40 Burst results for "international space station"

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on Tom and Curley

Tom and Curley

01:02 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on Tom and Curley

"I'm sure you're looking forward to space space space Space heroes heroes. I'm not really a fan of reality television, but I do think this is a really good idea for reality television. Because it's something I think pretty original, which is hard to find these days. It's in preproduction, and here's what it is. It's 24 contestants competing for the grand Prize of a ticket aboard. Ship bound for the international space station, so they're going to live in a space village. They're going to test their physical and mental strength. The drama is not going to be around interpersonal relationships necessarily. It's going to be more about how they can test you know their endurance and do all these things. And the winner has already got a ticket to fly above on the Axiom space mission, so they're already guaranteed. If they win that they will get to go on one of these space flights and go to the international space station. I just think it's kind of a cool idea. The fact that they say it's it's it's not going to be. Why are you saying it's not gonna be like any other typical reality television show? Of course, it has to be because the average person doesn't care about that other nerdy stuff they want to see back biting and people being just generally mean and nasty to each other, or at least giving the impression they are when you can You know, stay on a single shot of somebody a little longer than you should. And And then they had they make this face is the person walks out of the room. That's the classic reality television shot, and then you go to the slow motion the speed up motion of the sun setting. Why do you sense its going to beam or, you know, science and less sniping. I just think this is I mean, do you? Do you think that they're gonna want to focus on those kinds of things when this is, um, something that when the final contestant or the person that wins is going off into space, and they might, you know, get more notoriety over that, so they do They really want this person to be the back biting, horrible person that That, you know, kind of made their way or was diabolical to make sure they got ahead of somebody else. Or maybe they won't care. I don't know. I think the subject matter is original. I think that that part is he's different. But, yeah, it may it make devolve into the regular human drama that we've grown to love in reality television because you're right. That is the backbone of it. You have to get a super flamboyant gay black man. And then you have to get like a lug head guy who's really good looking from Texas and that they, you know, odd couple sort of thing. And then you get the really pretty girl. Yeah, they're gonna ask get enough. And then the nerdy guy because, you know, I don't know. Are you really into space and astronauts and NASA and stuff like that? Sure. You said to get the kind of person it really the end of that stuff. No, no, I am. I am not into space. Um, I certainly respect it. I think that it's an important thing, but But I don't know. It doesn't interest me. Even as a kid like there are always those kids that want to be an astronaut. I had none of that. I mean, I did. I'm claustrophobic. I thought the whole thing you know, seemed like I couldn't Where some cool outfit you know, I had to wear that suit so I wouldn't want that s Oh, no, I'm not particularly into space. But I like people that are Uh, well, covering your bases there. Luckily because we don't wanna lose the astronaut demo. The I forget what so assassinate sound patriotic. If you say you're not into space, it sounds so un American. You know, you have to kind of be into it a little bit. I have to tell you something, You know, they're just a couple of weeks ago, We landed on Mars and Jacob and I are in the commercial break for looking up at the screen and all the guys at Mass of the men and women of NASA all the super nerds celebrating and I said to take a look out sad it is. They're all You.

Mars Nasa 24 Contestants Texas Jacob Couple Of Weeks Ago Single Shot Mass American Space One Of These Space Flights Couple
Soyuz Launch Kicks Off Space Station Crew Rotation

City Lights

00:41 sec | 20 hrs ago

Soyuz Launch Kicks Off Space Station Crew Rotation

"Astronaut and two Russian cosmonauts have arrived safely. But the international space station from member station W. M. F E Brendan Byrne reports the crew launched earlier today from Kazakhstan. The trio, including NASA's Mark Vanda, hi launched on Russia's Soyuz spacecraft, talking after two orbits and three hours in space. The arrival brings the number of residents on the orbiting lab to 10 with three departing next week, including NASA astronaut Kate Rubins. It's Vanda highs, Second space flight and he'll help the station crew with research and science while on board. Another crew of four set to launch to the station later this month, Launching on space sexes Crew Dragon capsule from Kennedy Space Center in Florida

W. M. F E Brendan Byrne Mark Vanda International Space Station Nasa Kate Rubins Kazakhstan Russia Kennedy Space Center Florida
Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

The Christian Science Monitor Daily

01:10 min | 14 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on The Christian Science Monitor Daily

"By the end of the decade back then at the height of the cold war u s soviet competition in space was fierce but as kenan institute director matthew Jansky points out space soon became an arena for cooperation. There's the apollo soyuz project in the nineteen seventies the international space station in more recent years and massa's reliance on russia to ferry u. s. astronauts to the space station after the us cancelled it shuttle program in twenty eleven. Whether this kind of cooperation has kept relations here on earth from going off. The rails is harder to say mr jansky who will host a webcast tuesday on the garin legacy sale but it has certainly been a positive factor and one we should seek to continue in the years ahead despite disagreements and other areas indeed sixty years after colonel gerrans brave flight citizens the world over can celebrate this achievement and when the national air and space museum in. Washington reopens visitors. Can view perhaps the ultimate symbol of us. Russian cosmic friendship spacesuits of both the garin and john glenn the first american to orbit the earth.

John Glenn Matthew Jansky Jansky Tuesday Kenan Institute Nineteen Seventies Twenty Eleven Russian Washington Garin Earth First U. Both ONE End Of The Decade Back Cold War U S Soviet Russia American Colonel Gerrans
What Does It Take to Become an Astronaut?

BBC Newshour

01:57 min | Last week

What Does It Take to Become an Astronaut?

"Libby Jackson is human exploration program manager of the UK Space agency, part off the E essa. So what does it take to be an astronaut? You have to be calm under pressure. You have to be willing to work as a team. You have to be happy to go and spend six months living and working on the international space station where there's no shower the portal. Ooh. And if it breaks it breaks often has to be fixed by. You know, plumber on orbit Long days, but with amazing views. You're carrying out science that can only be done in space that will help everybody down here on Earth. New to lead better lives to help discover new materials with researching drugs on of course, astronauts are the sort of faith of the space industry, but they are absolutely not the only part off the space industry. The space industry is global. There are jobs in every possible skill set that you can imagine. And if people want to join the industry if they think space is something that its sights and they should feel empowered I'm able to do so we'd love to have him so calm. Scientists who conducted of plumbing on bond maybe speaks few languages. You have to be fluent in English. Knowledge of other languages is an asset but not essential. But you do need to have a grasp will be able to learn other languages because the international space station works in both English and Russian. You've got to learn Russian. No, I'm a Russian speaking. But unfortunately I am. I'm just north of 50. So that counts me out. There is a maximum age limit, isn't there? There is it takes out 5 to 10 years to train our pastor rolls and you only will get a mission perhaps every 5 to 10 years so they can't put on upper age limit on it. But it's higher than the last call back in 2000 and eight all part of this drive to increase the Paul to be as diverse and inclusive as possible. Mrs. Really lovely to see that it's increased to 50. Actually, it's a shame we had to put in angel bid

Libby Jackson Uk Space Agency International Space Station Paul
Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on ARRL Audio News

ARRL Audio News

01:35 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on ARRL Audio News

"The military auxiliary radio system or mars is a us department of defense adjunct comprised of radio. Amateurs that's not always the first resource that comes to mind in an emergency even within the military and a recent article in the us marine corps. Major brand kurg exhorts the brass to more fully exploit amateur radio in general and mars in particular for use in times of distress in short. He'd like to see more ham. Radio in military training programs as future threats. Continue to evolve day-to-day communications architectures will become more unreliable. In times of crisis kerr concluded it is imperative that joint communications planners turn to amateurs in order to remain experts curb attempts to raise the amateur radio consciousness level of military planners he characterizes ham radio as a robust and readily available communications resource when things go south and every bit as expert as professional military communicators signalmen. The downside kirk said. Is that the use of mars remains largely unknown or niche capability. One that is usually stumbled upon by planners in a moment of crisis and then poorly implemented amateur radio on the international space station or aris in the us has earned recognition from the us internal revenue service as a section five. Oh one c. Three charitable scientific and educational organization aris. Usa is the us bend of the aris international working group. We're this. Irs determination aris usa may solicit donations and grants and donations to aris usa become tax deductible in the us retroactive to may twenty first twenty twenty the educational scope and reach of what ariza accomplishes has grown significantly since our beginnings in nineteen ninety-six said aris usa executive director. Frank bauer a three hd. Oh we are. Actively working to extend students reach even further aris. Usa says it will continue to promote student involvement with the astronauts.

Frank Bauer First Resource Aris Usa Ariza Twenty Nineteen Ninety-Six ONE USA Kerr Kurg Section Five Three First Twenty Twenty Aris Kirk
NASA to offer funding for studies of commercial space stations

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:37 sec | Last week

NASA to offer funding for studies of commercial space stations

"Leo Destinations project, which could award up to $400 million in total to his many as four companies working to build private space stations. The agency is seeking to replicate the success of its commercial cargo and commercial crew programs, which sees private companies help send cargo and astronauts to the international space station. The IAEA says cost about $4 billion a year to operate, and as it gets older, the reality is it won't last forever. NASA believes it could save big bucks by becoming the user of future space stations rather than the owner and operator of them. Throughout the month

Leo Destinations International Space Station Iaea Nasa
Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

