35 Burst results for "j Hines"

Hebrew At American Jewish Summer Camps With Sharon Avni, Sarah Bunin Benor, And Jonathan Krasner

Jewish History Matters

04:57 min | 3 d ago

Hebrew At American Jewish Summer Camps With Sharon Avni, Sarah Bunin Benor, And Jonathan Krasner

"Hi sharon hi sarah. Hi jonathan welcome to the podcast. I'm so excited to be able to talk to you guys about this book. Hi jason i'm sarah buchanan. Nor thanks so much for having us. Hines the sharon me. It's really nice to be a part of this. And i'm jonathan crasner. Thank you guys so much. It's such an interesting book. Such a fascinating topic very specific topic. But it's one more. I think there's a lot of really interesting directions in which we can take it. You know talking about jewish camping talking about jewish languages talking about american jewish life. American jewish culture. Kind of broadly speaking. I think that that it might be really useful to actually start out where the book starts the hebrew spoken at jewish camps in the us. What you call cap. Hebrew english is not the same as vernacular hebrew which is spoken in modern day israel. So do you guys. Have you wanna comment about what this idea means to you. Is this language. And why is it important. In terms of understanding the dynamics of jewish culture jewish education and so on we went into camps and we started to hear and see the hebrew that was being used. We recognized immediately that it wasn't hebrew spoken in israel and that it was really a variety of language that was drawing from lots of different sources this variety however look these cam is really drawing for all sorts of histories and experiences and one of the things that we tried to tune in. The book was to trace these histories of cow. Hebrew found its way into american jewish camping. How it changed over time. Both in relation to the american jewish community was happening in the united states. Obviously with the establishment of state of israel. How the american. Jewish community reacted responded with its own relationship with hebrew and then bringing it into the modern times of what's happening today and so when you look at it across the trajectory we can see that this variety of this language really has a very specific meaning within the camp context in has rich cultural meaning for american cheats. I see cap hebrew in three whiz. I see at first and foremost as an insider language. These is a language that is understandable. Only people that are in the group. It's something that they share in common. It's a community building exercise if you will the creation and the dissemination of this language second is jewish language inspired by and it is definitely located with in a jewish context and third. It's zionist language. The decision to have a heavy iced english as opposed to. Yiddish is english or a latino english. That was a specific decision. It was a very conscious decision that was made early on. If you go back and you look at the early history of these camps and how this language was created the people who were invested in the creation of this language were zionists and they were looking to the project in palestine and inspired by it when they started speaking hebrew it now the listeners might be wondering what we're talking about when we're talking about camp. Henry is english. So i guess i should give an example in some camps you might have just jewish life words like they might say after beer cut. We're going to go straight to own egg. And those are words that you would hear outside of camp. In many jewish communal settings but many camps that are more to the right of the on the continuum of hebrew richness would have sentences that have a lot more hebrew words in them so they might say something like honey theme and module him go to the tach run for a lot era of now that has so many hebrew words that it really wouldn't be comprehensible to somebody who didn't go to a jewish summer camp that has a lot of hebrew words but note that it's still an english sentence in that the grammar and the function words are english right. They wouldn't use a full hebrew sentence at most camps and then even farther to the right on that continuum of hebrew richness. You have camps that do all of their announcements in hebrew and in some cases this is a hebrew that is mostly set phrases so they might just say something like guess share a mirage cadore saul Salim live bait knesset right so that they would be saying the name of a group and the place where they're supposed to go and people listening to that would just have to listen for the name of their group and the police. They're supposed to go. But then some camps have much more complex sentences in hebrew in their announcements and in other camp public language.

Sharon Hi Sarah Sarah Buchanan Jonathan Crasner Israel Hines Jonathan Jason United States Palestine Henry Saul Salim
Washington DC police shoot, arrest man in assault on an officer while armed

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 4 d ago

Washington DC police shoot, arrest man in assault on an officer while armed

"After they say he came it officers with a knife. It began when officers noticed a man in the roadway in Northeast D. C on New York Avenue, D c. Police say When 33 year old Michael Hines of Southeast refused commands to put the knife down the officer, one of them opened fire. Mind was taken to the hospital but is expected to be okay. He's been charged with assaulting a police officer while armed with a knife. The officer who opened fire is on administrative leave as the shooting is investigated. The infant mortality rate

Michael Hines Southeast New York
Who is Merrick Garland? What to know about the longtime judge and Attorney General nominee

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | Last week

Who is Merrick Garland? What to know about the longtime judge and Attorney General nominee

"Hearings. Hard on one day for President Biden's choice for attorney general of Corrine Appeals judge once nominated to the U. S. Supreme Court by then President Obama, who did not even get a Senate hearing. Then with a preview. CBS is clear. Hines Judge Merrick Garland will set before the Senate Judiciary Committee for his confirmation hearing for the position of attorney general on Monday. In his statement, he called the insurrection at the nation's Capitol, a quote heinous attack. And commits to overseeing the prosecution of white supremacists who took part in the assault on January 6. In an

President Biden Corrine Appeals U. S. Supreme Court Hines Judge Merrick Garland Senate Judiciary Committee President Obama CBS Senate
"j hines" Discussed on Brands On Brands On Brands

Brands On Brands On Brands

08:38 min | Last month

"j hines" Discussed on Brands On Brands On Brands

"So i want to hear what what you love about podcasting and when i say that i say it because i think for me i had to use my voice to find it and i. I like to say that. Because until when i started i didn't i was like i just need to. I wanted my reputation but in like talking about things and force myself to use my voice. I kind of found. There's this trend. Like i keep talking about these things because when you get out of your head and you're just you're forced to talk every week you start to come up with. This is what. I'm kind of pissed off about today. This is what i'm talking about. There's a trend and so by using it. I kind of found like what i want to be passionate about before you like when you started to get into podcasting or even just now like what is it about podcasting. That is really you up and made you kind of focus on that. I've always had a strong opinion. And i've never really been afraid to speak my mind like public. Speaking never frightened me. I can't remember one distinct moment in high school. It was kinda one of those lazy days where the class wasn't doing anything. And i i just went to the first class and i just started talking to everybody and asking people questions and it was like open forum where we will just have it as mass discussion. It was about basketball. But i was standing in front of the class talking to everybody. We're argued about sports. My professor is like easier going to be a comedian republic speaker. And i was like oh of non much to do that so i can't ignore it later on in college. Isos forced to take a public speaking class. And at the time. I still was speaking publicly yet but i wanted me take discourse and actually did it and i attended and everything and i loved it and has been one of the best things ever so they got me so deep into podcasting is it's a way arcane consistently like you say use my voice in share my thoughts opinions on different things. It's just it's freedom for me. This is frida. I love it. I could not imagine life without it now. You have a show called the personal branding. Playbook it's one of your shows you of a few and in that show you talk about building personal brands podcasting and more one of the episodes you talked about. Why podcasting is the future. And i want to be fully biased. 'cause i always hold my whole my punches back mike. Well you could also do a youtube. You can also do a blog for me. Podcasting is what's right. Let's talk about that a little bit like. Why is podcast future. Because i want to convince some people today to just get off their butts and like try man now is the time i keep trying to tell people time because five years ago when i started podcasting people looked at me crazy. My family literally asked me. Why are you talking to yourself in a closet awesome. It was crazy years ago. now it's mainstream. everybody either has a show or they know somebody with what so. Now's the perfect time to start with. Because they are so popular right so the main reason. Why park has it gives. A future is because of the networking aspect. This is probably the most underrated feature of hosting a show. When you're host of apart as you don't always have to do interviews. In fact i advise you don't always interviews but you get to connect with some amazing people and they teach you so much like i've learned a lot from having conversations with people there. Were all my show. We built amazing relationships and in those same people some of them come back on my show again like bestselling authors like millionaires they. I've learned so much from these people. It's like my own masterclass like so the networking aspect is like the top for me. Yeah i think it's the same for me. And it wasn't what i thought when i went into it when i went into it i was like i want to this so that i can create content and so that i can become known for something and i was like what when i started interviewing people in fact when i started show it was a solo show and thirty episodes only solo show but i got coaching. 'cause i was like i love podcasting but i want to do it. That guy so. I found someone that was doing it well. And it turned out that like adding interviews changed everything for me because the networking it opened up doors and now and i introduced myself to people that i really said of being a fan boy and saying hey i love what you do. Love your book and i can be like. Hey i actually like to get into your book and ask you some questions that got you know to really dive deeper on something and they love that and i love all. They love it authors. Love it because it's like you first of all you bought my book. I appreciate that. Oh you wanna talk to me of book. Oh for sure like very rarely. Do i reach out for an interview and a person is like no. I don't wanna do that like it's very tell people all the time like the best part of the is you get to network and then everybody you wanna talk to wants to talk to you now. You will have a few. that are like busy. Maybe later this year but most of them are going to say yes. It's very rare that they're like nah. I don't wanna talk to you at all. That's very rare. I'm curious about your opinion on getting people started. And how you get them to go. And then i'll give you mine. But how do you get people started. What's like your path step one-two-three if you had to give someone a sequence to follow to be. Oh may step one is to have a goal for your show to many podcasts star with no go there just like i kinda wanna to sponsor i would like to sellable or i just want host. Show wanna talk. Whatever your decision is. That's fine but you have to have one goal. Step two is to have a theme for your show because if you just talking about everything and it's which is up every week i'm not subscribing. I'm pretty sure every park has listeners. Like this you have certain shows that are for entertainment for a certain type entertainment. You have go shows that you go to for news. Maybe have educational shows. So you have to figure out what you're famous for show and number three is to really have a direction like are you gonna do. Seasons isn't going to be solo. The it up a bit a what's your style of producing your show so the first stages for me. It's always planning like plan i am. I forgot how the saying goes. Who said it. What is it a sharpened a knife for ninety nine times and cut once measure nine times and cut once there. It is so it's the same day Exactly i think my my stepdad. You say measure twice. Cut once so that you don't like yeah you can mess up the would you don't want you cut it right. You've got it wrong your script. I love that now. I'd say the same thing. Honestly when i get people on a call i offer you know by talking for twenty minutes for free. It's no problem. I can't teach you how to watch a whole show but at twenty minutes. I bet you will get you in the vicinity of what the show is going to be about. Because if i asked you just a few questions you are the one who knows not just your the realm you know the the category you wanna be in but you typically know what it is. It makes you different. You just haven't said it out loud enough times for to for you to hear yourself. So i think if i can give people there to where they have a sense of. This is what i want to talk about. Then the fires lit up inside of them. And if you can get the show somewhat named even then like then it's their baby and like they're off to the races and then from there like don't worry about the people getting it done better than than perfect and i'm like i have mixed feelings about that but for me. I'm more like getting it done to where you've recorded something and not distributed it not putting. It tunes that literally just record some things a couple episodes solo interview. Whatever records some things. You can get a sense of what this could be for you if i can get you there and just tell you. Those couple of things might help you with that. Then i think you're golden and once you've experienced it then you'll have the passion to want to learn the things that are harder usually stop people though. Yeah yeah man. Because you know it's funny coming from the basketball world it's normalized for athletes and players to invest in himself to get better like that's a normal thing. If i'm telling you i'm working on going to the olympics are higher three trainers and i have a nutritionist. You will look at me crazy and say oh. That's good do well but podcasters don't have this approach to podcasting yet. It is worrisome to me because the industry is becoming bigger and bigger and bigger and more money being poured into it. But if you're not a podcast you can't see any of those benefits is not gonna work so you have to invest in yourself as a host to get better at your craft like you wanna learn how to interview and be a great interview. You have to learn that you don't just wake up one day and you're amazing at it because you wished it on night. It doesn't work like that. So i think we need to make it normal for people to invest in themselves to become a better park.

Chris brandon burke Meyer brandon burke mike brandenburg meyer
Podcasting IS Branding with Chris Hines

Brands On Brands On Brands

08:38 min | Last month

Podcasting IS Branding with Chris Hines

"So i want to hear what what you love about podcasting and when i say that i say it because i think for me i had to use my voice to find it and i. I like to say that. Because until when i started i didn't i was like i just need to. I wanted my reputation but in like talking about things and force myself to use my voice. I kind of found. There's this trend. Like i keep talking about these things because when you get out of your head and you're just you're forced to talk every week you start to come up with. This is what. I'm kind of pissed off about today. This is what i'm talking about. There's a trend and so by using it. I kind of found like what i want to be passionate about before you like when you started to get into podcasting or even just now like what is it about podcasting. That is really you up and made you kind of focus on that. I've always had a strong opinion. And i've never really been afraid to speak my mind like public. Speaking never frightened me. I can't remember one distinct moment in high school. It was kinda one of those lazy days where the class wasn't doing anything. And i i just went to the first class and i just started talking to everybody and asking people questions and it was like open forum where we will just have it as mass discussion. It was about basketball. But i was standing in front of the class talking to everybody. We're argued about sports. My professor is like easier going to be a comedian republic speaker. And i was like oh of non much to do that so i can't ignore it later on in college. Isos forced to take a public speaking class. And at the time. I still was speaking publicly yet but i wanted me take discourse and actually did it and i attended and everything and i loved it and has been one of the best things ever so they got me so deep into podcasting is it's a way arcane consistently like you say use my voice in share my thoughts opinions on different things. It's just it's freedom for me. This is frida. I love it. I could not imagine life without it now. You have a show called the personal branding. Playbook it's one of your shows you of a few and in that show you talk about building personal brands podcasting and more one of the episodes you talked about. Why podcasting is the future. And i want to be fully biased. 'cause i always hold my whole my punches back mike. Well you could also do a youtube. You can also do a blog for me. Podcasting is what's right. Let's talk about that a little bit like. Why is podcast future. Because i want to convince some people today to just get off their butts and like try man now is the time i keep trying to tell people time because five years ago when i started podcasting people looked at me crazy. My family literally asked me. Why are you talking to yourself in a closet awesome. It was crazy years ago. now it's mainstream. everybody either has a show or they know somebody with what so. Now's the perfect time to start with. Because they are so popular right so the main reason. Why park has it gives. A future is because of the networking aspect. This is probably the most underrated feature of hosting a show. When you're host of apart as you don't always have to do interviews. In fact i advise you don't always interviews but you get to connect with some amazing people and they teach you so much like i've learned a lot from having conversations with people there. Were all my show. We built amazing relationships and in those same people some of them come back on my show again like bestselling authors like millionaires they. I've learned so much from these people. It's like my own masterclass like so the networking aspect is like the top for me. Yeah i think it's the same for me. And it wasn't what i thought when i went into it when i went into it i was like i want to this so that i can create content and so that i can become known for something and i was like what when i started interviewing people in fact when i started show it was a solo show and thirty episodes only solo show but i got coaching. 'cause i was like i love podcasting but i want to do it. That guy so. I found someone that was doing it well. And it turned out that like adding interviews changed everything for me because the networking it opened up doors and now and i introduced myself to people that i really said of being a fan boy and saying hey i love what you do. Love your book and i can be like. Hey i actually like to get into your book and ask you some questions that got you know to really dive deeper on something and they love that and i love all. They love it authors. Love it because it's like you first of all you bought my book. I appreciate that. Oh you wanna talk to me of book. Oh for sure like very rarely. Do i reach out for an interview and a person is like no. I don't wanna do that like it's very tell people all the time like the best part of the is you get to network and then everybody you wanna talk to wants to talk to you now. You will have a few. that are like busy. Maybe later this year but most of them are going to say yes. It's very rare that they're like nah. I don't wanna talk to you at all. That's very rare. I'm curious about your opinion on getting people started. And how you get them to go. And then i'll give you mine. But how do you get people started. What's like your path step one-two-three if you had to give someone a sequence to follow to be. Oh may step one is to have a goal for your show to many podcasts star with no go there just like i kinda wanna to sponsor i would like to sellable or i just want host. Show wanna talk. Whatever your decision is. That's fine but you have to have one goal. Step two is to have a theme for your show because if you just talking about everything and it's which is up every week i'm not subscribing. I'm pretty sure every park has listeners. Like this you have certain shows that are for entertainment for a certain type entertainment. You have go shows that you go to for news. Maybe have educational shows. So you have to figure out what you're famous for show and number three is to really have a direction like are you gonna do. Seasons isn't going to be solo. The it up a bit a what's your style of producing your show so the first stages for me. It's always planning like plan i am. I forgot how the saying goes. Who said it. What is it a sharpened a knife for ninety nine times and cut once measure nine times and cut once there. It is so it's the same day Exactly i think my my stepdad. You say measure twice. Cut once so that you don't like yeah you can mess up the would you don't want you cut it right. You've got it wrong your script. I love that now. I'd say the same thing. Honestly when i get people on a call i offer you know by talking for twenty minutes for free. It's no problem. I can't teach you how to watch a whole show but at twenty minutes. I bet you will get you in the vicinity of what the show is going to be about. Because if i asked you just a few questions you are the one who knows not just your the realm you know the the category you wanna be in but you typically know what it is. It makes you different. You just haven't said it out loud enough times for to for you to hear yourself. So i think if i can give people there to where they have a sense of. This is what i want to talk about. Then the fires lit up inside of them. And if you can get the show somewhat named even then like then it's their baby and like they're off to the races and then from there like don't worry about the people getting it done better than than perfect and i'm like i have mixed feelings about that but for me. I'm more like getting it done to where you've recorded something and not distributed it not putting. It tunes that literally just record some things a couple episodes solo interview. Whatever records some things. You can get a sense of what this could be for you if i can get you there and just tell you. Those couple of things might help you with that. Then i think you're golden and once you've experienced it then you'll have the passion to want to learn the things that are harder usually stop people though. Yeah yeah man. Because you know it's funny coming from the basketball world it's normalized for athletes and players to invest in himself to get better like that's a normal thing. If i'm telling you i'm working on going to the olympics are higher three trainers and i have a nutritionist. You will look at me crazy and say oh. That's good do well but podcasters don't have this approach to podcasting yet. It is worrisome to me because the industry is becoming bigger and bigger and bigger and more money being poured into it. But if you're not a podcast you can't see any of those benefits is not gonna work so you have to invest in yourself as a host to get better at your craft like you wanna learn how to interview and be a great interview. You have to learn that you don't just wake up one day and you're amazing at it because you wished it on night. It doesn't work like that. So i think we need to make it normal for people to invest in themselves to become a better park.

