scale here the fifteen largest pork plants process sixty percent of all parts of the country for beef it's the ten largest beef plants process sixty percent of all cattle to you couple those go down you're talking about it a big percentage of all meat production and that's what we're we're we're the worries are coming in at the moment okay what do you think your transitions those from worries to to not all oppose kind of same question to you is that as as earlier how many these plans have to go down before you go to the store and you can't find what you want or more maybe it'll be there in a day or two and just as not every time you go right well we're we're getting there I think prices of already started to rise somewhat per piece there also prices rose are pretty remarkable level pork just yesterday's often significant price increases although not necessarily out of you know historical norms so you know I think we're kinda okay at the moment I think I agree without was that previously were okay at the moment but you know you get another one or two plants go down it could cause some significant disruptions one thing to keep in mind it's important to there's a lot of pork and beef and chicken in cold storage more than we had at least at the end of March coming into this month so that you know things get really tired may not be the exact cut the you've always had a may be packaged in a strange way maybe backing package it was originally intended for restaurants so I think as long as consumers are willing to be flexible they're going to have things available for them Chris young some workers in in meat plants have been saying that the processors the companies are not really protecting them enough from getting infected with this particular virus and that's why we're starting to see shortages of it in the work force and that leads of course then ultimately the shortages in the product I'm sure the processors probably say we are doing enough where's the truth lie in that well I think you have to look at it it's hard to say that from an overall standpoint because each individual company can be doing something different but we've also been working with a moving target you know.

Jason Lusk
"jason lusk" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:09 min | 7 months ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Keep outsiders out at an entrance to the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota we found the Ogallala Sioux tribes road block all cross the street they need to be trying to test as many people as they can so they know who has it who doesn't happen and wind river Dr Paul Ebert's team is ramped up testing at a higher rate than the entire state of Wyoming but they face another kind of roadblock not everyone has a phone so getting the results to people infected tested positive means they remain out there somewhere thanks correspondent Michelle Miller the Navajo Nation is reported more coronavirus cases than any other native American tribe the people considered high risk because they live in close quarters and I've often and often have substandard healthcare after major pork processing plant in South Dakota to shut down after workers got sick with the virus concerned about food shortages start to Matt and off it is been difficult finding toilet paper hand sanitizer forget about it but food has been largely plentiful in all of our markets but when word spread that hundreds Turkey all of the pork processing plant visions of empty freezers invaded our collective nightmares but we're still in pretty good shape thanks Jason Lusk who directs the department of agricultural economics at Purdue University corporate support packing plant closed out but at the same time we we have more pork in cold storage right now at the moment that we've had in the last several years Luskin others say that all sorts of food processing plant we're trying to come up with better ways to protect their own workers from the coronavirus Charles Feldman can extend seventy newsradio if you're working out of the house to the coronavirus crisis you can still listen to KNX to get the latest on how this affects you and your family stream us on the radio dot com app on your smart speaker just search KNX and of course on the radio at ten seven AM at this important time were everywhere you are it's twelve fifty times your money before the corona virus pandemic Google was able to get a jump on its rivals in the online learning market by providing its software.