03:11 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on NASACast Audio

"A few of the stories to tell you about this week. At massa acting nasa administrator steve jersey discussed the president's fiscal year twenty twenty two discretionary funding request for nasa the twenty four point seven billion dollars. Funding request allows nasa to address climate. Change challenge more significant ways than we've had in the past it allows us to understand earth as from the oceans of atmosphere. The request includes funding also related to climate change for programs associated with the first am. Massa's name 'aeronautics is being charged with developing arm mentally frenzy. Aviation system. One of them is the extra thirty seven. Maxwell like straighter. It's going to demonstrate electric aircraft technology including distributed for bullshit other milestones expected under new funding request include the launch of the james webb space telescope. Which will look back in time to the first galaxies in the early universe. The funding request also is a strong show of support for our artem is program and moon to mars exploration approach the space launch system rocket the orion spacecraft gateway in lunar orbit and a commercial human landing system will land the first woman and first person of color on the surface of the moon and the systems we will use to establish sustainable exploration and research in preparation for the first human missions to mars during a preflight briefing on april ninth team for our ingenuity. Mars helicopter discussed the helicopters status. And what to expect on. Its first attempt at powered controlled flight on another planet currently targeted for no earlier than sunday april eleventh. We have carefully designed carefully tested on. We have been checking out carefully on mars to now and it's time to attend the first flight and we will test proof and learn regardless of what the outcome is if he flies on april eleventh has expected a livestream confirming the historic first flight is targeted to start around three thirty. Am eastern daylight time on april twelfth ingenuity a technology demonstration to test powered fight on another world for the first time arrived at mars on february eighteenth with our perseverance. Mars rover the international space station's newest crew including our remark. Vanda high blasted off on april ninth from the bike in or cosmodrome in kazakhstan. A few hours later vanda high elective isky. Npr toward dubroff. Both of the russian space agency roscosmos or welcomed aboard the station by the crew already on board including arcade rubens and nasa spacex crew on astronauts. Michael hopkins victor glover shannon walker. And so we tina gucci april fifth marked of i four commercial spaceflight aboard the international space station when the crew dragon resilience spacecraft carrying nasa space x crew on astronauts autonomously undocked from before report of the station's harmony module and relocated to the space facing port. The move will enable the extraction of new solar arrays from spacex cargo spacecraft. That will arrive after crew. One departs on april. Sixth engineers conducted an rs twenty twenty-five engine tests on the test. Stand and are stennis space center near base louis mississippi. The full duration ten is the second in a scheduled series of seven tests to provide valuable data for development and production of the engines for our twenty-five will help power. The agency's space launch system rocket on future missions to the moon including the on flight test of targeted for this year. That will pave the way for future flights with astronauts to explore the moon and prepare for missions to mars. Nasa's cyrus rex spacecraft completed. A last fly over of asteroid on april seventh to document surface changes that resulted on the asteroid sample collection maneuver last october. It will take until at least april thirteenth to downlink. All of the data from the fly by a survey of the sample collection. Site could teach us more about the nature of the surface and subsurface materials and the mechanical properties of the asteroid will cyrus. Rex is scheduled to return to earth with a sample material that collected from banou in september. Twenty twenty three. That's what's up this week. Massa for more on these and other stories follow us. On the.

Michael Hopkins April Seventh Kazakhstan April Eleventh February Eighteenth Nasa Earth Steve Jersey September April Thirteenth First Flight Mars Sunday April Eleventh Seven Billion Dollars Last October Russian First Time April Twelfth April
Experts declare $6,000-a-bottle wine aged better in space

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:50 sec | 2 weeks ago

Experts declare $6,000-a-bottle wine aged better in space

"Have been sampling of pricey bottle of wine just back after a year of aging on the international space station. Absolutely. HS. Jane Anson writes about wine for the decanter, one of a dozen connoisseurs taking part in a blind tasting, comparing a bottle of Petrus Pomerol sent into space with a bottle of the same Bordeaux that it stayed in the cellar, the one that had remained on Earth. Me was still a little bit more closed a bit more tannic, a bit younger on the one that had bean up into space talents have softened the side that more floral aromatics came out bits of merlot and cabernet sauvignon. Grapevines also went into space, exposing them to new stresses that scientists hope could reveal how plants might be made More resilient to climate change and disease. I'm Ben Thomas

Jane Anson Petrus Pomerol International Space Station Bordeaux Ben Thomas
Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on Ray Appleton

Ray Appleton

00:32 min | 17 hrs ago

Fresh update on "international space station" discussed on Ray Appleton

"Was always by her side, his life defined by his marriage to Queen Elizabeth, the second baby Philip take born into the Greek royal family, but later exiled from Greece. Philip eventually landed in England. Elizabeth Ascension to the throne in 1952 changed everything. Giving up his own career. Phillips spent the rest of his life walking two paces behind the sovereign. Today, this country closes the chapter on the longest lasting marriage in British royal history. James Long When ABC News London Prince Philip again gone at the age of 99 2 weeks shy of his 1/100 birthday, the family of rapper D. M access he has died at age 50. Grammy nominated performer died after suffering a catastrophic cardiac arrest, according to a statement for the hospital in White Plains, New York, where he passed away. TMZ is reporting that heart attack caused by a drug overdose. Family of DMX, whose birth name was Earl Simmons died with relatives by his side after several days on life support. A trio of a trio, comprised of two Russian and one American space traveler launches successfully and has now reached the international space station. Crew blasted off as scheduled this morning aboard a sore use and s 18 spacecraft from craft. Excuse me. Launch facility in Kazakhstan. They docked at the I s s after a to orbit journey around the Earth. The last it is tad over three hours, and today's launch comes just three days before the 60th anniversary of the first human spaceflight. That, of course, conducted by Russian cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin. Three minutes after 11 o'clock, checking in with the comings and goings on Wall Street, Pretty good weight and the work week the Dow NASDAQ S and P 500 all posting gains, but the Dow just taking off within the last hour. It's now up. 135 points trading.

Yuri Gagarin Kazakhstan England Earl Simmons 1952 Greece Queen Elizabeth James Long ONE TMZ TWO Earth Elizabeth Phillips D. M Today Abc News London DMX
Cosmic mouthful: Tasters savor fine wine that orbited Earth

AP News Radio

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Cosmic mouthful: Tasters savor fine wine that orbited Earth

"Researchers in France are carefully studying a dozen bottles of wine that have returned to earth after a year long stay aboard the international space station it's the kind of research one can imagine John Luc Picard appreciating the captain of the starship enterprise of TV Star Trek the next generation who grew up on a French figure why send a dozen bottles of the finest wines into space to see how the aging process is working and how we can we can influence the aging process Dr Michael labored as a space biology it's the only way to find out sort of the old of certain substances is to go under conditions where you can exclude these these working off this substance for example oxygen J. Manson is a writer for the decanter and one of the expert tasters who compared the space wine one if it stayed in the cellar you too full the one that made on us with a little younger than the one that I'm Ben Thomas

John Luc Picard Dr Michael International Space Station France J. Manson Ben Thomas
NASA concerned about space's growing trash problem

Chris Krok

02:43 min | 3 weeks ago

NASA concerned about space's growing trash problem

"Is now more than 128 million pieces of trash. Left over from 128 Million, yes, left over from degrading satellites, byproducts of past flight missions and other cosmic accidents, and they just keep circling the earth. They just keep spinning around the earth. That is, um That's just the debris that we actually have the ability to detect. But here's the problem even like paint chips. Paint chips can actually be a fairly deadly if they are, you know, flying around at warp speed around the planet. And that's what that's what's happening out there and again when the astronauts get out onto the space station to try to fix stuff. I would think that you know, it could be kind of Bad situation. It was I quarter inch. Let's see. Uh oh. It was 2016 1 of the European Space Agency Astronauts took a picture of a quarter sized dent. It was in a glass window of the international space station. It turned out to be a tiny little teeny fleck of space junk. It was a paint flake. From a satellite. It was, they said few thousands of a millimeter across They said, not much bigger than a single cell of E. Coli. And it caused a quarter sized Out in a Pane of glass in one of the windows. I mean, seriously, You gotta watch out that something like that hit you in the helmet. You're not gonna have a good day. Um When it when something that small could do that much damage. Of course, the bigger stuff is going to be a really, really bad day 34,000 pieces of moderately sized debris. That's anything larger than four inches. Would just pretty much take out an astronaut. Anything bigger than that. Uh or anything bigger. I guess. Then the little tiny fleck of paint would be catastrophic. All comes down to full lot of philosophy, philosophy and velocity. Uh, Anything circling the orbit? With the space station. They're moving at 17,000 Miles an hour, 10 times faster. Than a speeding bullet. So the key is I think you wanna be rotating with the trash. Or simply tried to avoid it altogether.

European Space Agency International Space Station E. Coli
Spacewalking astronauts manage possible ammonia leak

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:50 sec | 3 weeks ago

Spacewalking astronauts manage possible ammonia leak

"Well, space walking astronauts are back safe inside the international space station after reading right ring their suits of any toxic ammonia. AP correspondent Ben Thomas. With more ready for me to come out, NASA's Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins had to take extra safety precautions after stepping outside Working on the space station's external cooling system. They had no trouble removing inventing a couple of old jumper cables to get rid of any ammonia still lingering in the lines. But so much spewed out of the first hose that mission control worried some of the frozen white flakes might have gotten on their suits. NASA did not want the ammonia, getting inside the space station and contaminating the cabin atmosphere. But after a nearly seven hour spacewalk, mission Control said the astronauts had spent so much time in sunlight. Any ammonia. Residue would have baked off.

Victor Glover Mike Hopkins Ben Thomas Nasa AP
Spacewalking astronauts perform six-hour long repair on the International Space Station

Kim Komando

00:41 sec | 3 weeks ago

Spacewalking astronauts perform six-hour long repair on the International Space Station

"Two NASA astronauts are back safe inside the international space station After a walk in space. A couple of NASA astronauts took a saunter outside the international space station Saturday. They had some outdoor plumbing chores that needed doing, namely fixing the air conditioning system. Astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins, teaming up for the second time since performing back to back spacewalk six weeks ago on another repair job. One thing to be careful of venting ammonia. I thought it was more than I was expecting Justin this line, but it did stop. In addition, the out of this world handyman replaced an antenna for helmet cameras and tightened the connections on a European experiment platform. Talk about helping out your neighbors

Nasa Victor Glover Mike Hopkins Justin
Spacewalking astronauts perform six-hour long repair on the International Space Station

Fork Report

00:16 sec | 3 weeks ago

Spacewalking astronauts perform six-hour long repair on the International Space Station

"NASA astronauts have wrapped up a seven hour spacewalk outside the international space station. It was the 237th space walk and the fifth one this year for astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins. They did some repairs and symptom systems upgrades as they floated around in

Nasa International Space Station Victor Glover Mike Hopkins
Spacewalkers take extra safety precautions for toxic ammonia

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 3 weeks ago

Spacewalkers take extra safety precautions for toxic ammonia

"Spacewalking astronauts are back safe inside the international space station after reading their suits of toxic ammonia very provocative all masses Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins had to take extra safety precautions after stepping outside working on the space station's external cooling system they had no trouble removing inventing a couple of old jumper cables to get rid of any ammonia still lingering in the lines but so much spewed out of the first does that mission control worried some of the frozen white flakes might have gotten on their suits NASA did not want the ammonia getting inside the space station and contaminating the cabin atmosphere but after nearly seven hour spacewalk mission control said the astronauts had spent so much time in sunlight any ammonia residue would've baked off I'm Ben Thomas

Victor Glover Mike Hopkins International Space Station Nasa Ben Thomas
Astronauts step outside space station to wrap up work

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:38 sec | 3 weeks ago

Astronauts step outside space station to wrap up work

"From the last spacewalk. Two spacewalkers stepped outside the international space station today to complete electrical connections with the European experiment platform and conduct other repairs. CBS News Space Consultant Bill Harwood has more astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins air working outside the International space station to carry out a variety of maintenance task. They're going to relocated ammonia coolant line. They're going to install a new wireless camera transceiver and make a few final connections to a new European experiment platform. They're also round a couple of Ethernet cables for use with the station's external WiFi system to watch video of that space.