Frida Basketball Youtube Mike Olympics
Doctor Who: The Faceless Ones review – a murderous Who-dunnit comes alive

Next Stop Everywhere: The Doctor Who Podcast

05:29 min | Last month

Doctor Who: The Faceless Ones review – a murderous Who-dunnit comes alive

"The recent. You know kind of low budget animation. That they've been doing the more cost effective animation. I should say and thankfully we it was released in twenty twenty and finally have a complete story so this is one of the things on my to do list that i wanted to get to as soon as possible when i was making the new schedule. So this story written by david ellis and now the hulk or zydeco the incredible malcolm hulk who wrote a bunch of notable stories from the patrick troughton in jon pertwee eras including will. Hey the war games. Patrick crowds final story the celerion. The first appearance of this larry ins ambassadors of death which was really cool story that we talked about here it also the seat devils a fun story with the master that we haven't talked yet so that's one of those that hopefully we'll get to at some point here on next up. This was directed by jerry mill. This was the eighth serial of doctor who season four nineteen sixty seven starring. Patrick troughton as second doctor. Unida wills as poly right. Michael craze as been jackson in. This is betty polly's last story by the way. And frazer hines as jimmy mcrae. Mid who at the end of the story gets a promotion to main companion after benn polly Exit the tartus closing out the way of heart once and for all so jesse. I know that this is probably your first time watching the story. I'm guessing david your thoughts about it. So i yeah and i'm gonna have a couple of questions we'll get you that i assume you're going to cover in trivia but just in case you want yeah So i settled down to watch this Linda was out of. Linda was spending the night with her sister. Kaya in a many birthday celebration. And so i watched the first dealer yes. I watched the first three on friday. Night and i watched the remaining three on saturday And i enjoy the. I enjoy the last three a lot more than i did. The first three now. I think part of that may have been. I was a little tired. It was today but also think the first three were a lot of setup. Yeah in once the next three you got really a lot of the story and was really well done so overall. I'm pretty happy with this one. I'm glad we got to see it. Yeah and And i'm looking forward to talking to you about it but my question is In you've probably covered this before. But i have slept since then. Why was so much of patrick. Totten's episodes lost and specifically about this. Well there was a purge by the bbc to essentially make space as i understand it and in the process they junked a bunch of old doctor. Who's they didn't think they needed them anymore. In their infinite stupidity and a lot of them were were episodes. From the william heart. Oh and patron eras you know there was in levin and some others that had managed to recover some of those over time because this was believed in the seventies and since then you know there's been a lot of effort by fans to try and recover episodes which have either been somehow scattered to the winds across the entire globe and or just play lost in this story. They'd only managed to recover episodes one in three. That are returned to the bbc archives. Because hey now they want to keep them a what. I what i find interesting. Charles is the seventies relatively speaking. I mean i love. Lucy had been in syndication. So you think people would have realized the Cordao yet and the importance and also. I know that they talked about that. Many of the early tonight show episodes back with johnny carson. The same thing they just re. They didn't keep them. They did because they didn't think they're reporting. And i remember years ago. I talked to someone and he was british. And he's like yeah doctor who it's it's just the it's just a minor kid show. Yeah i'm sure that was the ski. Oh executive thinking yes the super geniuses as wylie coyote super genius exact who made this horrible decision probably thought. Well it's just a kid show doesn't matter you know they. They won't miss it. We've already done Because back in the day dear listeners you used to have summer reruns until you would show an episode twice and and it was kinda done. So i'm sure they were thinking okay. We've already had a repeat time to move on. It's just it's it was just a really bad unfortunate thing that happened to the show because you know like a lot of classic moments are just now lost in presumably. A lot of these are never going to be available in their original format. Now they're going to be like stories like this. That would probably be reconstructed through animation. Or maybe whatever happens in the next ten years technology wise that they could be recreated so now and i guess they had audio right so now the audio either fans have the audio or someone in so that's for steps are recreating it. Yeah thankfully now though. The upside that. I should mention was that through the efforts of fans a lot of kids at home you know. They had their home tape cassette recorders right. Or whatever you know recording real

Patrick Troughton Malcolm Hulk Jerry Mill Unida Wills Michael Craze Betty Polly Frazer Hines Jimmy Mcrae Benn Polly David Ellis Jon Pertwee Linda Kaya BBC Patrick Totten Jesse Jackson Wylie Coyote Levin
US cyber-attack: US energy department confirms it was hit by Sunburst hack

TIME's Top Stories

03:52 min | 2 months ago

US cyber-attack: US energy department confirms it was hit by Sunburst hack

"Weapons agency hacked. As part of massive cyberattack by william turton michael riley and jennifer jacobs the us nuclear weapons agency and at least three states were hacked as part of a suspected russian cyber attack that struck a number of federal government agencies. According to people with knowledge of the matter indicating widening reach of one of the biggest cybersecurity breaches in recent memory. Microsoft said that its systems were also exposed as part of the attack. Hackers with ties to the russian government are suspected to be behind a well coordinated attack that took advantage of weaknesses in the us supply chain to penetrate several federal agencies including departments of homeland security treasury commerce and state while many details are still unclear. The hackers are believed to have gained access to networks by installing malicious code and a widely used software program from solar winds corp whose customers include government agencies and fortune five hundred companies according to the company and cybersecurity experts. This is a patient well resourced and focused adversary that has sustained long duration activity on victim. Networks the us cybersecurity and infrastructure security agency said in a bulletin that signalled widening alarm over the preach. The hackers posed a grave risk to federal state and local governments as well as critical infrastructure and the private sector. The bulletin said the agency said. The attackers demonstrated sophistication and complex tradecraft. The energy department and its national nuclear security administration which maintains america's nuclear stockpile were targeted as part off the larger attack. According to a person familiar with the matter an ongoing investigation is found. The heck didn't mission essential national security. Functions shaolin hines a department of energy spokeswoman said in a statement at this point the investigation has found that the malware has been isolated to business networks only 'instead. The hack of the nuclear agency was reported earlier by politico. Microsoft spokesman frank. Shaw said the company had found malicious code in which we isolated and removed. We have not found evidence of access to production services or customer data. He said in a tweet. Our investigations which are ongoing have found absolutely no indications that our systems were used to attack others reuters had earlier reported that microsoft was hacked and that its products were used to further the attacks in addition to people familiar with the broader government investigation into the attack said three state. Governments were breached. Though they wouldn't identify the states. A third person familiar with the probe confirmed that state governments were hacked but didn't provide a number biden's pledge while president donald trump has yet to publicly addressed the hack president elect joe biden issued a statement thursday on what appears to be a massive cyber security breach affecting potentially thousands of victims including us companies and federal government entities. I wanna be clear. My administration will make cybersecurity a top priority at every level of government. And we will make dealing with this breach a top priority from the moment we take office. Said pledging to impose substantial costs on those responsible for such malicious attacks. Russia has denied any involvement in the attack hines. The department of energy spokeswoman said that efforts were immediately taken to mitigate the risk from the hack including disconnecting software identified as being vulnerable to this attack.

William Turton Michael Riley Jennifer Jacobs Russian Government Departments Of Homeland Securi Solar Winds Corp Cybersecurity And Infrastructu United States Microsoft Shaolin Hines National Nuclear Security Admi Energy Department The Bulletin Department Of Energy President Donald Trump Shaw Frank Reuters Biden Joe Biden Hines
"j hines" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

Hollywood Handbook

05:30 min | 4 months ago

"j hines" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

"In terms of naming people who voted. I could think of ten people who voted. But i did. Did you guys vote. Hayes hazing sean. Did you vote. I have kevin. Did you vote. I'll let them go first. I'll let them go first as well. I was definitely a wake. Okay that's good. I remember that. Yeah and i. What are you figuring out. It was like i was. I remember i was like looking around You know yes. I do know the idea of looking around. Yes i and i'm seeing. Something was the voting at the fair. No i there was no exactly the you were making a point when you asked that question. I i don't even know of any fairs. I don't really know of any fairs that happened on tuesday. I'm sure there was a fair somewhere in america are saying that the election is not fair. I'm just saying. I don't know you don't know of any fairs that happened on tuesday and so that would mean that this actually what happened was not fairs i. I don't feel that way at all. I i think the election. I i misspoke by using a word. I've heard other people being like that are saying this. That there were there was no No fairs that happened. No fair there are people who say that. The election was not fair. There's the president the president who lost. I don't believe that i just wanted to say resident. Who lost yes but you. So there's only one president. Yes so the existing president lost the election and he will be replaced by the new president. Zuma's he the president who lost or is he the former president. Ps currently the president who lost and he will become the former president and the guy who won is the what president elect the president to be he will be president is that hey.

president Hayes kevin america
"j hines" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

Hollywood Handbook

05:02 min | 4 months ago

"j hines" Discussed on Hollywood Handbook

"I am black. Wh wh where you go out there and people are saying all this stuff and saying all these are writing it down. No not interested. They're writing it down. Let me ask you guys. Where how deep have you been in following the news on the election and everything before it. I'm looking at it period. Okay just like now or just like that's your okay. Well i mean like yeah how dare how deep how. Deep geez about six feet pretty deep. Okay no i mean like a. You're asking me. Yeah i guess i i mean i'm i'm asking you a question. Yes i six feet deep. Yeah okay well Let let's get into how long it took for the results to come in right. The election was tuesday and a winner was the what for president of the united states. Okay of witch of win. Say which one you can say. Or which the current for the for the forty sixth president of the united states. For the forty okay. That's that's a lot. It really doesn't matter at this. How many i don't know if it's a lotta i don't. I don't think it's consent. I think actually america's a pretty young country probably forty six heads of state is not a lot compared to like. It just depends on. I guess when you say a number. I guess it just depends on what you're talking about because cars okay. That's so many jay leno's garage territory at that point but if it's like rice pieces to nothing no one not even a snack exactly so it really depends right no number. It's so important. What the number is of and so i guess this isn't this isn't like a criticism but like so. I think we can probably say that no next time i say what president is. I'm sure to give context of whether that's a lot if that's a huge number forty. Six hundred is a medium number presidents medium medium. Rare perfect okay. I'm not gonna say ton. I think you know joe biden. Beat donald trump so that would be like for books Yeah that's to me that's medium books medium books. You know. it's not yes so many you're never going to be able to read them. But you certainly wouldn't be able to do it on nope. Single like plane ride was already six books. You could not read forty six books on a single plane right. I think no matter even if you were really really a.

president united states joe biden donald trump jay leno america
Kraft Under Fire for Sexualizing Mac n Cheese

Business Wars Daily

03:50 min | 4 months ago

Kraft Under Fire for Sexualizing Mac n Cheese

"When you think of macaroni and cheese what comes to mind comfort food and easy cheap meal for you your kids or your broke college student or something more risque. Wait if I confused you just now clearly, you miss the drama that happened earlier this month for kraft, Heinz the maker of the number one boxed Mac and cheese in America wound up embroiled in controversy over an ad campaign that most definitely attracted attention to celebrate National Noodle Day October six. In case you missed it on your calendar Somehow Kraft Heinz launched a playful campaign suggesting people send nudes that is noodles to friends and family. The double meaning of course was intentional sending nudes could mean sending nude photos in some of their ads, pictures of a box of Mac and cheese were deliberately out of focus as if the company was hiding something you know. And video featured former Saturday night live actor Vanessa Bayer. Trying to make the distinction between noodles and nudes. It's been pulled from crafts social channels, which I'll get to in a minute but take a listen clear not advocating you send nudes to anyone I'm talking about news not news I want there to be no confusion do not send nudes definitely send news even as it sent social media into a tizzy the campaign was a hit twenty thousand comfort loving tweeter took the brand up on its offer to mail free boxes of the cheesy stuff to loved ones. But unless you subscribe to the theory that all publicity is good publicity, the backlash created a craft crisis parents tore into the multibillion dollar brand on instagram. They said sexualizing macaroni was inappropriate for kids and accused craft of inciting children to send nude pictures. Many angry viewers threatened to ban kraft MAC and cheese from their pantries and turn instead to rivals like Annie's Mac and cheese owned by General Mills, some threatened to boycott. All craft products and some critics went even further according to buzzfeed Cunanan supporters got into the act. buzzfeed describes Cunanan as a collective delusion believers in what has also been called a right wing conspiracy theory subscribed to a number of different baseless notions including that something called the deep state promotes child sex trafficking buzzfeed reported that some Cunanan believers accused craft hines of using it's Mac and cheese nudes campaign for just this purpose. In the end, the company pulled its campaign in a statement brand officials stated, blandly, we sincerely appreciate and hear all of your feedback. As it happened, the news promotion was intended to end only a few days after it began anyway, whether craft considers its campaign, a win or a loss is hard to tell at the moment but consider this not only did craft managed to. Give away thousands of boxes of noodles but the controversy generated thousands of mentions on social media and in the press also keep in mind that making processed foods. Sexy is not a new idea for kraft. Heinz back in February of Twenty nineteen long before our world was upended, the company ran an actual ad on a porn site likening Mac and cheese attraction to addiction to. Well something else entirely that adds steely promoted devour a kraft Heinz frozen food line. That made headlines and sales. It's a big deal for consumer packaged foods players like Kraft Heinz Kellogg in Unilever Comfort food sales have fattened up during the pandemic now officials from Kraft Heinz, and Kellogg promised market very aggressively during the second half of this year to keep momentum up according to industry publication marketing dive given the ferocious rivalry between giant packaged food companies. There's really only one conclusion to draw about a brand that doesn't just go to the edge of tasteful nece but jumps right over it. Even today's cancel culture craft Heinz knows. Exactly. What it's doing.