South Dakota Dr Paul Ebert Wyoming Matt Turkey Charles Feldman KNX Google Pine Ridge Michelle Miller Jason Lusk Purdue University Luskin
"jason lusk" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:32 min | 7 months ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"To keep outsiders out at an entrance to the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota we found the Ogallala Sioux tribes road block all across the state they need to be trying to test as many people as they can so they know who has it who doesn't happen at wind river Dr Paul Ebert's team is ramped up testing at a higher rate than the entire state of Wyoming but they face another kind of roadblock not everyone has a phone so getting the results to people infected tested positive means they remain out there somewhere correspondent Michelle Miller the Navajo Nation has reported more coronavirus cases than any other native American tribe the people are considered high risk because they live in close quarters and often have substandard health care after major pork processing plant in South Dakota had to shut down after workers got sick with the virus concerns about food shortages started to grow at an office has been difficult finding toilet paper hand sanitizer forget about it but food has been largely plentiful in all of our markets but when word spread that hundreds Turkey all of the pork processing plant visions of empty freezers invaded our collective nightmares but we're still in pretty good shape thanks Jason Lusk who directs the department of agricultural economics at Purdue University corporate support packing plant closed out but at the same time we we have more pork in cold storage right now at the moment that we've had in the last several years Luskin others say that all sorts of food processing plant we're trying to come up with better ways to protect their own workers from the coronavirus Charles Feldman can extend seventy newsradio a lot of corona virus outbreaks in California especially here in southern California will have that after news at the top of the hour ten fifty five traffic and weather together every ten minutes on the five Sir Geoff Biggs well as we wrap up this hour we can tell you that right now in south LA this is on the harbor freeway the one ten north bound and gauge the CHP is about to run a break to remove a stalled vehicle so that's what's going on there and then in Covina we have a problem on the ten westbound via Verde that they're still working on this is where a car and a big rig got tangled up in a block in the slow lane also the cars and four oh five north out of the one ten a solo car spin out blocking the slow lane good neck support coming up at eleven oh five I'm Jeff Biggs with more traffic reports were often can extend seventy newsradio the cool day tomorrow she's going to be in the mid to upper sixties and then we're gonna get a little bit of drizzle on Monday night right now Santa.

LA Luskin Purdue University Jason Lusk Pine Ridge Santa Jeff Biggs Covina South Dakota Sir Geoff Biggs California Charles Feldman Turkey Michelle Miller Wyoming Dr Paul Ebert
"jason lusk" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

02:17 min | 7 months ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on KNX 1070 NEWSRADIO

"Virus testing sites in Long Beach aim to get more African Americans tested since they're dying from the virus at disproportionately high rates there were not a lot of people coming to the Jordan high school site to get a corona virus test on Saturday morning but it is the first stage open captain Jason Jose with the Long Beach fire department thinks that will soon change I think once the word gets out it spread through the community we should get more involvement in terms of people coming in to test now anyone can get a test who has symptoms of COPD nineteen they include severe fatigue fever a cough shortness of breath and loss of smell Moore also reaching out to the local community partners sell our churches are really using the schools there medium that they use to get out and get messages out to the students the other side that opened this weekend is at career high school people can get same or next day testing appointments by going on the Long Beach city website in Long Beach and only Valdez Kate extend seventy newsradio Fishel's today announced more corona virus testing sites on the way next week and would your belt Montebello and macarthur park after a major port processing plant in South Dakota had to shut down this past weekend after workers got sick with the virus concerns about food shortages started about at an office has been difficult finding toilet paper hand sanitizer forget about it but food has been largely plentiful in all of our markets but when word spread that hundreds Turkey all of the pork processing plant visions of empty freezers invaded our collective nightmares but we're still in pretty good shape thanks Jason Lusk who directs the department of agricultural economics at Purdue University corporate support packing plant closed down but at the same time we we have more pork in in cold storage right now at the moment than we've had in the last several years Luskin others say that all sorts of food processing plant we're trying to come up with better ways to protect their own workers from the coronavirus Charles Feldman can extend seventy newsradio southern California doctors conduct the first study which links loss of smell to coronavirus researchers at UC San Diego asked patients with flu like symptoms if they lost their sense of smell or taste and then they were tested for corona virus Dr Carol Yan is one of the study's authors the ones that were actually.