Bill Harwood Victor Glover Mike Hopkins International Space Station Cbs News
Spacewalking astronauts wrap up maintenance work on space station

Leo Laporte

00:22 sec | 3 weeks ago

Spacewalking astronauts wrap up maintenance work on space station

"Two NASA astronauts are wrapping up a seven hour spacewalk outside the International space station, Victor Glover and Mike Hawkins made some minor repairs and tackled some plumbing issues among their tasks. They had to invent a pair of ammonia cables used to repair a leak in the station's cooling system. The spacewalk today is the fifth for members of the US Russian Japanese

Victor Glover Mike Hawkins International Space Station Nasa United States
NASA astronauts take spacewalk outside ISS

NPR News Now

00:25 sec | 3 weeks ago

NASA astronauts take spacewalk outside ISS

"Nasa astronauts are on a space walk outside the international space station. It's already lasted nearly seven hours. So far there rearranging some plumbing and wiring and completing other power upgrades. That couldn't be accomplished. During a spacewalk a week ago they ran into a couple of issues including an ammonia leak but they are about to wrap up the

International Space Station Nasa
Astronauts step outside space station to wrap up work

WBZ Midday News

00:30 sec | 3 weeks ago

Astronauts step outside space station to wrap up work

"Line. Way Up on the International Space station yesterday a spacewalk CBS News Space consultant Bill Harwood tells us what they were up to astronauts Victor Glover and Mike Hopkins air working outside the International space station to carry out a variety of maintenance tasks. Going to relocated ammonia coolant line. They're going to install a new wireless camera transceiver and make a few final connections to a new European experiment platform. They're also round a couple of Ethernet cables for use with the station's external

Bill Harwood Victor Glover Mike Hopkins International Space Station CBS
Spacewalking astronauts tackle hoses, other station odd jobs

Science Friday

00:53 sec | Last month

Spacewalking astronauts tackle hoses, other station odd jobs

"Two NASA astronauts will venture outside the International Space station today on a spacewalk some 254 miles above the Earth from member station W. M. F E Brendan Byrne reports NASA's Michael Hopkins and Victor Glover will work outside the station for about 6.5 hours conducting maintenance on the orbiting lab. To do a little work on the station's cooling system, venting ammonia and moving cables in an effort to make the system more efficient. They'll also run cables along the station for a new payload platform and amateur radio system, a new antenna and wires for two new high definition cameras. Ash knots on two recent spacewalks installed mounting hardware for a new set of solar panels for the station arriving later this year. Hopkins and Glover arrived at the station back in November after launching from Kennedy Space Center on Space Sexes Crew Dragon

W. M. F E Brendan Byrne Michael Hopkins Victor Glover Nasa International Space Station Glover Hopkins Kennedy Space Center On Space
Astronauts plan Saturday spacewalk at space station

NASACast Audio

00:21 sec | Last month

Astronauts plan Saturday spacewalk at space station

"International space station's fifth spacewalk of the year. Risk slated for march. Thirteen during the audi nastase michael hopkins and victor glover are scheduled to service and relocate some jumper cables of the station's thermal control system. Continue some work from january twenty seventh spacewalk and work on some other tasks. The outing is the fourth spacewalk. Glover and the fifth for

Michael Hopkins Victor Glover International Space Station Audi Glover
China, Russia Announce Plan To Build Moon Research Station

Fresh Air

00:48 sec | Last month

China, Russia Announce Plan To Build Moon Research Station

"Details from NPR's Emily Fang. Both China's and Russia's National Space Agency, said in separate statements that they would begin planning a joint international lunar research station. Ross Cosmo's Russia's Space agency said the station could orbit the moon or it could be on the moon itself. Neither agency said when construction and such a station might begin, though. China has invested heavily in its base conditions. It successfully sent a probe into orbit around Mars this year, and it could begin construction on an international space station as early as this year. Current international space station has been in orbit around Earth since 1998 but is set to be retired by 2030. Emily Chang. NPR NEWS Beijing Another glance at Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrial Average is now up 1.5%

Emily Fang National Space Agency Ross Cosmo Russia NPR China Emily Chang Beijing
Food Fatigue for Astronauts on deep space missions

Innovation Now

00:58 sec | Last month

Food Fatigue for Astronauts on deep space missions

"On the international space station and astronauts menu repeats about once every eight days and supply ships bring new food options every few months but astronauts who travel to mars won't have those same luxuries so nasa is looking for creative solutions to menu. Boredom astronauts will likely grow their own crops to supplement dehydrated or powdered food supplies and three d. printed foods might allow astronauts to create more dishes from nutritional pastes but nasa researchers are also delving into the psychology of eating to better understand how the sense of smell and taste will change in space. How will act or noughts perceive foods that might be different. Colors will foods that have little or no smell be appetizing understanding how to keep foods interesting maybe just as important as their vitamin and mineral content for astronauts that are a long long way from a home cooked meal

International Space Station Nasa
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:57 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"You <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> runner <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> only. <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> Hey <Speech_Male> thanks for sticking around Hopi. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Listen to two <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> of these parts <Speech_Female> with our conversation <Speech_Female> with Dr Gary <Speech_Female> Gary Kit Macher. This is <Speech_Male> episode. One thirty three. <Speech_Male> If you haven't go <Speech_Male> back and listen to episode <Speech_Male> one thirty two it's a fascinating <Speech_Male> compass <Speech_Female> Conversation <Speech_Female> on everything that happened before <Speech_Male> the International Space <Speech_Male> Station. Hope you tune <Speech_Male> in. You can find it at <Speech_Male> NASA GOV slash <Speech_Male> podcasts. <Speech_Male> Along with the other NASA <Speech_Male> podcasts. That we have <Speech_Male> there are the many space <Speech_Male> centers here <Speech_Male> at NASA. <Speech_Female> If you <Speech_Female> want to learn more about the <Speech_Male> international space station <Speech_Male> I'd be surprised. But <Speech_Male> there is more the investigate <Speech_Male> and NASA <Speech_Male> GOV slash I <Speech_Male> S S. We <Speech_Male> got Social <Speech_Male> media places <Speech_Male> where you can go facebook <Speech_Male> twitter instagram. <Speech_Male> Just search the International <Speech_Male> Space Station. We gotTA <Speech_Male> count on all three of those <Speech_Female> use the Hashtag <Speech_Female> ask NASA on your favorite <Speech_Male> platform to submit an <Speech_Male> idea for the show and <Speech_Male> make sure to mention it's <Speech_Female> for Houston. We have a podcast. <Speech_Male> For our students <Speech_Male> out there I have a quick plug <Speech_Male> for you. <Speech_Male> Research in the microgravity <Speech_Female> environment of <Speech_Male> the International Space Station <Speech_Male> is still <Speech_Male> as important as ever <Speech_Male> and to