Kraft Heinz MAC Kraft Heinz Kellogg Kraft Vanessa Bayer Cunanan Buzzfeed America General Mills Annie Hines Unilever Comfort
Pete Hines (SVP Global Marketing & Communications, Bethesda Softworks) Discusses Bethesda's Purchase by Microsoft

The Business of Esports

07:31 min | 5 months ago

Pete Hines (SVP Global Marketing & Communications, Bethesda Softworks) Discusses Bethesda's Purchase by Microsoft

"To say we have. Worked closely. With Microsoft, for pretty much my entire time at them, the FESDAY, it's a company we know well They were the ones who really gave us the incentive to change from just being a PC only developer which we were when I started back in ninety nine we we developed and made games only on the PC and decided to make the leap for a game called the eldest group elder scrolls, three more wind for the original xbox and honestly in in part because at their urging, hey, this this console could could handle could do the kind of games that you all make an RPG like yours. Could do pretty well on our system and that was sort of the early days of what has become no a two decade relationship between ourselves and a lot of folks over there who we very much like and respect to chief amongst them obviously being Phil, Spencer and. In terms of his vision how how he sees the the future of Microsoft how we fit in that future? and how this this acquisition can lead to. A future for for both of us, that is sort of win win win. In that we get support and resources that allow us to make even bigger and better games with their help. You know if I've I've worked with I've worked as a publisher who is a third party publisher and developers who have all had to be third party developers for very long time. The opportunity of join somebody and essentially be treated as a first party. Developer publisher is pretty darn appealing in terms of. Access to resources or the conversations you get to have not just in like what are you need to make the? Game better but like from console support standpoint from a systems level standpoint are there things you need us to do, and again we've been in this industry a long time, and so we hear the stories behind the scene about first party games. They get a certain features or special support from Sony or Microsoft Nintendo to lower a first party game to do something particular and you know you talked our developers that's pretty appealing I. Think it's Great for Microsoft as well because I think we bring a lot of additional pedigree to an already very strong lineup and stable of developers look I believe in walking softly and carrying a big stick but. I've been doing this for a long time like we're pretty good catch like we make a lot of really good games. We've made a lot of game of the year stuff and bestseller stuff and in a variety of different. Genres and if I step it, take my Bethesda hat off for a minute. were pretty good get and I, think we ultimately make them better as a company to be a part of what they're doing. And the other one is I think this will ultimately be a win for fans and for gamers because at the end of the day, the thing that we have always believed first and foremost is look making games as a pain in the ass it's hard. It's a lot of work over a lot of years on a lot of people. Spent big chunks of their lives working on these games, and we spent a lot of money making them, and at the end of the day, we want as many people as possible to be able to play what what it is. We make and Microsoft is very much in the same camp of we want to help you get your games to the widest audience possible which. Means that you people are going to be able to play our games you know all over the place you know not just on a specific console, not just on your PC, but what they do with X. God streaming, and now streaming being something that we as a company have looked into and worked on some some things there in terms of moving that forward as viable. Technology that you know. Sure. I'll I'll have people playing sky rim doom fallout fill in number here on his many devices as we can, and so at the end of the day I think it is a good cultural fit at think it's a good philosophical fit and I think it's a good fit where our strengths play welded their strengths and advisers. Yeah. So so just falling because there's another question was sort of desperate Ted to ask in S, which is so you said you know protest is a good gap ripe and totally agree I mean they're assuming credible brands in the portfolio that s to has, but also you guys weren't cheap. You know the acquisition is William. It's worth mentioning your benchmark right as we as a benchmark on the. Might might benchmarked requisitions is Star Wars Disney bought star wars that was like two billion dollars, right? That's kind of my benchmark. So I large acquisitions I value in multiple. Multiple. Star. Wars. Yeah. But then. Again, I mean three point, five star wars like that is a lot of. A lot of stars that's actually more star wars than actually art films, in stores, mainland. So Seriously, though like just. Valuation, obviously, you know Microsoft sophisticated buyer you know you guys must've deserved it. But where is that value coming from? Is it the IP juicy? The value in elder scrolls fall out things like that is at the studios in the talent is it something else like if Microsoft we're gonNA say there were seven billion dollars for X. Y. and Z. What are the buckets that value is getting created We'll. Certainly it's the things that you mentioned we we do have a lot of pretty strong IP's. Elder scrolls a massive brand for US fallout doom Wolfenstein. We've we've got a lot of stuff that has value and legacy right and not stuff that we just came up with five years ago right? Doom started and Wolfenstein started the popularity of were the existence of first person shooters a really long time ago so whether it's RPG's or first person shooters I do think we have very strong piece I also believe we have really good pedigree in our studios in terms of every studio that we have. That is part of our company that we've shipped a game with has won at least one game of the year award for what they've made a except for one developer and that's pretty impressive. When you talk about a whole wide variety of studios different locations, very different genres, actions you know first person send stuff, really bloody violent kill Nazi stuff kill demons post apocalyptic fantasy. We do a lot of different stuff. So I do think there's a lot of talent I also think that and I've I've heard Phil talk about this is he had a lot of respect for the fact that it's Not just that we have talent but that were willing to take chances and try and push things forward and break ground right? We didn't just participate in Vr like we were you know primary catalyst for VR

Microsoft Developer Phil Publisher Bethesda Disney Spencer TED William Sony
Trump 'doing very well,' White House physician says

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:56 sec | 5 months ago

Trump 'doing very well,' White House physician says

"Of staff Mark Meadows says President Trump is doing very well at Walter Reed Military Medical Center, The president's physician, Dr Sean Conlon. Just 72 hours into the diagnosis. Now, the first week of covered in particular day, 7 10 of the most critical and determining the likely course of this illness. Pulmonologist Dr Brian Garibaldi is treating the president a big plan for today, since he's in such great spirits and doing well is to encourage them to eat. To drink to stay hydrated to be up out of bed and to be working and doing the thing things that he needs to do to get well, Dr Matthew Hines tell CBS News. They're telling us some things, but not others, And that's particularly frustrating. So will tell us, for example, that the president's auction saturation levels 96% while walking around the unit. But when he was asked, Hey, so do the president ever have a fever? And if so, what was the fever? He wouldn't answer the question. CBS News Special Report. I'm Lisa Matteo to

President Trump Dr Matthew Hines Dr Brian Garibaldi Dr Sean Conlon CBS Fever Walter Reed Military Medical C Lisa Matteo Mark Meadows
What Microsoft buying Bethesda means for gamers

What's Good Games

02:06 min | 5 months ago

What Microsoft buying Bethesda means for gamers

"So we talked a little bit about the Fez at the top of the show and we've been getting some more rolling details since the acquisition was announced earlier this week this story comes from I but does will run semi independently under Microsoft. xbox Phil Spencer has confirmed that Bethesda will continue to run. Semi independently after the company's acquisition. Speaking, to see nut Spencer made clear that while but those games will adopt some of XBOXES new practices including launching into game pass and becoming playable through game streaming. The company will retain some of the autonomy that resulted in some of the biggest games of all time quote. It's all about the culture of those teams Spencer explained they're not about becoming us this tally of the previous comments from but does s vp of Global Marketing Pete Hines who said quote were still working on the same. Games, we were yesterday made by the same studios we've worked with for years and those games will be published by us on a related knows any Max online studios announced despite Microsoft's acquisition the elder scrolls online we'll continue to receive support on play station for and Patron Michelle writes in and says, what are the actual chances of a fallout new Vegas to now that Bethesda and obsidian are both owned by Microsoft? So we've found a lot of fun memes floating around the last couple of days. I think the one where. Oh. My Gosh. I'm forgetting the director's name where he's making his Oscars Kiss Oh was it for parasite? No. Yes, it was it. Yes. Okay. Bethesda Obsidian, and then there's was a bunch of a bunch of ones and obsidian even got in it. We talked about it on the Monday show but how they tweeted and responds with a little shrug Gif not a gift but like the Emoji Yeah like are we going to make this? I would not hold your breath. OBSIDIAN has a lot of projects that are working on will follow New Vegas be something they may explore down the road potentially in the next three to five years I would guess not probably not got other other things on the roadmap

Phil Spencer Obsidian Bethesda Pete Hines Microsoft Max Online Studios New Vegas Patron Michelle VP Microsoft. Director
Preparing For Perimenopause: You Don't Have To Do It Alone

Short Wave

03:56 min | 5 months ago

Preparing For Perimenopause: You Don't Have To Do It Alone

"Today I'm joined by NPR health correspondent and reproductive fairy godmother Chatterjee for some real talk about peri menopause. We're GONNA talk about how the physical symptoms can come with a host of emotional and mental health symptoms to which some people don't realize right exactly But before I say more I just WanNa say that I. Think. I. Love My new title Reproductive Fairy Godmother but anyway getting back to business yes. So sure would go yeah. The physical symptoms can come with a host of emotional mental health symptoms absolutely. So take for example, woman I spoke with Terry, hines now about a decade ago when Terry was in her mid forties how period started to change it increased in frequency it increased in intensity and increased endurance. Now she had some of the classic symptoms of paramount applause laycock flashes, chills started gaining weight which many women do during this time but the would notable changes to her mental health to they just did not have the energy to do the things that I wanted to do was such a fog over who I was what I wanted whereas going. What I was capable of accomplishing I just could not find my footing at the time. Terry. Lived alone in Philadelphia where she worked as an assistant principal at a school. And she really struggled to get out of bed and good work and do the things that she loved to do like taking her dogs for morning walk and she began to withdraw from her friends as well. Yeah. To speaking from experience these all sound like symptoms of depression. You know self-isolation foggy nece low energy exactly, and you know the thing is that Terry actually struggled with depression before and had sought treatment for it and she knew her symptoms she knew what triggers and that that was usually a big change in her personal professional life. But this time though she says, she was just so focused on all the physical changes going on in her body because of premenopausal that her emotional struggles at first, they didn't even register in a mind. Oh so on top of Peri, Menopause Terry was managing depression to exactly and that's not uncommon. Among individuals who have had previous diagnoses or of clinical depression anxiety and this data suggesting that in the leader stages of paramount applause as many as thirty percent of women experience depressive symptoms. I want to put this on the evening news like all persons who experienced presents should be made aware of this. So they're prepared. I mean that's a huge number. So do you have a sense of biologically why they're such a spike? Right. So it's a stage of life when your hormone levels are changing, it's all changing your periods of changing your hormonal Goals are all sort of you know going awry and that can trigger intense changes in mood and psychiatrists that I talk to for the story said that if you're experiencing depression or anxiety during paramount a pause. It's not the changes in your hormonal cycles are unusual. Lawrence say dramatically different from somebody else's but it's more likely that you bring is more sensitive to these changes. So if you've experienced depression before you're more sensitive experiencing it when going through peri menopause exactly now, the other reason is that paramedic plus isn't just a biological change, right? It's also a huge life transition. Because they're all these changes in your body Sharon, it's a big part of aging which coming to terms with your metabolism might be slowing down. You might be mostly processing these things as well, and any big life transitions can affect people's emotional wellbeing

Menopause Terry Depression NPR Chatterjee Laycock Philadelphia Sharon Principal Lawrence Hines
Microsoft To Buy Bethesda In $7.5 Billion Deal, Acquiring Fallout, The Elder Scrolls

Techmeme Ride Home

02:02 min | 5 months ago

Microsoft To Buy Bethesda In $7.5 Billion Deal, Acquiring Fallout, The Elder Scrolls

"News this morning in video games Microsoft said it will be acquiring xanax media for seven and a half billion dollars in cash. Now, you might not know the name, any Max media I know I certainly didn't but I did know this name but says the soft works Xeni Max Media Owns Bethesda the maker of such gaming franchises as doom, the elder scrolls and fallout and the upcoming space epic star field as ars Technica says, this is an industry changing acquisition quote for context that's three times the. Price Microsoft paid for minecraft maker Mo- Jiang back in two thousand, fourteen merging of course, continued to be multi-platform developer. After it's Microsoft acquisition a decision that led to the site of Microsoft publishing a Mario themed mash up pack for Minecraft Nintendo consoles but minecraft was a relatively unique situation where the acquired game was built around cross platform compatibility among a heavily established fan base Microsoft seems less likely to extend that same multi-platform courtesy to says, does gaming properties in the long term, but nothing has been officially. Announced on that score in the near term, though Bethesda is still working on to console exclusive titles for the past five ghost wire Tokyo and death loop both those games have featured heavily in Sony's console marketing. This year ahead of expected launches in two thousand, twenty one, it is likely too late to change deal structures and platform release plans for those titles which are also coming to the P. C., which means Microsoft, could well, behind two of the PS five biggest console exclusives next year the key point. is where still Bethesda a VP OF PR and Marketing Pete Hines wrote in a blog post announcing the news we're still working on the same games we were yesterday made by the same studios we've worked for years and those games will be published by US and quote being part of Microsoft. Game Studios Makes Bethesda gaming lineup, a defacto part of xbox game pass Microsoft promised years ago that every upcoming first party game would be available on the subscription service quote on the same day they launch and

Microsoft Bethesda Game Studios Ars Technica Vp Of Pr Mo- Jiang United States Pete Hines Tokyo Developer Sony
A Modest Gentleman Who Changed Houston Skylines Forever-Gerald D. Hines’ Death at Age 95

Ground Zero with Clyde Lewis

00:19 sec | 6 months ago

A Modest Gentleman Who Changed Houston Skylines Forever-Gerald D. Hines’ Death at Age 95

"Heinz has died at the age of 95. Hines was the mastermind behind several local landmarks, including one Shell Plaza, the Galleria, Pennzoil Place, Bank of America Plaza, Jpmorganchase Tower and Williams Tower. Water wall on post Oak is named after Heinz, along with the College of Architecture at the University of Houston. HB expanding store

Heinz Shell Plaza Bank Of America Plaza Williams Tower Pennzoil Place Jpmorganchase Tower Hines College Of Architecture University Of Houston OAK
An attempted Coup in the US

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

03:31 min | 7 months ago

An attempted Coup in the US

"Welcome to kiss myths and mysteries either host Kit Chrome today the story of a coup against one of the presidents of the United States today's Podcast is the result of myth and mystery coming together to form a truth, a truth confirmed by data revealed by both the Freedom of Information Act an archive letters regarding lawsuits against the Bush family made public in one, thousand, nine, hundred, seventy, eight. This podcast is without political bias and exists only to. demystify myth and mystery whenever possible in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, three, a group of Americans wealthiest businessman powerbrokers including the grandfather of George W Bush Prescott Bush plan to stage a coup against then President Franklin Roosevelt to change the regime one year later retired Marine Corps. Major General smedley Butler revealed applaud the wait Prescott Sheldon Bush was an American banker and politician Wall Street executive partner the Brown brothers and a US senator he was the Father President. George H. W Bush in the grandfather to President George W Bush he attended Yale and was a member of the skull and bones. Prescott Bush seems larger than life and he was a business plot in nineteen thirty three referred to as the white. House. Coup was led in part by Prescott. Bush, the purpose of the alleged conspiracy was to replace the Roosevelt Administration with a fascist dictatorship, a coalition of many influential billionaires and powerbrokers led by Prescott Bush. Plan the coup the reason behind this attempt was the policies of the Roosevelt Administration towards the business world the owners of some of the biggest corporations like General Motors. Goodyear Chase Bank and hines thought the government would destroy private enterprise. Thus, they wanted to create a business friendly zine so that they could preserve their power. However, the coup plan came to light when smedley Butler a retired burning corps major general alerted authorities in Washington DC of the conspiracy. According to his statement. So mysterious bankers and businessmen approached him and asked him to command an army of veterans who fought in World War one in order to stage a coup and overthrow the democratically elected President Franklin Delano Roosevelt Butler was a popular military figure then, and he also had influence over the veterans. That's why they chose him a committee investigated the allegations and Declared that some Wall Street elites were involved in the conspiracy but nobody was charged go figure. Then there was Prescott involvement with the Brown brothers the financial architects of Nazism the documents from the National Archives showed that the bushes and Brown brothers shipped valuable US assets including gold coal steel at US Treasury war bonds to their foreign clients overseas as Hitler geared up for his. Nineteen thirty nine invasion of Poland the event that sparked World War Two is business dealings continued until his company's assets were seized nineteen, forty, two, hundred, the trading with the Enemy Act. Then there is the Bush family stronghold Jupiter Island, but that will have to be another

George W Bush Prescott Bush President Franklin Roosevelt Major General Smedley Butler President Franklin Delano Roos Roosevelt Administration Prescott United States Brown Kit Chrome Marine Corps General Motors Goodyear Chase Bank Jupiter Island National Archives Washington Poland Senator Hines
Kodak Crashes 85% from Recent Peak