Dr Carol Yan California Luskin Purdue University Jason Lusk Montebello newsradio Fishel Long Beach Jordan high school UC San Diego Charles Feldman Turkey South Dakota macarthur park Valdez Kate
"jason lusk" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

03:13 min | 8 months ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Fighting the fear with food seems like a good idea and number three human beings for all our enviable individuality also succumb to the herd mentality seeing that person next to you that has the fifty pounds of potatoes and all the rolls of toilet paper you know we take signals from other people around us and even if I am perfectly sane and reasonable most reasonable people also understand we can't and don't know everything and so we infer information from other people's behavior and you see that guy or gal with the basket full of food and you think what do they know that I don't know and that's how you end up with serious shortages in grocery stores as Jason Lusk himself encountered even though he showed up at seven thirty in the morning he was alarmed to see the toilet paper aisle completely cleaned out what do you think of that people are just crazy you know that's that was my first started that I'll but then you know I was a little more concerned when I got to the meat I'll that too was pretty much cleaned out on the surface of it that seems a little odd meat is perishable particularly beef products is more expensive in here we are in the midst of this panic why would somebody go to the product that is most likely to spoil and is the most expensive did you come up with an answer for that in this time of uncertainty a lack of clarity about the future things are familiar and comforting to us have a real pull and I think that was probably one of the motivating factors in people stocking up on things like meat even though it's perishable you can freeze it but it's something that tastes good we know we like you know can be a bit of a treat why not stock up on it now and enjoy that so it's not just gonna be beans and rice for the next six months so whenever you think about supplying demand and there's a shock in one we think about the ramifications the shock here is in demand but I would put the demand in quotes because it's not like people are suddenly eating twelve meals a day they're just accelerating their purchasing and hoarding yes there's nothing about the corona virus that I'm aware of that are gonna make people hungrier and so I think what's happened is we are moving inventory from warehouses in grocery stores into our pantries and our refrigerators so it almost has to be a short term demand shock because we're not gonna eat more food as a consequence of that the food supply chain is geared up to provide enough calories in food for all of the US population you know even though people may get sick from cove in nineteen the number of chickens didn't change they're still sitting out there laying eggs they're not worried they don't know that a crisis is upon us so there is enough food being produced in fact they were talking about commodity crops agricultural very seasonal and as a result the corn the wheat to soybeans the rice that we have right now it was produced back this fall or summer it's been sitting in storage in anticipation of us buying and using it throughout the year and so it just in terms.

"jason lusk" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

03:40 min | 8 months ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on Freakonomics

"At least not here in New York state and it's not just New York state alcohol sales have been given a wide dispensation during the pandemic perhaps due to the strength of the alcohol lobby in DC and in-store alcohol sales are way up but think about how much boozers consumed in restaurants. It's bars it's restaurants. It's weddings it's all sorts of events and affairs out of the house so when everybody is locked in place at home so you look at Heiser Bush that went from eighty one to thirty five. I mean that is really some ugly looking stock price sales at pizza chains like Dominos and Papa. John's meanwhile are up not way up but a few percentage points each and then there's Blue Apron a company that sells meal kits by mail when it went public in two thousand seventeen Blue Apron. Stock went for a share price of one hundred and dollars. It had crashed down to around two dollars and fifty cents by the beginning of March this year before the pandemic really set in but in the space of just a few days as governors across the country ordered people to stay at home blue apron. Shares shot up to sixteen dollars an increase of more than five hundred percent so first world problems are being solved by software and technology companies not just blue apron with its meal kits but online grocery delivery firms people in an instant card that will save you the time it takes to go food shopping for a small fee and of course they allow you to replenish your groceries without having to leave home before the pandemic. Barry Ritholtz was not customer. I've never got around to trying it out until this recent event and so far so good so far so good except we should add for mega delays in some places like New York City. Eventually things will likely revert to normal. And then I don't know how much that's going to change my shopping habits but I have to imagine that there are some people who are going to adapt that and say we're going to keep doing this in the future. People are learning new skills right now in the longer that this goes the more comfortable they're gonNA get with those skills that's Doug Baker again with the Grocery Association. Fm I I live in the emergency management world. We talk blue skies and dark skies so during blue sky days online. Shopping is averaging around the country. Between two and three percent and many retailers now are seeing that percents of sales between ten and fifteen percent so you could see online grocery sales staying higher after the pandemic but Barry Ritholtz has concern my concern with all these companies that are doing deliveries if someone actually gets the corona virus from a food delivery. What is the risk to the stock price there? Something that I don't know how to discount. I barely know how to think about. It's a genuine risk to any of these companies especially the ones doing curbside pickup or deliveries of going to the grocery store in person carries its own corona virus risk. But that is one of the few sanctioned activities in America right now and it's an incredibly popular one now remember before the pandemic Jason Lusk said we'd been spending more than fifty percent of our food dollars at restaurants and elsewhere outside the home terms of pounds of food. It's certainly lower than that lower than fifty percent because food is more expensive per pound in restaurants. My guess is you're probably talking the thirty to forty percent range of.