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

13:03 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"It comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years of continuous human presence. Now someone's gotTa be honoring those guys on the one hand we have people on the ground. Continuously monitoring and continuously operating the systems and on the other hand Through the use of Intelligence Systems and a lot more understanding of how the systems operate we can have a relatively small number of people operating the station and so The number of people we have during a holiday or on a weekend is not narrowly what we would have during a normal workday Whether in Houston or in other parts of the world now keep in mind While this is somewhat simplified and made somewhat less expensive the operation of the station today When we start talking about whether it's a moon base where there's a communications lapse of several seconds or Mars mission where the communications laps can be more on the order of forty five minutes We have to start rethinking Is Is this going to be the way in which we can operate How do we? How do we operate the systems When you can't do it real time yeah definitely a huge consideration and I want to kind of take that as a jumping off point from. We've had this long conversation about the International Space Station. And what I what that really. I'm trying to establish is just what went into this thing. What it what it takes to put this thing together to construct it to to make it permanently habitable for twenty years thinking about that thinking about those lessons. What are we taking now and putting towards the gateway which is not meant to be continuously inhabited? But there's you know. We talked about improvements of technology and just lessons that we've learned throughout the whole year all of these years going towards a moon orbiting platform. Well the Right from the very start. We envisioned the Space Station and low-earth orbit is being prototype for the kind of vehicle that you would use for not so much lunar as much is planetary missions vehicle. That would take off for many months in years to carry astronauts to distant planets early on we were thinking about the planets Venus and Mars now our our main focus is particularly Mars and so depending on the mission that we would be going on it could be a mission of anywhere from eighteen of probably at the minimum to several years three or four years. Maybe even longer than that. A gateway is a particularly particular kind of space station. That would be used to support the lunar missions and so Because of the way in which the Orion is developed it would need a base in orbit around the moon that it would be able to to dock to stay there while astronauts. You're down on the lunar surface and then carry the astronauts back from the gateway back to the year and so Right from the outset were looking at developing the kinds of systems that would be required for taking care of people for very long durations and when I say taking care of people they not only have to be operable They really have to be able to operate with minimal maintenance with minimal kinds of systems difficulties over very long periods and. I think we've been doing that. We've been doing that with the not only the environmental control system The exercise systems that are Fairly critical and keeping the people Healthy and active But with computer systems communication systems all of the different systems that we need to support a space station were learning how to depend upon them and Through some of the problems we have faced. Were were learning how to redesign and develop them in such a way that they are dependable for future years. Now What's interesting is we're talking about the international space station being a lesson for travelling further out into solar system which I think was one of many purposes from the get-go was was to learn how to how to do that. Zion systems how to live and work in space for a long period of time. But I know we still want low earth orbit as a place to continue to practice to continue to develop technologies to continue to train. Crews this is. This is a place we need and looking further further into the future of the International Space. Station's not meant to be there forever so the transition is to a more commercial economy. Tell me about the transition on the International Space Station. What we what we're learning and what we're doing now to eventually transition to this low-earth-orbit economy of course the space station. Because of its location in lower orbit as a number of attributes that are useful. One of them is a micro gravity or zero gravity so that we can look at different kinds of physical processes in orbit in this very low gravity field environment as compared with one gravity. Here on the your another aspect is the the observational aspect. And so we have Scientific Windows we have the KUPUNA windows of the station. And the astronauts suspend a fair amount of time looking at the earth and particularly Looking at things which really haven't been planned in advance so if there are fires in Australia volcanic eruptions They're right there looking at them. Taking Pictures Making observations And of course these were all things that were foreseen from the outset. And we've seen that they Have been useful for different kinds of companies some of them looking at very basic research. Others are more specific Looking much more specific kinds of products In two thousand five the ISS was designated a National Laboratory and in two thousand eleven they brought in an independent organization called Casus to operate the national lab and They go out around the country and try to tell people about the The availability in the possibilities of using the International Space Station Other companies have been coming along. axiom space Mister bigalow with his inflatable modules and so Others are coming along and depending on whether there is a A commercial opportunity or not whether they can make access to space reasonably inexpensive and they have an orbiting platform then in the future the The opportunity will be there for commercial operations in a space station in the meantime the ISS is being used in this way already Not only by the US the Russians. Of course have Famously been bring various tourists up to To the space station for visits and in the future we think that we'll have more opportunity For various kinds of commercial activities on the station. Do you think I what you're talking about now? I mean we talked about International Space Station Informing Lunar Exploration Informing Mars exploration everything. It takes their Being in this place where there's commercial viability For for operating space. Do you think the Internet. How how big of a role do you think? The International Space Station played in that. And do you think we can even be in this place without the International Space Station? I think the the International Space Station has been critical in learning how to design build and operate different kinds of hardware and systems learning how to work together with international partners. Keep in mind. We have not only the Russians but Sixteen or seventeen. Different countries number has varied over the years And we've learned how to work with them I know early on. I worked cleric closely with the Russians. They did not really have a good of how the US went about Putting things in orbit on the shuttle or on the station and we developed joint integration processes joint documentation. I know I was talking with my Russian counterpart from the mirrors just a few weeks ago and he says well the work that we had laid in nineteen ninety four nineteen ninety three is still the basis for how the Russians work today so they were learned a great deal about How the more advanced world I guess? does payloads in science and experiments in orbit At the same time we've learned how a lot of their hardware is built and designed. I know I was involved in the design of moon bases and Mars vehicles back during the first President Bush's space exploration initiative and a lot of the hardware that we have actually built for the space station today whether it's the most basic hardware the modules the nodes the racks the Cupola or down to the more detailed aspects of the CTB's the stowage bags the computer systems. The communication systems. A lot of these will actually become the components of future moon bases and Mars spacecraft justice. Today we're looking at using a lot of these pieces on the Gateway in orbit around the Moon. Well what are you looking forward to the most then for the future you have this gigantic history in your brain of everything. That's happened over the years to get to this point. What are you looking forward to the most? Well I've I've been lucky enough to participate in a lot of these programs and even have a hand in the design and development of the law. A lot of the hardware and so every time I see whether it's the CTB's or the Cucolo or the cost computer system. These were all things that I had a direct hand in and I'm looking forward to seeing some of those same systems on the first moon base Or on the first Mars spacecraft Right now I'm looking at them in orbit around the earth. The the cool of course is famous as the the astronauts favorite place in space to observe the earth That grew out of a lot of In terms of what we the astronauts needed what we had to be able to provide for the astronauts and We're lucky that we have in orbit today. But now I'm looking at putting the system just like that base on March leaving your mark on human space exploration forever. That's amazing Gary. Thank you so much. We're going through this history. This has been fascinating to discussions really through the concept of space stations. Through what we've learned in what would what is taken to put together the International Space Station and laying the groundwork for what's to come really appreciate your time. Thanks for having me as a glide that is able to to offer something of interest. I loved it. Thank you.

International Space Station Space Station International Space Intelligence Systems US CTB Michigan Houston ISS Gary Australia KUPUNA Mister bigalow
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

13:51 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"This is allowed the people on the ground to have almost as much sometimes even more insight into situation on the station the crew has It also means that you can have specialists all over the world Specializing in their own systems. They don't necessarily have to come here to Houston or in the case of payloads the Marshall Center in Alabama They can oftentimes stay in their own. Local control centers and operate their systems from Oberpfaffenhofen Germany or from From Chikuba in Japan or from wherever the location is So that means A lot more of the people that maintain and operate the station. can do it remotely Not only remote from the station but remote parts of the Earth. And what is it? What did it take to switch to Because when it comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years of continuous human presence. Now someone's gotTa be honoring those guys on the one hand we have people on the ground. Continuously monitoring and continuously operating the systems and on the other hand Through the use of Intelligence Systems and a lot more understanding of how the systems operate we can have a relatively small number of people operating the station and so The number of people we have during a holiday or on a weekend is not narrowly what we would have during a normal workday Whether in Houston or in other parts of the world now keep in mind While this is somewhat simplified and made somewhat less expensive the operation of the station today When we start talking about whether it's a moon base where there's a communications lapse of several seconds or Mars mission where the communications laps can be more on the order of forty five minutes We have to start rethinking Is Is this going to be the way in which we can operate How do we? How do we operate the systems When you can't do it real time yeah definitely a huge consideration and I want to kind of take that as a jumping off point from. We've had this long conversation about the International Space Station. And what I what that really. I'm trying to establish is just what went into this thing. What it what it takes to put this thing together to construct it to to make it permanently habitable for twenty years thinking about that thinking about those lessons. What are we taking now and putting towards the gateway which is not meant to be continuously inhabited? But there's you know. We talked about improvements of technology and just lessons that we've learned throughout the whole year all of these years going towards a moon orbiting platform. Well the Right from the very start. We envisioned the Space Station and low-earth orbit is being prototype for the kind of vehicle that you would use for not so much lunar as much is planetary missions vehicle that would take off for many months or even years to carry astronauts to distant planets early on we were thinking about the planets. Venus and Mars now. Our our main focus is particularly Mars and so depending on the mission that we would be going on it could be a mission of anywhere from eighteen of probably at the minimum to several years three or four years. Maybe even longer than that. A gateway is a particularly particular kind of space station. That would be used to support the lunar missions and so Because of the way in which the Orion is developed it would need a base in orbit around the moon that it would be able to to dock to stay there while astronauts. You're down on the lunar surface and then carry the astronauts back from the gateway back to the year and so Right from the outset were looking at developing the kinds of systems that would be required for taking care of people for very long durations and when I say taking care of people they not only have to be operable They really have to be able to operate with minimal maintenance with minimal kinds of systems difficulties over very long periods and. I think we've been doing that. We've been doing that with the not only the environmental control system The exercise systems that are Fairly critical and keeping the people Healthy and active But with computer systems communication systems all of the different systems that we need to support a space station were learning how to depend upon them and Through some of the problems we have faced. Were were learning how to redesign and develop them in such a way that they are dependable for future years. Now What's interesting is we're talking about the international space station being a lesson for travelling further out into solar system which I think was one of many purposes from the get-go was was to learn how to how to do that. Zion systems how to live and work in space for a long period of time. But I know we still want low earth orbit as a place to continue to practice to continue to develop technologies to continue to train. Crews this is. This is a place we need and looking further further into the future of the International Space. Station's not meant to be there forever so the transition is to a more commercial economy. Tell me about the transition on the International Space Station. What we what we're learning and what we're doing now to eventually transition to this low-earth-orbit economy of course the space station. Because of its location in lower orbit as a number of attributes that are useful. One of them is a micro gravity or zero gravity so that we can look at different kinds of physical processes in orbit in this very low gravity field environment as compared with one gravity. Here on the your another aspect is the the observational aspect. And so we have Scientific Windows we have the KUPUNA windows of the station. And the astronauts suspend a fair amount of time looking at the earth and particularly Looking at things which really haven't been planned in advance so if there are fires in Australia volcanic eruptions They're right there looking at them. Taking Pictures Making observations And of course these were all things that were foreseen from the outset. And we've seen that they Have been useful for different kinds of companies some of them looking at very basic research. Others are more specific looking much more specific kinds of products In two thousand five the ISS was designated a National Laboratory and in two thousand eleven they brought in an independent organization called Casus to operate the national lab and They go out around the country and try to tell people about the The availability in the possibilities of using the International Space Station Other companies have been coming along. axiom space Mister bigalow with his inflatable modules and so Others are coming along and depending on whether there is a A commercial opportunity or not whether they can make access to space reasonably inexpensive and they have an orbiting platform then in the future the The opportunity will be there for commercial operations in a space station in the meantime the ISS is being used in this way already Not only by the US the Russians. Of course have Famously been bring various tourists up to To the space station for visits and in the future we think that we'll have more opportunity For various kinds of commercial activities on the station. Do you think I what you're talking about now? I mean we talked about International Space Station Informing Lunar Exploration Informing Mars exploration everything. It takes their Being in this place where there's commercial viability For for operating space. Do you think the Internet. How how big of a role do you think? The International Space Station played in that. And do you think we can even be in this place without the International Space Station? I think the the International Space Station has been critical in learning how to design build and operate different kinds of hardware and systems learning how to work together with international partners. Keep in mind. We have not only the Russians but Sixteen or seventeen. Different countries number has varied over the years And we've learned how to work with them I know early on. I worked cleric closely with the Russians. They did not really have a good of how the US went about Putting things in orbit on the shuttle or on the station and we developed joint integration processes joint documentation. I know I was talking with my Russian counterpart from the mirrors just a few weeks ago and he says well the work that we had laid in nineteen ninety four nineteen ninety three is still the basis for how the Russians work today so they were learned a great deal about How the more advanced world I guess? does payloads in science and experiments in orbit At the same time we've learned how a lot of their hardware is built and designed. I know I was involved in the design of moon bases and Mars vehicles back during the first President Bush's space exploration initiative and a lot of the hardware that we have actually built for the space station today whether it's the most basic hardware the modules the nodes the racks the cupola or down to the more detailed aspects of the. Ctb's the stowage bags the computer systems communication systems. A lot of these will actually become the components of future moon bases and Mars spacecraft justice. Today we're looking at using a lot of these pieces on the Gateway in orbit around the Moon. Well what are you looking forward to the most then for the future you have this gigantic history in your brain of everything. That's happened over the years to get to this point. What are you looking forward to the most? Well I've I've been lucky enough to participate in a lot of these programs and even have a hand in the design and development of the law. A lot of the hardware and so every time I see whether it's the CTB's or the Cucolo or the cost computer system. These were all things that I had a direct hand in and I'm looking forward to seeing some of those same systems on the first moon base Or on the first Mars spacecraft Right now I'm looking at them in orbit around the earth. The the cool of course is famous as the the astronauts favorite place in space to observe the earth That grew out of a lot of In terms of what we the astronauts needed what we had to be able to provide for the astronauts and We're lucky that we have in orbit today. But now I'm looking at putting the system just like that base on March leaving your mark on human space exploration forever. That's amazing Gary. Thank you so much. We're going through this history. This has been fascinating to discussions really through the concept of space stations. Through what we've learned in what would what is taken to put together the International Space Station and laying the groundwork for what's to come really appreciate your time. Thanks for having me as a glide that is able to to offer something of interest. I loved it. Thank.