Stansberry Investor Hour

11:24 min | 7 months ago

Kodak Crashes 85% from Recent Peak

"Kodak. We've been all over this for the past two weeks. Right I told you they got a seven hundred and sixty five million dollar loan to get into the drug. Business Kodak the Film Camera Company getting into the drug business. Turns out in their one hundred thirty, one year history they actually were in the drug business for six years from one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, nine, hundred, ninety, four, it was a failure they got out and it's notable that they got in one thousand nine, hundred, eighty, two years before the recession set in right typical top of the cycle de Worse vacation kind of acquisition move for for a company is being managed into into the ground so. That's where it to the reason episode again and and we're back in the drug business with this seven, hundred, sixty, five, million dollar loan from the government I thought that was just kind of crazy enough all by itself because sent the stock soaring from to sixty two on a Monday to sixty dollars at the peak on a Wednesday in you know the third trading session of the week that week. Just insane. That was crazy enough right. Then what are we talk about last week? Well, they granted themselves stock options the day before announcement like that's not fishy like. Crony capitalist move, you know to just try to rake some of his money off the top of the management team. Okay. Now. This Week There's well other stuff going on. So so since last we talked the SEC is investigating this thing. And the loan from the. International, the government agencies called the DNC, the Development Finance Corporation the DNC loan is on hold. And the stock as I speak Ios below ten bucks again, and if you look at the stock chart of the last several days, it looks like it was flatlined. You know like somebody whose heart stopped and then wham the hit it with the paddles and now it looks like his heart stopped again it's a ridiculous episode but I feel like I need to clarify something because of at least one feedback email I got in this case. No, it is not okay for these executives to get stock option grants it's not okay and it wasn't okay for them to get them. I don't believe even back in May. Right I put together a time line I wrote a whole piece about this for the stands very digest and I put together a time line and my timeline showed that the order the executive order from President Trump. Was May fourteenth. Two days before that Kodak moves seventy million dollars from a Chinese subsidiary to a US subsidiary quote in anticipation of an intercompany transaction and quote I believe starting up a new pharmaceutical subsidiary constitutes an intercompany transaction, right? So that was actually made twelfth may fourteenth. Trump is used the executive order and invokes the defense production act and says, Hey, you know, let's lend money to companies so that we can produce drugs domestically because too much drug production is overseas in places like China and India by the way if you research that, it's not completely true. We'll talk about that. Maybe another day Kodak made the director option grants the first time on May twentieth today their annual meeting. So, eight days before they're moving money from Chinese from a foreign subsidiary to to a US subsidiary anticipation of a major transaction. Then trump invokes this defense production act, which is just appropriates money for national security right two days later, then six days later, they grant themselves these options at premium prices. Then approximately may eighth according to an interview with the CEO Kodak, and this government agencies start talking about its new drug business. Then on July twenty seven, these idiots grant themselves more options. Then July twenty eighth and it leaks out stock was up twenty, five percent that day the news leaked out. and. Then Twenty John Twenty as the big announcement right? Seven, hundred, sixty, five, million dollar loan to Kodak the shares were up four fold that day July twenty, ninth the stock price hit sixty dollars. And the volume that day is like a hundred and sixty times the previous day and the previous day was twenty, two times the David were that. Next Day July thirtieth a fellow called Mike or non gap thoughts. Which is a a newsletter that he writes on sub stack non gap thoughts. He writes this article citing these suspicious option grant dates when and strike prices next day July thirty fourth. Wall Street? Journal publishes an article citing the potential you know ninety, they said ninety five million dollar windfall for CEO Jim Continente. And there were others on on the Management Team received the options to August. Fourth Wall Street Journal publishes an article citing a new SEC investigation into the disclosure of the loan and the option grants right because it looked like the the loan with the news of the Lomas leaked out on the twenty seventh I think is really what they were concerned about. But the whole thing stinks and let me tell you something what I alluded to earlier when I said I need to make something clear about this. This is not the way capitalism is supposed to work. A corporate management team is supposed to make a lot of money. They're supposed to get ninety five million dollars for creating a business that has performed well for a period of time. That has generated you know for ninety, five, million bucks. You'd better be generating you know at least a billion or more couple of billion hopefully in free cash flow over a period of time consistently, right a real sustainable business for that kind of reward. You don't get paid that kind of money just for getting a loan to be in a business that you were in for six years out of your one, hundred, thirty, one year history and sucked at. Okay that's not the way this is supposed to work. This is the ranking crony capitalism, the EST crony capitalism. And crony capitalism is when you get paid for no in people, right it starts looking suspicious back in May when they're moving seventy million bucks from China to the US, it looks like they already knew they were going to do something and then Oh, two days later trump invokes this this executive order appropriating these loans for this kind of stuff and then up six days. Later, we start granting ourselves options at prices that suggests we know the stock is GonNa take off like a rocket ship. Then we do it again on July twenty seven just to show you how utterly stupid we are. This is not the way it's supposed to work they basically what they did here was. They just took money from well, you know this government money. So you could say they took taxpayer money and they said how can we get way too much of this money in our own pockets? Oh, I know let's grant ourselves a bunch of options. Okay, your stand. Now, I don't have a problem with option grants in general I. Realize people need to be incentivized. It's just the way. Things are nowadays right to to attract good management. You gotta pay them. What looks like way too much money a lot of the time, but this is not that. This is a management team taking money from taxpayers and really taken ultimately from shareholders as well. They're given themselves equity for free that the shareholders have to buy in the market. This isn't the only episode of this. You'RE GONNA see there was a smaller episode that I I kinda filed this way I didn't think I was going to mention it but there was a guy. David? T hines in a story in the Washington. Post. July. Twenty Eighth I mean it's all allegations so I don't know I'll just say this poor fool apparently borrowed four million dollars in this federal PPP paycheck paycheck protection program it was part of the cares act. Right. The cares act was that two trillion dollar corona virus bill that was signed into law in March and included three hundred and forty, nine billion in forgivable loans for small businesses to maintain operating expenses. Mostly payroll, right? That's why it's called. PAYCHECK protection program. So you can just pay your employees even though maybe you're running a restaurant and they have to stay home because of the cove in nineteen, right. So this guy gets four million from this program and then a week later people see him riding around. Miami beach in a Lamborghini. A brand new Lamborghini Lamborghini. Hurricana. Which I guess. That's an electric Lamborghini costs more than three hundred, eighteen, thousand dollars again, how stupid is this guy? That's like granting yourself options the day before the loan announcement. And of course, these things are ripe for. For, this kind of abuse, this is what you get went when the government starts literally like throwing money around all, this is done very very hastily right because we think we have to act we have to act now. and. So this is what you wind up with. You wind up with Kodak and you wind up with this poor sad sack who who thought he wasn't GonNa get caught when he use P P peabody to buy a fricking Lamborghini. It's you know somebody's going to include that in some kind of TV you know some kind of fictional TV show because it's just too priceless. So that's where we are that. That's where we are in. You know the state of of all things financial in August of twenty twenty. Boy Twenty twenty is the weirdest fricken year. I mean things that I won't even get into some of the things that that people I know have been exposed to this year, but it's just. So it's also utterly weird when you shut who who'd a thunk who'd a thunk when you shut down the global economy because you're afraid everybody's going to get the flu or whatever. That all of this stuff would happen that you would get people you know in Lamborghinis with government money and you know Kodak Management taking money out of taxpayers, pockets would have thunk it. Anybody. With a brain is the answer to that one anybody with a brain. And what what you do about what you do about it well. Look we told I told you to avoid Kodak because. People look at that kind of action and the knee jerk. The thing that's built into your brain you know that's that's been kind of evolving for hundreds of thousands of years in complete evolved for hundreds of thousands of years completely different circumstances that have nothing to do with investing. So immediately, as soon as you see that surge Kodak you want hit the buy button but I'm telling you it's deadly and wrong every single time

Kodak Twenty Twenty Management Team President Trump United States Ceo Kodak Executive John Twenty Lamborghinis SEC David Kodak Management China Kodak. DNC Lamborghini Wall Street Journal FLU Miami Beach Film Camera Company
LGBTQ+ representation in cybersecurity

Cyber Work

05:38 min | 7 months ago

LGBTQ+ representation in cybersecurity

"You tell me some some some juicy bits from your autobiography? What kind of stuff? Are we going to cover here. Let's let's you know. Let's let's for a little bit not too much but just a little bit for the readers. I'd have to be careful because I gotta take care of my boy Jim minutes. Oliver Wiley Okay Yeah so great guy by the way. Cool cat. So. Widely doesn't publish autobiographies. So technically I checked call it that it is a non fictional narrative. I am. Real territory between more autobiography whatever exactly. Exactly. But so yeah, it's it's really it's my coming up story. It's my former life and my former skin you know as Eric Hines. And and Not. So where does say that name And you know my transition and really you sort of becoming Loki. Where I transitioned in two thousand and eight, and my journey is a trans woman in. A male dominated world male dominated industry in cybersecurity. My world is cyber security right and You know what that experience has been like just. It's interesting for me because it's very. it's a very unique perspective being able to say that I've lived my life is to completely different sexes to completely different genders you know and and living my life is a man living my life as a woman It's very interesting because you don't really prepare for that. You don't prepare because is a man you read about the inequality. Roy of of men and women in the workplace. The wage disparity being passed up for job opportunities in the workplace as a woman over a man with the same or less credentials or experience. It's a real thing and I didn't prepare myself for what that would be like and it's it's you would hope that. An industry as as you know, new is cyber security. 'cause if you think about cyber security isn't very old, it's not like us. Our banking. Or. Investing, it's it's A. It's a nascent industry that we are trying to figure out as we go right and So you would think it would be more progressive. When it comes to equality and inclusion in. It's not you know and I. You know there was a tweet storm that occurred. I. Think you brought it up in a previous episode where I got involved in to a thread that actually became my most viral tweet and it was a about a gentleman who made the made the statement that cybersecurity moves too. Fast for women run and and that women would rather be at home and be homemakers and be family oriented versus being in Cybersecurity, and it was shocking to me is this is this is a very prevalent narrative for some reason You know there's a lot of people that believe that you know, hey, a cybersecurity isn't for women and here's why. I always from played devil's advocate I was trying look at it from other people's perspective But it's hard to find out a lot of things I'm reading. Because you know I mean there's there's a lot of I think. There's a lot of things that people need to be educated on when it comes to just women issues, but trans issues like you know there's this belief and I hear it a lot. That Trans women shouldn't be allowed to participate in Women Only Sports, right? That's so stupid to me. You know and is in I think it was actually South Rogan's podcast where he actually talked about this and in the narrative is being spread a lot. I understand I think from that perspective but people don't understand that when you go through hr it. Your upper body strength as a as a man as man's body gets depleted you know your your upper body strength. Pretty much goes away in deteriorates. There are women on the tennis court. I. Used to be a competitive used to play tennis competitively and go to tournaments, and there's women biological women that could kick my ass on the tennis court you know and their biological women have. Much, more per body strength than me and you know I think it's an I. Don't think it's ignorance I. Think it's education. It's it's. A learning curve. Yeah and like like for example, martial arts, you know there are biological women that could wipe the floor with. And and you know so I think I think it's educating people understanding and also the unique perspectives were probably talk about the blog article here in a minute unique perspectives at the Lgbtq community brings two teams brings to the workplace. Yeah. that that that you may not find in a less inclusive culture

Tennis Oliver Wiley JIM South Rogan Eric Hines ROY
Florida man accused of using coronavirus relief funds to buy Lamborghini

TIME's Top Stories

02:33 min | 7 months ago

Florida man accused of using coronavirus relief funds to buy Lamborghini

"Florida man receives three point nine million dollars in Covid nineteen relief funds Biza Lamborghini and gets arrested for fraud by just SI- abates a Florida man has been charged with fraud and other criminal offenses after receiving three point nine million dollars in covid. Nineteen relief funds and using the money to purchase among other things a Lamborghini. David T hines twenty nine was arrested on Friday and charged on Monday according to a statement by the Department of Justice over three million dollars has been seized from his bank accounts along with the sports vehicle. Authorities allege that hinds fraudulently applied for about thirteen point five million dollars in paycheck protection program P. P P loans for a few companies P P P part of the corona virus aid relief and Economic Security Act was enacted on March twenty ninth to provide small businesses with forgivable loans. Any money given to accompany on behalf of the program is supposed to be used for rent or mortgage costs, employee, salaries and utilities. According to the DOJ statement, Heinz lied on the loan applications and made inaccurate statements about the expenses of the companies including the amount paid to employees. Those purported employees either did not exist or earned a fraction of what hines claimed his P. P P applications. US Postal Inspector Brian McMillan says in an affidavit, according to the Miami Herald collectively hines falsely claimed his companies paid millions of dollars in payroll in the first quarter of twenty twenty state and bank records however show little to no payroll expense during this period. Hines was approved for funding and received three point nine million dollars just a few days after getting the money, he bought the Lamborghini for three hundred eighteen thousand dollars. He is also alleged to have purchased luxury items from stores and resorts. In the past few weeks. Florida has become one of the hot spots for US Covid, nineteen cases and recently passed New York for having the second most confirmed cases in the country behind California. Hines was in federal custody over the weekend released on bond on Monday and is scheduled to be arraigned on October

Hines Lamborghini Covid Florida Biza Lamborghini United States Fraud P. P P Miami Herald SI Hinds Brian Mcmillan DOJ Department Of Justice David T Heinz California New York
Frank It Forward: How to Sell Ball Park Franks When No One's at the Ballpark

Business Wars Daily

04:48 min | 7 months ago

Frank It Forward: How to Sell Ball Park Franks When No One's at the Ballpark

"The weirdest baseball season in history started last night. The Twenty Twenty Major League baseball season debuted with a clash between the Washington nationals in the New York Yankees, nationals park in the country's capital was packed with. Virtual fans, that's right, the fans you may have seen on TV. Were just images manufactured for the cameras by Fox Sports? In reality, the teams play to an empty stadium because of covid nineteen. This season teams will play only sixty games down from the typical one hundred sixty two right now. There's no intention to have many live fans at any of them just TV cameras. We won't get into the debate about why Fox decided to manifest virtual fans complete with recorded sounds of cheering applause, and the like the TV audience know. Today, we're interested in one of those things that like baseball. Itself has always seemed timeless the stadium hotdog. Too, many of us me included a hot dog goes with the baseball game. The way hot fudge goes with vanilla ice cream. They just belong together, but not this year. Needless to say virtual fans don't order francs with mustard and onions, nor do they reach out and snack a beer from a wandering vendor that's leaving entire industry, high and dry stadium vendors are out of work. That's giving Ballpark Franks the nation's number one. One brand of hot dogs and opportunity to look philanthropic, while also promoting their dogs to fans, watching Games on the small screen on Wednesday, which not coincidentally was national hotdog, day Ballpark Franks and it is donating one hundred thousand dollars to unemployed stadium vendors through a baseball charity in campaign. They're calling frank it forward. They're also asking fans to tweet their favorite baseball memories along with the Frank. It forward Hashtag of course. For every tweet that fans post ballpark will donate an extra dollar up to fifty thousand dollars within a day. Fans had begun complying. Some tweets were clearly planted by Tyson foods. ballpark Franks owner to get the Frankfurt Frenzy on fast forward, but some were genuinely sweet like a tweet from Ban Molly, Heidrick, she finally recalled attending the thousand fifteen world series game with her dad, telling her for the entire five hours that she would be Zombie the next day at school. She said she almost caught a foul ball and yes, she couldn't stay awake in math class. Her HASHTAG, no regrets. The promotion gives a sheen of sweetness and philanthropy to the ballpark francs, which happens to be America's biggest seller of the process. Meet parent. Tyson foods of course is struggling with its image these days between having covert outbreaks at many of its meat, processing plants, and being under investigation by the Justice, Department for alleged poultry price-fixing, but on a summer night. We need to dwell on the bigger picture. Maybe. What's worth spending time on? Is The marketing rivalry between BALLPARK Franks in America's second largest brand Oscar Mayer that brand owned by Kraft, was revived three years ago when its parent put ten million dollars into removing chemicals like nitrates nitrites from its dogs, the attempt to cater to the clean eating tastes of millennials. It helped nowadays craft hines has been doing well selling its enormous variety of grocery store staples to our newly stay at home nation, but how will it compete at the? No, Fan Ballpark. Hopefully not with a repeat of its attempt from twenty nineteen, a hotdog ice cream sandwich. It was made with. Get this candied hotdog, bits, hotdogs, sweet, cream, spicy, dijon, Gelato, and a cookie Bun, according to writer Michael Clare and a Major League baseball publication called cut four last August. Clare's take on what was clearly a desperate attempt to get the upper hand in the Weiner wars. This hot dog mustard ice cream. Monstrosity needs to return to whatever hell it came from. So. Far Oscar Mayer hasn't made any announcements that one this year may be given covid nineteen craft hines got a little more sensitive about the queasiness factor when it comes to the economics of the Frankfurter fight between Tyson and craft Heinz. The ballpark matters in two thousand sixteen Americans spent twenty million dollars buying hotdogs at ball games, so says the national hot dog and Sausage Council. Council apparently, that's the last time they gathered this debt. So the biggest question this year will be. Will fans watching at home still by hotdogs, or will they just eat? Whatever happens to be for? Dinner served on a real plate, not in a little cardboard dog holding. If that happens, the frank forward campaign is unlikely to give much of an advantage to Ballpark, Franks and hopefully. WHO's out of work? hotdog vendors have already found a way to turn their talents to something more lucrative. And perhaps less greasy.