Blue Apron Barry Ritholtz New York Grocery Association New York City Heiser Bush Dominos Doug Baker DC Jason Lusk America John
"jason lusk" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

04:33 min | 1 year ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on Freakonomics

"My name is pat brown. I am currently the c._e._o. And founder impossible foods whose mission is to completely replace animals as a food production technology brown grew up in the suburbs of washington dc z. as well as paris and taipei father worked for the c._i._a. He studied to be a pediatrician and in fact completed his medical residency but he switched switched to biochemistry research. I had the best job in the world. <hes> at stanford my job was basically to discover and invent things and follow my curiosity. Brown did this for many years and was considered a world-class researcher. One of his breakthroughs was a new tool for genetic mapping. It's called the d._n._a. Micro ray that lets you read all the words sal is using and effectively kind of start to learn the vocabulary learn how the genome writes the life story of a cell or something like that it also has practical applications because what it's doing in sort of a deterministic way specifies the potential of that cell or if it's a cancer sal some people think the d._n._a. Micro array will win. Pat brown a nobel rebel prize when i bring this up he just shakes his head and smiles. It's clear that his research was deep passion for me. This was the dream job. It was like in the renaissance you know having the magies as <hes> patrons or something like that but after many years brown wanted a change he was in his mid fifty s. He took a sabbatical figure out his next move. It started out with <hes> stepping back from the work. I was doing and ask myself the most important thing i could do. What could i do that. We have the biggest positive impact on the world and looking at what are the biggest unsolved problems in the world. I came relatively quickly. They conclusion that the use of animals fruit production technology is by far and <unk>. I'd give you endless reasons why that's true but it is absolutely true by far the most environmentally destructive thing that humans do there is indeed a great deal of evidence for this argument coming across the entire environmental spectrum the agricultural historian james mcwilliams a book called just food are used that quote every environmental mental problems related to contemporary agriculture ends up having its deepest roots in meat production monocropping excessive applications of nitrogen fertilizer addiction fiction to insecticides rainforest depletion land degradation topsoil runoff declining water supplies even global warming all these problems mcwilliams williams writes would be considerably less severe if people ate meat rarely if ever. There's no doubt that meat production has environmental consequences focuses. Jason lusk again to suggest that it's the most damaging environmental thing we do is <hes> i think pretty extreme overstatement but what about the greenhouse gas gas emissions associated with raising me especially in the u._s. Which is the world's largest beef producer our own e._p._a. Environmental protection agency suggests that all of livestock contributes about three percent of our total greenhouse gas emissions so i mean three percent is not nothing but it's it's not the major contributor contributor that we see that that number i should say is much higher than many other parts of the world so the carbon impacts per pound produced are so much smaller. We're here than a lot of other world but when you tell people the way to reduce carbon emissions is to intensify animal production and that's not a story a lot of people like to hear because why not it sounds ah gets against animal welfare well two reasons exactly one is there are concerns about animal welfare particularly when you're talking about ruler chickens or or hogs less so about cattle the other one is there are concerns about when you concentrate all animals one place and get all this waste in in a location that you have to think about creative eight of ways to deal with that don't have some significant our mental problems so the e._p._a. Number livestock contributing three percent does that include the entire production chain go because some of the numbers that i see from environmental activists is much much higher than that the u n estimate that you often hear from iraq originally it was created in this report called livestock. Long shadow was something around nineteen percent that nineteen percent roughly number is a global number..