International Space Station Space Station International Space Houston US Intelligence Systems Oberpfaffenhofen Germany Michigan Chikuba ISS Marshall Center Alabama Japan Gary Ctb Australia
"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

15:48 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We were developing was not put through a lot of testing When we first launched it into orbit and so the first crew started using it around the year two thousand immediately collapsed it had not been tested adequately and So we had to go back and redesign and rebuild it to be much stronger and we discovered that if the crew cannot exercise this as a critical failure and you start thinking about bringing the crew home within a matter of a month or less and So it turns out it is really critical hardware and it is something that you need to give serious thought to and has to be adequately tested before it goes into orbit so we were learning a lot of these lessons as we were going We started out with the Mir flights that allowed us to test a lot of this equipment. including some of the scientific payloads we sent up the first microgravity glove boxes Prototypes for what would later fly on the ISS. We sent up Other kinds of devices that were intended to limit the number of vibrations between the payload and the vibrations of the structure of the space station. So we tested those out and then we would launch more Significant systems for the ISS. We looked at the design of the Russian waste management system and also how they use different systems for recycling air and water and We were already involved in developing some of that for the ISS But the Russian approach was often very simple Almost elegant in its simplicity. And so we adopted some of those approaches And made our systems a little bit simpler to and I think in the long run that has worked out better In terms of being able to maintain and support the system in orbit about data and communications. I know that was a big one over time. And the improvements there will a lot of A lot of things really did improve significantly mirror. showed us a lot of the problems of a space station. A lot of the potential problems lot of the art experience on Mir was pretty negative because first of all Mir was very old when the US started flying the shuttle up there it was only intended to last about five years and by the the first shuttle visited it was had been there for nine years allow and by the end of the program We were going on about fifteen years. Mir had very limited communications Because of the the collapse of the Soviet government They really no longer had the t teed risk kind of a satellite that would allow them to maintain continuous communications geosynchronous communication satellite and therefore astronauts and cosmonauts could only communicate when they were within range of a few ground stations mainly across the old Soviet Empire and so they're fairly limited. How much communications could go back and forth. In the meantime we had computer systems that were growing more sophisticated For instance we had wi fi In the first laptop computers that we put on the Mir but the Russians were somewhat hesitant to use something like that because of the potential interference electromagnetic signals and so on and so we were learning a lot about how to do that and they were learning quite a bit about How that could affect things by the time. The International Space Station comes along just a few years later We we have learned a lot of those lessons. We had grown somewhat more sophisticated Our systems were new and they were working well We were very dependent on computers on the ISS whereas Mir had evolved from being a pre computer age kind of a station in the seventies and early eighties prior to Mirror They were more dependent on computers but by the time of ISS in nineteen eighty eight We we are very dependent on computers. In fact the The first crew that reaches the space station says they can't turn the lights on. They can't turn the lights on because you do it through the computer and they can't find the computer because the lights are off and so So that were some of the lessons that That we were learning at that time so So the computers were going far. More sophisticated and capable. Communications was Was almost continuous Because we did have the cheater system in orbit. Now what did we learn about life on the station because this was really are? We were jumping right into some of these long expeditions. And whatever it takes to operate over these periods of time again we have learned on the mirror that a lot of the crew time spent just maintaining the station and fortunately because the the ISS was somewhat simpler and there wasn't as much stuff in on the inside it was a little bit easier to access different areas so it didn't take quite as much time to maintain the systems. And what I'm talking about maintaining just wiping down the interior with the various kind of biological materials to control the growth of any kind of hazardous contaminants That was something that we had faced on Mir man Don. I assess Fortunately we didn't have to deal with that as much but we still had to spend at least about a day a week for by the crew cleaning and maintaining a lot of the systems We learned quite a bit about The health of the astronauts and how the health of the astronauts interface with the environmental control and Life Support. System so for instance. We knew for a long time that the astronauts were losing minerals from their bones. Her bones were growing weaker. Like in osteoporosis. In the case of the elderly it was the same kind of thing in Orb as well as the muscle. Mass of the astronauts was decreasing. And so these were things that we needed. Various kinds of countermeasures Exercise Countermeasures What we did not appreciate was a lot of these minerals that were coming out of. The astronauts was coming out in the urine and therefore in our waste management system which was processing the urine We formed What you mystically call urine brickell and it was clogging up the systems on the environmental control recycling equipment and so we were learning quite a bit And had to go back and redesign. Some of the components said that it was a less susceptible some of these kinds of problems. Wow now you talked about a lot crew time especially on Mir was dedicated to just maintaining fixing this or scrubbing down that. But I think the the goal of the International Space Station was eventually to move towards maximizing utilization time or the time you dedicate the science we had Looked at how best to use the space station right along from the very beginning A lot of the top level NASA management felt that it was all about science. It was all about building. He user community. That was going to be supportive of human spaceflight and therefore we were trying to develop experiments. I on shuttle later for SPACELAB. And then Mir that took could be developed into more sophisticated systems for use on the ISS. the problems early on on the ISS was that with the small number of crew members. Initially Just a three and then eventually growing to four and not getting to eight until Later years after about ten years or so We really did not have as much crew time as we would have liked if you take a look at the crewman's day and how much time they have to spend Maintaining themselves whether for exercise or cleanliness and so on but then How much time they actually had available for a for doing scientific work. It was a pretty constrained so we're learning quite a bit about how to either automate. Some of the systems how to operate a lot of the systems from the ground and so This has been developed really to the point now where the astronauts although they do have to do. Some on-orbit Actual maintenance of the station most of the system level activities operating the systems is done from the ground and so the astronauts do not have to focus on that so much and they do have more time to focus on scientific experiments. Yeah and they're every kind that you can imagine there earth observation. Their biological their systems. They're they're really everything going. I WanNa take a kind of zoom in on International Space Station history to the Columbia accident. What happened there in terms of the assembly? And then what we had to rethink and Redo and then get back up on our feet turf. Thin eventually finished construction of the space station or of course the initial Assembly mission occurred in nineteen eighty eight and so from eight until two thousand and three when the Columbia accident occurred We were able to do a fair amount of assembly work although we were somewhat limited because the Russians Were not moving along quite as quickly as we had hoped with the service module The survey the Russians only have a limited number of people that they apply on any of their modules. And so they had to I. do the F. B. B. and it wasn't until the F. was in orbit that they were able to move on to the service module and get it ready to fly That was finally ready The first crew went up of the first long duration crew went up in. I think two thousand and so they took their place in orbit and so then we had it about another Almost three years to work in space before the Columbia accident occurred at the time. The Columbia accident occurred. We really were not In the best of situation in terms of having all of the electrical power and and radiator systems in place. We had just started building out the trust We in a way. We were fortunate in that. We did have a fairly balanced station. Where equal amounts of trust had been placed on both sides and therefore it was somewhat easier to control and maintain in orbit. But of course we had been so focused on building assembling the station using the shuttle that when the shuttle stopped flying after Columbia We really were not able to do any more assembly work and so that That stopped everything for about two years or so until the return to flight and they returned to fly. Did that kick off a rapid set of assembly missions. So one of the problems we had run into prior to Columbia was we were bringing the different elements of the station Down to Kennedy and preparing them to fly but often times we would have one element there and the next element to add to connect Was Not really there to do any kind of testing on So we frequently had to do simulators place of the actual test articles when the Columbia accident happened In a way it worked out fortunate. Net all of the equipment began to coalesce at Kennedy Space Center. And so we could put a lot more of it together. Test it out more thoroughly Prior to launch and that way when we when we returned the shuttle to flight the the assembly missions could go off Much more rapidly almost at the pace of about one month or so when one of every month and a half or so and so we were able to move along pretty quickly. Okay now I WANNA Talk Abou Operations for a second. Because I think you've mentioned it a few times that You you mentioned this. Space Station was designed to be a bit simpler so the crew didn't have to do much but really this is different from even shuttle where it was the crew that was that was flying the shuttle. The space station is almost flown from the ground operated from the ground. Twenty four seven operations and then on top of that you have international operations. Tell me how that structure can about well. Of course computers and computer networking has evolved quite a bit over the years over the course of the last twenty years and so this is allowed the people on the ground to have almost as much sometimes even more insight into situation on the station the crew has It also means that you can have specialists all over the world Specializing in their own systems. They don't necessarily have to come here to Houston or in the case of payloads the Marshall Center in Alabama They can oftentimes stay in their own. Local control centers and operate their systems from Oberpfaffenhofen Germany or from From Chikuba in Japan or from wherever the location is So that means A lot more of the people that maintain and operate the station. can do it remotely Not only remote from the station but remote parts of the Earth. And what is it? What did it take to switch to Because when it comes to Michigan troll Before the International Space Station a lot of what we know is mission. Control was staffed for a mission and you. Would you would train and you would do simulations and you would do that. But this now we're talking about continuous staffing making sure that someone's in the room at all times because you already mentioned it. Almost twenty years.