Franks Baseball Twenty Twenty Major League Oscar Mayer Hines Fox Sports America Tyson Foods New York Yankees Washington Michael Clare FOX Heidrick Major League Sausage Council Kraft Tyson Writer Weiner
"j hines" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

06:18 min | 1 year ago

"j hines" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"Families You know whether or not the mother the daughter the brother Along with their wives living in apartment complexes living together. So I think here it's a it's a bit more family oriented Bennett is in a state versus like you said you have a lot of a single single parent households Because of the high divorce rate or because no Just because of the culture or different things like that but I think here family sticks together a lot longer and it's more of a family a family environment. Yeah that's awesome to see and Kylie no one of the things that we all struggle with. Dad's is the technology. We're all battling against it because it's hard to kind of lead by example anymore. Because I know myself just from doing what I do. I'm constantly using the phone or some type of form technology and I'm trying to tell my kids not to do it so I know your kids are young yet. It's for this as well but they already swiping screens. Are they involved in the in the analogy? A what is it like over there? Everybody the same thing I mean. Yeah my daughter is knows is better with my iphone and IPAD. Im and she's three years old. So I mean this is just the world we live in right now. You know the we grew up with a lot. Different toys a lot different. You know technology less type things and you know the opposite. Everything she does is on the IPAD and even when she goes to school you know she's three years old and they're doing everything on a smart board doing stuff on a computer you know. They're doing stuff one. You know doing stuff when youtube educational video so we try to find a happy balance. Where with the kids Week technology is so big. That's the way we communicate with family members because we're Brooke so obviously technology with facetime and skype and everything is like really big. Russ but we try to. Have you know our hours out of the day? We're eating dinner or together where we just don't have any. We don't have any technology to kind of have the happy balanced Were you know the away returned? Tv off and just so we can actually compensate more. Actually ignore them not to be. So did you know did it. Technology for all of us and it is an addiction. That's for sure had your kids. Have they been to the United States yet or have? They spent their entire lives so far in Russia. No so both my kids were actually born in the United States. so they came over afterwards in a while you're playing And we spend generally we spend ten months out of the year I spend time with out of the year in overseas And then I'm usually home for two months My family's usually here I will say a out of the ten months that usually here about eight eight eight months And then they go back home so generally they ate my wife and my kids they They kind of have be balanced But seeing no no the state in the eight my my daughter now he definitely No recognize the difference. He talk about you know her whole New Jersey and hurt delays in New Jersey. And everything like that. So she recognizes the difference since he's like we already booked a trip for them to go home in April and she's like Oh. I can't wait to go into airplanes. I can go home and I could see Nanna argosy GRANDPA and could see everybody so she definitely at the age now. She's starting to realize it the difference between the two which is pretty cool. Yeah and that's all see I'm speaking to you from Jersey today here and It's pretty cool. I imagine a big benefit to your kids growing up to have that a multicultural multi language benefit. That will be. What about for yourself here Kyle? We're about a month into the new decade here. What kind of goals as the happy self here for the future number one I think The the passing of Kobe. Brian definitely had a huge effect on me One of the things I notice about illnesses to his his balance of white how he was able to be such a great As well. They're a great entrepreneur Do all these things but yet state still be a great father. You know he was always know at all. His children stuff is daughter stuff. He was always very supportive. Very attentive You know to to to to their things and I think for me as a father and as an athlete you know. We're always taught at athletes to be married to our sport or Mary who are crap. And that's the reason why we're so successful at what we do and sometimes our families and our kids kind are the are kind of the ones that have to sacrifice you know they take the brunt of that sacrifice because of art because of my my athletic career. I remember I think it was ultimate right. I think he said that his daughters. I worry for by daddy in desktop. And you know this because no we're always traveling stuff like that so I think for me. My biggest goal in thousand twenty Is trying to find a happy balance so where I can be no more attendant. Why can still be You know involved with my career You know evolved in things that Basketball takes me athlete. Then also be very active in my children's is Especially oversight over here overseas in trying to be more present In the things they were just sometimes. It's not easy but I'm trying my best and I think that's why my biggest goal in two thousand twenty. Yeah that's good stuff you touchdown and a little bit here but the last thing I wanted to ask the data. Get on the PODCAST. What type of advice do you have the new dad or for that about the father? Who's out there listening? I think my my my lights I tell. Everybody is number one Enjoy the moment in staying in the present Because you know as you in as many parents note these these this time goes by so fast I remember my my dad and everybody stadiums like no. I feel like it was just yesterday. Were not years old. Even when you're old you ran diapers and I feel that way now even though my kids still young but we look at pictures and videos. I'm like wow like they've grown so much over the course of three years so I think that's my biggest advice. Stay President and enjoy the moment. Take take as many photos and videos as possible Because IT GOES FAST. You know kids. They grow by his growth acid. This time goes by fast so I said embrace of moment and enjoy the moment. I think that would be my biggest vice. Yeah very well said. Love the message. There's been an honor for me. I gotTa say karl-heinz Your First Class five all the way and thank you so much. You'RE GONNA be a few minutes of your time. I I last visited the.

New Jersey Dad Kylie Bennett youtube United States Jersey Basketball Russ Brooke Russia United States. Kyle Brian President facetime Mary skype
"j hines" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

03:00 min | 1 year ago

"j hines" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"Our family members out here For different holidays. Or you know different things that we have Just so they can kind of get a chance to experienced anything like I said. It's memories that we're not only growing together but also yeah that's awesome. Kyle and obviously the death of Kobe. Bryant sent shockwaves throughout not just the basketball but the entire world response. What was the response over there? In Europe the European League have any type of all tribute to Kobe. How is it handled over? There was literally coming off the when I got the news and immediately odyssey the just the kind of devastation in all my teammates faces in everybody in our our organization I'm illegal my wife Anything else started calling. Call my friends back home and it was being Kobe. Bryant means a lot to a lot of people especially international. I think he was a true own. Spokesperson Especially for the US Globally When it comes to apathetic You know he had A. He had a huge man accused lot to a lot of people Just because he no he was He was very well verse He's he's he's multicultural. Speaks a you know a a bunch of different languages? I think a lot of people were kind of relate to them late to him The early I did a bunch of different things. We had a moment of silence Each team we were the twenty four Twenty four shirts in in memory of imminent and the rest of the people that lost families We also did The Twenty Four. Eight southbound tribute sec like many of the special teams. Do in in even still right now. They're still many tributes going right. Now we play the game yesterday and Their team had a chicken in every team that we played so far has kind of tried to honor him Honor him in in the rest of the people that have arrested. Bakers have also lives in their own special way. So you know whether or not as you know people Ryan shoes or wearing t shirts or social media policy is is you definitely see it The huge impact that he's had throughout the world. Yeah I think one of the most important parts of his legacy or who he was is that he was a you know a first last father all the way father who was so important to him and right now. I mean in the United States were facing a fatherless crisis. We have way too many kids that are growing up without a father in their life. What is it? How is the family? Units over in Europe has composed over here and they having that similar crisis where. There's a lot of kids growing out of DAD's you don't see that over there as much. I think not as much I think you know. Generally the the biggest difference between a European culture in the United States cultures that you know normally when you're eighteen seventeen eighteen years old. You know your parents like you know you going your own you know you. You know your drought at House trying to kick you out of house possible and it's a little bit different here and you see You know you see families stick together a lot longer. You see kids still living their parents homes upwards until twenty or thirty until they marry until they had kids or even still you know you you see no groups of.

Kobe United States Bryant Europe House European League Kyle basketball Ryan
"j hines" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

09:23 min | 1 year ago

"j hines" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"Joining me now first-class father. Kyle hines welcome to First-class Fatherhood. This is definitely a privilege to to be here. Let's talk right here. How many kids do you have? And how old are the do kids My daughter Anya is three years old Three and a half now and I have a son who just turned to On New Year's that very cool did you guys do any kind of like gender reveal to find out what you avenue did you guys wait till the end so both times We did it kind of differences. First Time we waited until my daughter was board. Um So we had no idea But how or what the what the sex with Jennifer is going to be so we went to do this because we wanted to enjoy the privacy. What it was his organically enjoy everything and then kind of just focus on the Serbian pregnant is making sure that my wife. The conditions possible And then we end up having a girl the first time and it's on we actually did a general review at my daughter's Christening So kind of a surprise reveal we kind of had everybody Up for like a group picture while we're taking a group picture on. We have balloons going to pop up and everybody was kind of surprised. People didn't really understand what's going on today seeing the blue balloons and in he's like my father her father arm. You know. Start crying the grandmother's crying. And you know the aunts and everybody you know got really excited so yeah it was was definitely a beautiful definitely a beautiful day. Yeah so cool. I love watching those videos when they come up on Youtube twitter. Whatever all the different creative ways people come up to announce what they're having now you've got one and one. You're going to go to break the tie here. You all done. We want to We went to Definitely go one more We're thinking possibly to while my wife's always know voting the idea of you know when ABC twins so she decided to get it out the way But Yeah we definitely want to You know we went to have at least one morning possibly to I got four myself. We had three boys and then got the girl on the fourth. Try if not. We'd have five by now but we got a grabs places. Miami or a handful. Now I can imagine that you You do everything you do and still be able to you know. Maintain about the work is I mean. That's a that's a you know. It's a big. It's a big thing. They accomplishment really right. If you could please take a minute here just to hit my listeners with a little bit about your background what you do. My name is Carl Heinz I'm currently playing basketball professional basketball player playing overseas in the early I play for a team called CESCO Moscow currently living in Moscow Russia With my family I've been playing professional basketball now for twelve years For those that don't know the Euro League is essentially the second best basketball league in the world. it's essentially the NBA Virgin on the European version of the NBA For people that I guess say familiar names. Luca Danni each Two years ago came from the League. There's a lot of you know big name players Beca Canada they have come came from Europe or vice versa. That are playing over We travel out to play some of the best teams in the best cities Whether or not as in Greece or without Madrid Barcelona And like I said I've been in. I've been living out for the past seven years. Yeah that's very cool. Kyle and I know you've had all these experiences. How about. How old were you when you first became a dad? Had it becoming a father kind of change your perspective on life. I became a dad at the age of twenty nine It it it literally changed everything I always say that being a parent or becoming apparent is the most self listing that you can possibly do Because suddenly you know it's before it was more or less you know about you know you or your wife or you know just individual and now it's it's more about the kids about children You know my day is pretty much surrounded by by their debt. You know whatever they WANNA do. We kind of know plan our days around that which is not having any other way out of the biggest lesson and also giving opportunity kind of realise. What's important life You know having kids having my family quotes especially you know over here You know being Here in Russia and Moscow. We don't you know. Our secondary family are the primary family members with us. It's just us so you know it gives us opportunity to kind of grow with strong bond together. Kind of you know Grow a relationship than I guess you would say. Possibly we were living living back home states. Yeah well said and what was the transition like for you to add to move to Europe and are you like. What does the school system like? I know your kids are a little young yet for it but What type of schooling do they have for the American families that live over in Russia Initially in the beginning just for me individually was It was a little bit difficult transition. just coming from a completely different culture Learning different language You know trying to understand a different way alive and then also just the whole isolation factor of it Initially when I came for the first You know I five or six years. I was alone by myself It's a my wife came over so just you know kind of you know having that I'm a big family so a lot of friends are starting to get used to being alone and kind of you know trying to use that time wisely But when my wife game Literally we're just talking about now. She was over here on literally less than thirty days and we found out she was pregnant. So like it kind of initially had used impact on us And my kids. I mean Moscow. Surprisingly enough is nothing. Like what you see you on CNN. Or what you see the rocky movies or no all the no John wicked all that stuff Let's complete opposite. Moscow is probably one of the most family friendly place was most kid-friendly places that I've ever seen Everywhere you go every restaurant you go to they have a kid space they have a play space. Have entertainers there the balls all the shopping centers? They have like floors dedicated to kids. Play spaces you know. They have a huge indoor. I guess you're saying that States. Almost like chucky cheese like luxury chucky cheese type type type of place bases Here in Moscow in his beautiful so my kids they enjoy it We live in a apartment building where there's a lot of international people a lot of diplomats a that other athletes live here so just downstairs they have a a. I guess a nursery or almost like a kindergarten Nicole. Joe's guard gear my kids. They go half the English and they do. Have they rushing so we're trying to get them exposed to to to learning Both languages and also get their kind of their ear under my exposed to Learning multiple languages like many kids here overseas in Europe and in Russia. Do Yeah. What an important skill to have to and that'll be very valuable to them growing up so I I shouldn't expect Ivan Drago to meet me off the plane right. No I didn't own and he's the opposite of you. If you ever have opportunity to travel to Moscow I would say definitely come. I mean it's definitely one of the most beautiful cities on the entire world. I mean like I said it was probably the most surprising factor when I came here. I was expecting you know all the you know everything that we heard going up but it's been completely opposite. Yeah you know what I'm curious about. Kyle is as far as the holidays. I know certain holidays like Thanksgiving Halloween or like unique to the United States. While you're over there do you kind of keep those traditions in your family. Is there anywhere over there. Where any of that stuff celebrated. So we're we're part of a huge international community here along with the you know the players on my team the players from other teams So we try to keep those traditions alive especially because we want our kids to experience that we don't just because they're living abroad. We don't want them to kind of miss out on opportunities so one of the things we did like we kind of worker. Straighted During Halloween. We have a Halloween party every year. And my wife and my wife is a event planner. here So she plans a big Halloween Party where we had ELSA. We had no decorations. We had all different types of stuff for the kids to kind of get a chance to enjoy and then with a rest of my teammates and some of the other residents here in the apartment building. We kinda work Granada's almost like a trick or treat type of things that kids could knock on the doors and we kinda give them the experience that that Those type of things in the same with Thanksgiving Men with Christmas and stuff like that and we tried to know. Make sure that That they get opportunity to celebrate holidays and have opportunity to you. Know had those experiences because he knows we know as a as foreigners living here Sometimes that can be the most difficult part. Yeah very cool and I know you're you're early here. The kids are young. What was so far. What type of disciplinarian are you as a dad? You spank your timeout guy. How do you handle discipline kind of the I I guess my me and my wife we kind of do the good cop bad copper? Say so it's.

Moscow Russia Kyle hines Europe basketball NBA Anya Jennifer Youtube Miami CESCO Moscow Greece Ivan Drago CNN League Luca Danni ABC
"j hines" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

First Class Fatherhood

01:32 min | 1 year ago

"j hines" Discussed on First Class Fatherhood

"Please stick around for the interview and today's conversation? Kyle hines was recorded on video and is available for you to watch on my youtube channel. The link is the description of today's podcast episode. So please tap the link it over there and hit me with a subscribe and obviously the entire basketball community was rocked by the untimely death of Kobe. Bryant this past Monday. They held a huge celebration of life for the late basketball legend and his thirteen year old daughter who died in the helicopter crash. It is definitely something that forces us to take a look at our own mortality and realize that there is nobody. That's exempt from death here. We had a guy like Kobe. Bryant was in great shape had a ton of money in the bank fame fortune but in the end. None of that stuff truly matters or can prevent you from your date with destiny. What does matter is the impact you have on other people especially your children. That is the true legacy that we all have. That will be leaving behind. I believe Dana. White said it best when I had him on the podcast a few months ago. He said that when it's all said and done and you laying there in that box the only legacy you have is what your kids stand up there and have to say about you as a father and Friday on the podcast here. We're GONNA have a dad. Who was all too familiar with? How fast life can be taken away? Former navy seal. Jp donell joins before refresh frogman Friday edition of first place followed and next week. I'm going to be hit you guys with three episodes so please follow me on Instagram ally on the school as to find out who will be joining me here and as always guys please help me. Spread the word about this podcast. Every father in your neighborhood or in your contact list. Let them know about the show that celebrates Fatherhood Family Life Fatherhood rocks family values rule and every day is father's Day right here with me. I'm going to be right back with four time..

Kyle hines Kobe Bryant basketball White youtube Jp donell Dana navy
"j hines" Discussed on How Did This Get Played?

How Did This Get Played?

02:03 min | 1 year ago

"j hines" Discussed on How Did This Get Played?

"A week's go around will give it a will say one positive thing about this game and then give it a numerical decimal rating. I'll begin. You mentioned the ambulance levels again plan. I watched it on video but man. The lighting effects are very snazzy in an ambulance levels you're driving the road in the fucking lightest shifting over your and that's like an additional environmental hazard as you're trying to perform the surgery yeah. I thought that was dazzling but that look great. This game is you know. There's another game octo dad which is a similar sort of the. The controls are intentionally difficult. We talked a little bit of category. How that game is. The controls are difficult in that game. But not at anywhere on this level like that. There are a little clunky on that by design but this is more in the the OCTA dad category where it's just like it's intentionally very very hard to get with Matt screen up. We've got a dad who's an octopus basically And maybe wants you to retrieve his slippers from the porch or his sandwich from the kitchen. And but that's another game where it's just like very very hard to control and I get it I understand with the scheme is trying to accomplish. Something they WANNA play like. I'm not going to return to this and so for that reason. I think it's creative but I'm GONNA put the I'm GonNa give this a middling five point five. I heather go ahead The thing I liked the most and I would love Matt to pull. This up was the music. We haven't touched them. I I really liked that that that core song that plays that incorporates a beating heart into it or allow an EKG meter. I I love that music. I don't mind it at all. let's see if we can hear a little piece of it. It's so that the beat has dropped. That's pretty that's pretty fucking.