pat brown james mcwilliams washington Jason lusk founder taipei mcwilliams williams paris researcher iraq producer three percent nineteen percent
"jason lusk" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

03:58 min | 1 year ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on Freakonomics

"The need for fishing or the killing of animals because we grow the fish to wreck leave from stem cells. It's Mike Selden the co founder and CEO of finless. He's twenty seven years old. He started out as a cancer researcher. Like, Pat Brown, you could call him a wizard profit hybrid. He does take issue with the idea of lab grown food. The reality is like labs are by definition experimental and are not scalable see this won't be grown in a lab at all. It's prototypes. In a lab in the same way. The snacks are prototypes. In a lab, Doritos or prototypes. In a lab by material. Scientists looking at different dimensions of. Crunch in torsion, and all these other sort of mechanical properties. So what are facility will look like when we're actually at production skill. It's something really a lot closer to a brewery, big steel tanks that are sort of allowing these cells space in order to divide and grow into large quantities of themselves. Well, accessing all of the nutrients that we put inside of this nutritional broth, the fishing industry like the meat industry. Exact its share of environmental costs, but lake Pat Brown. Mike Selden does not want his company to win on goodwill points. So the goal of finless foods is not to create something that competes on ethics or morals or environmental goals. It's something that will compete on taste price nutrition, the things that people actually care about, you know, right now, everybody really loves Wales and people hate when Wales are killed what changed because we used to kill whales for their blubber in order to light lamps. It was. Isn't an ethical movement. It wasn't that people woke up one day and decided killing whales is wrong. It was that we ended up using kerosene. Instead, we found another logical solution a supply side change that didn't play on people's morals in order to win. We see ourselves as something like that. Why work with an animal at all? You don't need to. Indeed, you could imagine the not so distant future a scenario in which you could instantly summon any food imaginable, new foods new combinations. But also foods that long ago fell out of favour. How much fun would that be? I asked the agriculture economists Jason Lusk about this. If we had a three D printer, and let's say head just will be conservative a hundred buttons of different foods that it could make me does anyone press the button button. One of the great things about our food system is that it's a food system. Yes, makes food affordable. But also has a whole awful lot of choice for people who are willing to pay it. And I bet there's probably at least one or two people out there. That'll push that button. I also asked Lusk for his economic views on the future of meat, especially the sort of projects that inventors like Mike Selden and Pat Brown or working on. I have no problems with what? You know, Dr Brown's trying to do there. And indeed, I think it's very exciting this technology in I think, you know, alternately it'll come down to whether this lab grown meat can compete on the marriage. So there's no free lunch here. In fact, impossible burger I've seen it on menus. It's almost always higher price than the traditional beefburger. Now as an economist. I look at that and say those prices to me should be signaling something about resource use. Maybe it's in 'perfect. Maybe there's some extra analogies, but they should reflect all the resources that were used to go into produce that product. It's one of the reasons that beef is more expensive than say chicken. It takes more time more inputs to get produce a pound of beef than a pound of chicken. So why is it that the impossible burger is more expensive than the regular burger? Now, it could be that this is just a start up and they're not working at scale..