Space Station International Space Station ISS Mir Columbia Kennedy Space Center osteoporosis US Soviet government Oberpfaffenhofen Germany Life Support Japan NASA Michigan Houston Chikuba Marshall Center
"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

18:06 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"Bay. Stage going into an ambient food system. Wow so on this topic of systems tell me about the logic of designing the space station as we see it now with a trust segment with with solar rays with batteries with a the habitable modules. The Way to those we started out the different systems are going to be developed and built by different what we called work packages different contractors and different NASA centers managing them and so the power system was originally going to be a product of the Glenn. what is now the Glenn Research Center up in Ohio The modules became a product of the Marshall Space Center in Alabama although with an important role for Johnson in managing those modules A lot of the supporting systems the guidance navigation control Computers were being developed here at the Johnson Space Center because of our role in managing the spaceflight program We looked at How do you package those systems? And how do you tie them together on the inside of the modules We looked at the Spacelab racks and we went to a somewhat a simpler and more elegant design of a common rack. That could be put into the floor. The in the walls of the space station They were basically refrigerator sized up to a mass of about a thousand pounds and they were sized in such a way that if we ever got punctured by micrometeorites or a piece of orbital debris and we had to plug a hole the route could be pulled away from the wall very quickly to gain access to the pressure. Shell keep in mind we were looking at. How do we maintain these modules over a very long period of time decades? And so it was very important that it be modular in approach and so A lot of the keywords that we we wrote into the documentation both for our requirements and into the contracts were associated with modulate parity and upgrade ability and So that we would be able to recover from any kind of problems and issues in orbit the other systems such as the solar power cells and the radiators and eventually even the computers We looked at. How can you put those things on the outside of the station? How can you attach them? Originally on the Space Operation Center it was a somewhat simpler design approach But they were not quite as easy to put into place during assembly. And if you've ever had to change them out it would be difficult thinking about eating park thinking span so looking at. Va Robotics and how you assemble the pieces. We designed around this idea of the central trusts and attaching these as as different modular entities that could be attached to the trust. The trust self went through quite an evolution. Originally we were going to build the trust Out of what we called sticks and balls kind of a of a Lego set in orbit lots of little pieces and because of some of the concerns associated. With all the EV hours We went to a modular truss approach. Where the trusses were pre integrated so he would fill the truss up with as much of the equipment as we could. It would be pre assembled and then we would launch them into fairly large segments on the shuttle and So from nineteen eighty five through about nineteen eighty nine or so Those aspects of the space station what became space station. Freedom Grew pretty definitive. Now keep in mind. We did a lot of the early work at different NASA centers Looking at the design approach to us and specifying the requirements ultimately. What was built was an outgrowth of the contract competition So for instance A number of us from Johnson Space Center because of our Integral work on the modules actually went off to work package one into the Marshall Space Center. I was one of those people who worked out of Marshall for about a year during the source board and Ultimately what came back from the different bidders was what was built for the space station and still Looks pretty much like the space station today. Now some of the things The contractors and NASA did not necessarily get right in for instance. One of these things was the size of the modules Nasa specified in the requirements that the contractors were to bid to that The modules were. Take up the full capacity of the space shuttle. Payload Bay and so one of the bidders on the work patch one contract that you bidders. By the way we're Boeing and Martin Marietta and so one of the bidders said they could put a sixty or sixty five foot long module and they could launch it. Fully outfitted fully loaded with gear and then the other contractors said well a fully outfitted module would never be able to be lifted by the shuttle into the required orbit and therefore we would have to either short in the modules or we would have to launch the modules up largely empty and then send them up send the the interior contents up later in logistics modules and fact because I had been involved with shuttle payload integration I one of my jobs during the source sport was to write a white paper comparing the two approaches and who was right and my My statement was neither one is right because NASA specified the wrong requirements. So what the need them. What what we end up choosing What we ultimately ended up doing was shortening most of the modules and launching the mop partially outfitted so much of the equipment that could be integral Integrated inside as we could given the mass limitations. Okay so the the modules wound up not being They were probably never going to be sixty feet long. But the original modules. The space station were supposed to be about forty eight feet long and in fact now the longest. Us module the US lab is only. I believe about thirty feet long. Okay and so We did have to constrain the length because the mass limitations so you're defining these requirements for the contractor and go on having this back and forth with the contractors for some of the US segment. What about the international side? The internationals were going through a similar kind of approach and in some cases they were a little bit further behind us. So for instance although we were working right from the very outset with the Japanese and with the Canadians and with the Europeans They were learning a lot from how we were looking at the situation. For instance as I mentioned earlier we were building the mockups of the modules here at Johnson and the work was being done within our group. That was not in engineering. It was in the space in life. Sciences Organization called Man's systems man dash systems These days it probably would not be politically correct to call it. That we were not So forward thinking at that time It was interesting because the Japanese came. I remember Sh- MR CHIRAC. Who was their program manager? Came very early on probably in eighty six or eighty seven and we toured him through the MOCKUPS and showed him how we were approaching the design and they thought it was very interesting that we would have such a focus on the human aspect of the space station. That was something he said. The Japanese really did not know how to do The next year they said we're coming to Houston with our man systems advisory group and so they learned very quickly from us how to establish exactly what we already had in place here in. Houston and Pretty soon they were using the same approach Some of the aspects were political for instance The Japanese just as we have to fight in Congress for a monetary support to build all of these things had to do the same thing with their government and They went through and they said you know. We want to build this large laboratory and along with the laboratory logistics module and External Platform. There was a lot of concern over robotics and so the Japanese said well the Canadians rebuilding the main robotic arm for the station. But we'll build a robotic arm to so a lot of these things wound up on the Japanese module when we ran into problems such is the mass limitations of the modules the Japanese because they had sold it to their government that they were going to have a big laboratory stuck with their big laboratory. Hasn't pro as a compared with the US where we reduce the size. And that's how the the Japanese wound up with the largest lab on the station. All right now Tell me about construction. You already alluded a little bit earlier in our discussion about this wall of. Va Sins with some of the early construction. Tell me about how started and where we were. We had a series of as going on in the shuttle program through the early nineteen eighties We had rescued some satellites that had been put into Aaron orbits they weren't the right orbit or the state and the satellite did not start working the way it was supposed to. In so NASA shuttle were sent to rescue the satellites Sometimes activities went as planned other times. Didn't we sent up some chests of space station hardware for instance we built A segment of trusts off of the space shuttle and some of the problems that we focused on during that test said it was going to perhaps be more difficult than we originally assumed We had a study conducted by Astronaut Bill Fisher And Charlie price of the engineering director so is called the Fisher price study and they said. Oh this E. V. A. situation could be a pretty difficult with thousands of hours required to build the station and especially if something doesn't go right if we can't get certain things put in place then it could affect the entire assembly sequence so that was what got us looking at the idea of the pre integrated trust Some of the people in the engineering director at Who are still here today. actually patented that idea of the pre-integrated trust and so that changed our direction little bit although ultimately a the number of as his that have been required on the International Space Station has been far more than any prior program. Still in the I believe thousands of hours now I think we'RE UP INTO THE O. Two hundred devier's thereabouts today. And so So it's required quite a number bb as a lot of activity just as was foretold back in the nineteen eighties. Yeah for sure I think. Yeah we're we're way up there thousands. Yeah I think fifteen hundred hours was the last statistic for last spacewalk that we did so. It's definitely because it's it's not just we're not we're beyond construction now. This is construction. This is maintenance you know. We're talking about switching out. The batteries. Use The batteries. Don't components have been up there for decades. Now that's exactly right so tell me about some of the early years of space station with some of the smaller segments. Here we're talking. Sds Eight Expedition One Life there and how that technology has improved over time going from the small station and then eventually building on with this assembly sequence what changed what upgraded. And how what we learned improved our understanding of how to operate this thing. We'll bring in NASA Mir here because NASA Mir was a program that we conducted between about nineteen ninety five in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight so it was leading up to the first Assembly missions of the ISS and especially for those of us who were working on the inside of the station was very important We learned What kinds of equipment we would need? We learned how to work with the Russians we learned how to establish appropriate documentation and immigration processes. And so a lot of that was done early on in my own case I had been the storage manager on the shuttle during the mid eighties and also was responsible for integrating a lot of the payloads on the shuttle. And so when I was put in charge of one of the last modules on Mir I said well we streamline the process for integrating payloads if had common interfaces an so I designed the the CTB's the soft storage bags That quite honestly with something no one else had ever thought of previously and so when the first mission was getting ready to dock with the Mir Sti Seventy one in nineteen ninety five. They discovered just a few weeks before the flight. We have no way to carry things over between the shuttle and the MIR. How can we do this and I said well I have these? Ctb's manufacturer we were actually building them here on site JSE. They were in orbit within a matter of really weeks and So we we were fortunate in having that of eligible. computers When we started the design of computers For the space station in the nineteen eighties. There was no such thing as a laptop computer The first small apples apple computers were coming out probably around eighty seven or thereabouts. I remember when I went off to the source board Because I was the scribe. I was the person writing a lot of these documents. The repackaged one of these apple computers. It wasn't by any means a portable. We called it a lovable and But We were looking at large refrigerator size racks full of computer equipment in the nineteen eighties By the time of Muir When our first astronaut went up to the Mir he said he really could have used some kind of a computer system to re documents on re training manuals because otherwise we had no way of sending up lots of different manuals Even during his off hours he said boy I could use something just to watch a movie on and so I was given the job to develop the first portable computer to be used as A training aid and also to be able to be used in off. Duty HOURS ARE MEMBER. We recorded onto small eight. Millimeter cassettes the Apollo thirteen movie among others sent those up in nineteen ninety five and of course now today all of the computers on the Space Station are basically portable computers the PCs system of the of the space station really is the heart of the computer system. That drives everything We have no rack sized computer equipment anymore thankfully so we've gone away from that but keep in mind in nineteen eighty five. When we got started just didn't exist. You hadn't been invented A lot of the other equipment. We were testing out. I on NASA Mir And then we were observing some of the equipment that the Russians were using their waste management system there treadmill We got into some arguments here at the Johnson. Space Center about how critical some hardware was so for instance The ISS program at the time did not feel that exercise equipment was critical and the exercise equipment..