Matt OCTA
"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

"Big thanks to Irwin <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> hines and of course. <Speech_Music_Male> Thanks to you for listening <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you can find out more about Orion <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and has worked <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with the links and the show <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> at revision path <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> dot com <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Male> of course thanks to our sponsors <Speech_Music_Male> for this episode. <Speech_Music_Male> facebook design <Speech_Music_Male> and abstract <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> facebook design <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> is a proud sponsor <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> vision path <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to learn <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> more about how the facebook <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> design community is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> designing for human <Speech_Music_Male> needs unprecedented <Speech_Music_Male> scale. Please <Speech_Music_Male> visit facebook. Doc <Speech_Music_Male> Design <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> this episode <Speech_Music_Male> is also brought to you by <Speech_Music_Male> abstract <Speech_Music_Male> designed workflow management <Speech_Music_Male> for modern design <Speech_Music_Male> teams <Speech_Music_Male> spend less time <Speech_Music_Male> searching for design and <Speech_Music_Male> files and tracking down <Speech_Music_Male> feedback. That's <Speech_Music_Male> been more time focusing <Speech_Music_Male> on innovation and collaboration <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> like a glitch but for <Speech_Music_Male> designers abstract <Speech_Music_Male> is your team's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> version control source source <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of truth for design <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> work <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> with abstract <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> conversion sketch design <Speech_Music_Male> files present. <Speech_Music_Male> Work request <Speech_Music_Male> reviews collect <Speech_Music_Male> feedback <Speech_Music_Male> and give developers <Speech_Music_Male> direct access. The <Speech_Music_Male> all specs all <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from one place. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Sign your team <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> up for fourteen <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> day trial today <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by heading over to. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> WWW <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> DOT abstract dot <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> com. Aw <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Revision <Speech_Music_Male> Path is brought to you by <Speech_Music_Male> lunch a <Speech_Music_Male> multidisciplinary <Speech_Music_Male> creative studio in Atlanta <Speech_Music_Male> Georgia <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> looking for some <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> creative consulting <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for your next project. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Then let's <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> do lunch. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> visit us at Yup. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> It's lunch dot com. <Speech_Music_Male> I'll put a link <Speech_Music_Male> in the show notes. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> This episode <Speech_Music_Male> is created hosted <Speech_Music_Male> and produced by. Yeah <Speech_Music_Male> I mean Maurice Cherry <Speech_Music_Male> but engineering <Speech_Music_Male> and editing by <Speech_Music_Male> J Brasilia <Speech_Music_Male> our <Speech_Male> Intro voiceovers <Speech_Music_Male> by music man tray <Speech_Music_Male> with enjoy <Speech_Music_Male> natural music by yellow <Speech_Music_Male> speaker. <Speech_Music_Male> Our transcripts <Speech_Music_Male> are provided by <Speech_Music_Male> glitch. <Speech_Music_Male> So what <Speech_Music_Male> did you think of this episode. <Speech_Music_Male> Hit US <Speech_Male> up on twitter or instagram <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> or even better <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> by leaving us a <Speech_Music_Male> rating and review on <Speech_Music_Male> Apple. PODCASTS <Speech_Music_Male> I'll <Speech_Music_Male> even read your review right <Speech_Music_Male> here on the show <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> as always thank <Speech_Music_Male> you so much <SpeakerChange> for listening <Music> and we'll see you next <Music> time <Music> take <Music>

"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

07:17 min | 1 year ago

"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

"And it's not. We're not just a homogeneous group so I. I had early realization that I didn't have to try and be black. I just was black and that hat. Blackness can exist on a very large spectrum but it still impactful. It's still carries the same narrative story but my hey experiences are going to add to that history and that legacy to create something unique but I need to make sure that I carry Gary all of that with me into every room. I go to into every like time. I'm sitting with like a CEO or a C.. Suite person at Google. I need to bring with me. The legacy inherited a blackness and be proud of it and speak with the strength of that heritage. Wow now where do you see yourself in the next five years. What kind of work do you want to be doing? Twenty twenty-five and so me and a couple of my friends actually started project. That's actually building a restaurant group. We have two restaurants one is actually opening like they're actually building. Currently one is opening at the beginning of twenty twenty one. There's another one that's opening in October. And then we have a retail space. That's it's opening and like next month and so that to me is the next project and it kind of stems from crafted which is again like this space space in just to put more Colorado. I actually explained crafted as a living art experience that uses space in food and art to create empathy between disparate groups of people. And for me going back to like what I do. Art As art. The true in goal of art is not to create. Something beautiful is actually to create opportunity for conversation. That conversation can create change but in a conversation list society that silos us through Algorithms conversations between disparate group of people stopped happening and therefore it kind of limits. The amount of change that we can in have like impactful chains so crafted was that opportunity for me to create a space for conversation between district people to create change in and so extending that. We're looking at how we can actually go into some of these different neighborhoods so the chef and the guy who actually has own these different properties on I'm a partner in it but like the main owner. He's from this neighborhood called national city and for him. He grew up there but he always had to leave there to go to restaurants restaurants coffee shops. Like go anywhere which removes that since a pride in your neighborhood and when you have a sense of pride in your neighborhood then people begin to invest best more invest more time and invest more energy into that neighborhood. It's very similar to what we're seeing now in San Diego now that they see all these different things are going on. People are more proud proud to be in San Diego and then they're more likely to invest more likely to stay in so what we're trying to do in this neighborhood called national city where all of our three concepts are actually opening on one st is trying to create a sense of pride in that neighborhood so people feel prideful. They WANNA stay. And they want to reinvest into the community and so it's almost. How do you move into a neighborhood or not even moving? Because he's from there. But how do you reinvest into your community without outed ever having the need to be gentrified so I think we're trying to like for me that's like my my thing is like how do we figure out this fucking gentrification problem uh-huh oh it's almost going back to my passion for city plant or not passionate like what my goal of city planning was is going back to like these things that I had had from the very beginning which is how do you create equitable living spaces and make sure that your fostering opportunities conversation to create empathy and so oh my over the next couple of years. We're going to be launching those three projects and then from there who knows will say is probably going to be more stuff like that like. How do I just just getting deeper involved in helping to build true community reinvestment community? I'm big on community. Well see well just kind of wrap things up here. Where can our audience find out more about you and about your work on line? So of course you can go to basic agency DOT COM to see the agencies work and if you want to learn more about crafted you can actually go on instagram at experience crafted again. That's at experienced experienced crafted. And then if you WanNa follow me it's just at or when hines berry and that's on twitter. This is all on instagram. I mainly use instagram. A partial because I'm managing a lot of different social accounts and I can't be like going back and forth between twitter instagram. I find instagram by my main space to create conversation. So yeah definitely the main thing I would encourage people to follow is probably the experience crafted instagram. Just because that's where I put a lot of my time. I am a lot of my efforts. Outside of basic sounds good. We'll Irwin Hinds. I want to thank you so much for coming on the show. I mean I sort of had an idea. Yeah when I started this conversation kind of where things go but you you blew my mind like finding out about more about your background and seeing how now you've been able to we've all of these disparate experiences and influences into your story and then use that to like guide your work and go back out and give to the community. I mean it is such an inspiring thing to hear one of one of the themes that I'm trying to sort of carry throughout the a year is basically. How are we as black designers helping to build a more equitable future? Whoa and I feel that certainly you are doing it? I mean one through your design and branding work but then also through experience crafted and then through these actual physical spaces aces these restaurants and retail. Space I mean when they say people out here like doing it for the calls. You're out here doing it for the culture. Thank you thank you on the show. Oh I appreciate it. Thank you man. If I could leave with one one last thing. It actually goes to exactly what you're saying I think and I and I when I've had conversation with like other people of Color in general that from a very young age since we grew up in America we were actually forced to learn empathy and a sense of understanding of people outside of ourselves before we even were able to understand ourselves and so I think that is a very very powerful tool set as a creative to have in our tool bill because we can approach every single thing with a broader understanding and bringing that in making ensure. You're bringing that in making sure you're not shying away from it to me would be like the one thing. I hope that people like move move forward with Big.

San Diego twitter CEO Gary Google Colorado Irwin Hinds America partner DOT COM hines berry
"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

12:09 min | 1 year ago

"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

"Is this idea that culture sure is made by many in the beauty of San Diego is unlike some of the places in on the West Coast. SF`er unlike La people come here with different from perspectives in goals and backgrounds. Like a lot of people will go to. SF with one perspective. Been One goal so no matter what race you are. What cultural background you are? You have specific acidic perspective or goal. Res- here because you have the military because we're a border town because you have all the universities and the different levels of universities and then you just have random transplants flats who are coming here because it's something different or you have like the people who are coming here for the beaches. Yeah the people who are coming here for the music so you have all these different people that it almost is akin to something like a New York where you have this really really diverse makeup in. That's what makes the culture of New York into and to me it's like that's what makes the culture of San Diego is this diverse makeup in. It's just US realizing like over the past year. We've been realizing that that is true. Power like we don't have to just be a beach city in a brewery city we can be like a creative powerhouse and this year. We're going to actually have. I design week as well. So there's a lot of movement around San Diego and I'm happy to work in an agency that has been invested in me. Kind of take the reins on a a lot of the community initiatives and making sure that we're using our skill sets in our talents and authentic ways than like we still do can drive on all of those things but I think we used to just do that and we started asking ourselves. How do we as people who understand how to build brands? Start to build the brand of our own city in really give back to our community in a deeper authentic way that lasts so it's like the the teach Amanda fish versus just like fish. Were them right right. So I think what we're trying to do is build programs that teach people how to fish ultimately that will come back to other issues like homelessness or four other issues like education because by connecting these different people you can essentially begin to affect all of those different things because you're building empathy across these different groups so connecting. Somebody who like having somebody who. Maybe their family is being gentrified right or they're they're a part of like the gentrified ride class. You have them at the table. Wis like a property developer and maybe a city official and you actually allow to have choo conversation as opposed to just like yelling. That's like the main goal of crafted. Are You satisfied creatively. Oh yeah totally. I'm like I'm more than satisfied. Ed Parson because like whenever I'm unsatisfied just create something crafted like I literally. Just think about like okay. If I'm not having that feeling of expressing empathy or the feeling of me being able to tell my true authentic story and really explore who I am if I'm not having that then I just just create another avenue and another pathway for me to add it so I never. I never really rely on other people for my creative satisfaction of that doesn't make sense. I the reason reason I was asking that because I was talking with a friend of mine. Actually her name Dying Houghton. She's been on the show before to we're just you know kind of talking. Cash it up and she was mentioning. She's like beyond sailing. You don't take your foot off. What are you talking about? She's like the Vision Path. And now you've got the same series coming out and stuff and and like for me like what I'm doing these things and it's it's interesting. You mentioned like you sort of see the void and you figure out like how can I fill the void with something that can help so like with me with the anthology was like there's not a lot of people of color and indigenous. There's people doing enough writing about design like you go to a bookstore and you look in the archdiocese nine section. There are very few if any book there from people people of color definitely not from black people. Yeah and it's like where does that begin. It begins with just like you know writing an essay and like getting the the feedback from people and then building building on that. And you know I think now certainly with technology it's easier than ever to start up a blog and put your thoughts out there. One thing that I'm experimenting with this year is getting back to belong. I used to blog a lot and like the early two thousands and stuff and I'm thinking about getting back out there now because it's so much cheesier to just get your thoughts out before like yeah. That was blogging back. In the day like you had to know how to have my sequel database and install all to the database run the installation and then keep up with all this and you have to have hosting and domain and all this and like now I use this tool call notion which is sort of like like this all in one kind of work place it's like evernote and Trello and all these things like had a baby in its notion and like you can blog from notion so like no right a page and you can set the page to public and then because it's all in the cloud or whatever but like you can set that pace the public and then just have people read your stuff and it's like I have all my projects like I have all like revision path. Recognize all my stuff in notion and then I've got like a little separate thing that's GonNa be the blog that I'm going to start and it's I just right while I'm in here in published and it's so easy but I get what you mean about. You know you find if there's something that's not fulfilling you then you find a way to kind of get that difficult. Yeah and actually love what you're saying. I think that that's one of the biggest things within our industry that we've started to see an almost every other creative industry so like you start to see it in fashion and it's being led by these like black designers and I know I know that they probably wouldn't want you to call them black designers right because no one wants to be like pigeon holed in. I hate being called a black designer because I feel like. Oh you're just trying to say I'm good for that is opposed to just being like. I'm a good designer and I happen to have a very rich narrative that helps guide everything I do that. You might not have but like what you're saying about how we need more of that. We need more of that story within this industry within the design world because for far too long long it hasn't been there but we're here but it always feels like within this industry. It almost feels like we're the. We're like a minority group who's just like pushed to the side and it's it's not about us. You know what I'm saying like it's it's strange because the level of importance that specifically for me like black people have had within the building of America and what America as what America pop culture is a lot of stuff is based on pop culture and the nuances of pop culture and all of that stuff like like we kind of create that in our people create that we create the vibe of coolness that drives commerce right right around the world but people don't want to recognize that and so I think it's important like what you're doing hello important because it begins to shine shined light on the importance of these views and understanding these views and take antiques out of just the take maybe like a a young black kid reads it and it helps to take them out of just the consumer mindset of. Just I'm going to consume consume consume. I can actually create like like these platforms like instagram. And all of those things became popular off of the content that US create a lot of those youth are like young young black kids. They're creating content for an organization that they don't even know that they can work at that. They don't even know that they can build themselves. And so I think it's like just showing that pathway like going going back to what I was saying at the very beginning where I didn't even know things existed because I wasn't exposed to it and so by what you're doing you're like helping give that exposure hoping hoping that young kids are listening to this. I also man hope they're listening they're reading and even I mean not even though I would say just young kids because that exposure can really come at at any age you know just just know that the option is out there that there can be something different. That can really comment at any age. But yeah the what. What piece of advice has stuck with you the longest when you think back over your career you think over your creative journey like what is that advice? ooh So I never had like a specific mentor like ever in my creative journey. And I think it's just because I was a knucklehead so I never liked looks for mentors I would just always listen to like interviews from Kanye West West or like whatever creative. I'm super inspired by that time. And I think but the biggest nugget of truth that I ever received was like from my family. That just was about my father. One Time said I don't like who you're becoming and it was when I was losing myself for a little bit and I wasn't necessarily thinking about my heritage in my past my upbringing and to me. That conversation is the conversation that has stuck with me and helped to guide Eh. Although my my my father probably wouldn't remember this sled like one moment in the conversation that followed about making sure that you're checking checking with your heritage making sure that you're checking with the things of your past the things that your grandfather did the things that both sides of the family have done for me and didn't put a burden on my shoulder. It actually made me proud of WHO I am Roy. Come from and it made me want to truly honor that so that was probably be like the the biggest piece of advice again. I think I'm somebody who looks and desires to look for inspiration outside of my industry. I have never really looked at other design and other designers for my pathway. I really love to understand look at culture because the things that were creating are are all floor culture and so even with creatives my biggest inspirations are people in the world of fashion or the world music. So it'd be like a Kirby from Peer Moss or Virgil. Like those to me like some biggest. Inspirations because they stand for breaking down barriers and and was just by being fucking good. I don't know if you can curse on this side. I just by being good what they do and they they move with theory and a a message and to me. That's like that to me is my biggest inspiration. Is the idea of moving with theory moving with a message that is consistent and it might evolve over time but there's always substance there. Yeah and so for me. It's it's a combination of let my father said as well as is like growing up. I think I've always been like really proud of being a black man. No matter where I was or how I grew up I grew up in a predominantly white neighborhood head but I would like walk around school like my predominantly white school with my fist in the air. Because I was just like super proud of who I am where I came from it. I think it was because on top of like what the media would show you in all the negativity that the media was about being a young black man and how you can just be a rapper. You can just be this tonight. That's all you would see or criminal light the criminalization of black people. My parents had like these books. Forgot what they're called but we got. These books looks every single month every single month that would just dive into one like impactful like African American and so oh sing. Those stories alike. Booker T. Washington in like getting to see this diversity or like Harriet Tubman Like seeing those things at a very young age I got got to see the diversity of black people in that we exist on a spectrum of very large spectrum..