Pat Brown Mike Selden Jason Lusk lake Pat Brown cancer Wales researcher co founder CEO twenty seven years one day
"jason lusk" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on Freakonomics

"I had the best job in the world at Stanford. My job was basically to discover and invent things and follow my curiosity. Brown. Did this for many years and was considered a world-class researcher one of his breakthroughs was a new tool for genetic mapping? It's called the DNA micro array that lets you read all the words at this L is using and effectively kind of start to learn the vocabulary. Learn how the genome writes the life story of a Sal or something like that. It also has practical applications because what it's doing in sort of a deterministic way specifies potential of that cell or if it's a cancer cell. Some people think the DNA micro array will win Pat Brown Nobel prize when I bring this up. Just shakes his head. And smiles it's clear that his research was a deep passion for me. This was the dream job. It was like in the renaissance, you know, having the magic he's as patrons or something like that. But after many years Brown wanted a change he was in his mid fifties. He took a sabbatical figure out his next move. It started out with stepping back from the work. I was doing and ask myself the most important thing, I could do what could I do that? We have the biggest positive impact on the world and looking at what are the biggest unsolved problems in the world. I, you know, came relatively quickly conclusion that the use of animals of production technology is by far. And I could give you endless reasons why that's true. But it is absolutely true. By far, the most environmentally destructive thing that humans. Do there is indeed a great deal of evidence for this argument across the entire environmental spectrum. The agriculture historian James McWilliams in a book called just food are used that quote, every environmental problem related to contemporary agriculture ends up having its deepest roots in meat production. Monocropping excessive applications of nitrogen fertilizer addiction to insecticides rainforest depletion land degradation, topsoil runoff, declining water supplies, even global warming. All these problems McWilliams rights would be considerably less severe if people ate meat rarely if ever, you know, there's no doubt that meat production has environmental consequences. Jason Lusk again to suggest that it's the most damaging environmental thing, we do as I think it pretty extreme overstatement, but what about the greenhouse gas emissions associated with raising me, especially in the US, which is the world's largest beef producer, our own EPA environmental protection agencies suggests that all of livestock contributes about three. Percent of our total greenhouse gas emissions. So I mean three percent is not nothing. But it's it's not the major contributor that. We see that that number..

Pat Brown Nobel Sal James McWilliams Stanford researcher Jason Lusk cancer US EPA producer three percent
The Future of Meat with Pat Brown

Freakonomics

03:00 min | 1 year ago

The Future of Meat with Pat Brown

"Had the best job in the world at Stanford. My job was basically to discover and invent things and follow my curiosity. Brown. Did this for many years and was considered a world-class researcher one of his breakthroughs was a new tool for genetic mapping? It's called the DNA micro array that lets you read all the words at this L is using and effectively kind of start to learn the vocabulary. Learn how the genome writes the life story of a Sal or something like that. It also has practical applications because what it's doing in sort of a deterministic way specifies potential of that cell or if it's a cancer cell. Some people think the DNA micro array will win Pat Brown Nobel prize when I bring this up. Just shakes his head. And smiles it's clear that his research was a deep passion for me. This was the dream job. It was like in the renaissance, you know, having the magic he's as patrons or something like that. But after many years Brown wanted a change he was in his mid fifties. He took a sabbatical figure out his next move. It started out with stepping back from the work. I was doing and ask myself the most important thing, I could do what could I do that? We have the biggest positive impact on the world and looking at what are the biggest unsolved problems in the world. I, you know, came relatively quickly conclusion that the use of animals of production technology is by far. And I could give you endless reasons why that's true. But it is absolutely true. By far, the most environmentally destructive thing that humans. Do there is indeed a great deal of evidence for this argument across the entire environmental spectrum. The agriculture historian James McWilliams in a book called just food are used that quote, every environmental problem related to contemporary agriculture ends up having its deepest roots in meat production. Monocropping excessive applications of nitrogen fertilizer addiction to insecticides rainforest depletion land degradation, topsoil runoff, declining water supplies, even global warming. All these problems McWilliams rights would be considerably less severe if people ate meat rarely if ever, you know, there's no doubt that meat production has environmental consequences. Jason Lusk again to suggest that it's the most damaging environmental thing, we do as I think it pretty extreme overstatement, but what about the greenhouse gas emissions associated with raising me, especially in the US, which is the world's largest beef producer, our own EPA environmental protection agencies suggests that all of livestock contributes about three. Percent of our total greenhouse gas emissions. So I mean three percent is not nothing. But it's it's not the major contributor that. We see that that number.