Space Station NASA Johnson Space Center Marshall Space Center Johnson US Space Operation Center International Space Station Space Center Spacelab NASA Mir Glenn Research Center apple Houston Va Robotics Va Payload Bay
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

18:06 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Bay. Stage going into an ambient food system. Wow so on this topic of systems tell me about the logic of designing the space station as we see it now with trust segment with with solar rays with batteries with a the habitable modules. The way towards those we started out the different systems are going to be developed and built by different what we called work packages different contractors and different NASA centers. Managing them and so the power system was originally going to be a product of the Glenn. what is now the Glenn Research Center up in Ohio The modules became a product of the Marshall Space Center in Alabama although with an important role for Johnson in managing those modules A lot of the supporting systems the guidance navigation control Computers were being developed here at the Johnson Space Center because of our role in managing the spaceflight program We looked at How do you package those systems? And how do you tie them together? On the inside of the modules We looked at the SPACELAB and we went to a somewhat Simpler and more elegant design of a common rack. That could be put into the floor. The in the walls of the space station They were basically refrigerator sized up to a mass of about a thousand pounds and they were sized in such a way that if we ever got punctured by micrometeorites or a piece of orbital debris and we had to plug a hole the route could be pulled away from the wall very quickly to gain access to the pressure. Shell keep in mind we were looking at. How do we maintain these modules over a very long period of time decades? And so it was very important that it be modular in approach and so A lot of the keywords that we we wrote into the documentation both for our requirements and into the contracts were associated with modulate parity and upgrade ability and So that we would be able to recover from any kind of problems and issues in orbit the other systems such as the solar power cells and the radiators and eventually even the computers We looked at. How can you put those things on the outside of the station? How can you attach them? Originally on the Space Operation Center it was a somewhat simpler design approach But they were not quite as easy to put into place during assembly. And if you've ever had to change them out it would be difficult thinking about eating park thinking span so looking at. Va Robotics and how you assemble the pieces. We designed around this idea of the central trusts and attaching these as as different modular entities that could be attached to the trust. The trust self went through quite an evolution. Originally we were going to build the trust Out of what we called sticks and balls kind of a of a Lego set in orbit lots of little pieces and because of some of the concerns associated. With all the EV hours We went to a modular truss approach. Where the trusses were pre integrated so he would fill the truss up with as much of the equipment as we could. It would be pre assembled and then we would launch them into fairly large segments on the shuttle and So from nineteen eighty five through about nineteen eighty nine or so Those aspects of the space station what became space station. Freedom Grew pretty definitive. Now keep in mind. We did a lot of the early work at different NASA centers Looking at the design approach to us and specifying the requirements ultimately. What was built was an outgrowth of the contract competition So for instance A number of us from Johnson Space Center because of our Integral work on the modules actually went off to work package one into the Marshall Space Center. I was one of those people who worked out of Marshall for about a year during the source board and Ultimately what came back from the different bidders was what was built for the space station and still Looks pretty much like the space station today. Now some of the things The contractors and NASA did not necessarily get right in for instance. One of these things was the size of the modules Nasa specified in the requirements that the contractors were to bid to that The modules were. Take up the full capacity of the space shuttle. Payload Bay and so one of the bidders on the work patch one contract that you bidders. By the way we're Boeing and Martin Marietta and so one of the bidders said they could put a sixty or sixty five foot long module and they could launch it. Fully outfitted fully loaded with gear and then the other contractors said well a fully outfitted module would never be able to be lifted by the shuttle into the required orbit and therefore we would have to either short in the modules or we would have to launch the modules up largely empty and then send them up send the the interior contents up later in logistics modules and fact because I had been involved with shuttle payload integration I one of my jobs during the source sport was to write a white paper comparing the two approaches and who was right and my My statement was neither one is right because NASA specified the wrong requirements. So what the need them. What what we end up choosing What we ultimately ended up doing was shortening most of the modules and launching the mop partially outfitted so much of the equipment that could be integral Integrated inside as we could given the mass limitations. Okay so the the modules wound up not being They were probably never going to be sixty feet long. But the original modules. The space station were supposed to be about forty eight feet long and in fact now the longest. Us module the US lab is only. I believe about thirty feet long. Okay and so We did have to constrain the length because the mass limitations so you're defining these requirements for the contractor and go on having this back and forth with the contractors for some of the US segment. What about the international side? The internationals were going through a similar kind of approach and in some cases they were a little bit further behind us. So for instance although we were working right from the very outset with the Japanese and with the Canadians and with the Europeans They were learning a lot from how we were looking at the situation. For instance as I mentioned earlier we were building the mockups of the modules here at Johnson and the work was being done within our group. That was not in engineering. It was in the space in life. Sciences Organization called Man's systems man dash systems These days it probably would not be politically correct to call it. That we were not So forward thinking at that time It was interesting because the Japanese came. I remember Sh- MR CHIRAC. Who was their program manager? Came very early on probably in eighty six or eighty seven and we toured him through the MOCKUPS and showed him how we were approaching the design and they thought it was very interesting that we would have such a focus on the human aspect of the space station. That was something he said. The Japanese really did not know how to do The next year they said we're coming to Houston with our man systems advisory group and so they learned very quickly from us how to establish exactly what we already had in place here in. Houston and Pretty soon they were using the same approach Some of the aspects were political for instance The Japanese just as we have to fight in Congress for a monetary support to build all of these things had to do the same thing with their government and They went through and they said you know. We want to build this large laboratory and along with the laboratory logistics module and External Platform. There was a lot of concern over robotics and so the Japanese said well the Canadians rebuilding the main robotic arm for the station. But we'll build a robotic arm to so a lot of these things wound up on the Japanese module when we ran into problems such is the mass limitations of the modules the Japanese because they had sold it to their government that they were going to have a big laboratory stuck with their big laboratory. Hasn't pro as a compared with the US where we reduce the size. And that's how the the Japanese wound up with the largest lab on the station. All right now Tell me about construction. You already alluded a little bit earlier in our discussion about this wall of. Va Sins with some of the early construction. Tell me about how started and where we were. We had a series of as going on in the shuttle program through the early nineteen eighties We had rescued some satellites that had been put into Aaron orbits they weren't the right orbit or the state and the satellite did not start working the way it was supposed to. In so NASA shuttle were sent to rescue the satellites Sometimes activities went as planned other times. Didn't we sent up some chests of space station hardware for instance we built A segment of trusts off of the space shuttle and some of the problems that we focused on during that test said it was going to perhaps be more difficult than we originally assumed We had a study conducted by Astronaut Bill Fisher And Charlie price of the engineering director so is called the Fisher price study and they said. Oh this E. V. A. situation could be a pretty difficult with thousands of hours required to build the station and especially if something doesn't go right if we can't get certain things put in place then it could affect the entire assembly sequence so that was what got us looking at the idea of the pre integrated trust Some of the people in the engineering director at Who are still here today. actually patented that idea of the pre-integrated trust and so that changed our direction little bit although ultimately a the number of as his that have been required on the International Space Station has been far more than any prior program. Still in the I believe thousands of hours now I think we'RE UP INTO THE O. Two hundred devier's thereabouts today. And so So it's required quite a number bb as a lot of activity just as was foretold back in the nineteen eighties. Yeah for sure I think. Yeah we're we're way up there thousands. Yeah I think fifteen hundred hours was the last statistic for last spacewalk that we did so. It's definitely because it's it's not just we're not we're beyond construction now. This is construction. This is maintenance you know. We're talking about switching out. The batteries. Use The batteries. Don't components have been up there for decades. Now that's exactly right so tell me about some of the early years of space station with some of the smaller segments. Here we're talking. Sds Eight Expedition One Life there and how that technology has improved over time going from the small station and then eventually building on with this assembly sequence what changed what upgraded. And how what we learned improved our understanding of how to operate this thing. We'll bring in NASA Mir here because NASA Mir was a program that we conducted between about nineteen ninety five in one thousand nine hundred ninety eight so it was leading up to the first a assembly missions of the ISS and especially for those of us who were working on. The inside of the station was very important. we learned What kinds of equipment we would need? We learned how to work with the Russians we learned how to establish appropriate documentation and immigration processes. And so a lot of that was done early on in my own case I had been the storage manager on the shuttle during the mid eighties and also was responsible for integrating a lot of the payloads on the shuttle. And so when I was put in charge of one of the last modules on Mir I said well we streamline the process for integrating payloads if had common interfaces an so I designed the the CTB's the soft storage bags That quite honestly with something no one else had ever thought of previously and so when the first mission was getting ready to dock with the Mir Sti Seventy one in nineteen ninety five. They discovered just a few weeks before the flight. We have no way to carry things over between the shuttle and the MIR. How can we do this and I said well I have these? Ctb's manufacturer we were actually building them here on site JSE. They were in orbit within a matter of really weeks and So we we were fortunate in having that of eligible. computers When we started the design of computers For the space station in the nineteen eighties. There was no such thing as a laptop computer The first small apples apple computers were coming out probably around eighty seven or thereabouts. I remember when I went off to the source board Because I was the scribe. I was the person writing a lot of these documents. The repackaged one of these apple computers. It wasn't by any means a portable. We called it a lovable and But We were looking at large refrigerator size racks full of computer equipment in the nineteen eighties By the time of Muir When our first astronaut went up to the Mir he said he really could have used some kind of a computer system to re documents on re training manuals because otherwise we had no way of sending up lots of different manuals Even during his off hours he said boy I could use something just to watch a movie on and so I was given the job to develop the first portable computer to be used as A training aid and also to be able to be used in off. Duty HOURS ARE MEMBER. We recorded onto small eight. Millimeter cassettes the Apollo thirteen movie among others sent those up in nineteen ninety five and of course now today all of the computers on the Space Station are basically portable computers the PCs system of the of the space station really is the heart of the computer system. That drives everything We have no rack sized computer equipment anymore thankfully so we've gone away from that but keep in mind in nineteen eighty five. When we got started just didn't exist. You hadn't been invented A lot of the other equipment. We were testing out. I on NASA Mir And then we were observing some of the equipment that the Russians were using their waste management system there treadmill We got into some arguments here at the Johnson. Space Center about how critical some hardware was so for instance The ISS program at the time did not feel that exercise equipment was critical and the exercise equipment..