San Diego New York America La West Coast Booker T. Washington Ed Parson Harriet Tubman Dying Houghton developer Kanye West West official evernote Kirby Trello
"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

11:32 min | 1 year ago

"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

"Much so because again for me like even without the artist too I think I just needed to be exposed artist. Suit exposed me to the fact that this could be a profession but I did all of the work on the side and all my own like you can go audit classes to learn some skills or you can learn a lot of the skills that you need on youtube and stuff to me. I think the main takeaways of university city for me were some of the non design classes for the classes that were more focus like theory and Psychology like it does to me. The biggest helps because it expanded my mind as opposed to just expanding my skill set in so like if there is anybody who's listening. Who is is questioning whether they need to go to school or do I need to do this? I think as long as you're doing things that are expanding your mind so that you understand cultural nuances this you understand like again how to look at the world differently that to me is what as a designer university is really good for. Gotcha so from Pittsburgh to San Diego. That's a trick. Well really from Cleveland. The Pittsburgh San Diego. That's that's kind of a trek when you look back at your career. Yeah because I did my research I worked at a few agencies at no Biz. You know modify you did some work for digitize etc like when you look back at your career like what did each of those places kind of teach you like. Did you walk away from those experiences with like a nugget of information that you take with you now. Yeah Yeah I would definitely say I did. I think whether it be good or bad I definitely learned something from each of those experiences so I modify and some of the other ones were just like freelance clients like I was. I was the dedicated creative but they are mainly freelance. So it wasn't necessarily like major learning experiences right other other than like continuing to hone my craft res- notice interactive. I was also the only creative was brought in as like a creative director and it was is to help lead and build out this brand and I think one of the things that I learned from that was the importance of good leadership in the importance of a strong founder. And not say like notice actually didn't have that and I think that's why I learned it because I I saw what let in the experience and how it kind of destroyed the organization in the company and so from that is just like how to be a good leader by doing everything opposite of what that leader where did and how to be honest rice and making sure that you're inspiring your team and then when I went to Tara that was like learning how to manage growth because the d'italia was when I went to d'italia it was still relatively small. They had just gotten purchased by Jedi. Bt and over the time that I was there like expanded rapidly and what ended up happening. was you kind of lose. Designed for Culture Culture and the the owners knew that like their focus was expansion growth and almost taking over and becoming their own holding company that was like their goal and they actually they. They've done that so now they're called mural and Miriam is bought out a bunch of other digital agencies and and then digital media became Uram which is the holding company of all those other So like they were like super successful in that goal but I saw the sacrifice of creative to be this like bigger entity inside from there was making sure that when I go to the next organization Ms Ation that we managed growth properly so that we don't lose culture because we lose culture you have high attrition attrition costs more than keeping people as well as a cost that your work like if your your work is is is your product and if you lose all of those people than your product suffers. Yeah yeah that is so true. I see that now a lot of startups low tech startups. Usually that we're that's the case. There's been this sometimes over indexing on culture sure fit and oftentimes when bad things happen at a company like that and it's to the detriment of the product is to the detriment of the people that work there like. It's it's pervasive one stuff like that happens. Yeah now. You're in San Diego which we talked about this before recording I was like I don't think of when I think of San Associated Design or culture but like San Diego is one of the ten largest cities in the US which a lot of people know that. But I'm curious to learn for more about your community work there you said through basic that you all are kind of I. Guess the community series in San Diego. He talked a little bit about that. All right so I've been in San Diego for ten years when I first moved here like moving from Pittsburgh where you had like gallery crawls like once a month or like spending time in New York a lot where you just have a lot of culture like just a lot of creative culture and then even like touching l. a.. There's just like energy abide. When I moved here ten two years ago I was looking for those things and all I could find was like okay? There is breweries. And there's beaches like okay which is like super cool for a little bit. Especially when you're when you feel like you're a city boy and yeah I like the beach I'm gonNA sound like ungrateful like beaches like Nice but at the same time as a creative if I need that creative energy so when I first moved here there was like nothing in over the years especially within the past like three or four years I began to realize how wrong I was and just how hidden the energy in the Bible was in San Diego. It was like you had to know you had to know the people you had to know what's going on in order to find it so it was a lot more about the underground scene in San Diego and it was just like hard to find and Dan within the past like two years. That underground scene has started to really bubble up in so when we talk about. What is the creative scene in San Sandiego? We have like some of the best poets in the world like we have like our poetry society wins nationals. All of the time we have some of the best this dancers in the world. There's two dances in San Diego. Who Do choreography for like Justin Bieber? They have a new Broadway show. They do stuff for Britney Spears but they like I live in San Diego and we also have some amazing other dancers traditional urban as well as classical ballet. We have amazing chefs in an amazing culinary racing and then we also have like amazing creatives in amazing designers. I'm basic being one of those but you also have like grizzly in like a few other agencies and Young creatives who are here in San Diego and then you have like amazing deejays music so you have all of these different like amazing creative industries and creative spaces but one thing that we were seeing that they weren't rubbing shoulders so it kind of goes back to the thing. I was saying that I had this goal since the foundation of like my creative spark which is like. How do you build spaces where people can come together from different backgrounds and start to develop empathy and understanding and work together and again so you have all these different creatives in creative people in these different spaces and they're all doing these amazing things but they weren't rubbing shoulders? They there was no friction action. There was no collision and so we created this very simple series of this very simple idea of like just bring twelve people together from different industries different backgrounds. Different Cultures Cultures aren't racist together over dinner and we use food as the medium of connection. Because it's visceral it's easy to understand and it causes in spark conversation in so we strategically do like a five course a seven course meal mainly because it creates more time and then the food itself is never really the central focus of the time. It's there but really. The central focus is about creating a space for conversation to happen in these. He's twelve people. Do not know each other at all in they get free invites so no one has to pay because we WANNA make sure that it's open and accessible to everybody so we'll always have a a student will have like a somebody who works architecture will have a scientist will have like somebody who owns property within like an undeveloped neighborhood. We'll have fine. Artists designers will kind of mix and match these different groups and in each one of the experiences which happened. Monthly has a theme and we utilize the food to connect and to like make people comfortable and then the theme is utilized to create a unifying connection in conversation between everybody and those teams are like things like identity and in that dinner which was our dinner in December and that dinner the theme team was identity and it was about exploring the ever evolving nature of the self and what identity means to each one of us individually and so we usually start off to dinner with like introduce yourself and then kind of go into that line of conversation and usually that I run of conversation is like really really really deep where people kind of get really personal all. They expose things that they wouldn't have otherwise exposed. And maybe it's because it's a group of strangers so you feel a little bit more like comfortable in. No one knows me here. But they've been really powerful mainly because it's a small intimate group who ends up having a very deep conversation with one another and we've seen a lot of people begin to work together from the different from crafted experiences which is really the mangle like there's no other alterior motive other than bringing people together and then promoting and showing people that there's other things going on the city so you don't have to leave the also had like high attrition of like creative talent in San Diego because like a creative was like I do fashion but there's no one else here doing creative stuff I'll just go to la because there's more opportunity which right now they're still is more opportunity in La. Obviously like there's more people who appreciate that that's stuff so you have a higher or a larger consumer base as a creative in La but one of the the things that we're really focused on with dinner as well as all of the other groups who are doing really amazing thing so there's also this group called the travellers club. There's a group called weird us and I can go on with all of these different groups but everybody is now focused on creating an opening up the doorway for opportunities for these. He's young creative so that they don't have to leave so that's the dinner as well as like the energy in San Diego right now is like everybody is focused on building a community that can thrive and can be self sustaining and it's it's amazing because it's really collaborative so there's not a lot of like negative competition if that makes sense it's it's a lot of like collaborative co-building of the community that we all want nice visit. San Diego Sounds Taylor great energy also I mean San Diego's like right on the border to Mexico like you guys are right. That's like another beautiful thing about it is like we have all of this rich culture. One of the things that I find the most interesting we begin to talk about this. A lot through our crafted like instagram..

San Diego Pittsburgh San Sandiego la Cleveland Bt San Associated Design Justin Bieber Britney Spears Tara director Miriam US New York founder scientist Dan Mexico
"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

09:53 min | 1 year ago

"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

"How do you actually create spaces in cities that are equitable for both the privileged and the underprivileged? And how do you bridge that that gap between those two to actually begin to create some empathy. So people understand the other side night to meet. Empathy is like the biggest thing in the world. Because is once you have a sense of understanding that true understanding not just like. Oh Yeah I know what you're saying but I don't care once you choo- empathy from both sides. Then we can begin ends a push forward and work together to create equitable solutions for everybody. That might be like hell idealistic but that was like my mission. My goal my vision but I I feel like nowadays what they call it like service design or something ethics so you were ahead of the curve there except the only challenge was I hated math. I hated it so been like I'm there. I'm like designing cool things but none of them can be built. I also my teachers You can't make this at all but it'll be cool though if you cook right and so my first year in college that was happening and then I also took like art history classes and I had never ever taken our history so I didn't understand the history of right. I didn't understand the story of art. I understand the depths of art really before I went to college so that first year also took an art history class in that class us. They're teaching us about like Basquiat. Teaching about the cost of their teaching us about it was a very in-depth like all history of our in. They're talking about the impact that each one of these artists had and how they were and this is something I took away where it's like. Every single artist was every great artist. Artists was basically acting as a mirror reflecting society's ills back to itself so that society could actually digest it and understand it because in our day to day life. We move so fast. We don't actually take time to sit and think in see what's happening in front of us in the purpose of art has been to kind of create and take a moment and take a chunk of time and give it to us in a digestible way so that we actually actually can understand what's happening right so great writing great podcast great. Anything and I'm including all of these things on the umbrella. Art Do that right like they force us to have a conversation. They forced us the top. They force us to live in a space for a moment and take us out of our day to day so I I saw that and I was like Oh yeah. I'll have to. Architecture can just do some art to like have the same level impact so then I actually took time off school and I again. I still didn't know that I could do design. That still wasn't clear to me so I took some time off from school like about like half a ear and I went in like hung out and my friends like dorms at UPN and I would just go audit like classes and she was studying marketing marketing and advertising and sitting there with her being able to in sitting in those classes in like hearing about branding hearing about marketing getting hearing about light advertising L.. Shoot this is like they're using this power to create these emotions and create these feelings and create these desires. They're tapping into the things that like. Make US human like that to me became really really interesting still. I didn't know how to get into it because I definitely couldn't get into U. Penn after after dropping out of college so I went back to creating close again that was like my default. I kept making shoes and selling shoes and then one of my other friends actually saw the shoes that I was making it was A. Hey you should come check out the art institute of Pittsburgh and I was like yeah why not. I was kind of like down for whatever ever and then I went down to Pittsburgh and met with some of the people started to Pittsburgh. I'm not saying the artists who good would never promote the art institute's. That's just where I had to go because I didn't have a portfolio at all in. I actually wanted to do game design at first and it was is because they were like talking to me about their courses that they had going through all of the details they I mentioned game design. They talk about advertising. Sell to all these other things but game design and was interesting because it wasn't far off of what I enjoyed about architecture which is creating these immersive spaces that people essentially live in or for inhabit for a period of time and they'll spaces can be used to create connections. Incense Games are played over the Internet and it creates connections for people across the world. I was Oh yeah totally want to do that. And try and figure out a way to create like healthy games that like create these connections and try and build empathy with people but you needed a portfolio. That's like a constant theme where it's like. These are the things I wanted to do. But I didn't have either. The love of math wasn't good at math and and I didn't have a portfolio so then I was then forced into graphic design at the art institute of Pittsburgh and through my courses through my classes actually ended up Falling in love with it because like my brandon class again. It kind of re sparked some of the energy that I had when I was sitting in auditing the classes at my friends school cool whereas I o branding has immense impact is not just about the beauty. It's not just about the static but you're creating this like entity not you're creating this thing that if used properly will reflect and amplify the voices of the people that are supporting winging and so. That's when I knew that I was like okay. I'm GONNA do this. I'm GONNA go hard at branding. That's quite a journey. Yeah it's like it's a little bit it all over the place but it has a through line. I'm curious and I'm going to you know we don't have to dwell on it too much. But why would you never promote the art institute. I didn't go to art institute. I just WanNa be clear about that but I'm just curious why. Oh I mean there are for profit university. That's been sued mad signs and the incident. Pittsburgh is actually closed down. So I don't want people to against the Chicago Institute of art like that's an amazing institution and it has nothing to do with the art institute. The Art Institutes are all for profit. It and they they would like they lied and they would fudge the numbers for how many people are actually placing which was just sad because you would see people who like they would say they had really high rates and there were some people who got jobs like I was somebody who got a job but I did so much work outside outside of school like everybody. Who got a job did so much work outside of school? But they didn't tell you that right like if you're a student you're putting your trust in an organization position to teach you the skill sets in the things you need to get that job. It's almost like okay if that's a part of it. Why aren't they including that in the in the on boarding they say yes? You'll have your curriculum. You'll learn your skill sets. You'll learn the tools but in order to guarantee job. You need to make sure you're doing freelance. Let's you need to make sure you're going around to all of these different networking events. You need to make sure you're collaborating with kids from Carnegie Mellon you know what I'm saying like all of those opportunities were open but but it's like I had to figure it out and opened myself. Okay no I was. I was curious about efforts to reasons. I mean I like when people push back against these sort of I want to say like industry standard tropes of like you have to go to the school in order to make it as a designer like I do think and you know this is sort of a problem with the industry that there is still this notion of that you have to go to these certain schools like you have to go to the design schools if you consider a designer essentially I know just tell my story a little bit like I went to to Hbu. I went to Morehouse is. It's funny. You mentioned you didn't unlike math. I majored in math but like my first semester. I was like this is a lot and I really wanted to go into web design. I it was a computer science major and I remember my professor. At the time I was telling him I wanted to do web design because I had like been tinkering around with html L. Like reverse engineer say this is like nineteen ninety nine so this is for consul. While ago where I was like telling my advisor this and I remember him telling me how you know. The Internet is a fad. Like this isn't going to be around for too much longer. And if this is something that really want to put all your eggs in this basket let's get. You should probably change your major to another school. That was like Damn Okay and at the time I wanted to go to the art institute because we had we had to art right colleges here in Atlanta the Atlanta artists of Atlanta and we have the Atlanta College of Art on College of art is now closed down now we have a Savannah Atlanta College of art and design. Yeah here but for me I was like yeah the art institute's like that was it because I saw the commercials they would have these commercials where you could like see either doing all this stuff and I was like. Oh so this is where you go to learn design and then even later on in my career. Because I'm self taught even later on in my career there would. BV SORTS OF. I guess you'd call them gatekeepers. I suppose I don't know who would say like oh well you're not a designer because you didn't go to design school like yeah that's the only way when clearly. It's not the the only way you can. Yeah that's one of the great things about this industry is that you don't necessarily have to follow specific half or go to these specific schools in order to be a success breath. Yeah I was GONNA say like trash like very.

art institute art institute of Pittsburgh Atlanta College of Art on Coll Pittsburgh Chicago Institute of art Savannah Atlanta College of ar The Art Institutes service design Atlanta US Basquiat Carnegie Mellon U. Penn Morehouse Hbu engineer advisor professor
"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