Pat Brown Nobel SAL James Mcwilliams Stanford Researcher Jason Lusk Cancer United States EPA Producer Three Percent
"jason lusk" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Let's begin with a few basic facts fact, number one a lot of people all over the world really liked to eat meat, especially beef, pork. And chicken. If you add them all together, we're actually higher than we've been in in recent history. It's Jason Lusk. I'm professor and head of the agricultural economics department at Purdue University. I study what we eat and why we eat it. And then in terms of overall meat consumption per capita in the US. How do we rank worldwide where we're the king of meters? So compared almost any other country in the world, we eat more meat per capita, even Brazil Argentina. Yes. Yes. And part of that difference is income based. So if you took Argentina, Brazil and adjusted for income, they would probably be consuming more than us. But we happen to be richer. So we eat a little more the average American consumes roughly two hundred pounds of meat a year. That's an average. So let's say your meter someone in your fam-. Vegetarian. You might be putting away four hundred pounds a year. But in America, at least there aren't that many vegetarians? I probably have the largest data set of vegetarians of any other researcher that I know really why I've been doing a survey of US food consumers every month for about five years and one of the questions, I ask are you a vegan vegetarian so over five years time and about a thousand people a month. I've got about sixty thousand observations. Wow. And is this a nationwide data survey, it is Representative in terms of age and income education. I'd say on average you're looking at about three to five percent of people say yes to that question that say there's a very slight uptick over the last five years. So again, a lot of meat eating in America. What are some other countries that consume lot of meat, Australia and New Zealand Israel Canada? Russia most European countries and increasingly China. One of the things we know is that when consumers get a little more income in their pocket. One of the first things they do wanna add high value proteins to their diets. What is the relationship generally between GDP and meat consumption, positive, although sort of diminishing return, so as you get to really high income levels, it might even tell off a little bit. But certainly at the lower end of that spectrum as a country grows adds more GDP start to see some pretty rapid increases in meat consumption meat consumption is, of course, driven by social and religious factors as well by cuff, concerns and animal welfare..

US Argentina America Brazil Jason Lusk Purdue University professor Russia New Zealand Israel Canada Representative China researcher Australia five years four hundred pounds two hundred pounds five percent
"jason lusk" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

02:17 min | 2 years ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Tonight for Indian central Indiana IP L says twenty three hundred of its customers are without power. Also, Duke Energy says more than forty eight thousand of its customers are in the dark mostly in the southern and eastern parts eight a wish TV's Brittany Lewis joins us and Brittany. Where are you? What are you seeing this morning? We are on one hundred thirty first street just west of state route thirty seven and Fisher is in terms of the road conditions. It's really not that bad. We have been in Carmel and fishers this morning and all the busy air. Areas arose that you see a lot of traffic on. They were all pretty clear on morning. There is some spots where there was a little bit of slush. But otherwise, we did not really any slide offs or any major accidents bear, we'll tell you more about the roads coming up in the Ninety-three WIBC traffic center, also p s Decatur township schools and Wayne township schools all closed today. You'll get that full list of delays. Enclosing closings WIBC dot com. A plea of not guilty for Elissa shepherd. She's the woman accused of that bus crash near Rochester. Police say she hit four kids with her truck when she drove around the school bus that was stopped a nine year old girl and her two six year old twin brothers were killed in that crash shepherd is facing three counts of reckless homicide. Her next court appearance is set for February a shooting last night outside the WalMart at eighty-sixth in Michigan wrote on the city's northwest side and a seventeen year old boy is in the hospital. Police say there was a fight inside the store the boy was shot outside. He's now. Now in serious condition, and you're paying a lot less for your thanksgiving Turkey this year, Jason Lusk, the head of produce department of agricultural economics says Turkey prices are about a buck forty five pound which is the cheapest. It's been in the past decade. Farmers are just much more efficient figured out ways. Better genetics better technologies that allow them to produce more using last and that's going to bring down prices. The lust says what's good for shoppers may not be good for Hoosier farmers since lower prices mean less money coming in for their livestock. I'm C J Miller on the level on the go and on Twitter and ninety three and WIBC dot com. It's eight thirty four time now for sports and.

Elissa shepherd Brittany Lewis Duke Energy Brittany Carmel Wayne township Turkey Twitter Fisher Decatur WalMart Michigan Jason Lusk Rochester J Miller forty five pound seventeen year two six year nine year
"jason lusk" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Of school closings and delays WIBC dot com, which TV's Kevin Rodman has been out driving and checking out the roads. And Kevin where are you in? What are the roads? Looking like this morning highways are looking pretty good. We've been traveling at highway speed all the interstate south on sixty five four sixty five. When you when you gags off the interstate you're on the major city shoots both of them. Look pretty good. You just need to be careful on the side streets in the parking lot. And the sidewalks were the ice has accumulated and making it very slick, but you will have to scrape all that is auger cars are definitely budget some extra time for that. And mad bear joins us from the ninety three WIBC traffic center. Matt what are you seeing this morning? So we're getting a learner reports covered in WIBC traffic echo what Kevin seen so far. So good steady as she goes. But I just have to keep reminding everybody because I wanted to stay safe conditions can go south quickly and things can still ice over the bridges overpasses on. It offerings can always be dangerous. So yeah, give yourself a few extra minutes this morning. A lot of people seem to be doing that. And so far so good. We're keeping it safe out there. Great job everybody, which TV's. Randy Alex will tell you more about the freezing rain and win. It will be turning to snow coming up a seventeen year old boy shot outside a WalMart on the city's northwest side. Metro police say that boy was shot in the parking lot of the. Stored eighty-sixth in Michigan road after a fight inside the store the boys in the hospital in serious condition, while you're paying a lot less for milk bread. Even your thanksgiving Turkey this year. But that may not be a good thing for who's your farmers. Jason Lusk the head of produce department of agricultural economics says feed is less expensive. And that's one factor. Commodity prices for corn and soybeans are are low. They've stayed low been low for the last several years and while that's led to lower food prices for consumers. It's been a challenge for farmers. Also says farmers are just more efficient at doing their jobs with better technology,.

Kevin Rodman WIBC WalMart department of agricultural eco Randy Alex Jason Lusk Matt Turkey Michigan seventeen year milk
"jason lusk" Discussed on WTVN

WTVN

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"jason lusk" Discussed on WTVN

"And soybeans wheat and rice is because these are the plants that nature had nature in humans through our natural selection have are able to convert sunlight energy into energy in the form of seeds in a highly productive way and they they put that edible energy and a seed that can be easily stored and easily transported that's the reason we produce a lot of these crops not because there's some bad government policy there's some corporate conspiracy and so i think have just understand that basic underlying biology and physics is really important to understanding wire food system is the way it is and the and the challenge of moving it away from the way it is to something different i know you've got some books out there maybe throw a title or three out that the folks might find some interest if they go to amazon or barnes and noble or wherever sure will thanks for the opportunity to do a little promotion first major popular book was a book called the food police and that came out in two thousand thirteen argumentative book where a really take the food movement on and particularly its policy proposals and and in that book also talked about specific issues related to organics and local foods and obesity and biotechnology in really contrast the food movements perspective with what i think is the best science available my newest book came out in the spring of two thousand sixteen and it's called unnaturally delicious in in that book what i'm trying to do is tell the stories of abc food innovation through the eyes of innovators and is developing those technologies to really solve the world's problems and and tried to work a little bit on this connected that i mentioned before that if we really want to make headways on the environment who are the people doing that what are the kind of agricultural technologies they're adopting and using and so did that book and trying to engender a little bit of excitement innovation and technology we'll be back to wrap up our visit with jason lusk.

jason lusk amazon