11:37 min | 1 year ago

"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

"How did you all end up working with them so that was like A? I was like an honor because they honestly just reached out to us so they didn't do any pitching process. They just reach out to us because we have won. So many Webby Awards awards within the digital category over the past like five years and so I think because of that they looked at us. Firstly but then they also saw saw the quality of our work in our focus on really elevating the brand and trying to define new you X. Patterns because we win a lot in like like best practices. And we'd do that by trying to look at and understand and really pull Ford let your brands. Actual unique value proposition is which brand's mission is very similar to win. People are creating a retail experience. For like Ralph Lauren. A Winterberg creating a retail experience for like off light like those stores look different because they're trying to express what is inherently different about that brand in far too long digital experiences. Were moving away from that because everybody body was sort of moving to these templates sized systems because they were like deemed as easier to use. And so I think that we came in because we started like the agency we started doing at the very foundation was mainly Brandon in ninety eight. That's all we approach all of our projects with a very very brand heavy mindset in so they saw that we really hone in on what that brands messages. What the negative true with this and pull that forward into the digital experience to create something that is still very very easy simple to use but also has just a touch of like difference? Something that expresses that brand the best the types of clients for you to work. I honestly think for me. All clients are the best type of clients. That may sound like a cop out answer. Yeah I was GONNA say the reason I say that because I mean obviously I like have ideal clients like the idea. Client is like somebody who wants to be Super Super Open Super Collaborative challenges us very similar to what we look for when we look for new employees. It's almost the same as women look for like our ideal client right like we want. It'd be challenged. Who wanted to be pushed with one? This work to be the best work that we've ever done not saying that it needs to be like the craziest design but it expresses your brand. It tells your story story and you want to push us because you know your industry better than we do and we know digital. Maybe better than you do. That's what we really look for. When we're looking for relationships the reason I sent off clients is only because I've been in situations where at first I was like? I don't WanNa work with this guy or this decline is like really really frustrating but just just based on my time being in this industry or maybe just comes from like me being a black man in America just realizing that most situations are not easy. Eighty and I'd rather look at it as an opportunity to learn and grow than ever like a challenge that I need to run from and so even those clients I said are super challenging. I think I learned something new. I learn how to look at something new. I learned how to navigate a new area or new industry or a new client and deliver something good at the end of the day and as an agency in general because our product that we deliver at the end of the day. Is this service of design. Zayn we look at our clients in. WHO's reaching out to us really as a consumer or customer and we try and understand their late needs we try and understand what's frustrating them about their company? What hierarchy they have to go through what pushback they're getting so we don't look get our project in a silo saying like we have to get this through in all this stuff? We really trying to understand what the client is going through what the individual like. The person is going through at at that organization so we can help them at the end of the day like at the end of the day their goal is to create this product. Get this website done. Get this digital experience done. Get this brand on so that they can help their company be successful ultimately helping them be successful and so we try and understand their pathway of growth. In all of that stuff. So I think I think that's why I'm like. Every client is great because every client as a person and at the end of the day. We're here to help people not just create websites. Gotcha great explanation there. I like that. So let's switch talk about your work at basic and I do want to get more into some of the the community work but tell me about where you grew up so I actually. I grew up in Cleveland. Ohio grew up in Cleveland. Ohio love it. Still just can't move back there mainly because there's not like the job opportunities although it is like having this like really awesome resurgents like every time I go back which only once a year in its during the winter so it's probably not the best time to come back from like San Diego. That's always sunny but every time I go back it's like there's something new there is there's new energy there's there's there's new creatives moving into that city so every time I go back it is cool and it makes me. It makes me miss it but again I I can't move back purely because of the industry industry and now my my investment in San Diego. Yeah that makes sense. I have so for folks that have listened to the show for a while. They know I've got family in Cleveland. My Dad's the family is from Lake. Cleveland Shaker Heights town. Yeah Yeah Oh wow so most of my family like my Dad's side grew up in Shaker. I grew up in Beechwood. So if you have family that from Shaker I feel like there could be a connection. Sound like they might know them. My family is like heavily involved in community stuff in Cleveland and they were like family of like five or six and the Shaker school system and so they had like somebody in almost every grade. They're probably a some overlap. I think there probably is. Yeah so growing up up. There was creativity like a big part of your childhood. Yes I would definitely say so. I think I always had a had an inkling for creative like my family would push me into doing sports. I think that was just like by default. What what my family did like everybody plays? Everybody was good at sports and so on top above like me wanting to be creative and my parents supporting that so they put me. In Art classes they encouraged me to try music. Although I sucked like I tried to play Trumpet Britt the worst experience and at some point I actually thought I could sing and I thought I could play piano but it was just me playing. Hang on my parents piano and I'll be in the living room singing and trying to play into like I think about it now and I'm like that had to be so cringe-worthy and my parents wouldn't yell. Let me let me do it so I think I had like very very supportive parents when it come came to like exploring my creativity but again I was also pushed to do sports sports but in high school I actually dabbled in like pattern making. I really really loved clothing and creating my own clothes so that was like my main main form of creative expression throughout high school was like making clothes or making shoes a really. Wow Yeah like I viewed that as like I would like drew and stuff when I was younger like super young but then as soon as I got into like high school and I like touched the sewing machine I was like Oh this is like this is dope. Oh I can. I can create the things that I put on my body. I don't have to wear other people stuff like that was like so cool to me. And I viewed it as this. I think nick this living testament to who you are inside so was like this walking billboard of sorts billboard sound so marketing but the reality reality is like this walking art piece. I always find that like very powerful like I didn't realize the power of it. Then I think I liked it on a very shallow level title but there was a power and creating something that I was going to put on my body or that other people decided to put on their body. So when did you sort of know. Then I mean with not only only this exposure that your parents support but you know even now. You're talking about fashion apparel and stuff like that. When did you know like Oh? This is something I could do for a living. ooh I actually didn't know that until my like second half year in college. My parents support it but it wasn't like I. I didn't have any patterns to look at when it came to a designer like I didn't know any designers I didn't know anybody who made it in fashion design or I didn't even realize fashion design was a thing like I was doing it but I didn't realize it was like a thing like I never even like. I never stabbed him. That like my my access access to like create a profession was actually architecture in so on top of doing fashion stuff in high school. I also did a lot of CAD and took architecture get your classes and that was mainly due to the fact that I had exposure because my parents owned development company in so I saw it and and that was like Oh. I don't really like I saw construction as like a place I could go in so my parents on the development company on the then my grandparents on my father's side owned a successful like exterminating company and landscaping company. I'm sorry my grandparents my father's side owned the landscaping company. My grandparents it's on my mother's side on the successful exterminating company. So those are like the pathways that I was exposed to on top of like doctors and all that stuff but like those those were the entrepreneurial pathways that I saw in so out of all of those I was like l. e. designing like landscaping like a landscape architect. That's Kinda cool. who'll or designing a home where people can live and like creating these spaces that impacts your emotions in in all of that stuff like I found that deeply interesting interesting so I took some architecture classes in high school just to learn cad and I also did like my senior project at my parents company with the architect? That's convenient yet. That was like super but again it was like it was basically like what I was exposed to. It made my path way longer to get hit to realizing that design was a thing I can do so like then. My first year in College I studied or Mike Focus was construction uh-huh management and with that I wanted to really focus on this idea of architecture city planning and that was partially due due to the fact that when I was seeing my parents build these homes so they built homes like they bought affordable housing in the inner city. And when I saw them doing that in we would actually go back and always meet with and talk to all of the people that we built homes for to help maintain them because he also had the landscaping business. And we also exterminating business. So we would actually help you to maintain their homes and it was amazing the connections and then the joy that we would see on these people's face right and and I think I was very very impacted by that like the fact that again space things that we create can uplift a community that it to me was like what the heck like this is incredible. This is incredible in. So that's what took me in this space of like really trying to pursue architecture or city planning and my whole thing of like city planning was like..

Cleveland Ohio Ralph Lauren Shaker Cleveland Shaker Heights Ford San Diego Shaker school America Brandon Mike Focus Lake Beechwood nick
"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

11:52 min | 1 year ago

"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

"Irwin hines creative. Director at basic in San Diego California. Let's start the show all all right. So tell us who you are and what you do. My name is Irwin hines and I am a creative director of one of the two creative directors at basic agency located take. Our headquarters are located in San Diego but we have offices in mountain view as well as Saint. Louis Nice Talk to me about your work at basic like what's an average day like for you there. Oh man so. My role as a creative director is different from some of the other creative directors at agency's role we each kind of focus on our unique the unique specialty. So it's pretty expensive so I focus a lot on client work of course and so that just involves managing teams teams of two to maybe five people in guiding the process throughout the duration of the lifetime of a specific project with one of our clients and doing all the initial strategy and so add basic. We don't necessarily have a traditional strategy department. We expect all of our creatives who actually dive deep deep into strategy so that's understanding the different cultural nuances of the the clients audience and making sure that we are making those like unique connections connections based on what the clients goals are and what the audience actually values at the base level. That's one of my roles at basic but but since I've been there for seven years was one of the original people at the company I've also really taken it upon myself to to help guide the brand as a whole so as an agency. We don't necessarily just view ourselves just as a service company. We also be ourselves as a brand that we're constantly trying to a build one of our products that we deliver is our service right so we're very inspired by brands like Nike. Of course until my other role is really you know what our brand looks like. What are brand feels like what brands sounds like? And then all of our different community initiatives that we do. So are podcasts. brain-dead indeed that's one of the things I kind of head up. Then we also have a community series called crafted that was actually built to help bring together two different creatives within San Diego and help them to rub shoulders and break down the barriers between the different industries or creative verticals and so I do a lot of community stuff as well as the client stuff so again. It's like pretty expansive. That is really expansive. One thing that you just touched on there which I thought was interesting is that you expect the creatives them. Imagine these are like individual contributors. Right you expect them to get into the strategy like often that that strategy part tends to be reserved for maybe you like someone higher up the ranks like maybe a creative director art director. I mean take that approach. I think it came out of necessity so so when I joined there was only five people so all projects. We had to wear a lot of pets so I joined as like a senior designer but as a senior designer. I had to you come in and build brands. And all of that stuff. And we didn't have a strategy department and what we realized is that having that designer that creative from the very beginning beginning thinking about the brand strategy thinking about how the brand's needs need to be met in or what the consumers actual desire is and how the product that we're trying to market trying to build a digital experience for actually meets that consumers need and having the designer on board from the very beginning just creates creates a stronger. More seamless kind of project in process as well as just a stronger experience in the end and so it's just sort of stayed that way because as we realized the value in it from the beginning and now with one of the products of basic kind of being the service that you deliver. Is that something that came as sort of an organic evolution of the agency. Yeah I would say so and I think again. It's just it's mainly because we like to ourselves as a brand and Aubrey brands have the things that they create. Add to their larger sort of wide or larger sort of SS in their their larger perspective. Effective in so we make always considering. What is our larger perspective? What is our Y as a company? And how are we bring that forward through the work we do in proudly police also comes from the fact that we build a lot of brands for our clients and we always tell them to start with the. Why understand why you exist? What your customer wants? And then make sure you're delivering on that constantly and then all of the thing all of the things that you do are just really an ecosystem of consumer touch points that reflect your why in so I think we just internalized that ourselves in. Try and make sure that we're constantly focusing on refining in defining are are Y so that our work at the end of the day can become stronger. How did you first get started at basic seven years ago? I was actually doing freelance us. And so I was freelancing working at home working with anybody networking with other designers. Just McLean's and I was doing that for about six six months. I started to get very very restless because before that had been at a couple of other agency so I was able to toss ideas off of people always able to like feed off the other creative energy and I thought I would really really love that. Freelance lifestyle ragged do anything I wanted and hang out all day and take whatever days I would at all and all of that stuff but after six months ice again started to feel a little bit. Stir crazy identified people to toss ideas off of and basic actually actually reached out to me because I was doing some freelance work through an ex employee of basic and so through that ex employees match. Lock who owns basic actually saw my work in decided to reach out to me and at first so a little bit of a funny story. There's actually a pizza place in San Diego. That's really big big call a basic and it was located across the street from the agency I had previously worked at and we would go there like every single well day so in basic reached out to me via email at first I thought it was a pizza company asking for to become a designer at Pizza Company and at at that point like my freelance work was like activision Sony like I had big clients of freelancer. It's I was like no. Why would I ever want to meet with the people people but because it came through the referral of one of my other freelance clients? I decided to go meet with them and less pleasantly surprised that it was an agency that was doing amazing thing work. Now Talk to me about the team that you're working with because I would imagine you know. After seven years at the agency has went through a lot of changes. You probably went through a lot of changes as a professional final. What's your your team? Make up like now I was Gonna say we do so. I think there's two answers to that question. Why is over the years? We didn't didn't focus on this and this wasn't like a thing. We try to do but because the company is ran by a black man so matlock is black and then a lot of the leadership up is black as well as women. We've actually created a very very diverse team with people from all over the world all different cultures all different perspective and that was just because we truly valued different ideas and different perspectives coming together on one space and felt like that. Collision of of different perspectives and ideas actually fosters better work right so that was the perspective we had every time we would hire someone we like the challenge us do come with something different and if they did. That's when we knew that this was the right person of course tastes level. Great Work raper folio. All all that stuff was like table stakes. Like yes have all of that stuff but you have to challenge us in. So that's why I was like. Please ask that question again. 'CAUSE I had to make sure I like gave this a proper response so again. That's one side and then as far as like the makeup of the team. It's pretty pretty standard we have about. I'm GONNA probably really like mess up the numbers we probably have about like thirty five people in our San Diego Office forty people in forty to fifty people in the mountain view office and then we have like eight people in our office in so the Saint Louis Office is really an extension of the San Diego Office. It supports a lot of the work that we do in San Diego and then the mountain view office is really just focused on Google and then some of our other sort of bay area clients but their main focus is google in so that team. Makeup is is a lot different than the team makeup in San Diego. The team makeup and San Diego is project basis for individual clients. So you'll have teams of three or four. We like to try and keep them smallest smallest. They can be a lot more agile nimble as well as allow all of the designers to really have direct contact with the clients that way. There's like hidden people right. We always WANNA kind of elevate empower all of our creatives like I was saying with strategy to really be the face of the company and to be able Tila someday lead their own projects. That's really our goal right. We Really WanNa make sure that each person grows so we have junior designers. Senior designers are directors creative director. And then we have kind of the higher level leadership team that helps guide and really think through the vision and mission of the entire tire agency all of those departments and all of those groups. We do our best to work seamlessly together. So we strategically have set meeting eating so that whenever the leadership talks about can then be distilled down in share to the rest of the team as well as we have methods for communication in the other way so we can take things that like maybe a new designer comes in and has some frustration points or some tension points with some points in the culture in all of this other stuff that maybe has some great ideas. We have tools and really is just talking but we have tools that allow that new designers like frustrations or your ideas to bubble up to the surface of the leadership team in. That's how a lot of stuff at basic has really done. Its more so done from the younger creatives this or from the ground level as opposed to top down. That's an interesting kind of model. And it's something that I've noticed as I honestly am interviewing wing and and hiring creatives and stuff is that there certainly is more at least. I'm finding that there is more of a need to have designers that have sort of lead projects in that way maybe not necessarily from into end but they were more than just say the team member that did you know visual design. They actually had a project project or part of a project that they really got completely oversee. So it's good that you've got the agency kind of structured in that way to work with clients. Yeah and I think it also it benefits us at the end of the day and of course the designers because then these creatives are well versed if there has to be a shift in our agency. They're not just trained in one skillset. They're actually trained in. We like to say they're trained in brand building which extends past websites extends past. US extends past whenever Robert New medium or media type. There will be but now you understand the foundations of how to build a company that resonates with people and then whatever that company needs. In order order to speak to that audience we can create it and now speaking of clients and projects one of the clients you're working with are the Webby awards which yes and people know from. I don't know if I mentioned this on the show but I'm one of the judges this year..

San Diego director Irwin hines mountain view Director California Louis Nice San Diego Office Nike Pizza Company US Google Aubrey McLean Saint Louis Office matlock Tila Robert New
"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

Revision Path

01:55 min | 1 year ago

"j hines" Discussed on Revision Path

"You know. I hope that you've been following along this month. Breath Twenty eight days of the Web. Twenty days of the web is our sister site and during February we honor a different black designer or developer for each day in the month. So you can follow along and see this year's honorees at twenty eight days of the Web dot com poor. You can follow the project on twitter. It's at twenty eight days of the Web. Also we're having our first live show twenty twenty in Los Angeles two nights. That's right. Come out to revision path live in La on tonight February tenth hit that seven PM at the center in Lammert part. I'll be interviewing renowned black architect Roland a wily as part of Aig Los Angeles is La. The river series tickets are still on sale. So check out the show notes for a late or you can go to Los Angeles dot ca dot org for more information you can also check our twitter profile link on there as well now. Let's talk about our sponsors. facebook design and abstract facebook design a proud sponsor of provisions path to learn more about how the facebook designed community is designing for human needs at unprecedent scale. Please visit facebook. Dot Design and this episode is also brought to you by abstracts design workflow management for modern design teams spend less time searching for design files and tracking down feedback and spend more time focusing on innovation and collaboration like glitch but for designers abstract is your team's version control source of truth for design design work with abstract conversions gets designed files present. Work were credited US collect feedback and give developers direct access to all specs. All from one place signed your team up for Free Fourteen Day trial today by heading over to. WWW DOT abstract dot com. Now for this week's interview I'm talking with..

"j hines" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"j hines" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Who could tell them what they want for Christmas get a chance to speak to Santa Ana radio show that really happened so tomorrow eight o'clock hour we will be doing that Kendall is a look at things I'm looking at this hour we have okay so I have all the stuff we this those big Ole stack of stuff so my thought is in this hour because I have all these birthdays we haven't played any these birthdays just a couple I would like if you have something on your mind just call it's it's if it's fun you know it's Christmas time a reminder by the way that I will be working tomorrow night and then I'm gonna have a week off so this could be our last opportunity for awhile before taking some days off because I I see some vacation for the Christmas time like I always do very special time of year obviously so my thought can was we would have some calls we could chat about things Christmas he brings whatever keep it alive doesn't have to be Christmas whatever keeper lights we can play some of these birthdays all get to some stories will cut a mix and match everything here we can listen to some Christmas songs it were none of us really are hip to one of your some Christmas songs your whistle yeah meet your new Christmas station where they planned the music it's chess nuts roasting on an open fire it's that and it's jingle bell jingle bell jingle right it's all the big you know I'm dreaming of a White good is all the big hits but it's not that often candle and you can check the stats to be like sun Avenue here J. Hines in the boy's doing funky action is to you right off the forty five by the way.

Kendall J. Hines Santa Ana