Space Station NASA Johnson Space Center Marshall Space Center US Johnson International Space Station Space Operation Center Space Center SPACELAB NASA Mir Glenn Research Center apple Glenn. Houston Va Robotics Va
"international space station" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

SPACE NEWS POD

07:26 min | 1 year ago

"international space station" Discussed on SPACE NEWS POD

"I'm appear in the snow. It's twenty any degrees. We have about six inches of fresh snow last night. Some freezing rain so pretty cool. That Florida is launching rockets. So anyway this is what's going to happen. During the launch the dragon which is the module the stores everything everything that will separate from Falcon Nine second-stage about nine minutes after liftoff and then it'll make its way to the space the station and get their September or sorry Saturday December seventh and if this doesn't work out his plan if something happens if there's some weather there's always a backup so Thursday December fifth at twelve twenty nine p. m. eastern or seventeen twenty nine you. TC So both the Dragon spacecraft it will support the SIERRAS nineteen mission it also previously obviously supported the Sierra's four mission September of twenty fourteen and the Sierras eleven mission in June of two thousand seventeen and following stage separation. Shen SPACEX will attempt to recover felker nine's first stage and the of course I still love you. Drone ship will be stationed in the Atlantic Gauchan. This is one of the cool. Things about the space craft is that the Falcon comes was back down to earth and it lands either on the landing pad on the Earth on the land or it landed in the ocean. If there's no place for Ford to land so if the trajectory is a little bit further away than what's expected it's easier for them to land in the ocean than it is to try to get it back to a landing pad from where they started. So they're gonNA be landing out in the ocean on. Of course I I still love you. That's a drone ship in. They've done this successfully in the past so it's pretty routine for them and sometimes you know if you're watching the `blanche which you can launch what you can watch that with me tomorrow I'm going to be streaming live on my youtube channel YouTube dot com slash space news pod and you can go to YouTube dot com slash species news pod slash live and that will have my livestream. And I'll start a little bit early. So this thing launches at twelve. Oh fifty one so. I'll be there at about her. y'All be there at about twelve thirty PM eastern tomorrow and I'll be hosting hanging out talking to you guys just doing normal spacey nerdy things with everybody talking about space. Stuff and SPACEX Elon. Musk and stuff so I'll let the professionals channels takeover when the actual launch happening. Because they have more and better information than I do. Because I'm just a person like you guys so I'm out here. I'm doing my thing. And they have all the insider scoop so this dragon spacecraft. Let's go to be going to the ISS it'll be filled with approximately fifty seven hundred pounds hounds of supplies and payloads which include critical materials to support more than two hundred and fifty science and research missions that that will be going on on the International Space Station on this orbiting laboratory that we have. That's flying around Earth pretty cool see us. Nineteen is the nineteenth of up to twenty missions to the ISS. The space x will fly for NASA under the first crs contract in January. Two Thousand Sixteen NASA announced a SPACEX Falcon Nine and dragon were selected to resupply the space station through twenty twenty four as part part of a second commercial resupply services contract award and under the SIERRAS. Contracts SPACEX has restored the. US's capability the to deliver and return cargo which includes cool stuff like plants animals and scientific experiments airman to and from the ISS crew dragon which is a variant of this supply dragon spacecraft will be me sending people people to the International Space Station next year. If all goes well it should be early next year that people from US soil on a US spacecraft in a US rocket with all sorts of US flags all over it. We'll it'd be going to the International Space Station. I've just poking fun at Jim Breitenstein. He always says You know a US rocket from US soil with US astronauts. What's going to the International Space Station? He's really big proponent of it but it's cool because it's the first time since the space station sincere space shuttle. Pardon me there So desperately cool. This can happen next year. But this one's going to be happening Wednesday about noon thirty eastern time and the ISS capture of if this capsule They'll be using the fifty seven point seven foot robotic arm to capture dragon in attach it to the space station Saturday December seventh and there will be live coverage of that happening on my youtube channel. So you can go to that again. Make sure to subscribe to that too. By the way we're going for seven thousand subscribers were almost there Brit sixty three sixty four hundred somewhere around there. So going for seven thousand subs on the Youtube Channel. You Com slash space news pod and then once this is all over once they get all the stuff into the ISS. Everything's unloaded everything looks good it will return to Earth with more than thirty eight hundred pounds of cargo after a stays of the space station for four weeks because they have to unload and load and do all sorts of checks and balances and stuff like that and after about five hours of the dragon leaving the space station. It will deorbit right. So it'll do a deorbit burn and that will last about ten minutes. It's all fiery and cool looking takes about thirty minutes for dragon to reenter the earth's atmosphere. Sure and then it'll splashdown in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Baja California. This is a pretty cool thing to watch you. The launches are pretty cool but the Re entries are pretty cool. The return flights are pretty cool too. So I'll be there for you on that one as well so my friends make sure to head on over to my youtube channel. Check that out once again. I don't mean to be your brains with it but as youtube dot com slash space news pod and we can watch sat together. Hope everyone's there. It'd be really cool. If you're not able to make it you know you can watch the replay of a replay up there too so pretty cool and it'll be hanging out with everybody over there so thank you so much for listening to this. PODCAST DO appreciate it. I'm going to be posting on both my space news. pod And the Elon. Musk doc pod podcast so check both those out thank you everybody for all the continued support. And thank you for taking the time out of your day to spend two here with me on the Space News Pod my name is Willa Walden. And I'll see you soon..

International Space Station US ISS youtube SPACEX NASA Florida Pacific Ocean Musk Atlantic Gauchan Elon Ford Willa Walden Jim Breitenstein Baja California Re
"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

Houston We Have a Podcast

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on Houston We Have a Podcast

"We bring in the experts snus, scientists engineers and astronauts all let you know the coolest formation about what's going on right here NASA. So today is another very special episode because we're celebrating the twentieth. Anniversary of the beginning of the international space station. The I s a critical mission in this story is S T S eighty eight. It's the shuttle mission that brought the unity module to join the first element Zara in space. It was the first ISS assembly mission for the space shuttle, the first time I s elements join together and the first spacewalks for ISS assembly and maintenance SDS Eighty-eight launched on December fourth and return, December fifteenth nineteen ninety eight so tell the story we're bringing in Jerry Ross, he's a former astronaut and flew with Mr. Cabana, Mr. Bob. Cabana the commander and currently the director of the Kennedy Space Center on SDS Eighty-eight. Ross went out with astronaut Jim Newman back during the mission for the first three spacewalks of assembly and maintenance to give you some idea of how cool that is where over two hundred now for I s assembly and maintenance base walks at the time of this recording. So with no further delay less giambra head to our talk with mister Jerry Ross for the twentieth. Anniversary of the international space station and the milestone mission SDS Eighty-eight enjoy. Jerry. Thank you so much for being here today. I really appreciate you actually taking the time to come on here. I'm glad to be with you. So today, we're going to be talking about a milestone mission SDS ADA. This was a lot of I this was the first time that the first ISS assembly mission, the first ISS, our international space station space walk to actually do assembly and maintenance very important milestone in the beginning of the international space station program. So I kind of wanted to start by just sort of setting the scene. This is late nineteen ninety eight hour talking about what is what's going on at NASA where we coming from what's going on right now. What's going on one thousand nine hundred eight? Okay. Well, for me, personally, I'd been on one of the MIR missions SEO seventy four when we'd gone up and visit the MIR station, and we actually added the docking module to the MIR station that all subsequent SP. Official visits. There used to dock to the MIR station after that was done. I went into a fairly lengthy period of leading the spacewalking team to try to figure out how we were going to build a space station from spacewalking standpoint, we build a large cadre of crew members and engineers and and flight controllers. We went through evaluated every piece of hardware to make sure that we could physically do what we're supposed to do. Or what the engineers needed us to do to do the assembly and maintenance activities on that? We found many things that were not adequately designed and sent those back to the program and said, we can't do that. And we worked hand in hand with them to figure out ways to fix things and get things ready for us to be able to confidently build the station and maintain it. So this was coming from experiences on MIR to right because that was also a collaborative. Endeavor even said, you were talking about the docking module that fit the US shuttle to the MIR. Right. We didn't do any spacewalking on MIR except for one or two times. Okay. And that really didn't feed into to this effort. But certainly what we did learn on MIR about longer term stays in space in the logistics of it and how to do the care and feeding for the crew members that were up there for long periods of time. That's all certainly folded into our our thought processes in our planning and our execution of station. Once we start staffing it. Okay. So then how how did you even start with if learning to spacewalk, and knowing what you were going to do to actually assemble the international space station. Okay. Well, I had done five spacewalks already by that sorry for spacewalks by that time already. And after the the challenger accident. I started to campaign to start doing some more space walks planned spacewalk. Wchs..

MIR station Jerry Ross ISS Kennedy Space Center NASA SDS Zara spacewalking US Jim Newman commander Official Mr. Cabana director Mr. Bob nineteen ninety eight hour
"international space station" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

NASA ScienceCasts

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASA ScienceCasts

"Rule science on the international space station presented by science at nasa nessa researchers are creating a spot colder than the vacuum of space inside the international space station in two thousand eighteen new atomic refrigerator will blast off for the space station it's called the cold atom lab or cal and it can refrigerate manner to one ten billion of degree above absolute zero just above the point where all the thermal activity of atoms theoretically stops at this temperature atoms lose their energy and start to move very slowly explains rob thompson cal project scientists at nasr's jet propulsion laboratory or jpl at room temperature adams bounce off each other in all directions at a few hundred meters per second but in cal they'll slow down a million fold and condense into unique states of quantum matter count is a multi user facility that supports many investigators studying abroad range of topics eric cornell physicist at the university of colorado and the national institute of standards and technology will be leading one of the first calix perriman tes cornell and his team will use cal to investigate particle collisions and how particles interact with one another ultracold gases produced by the cold atom lab can contain molecules with three atoms each but which are thousand times bigger than a typical molecule this results in a low density fluffy molecule that quickly falls apart unless it is kept extremely cold how is particle behaviour affected as more particles are introduced what can be learned about quantum.

nasr eric cornell physicist cornell rob thompson university of colorado national institute of standard hundred meters per second
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"In the next several years or so very important step yeah and those kinds of things take time too so that's another thing to remember um we're seeing prima we're still seeing results from apollo come in rate allow and and when you talk about really critical results and benefits to those on earth um any laboratory could take awhile depending on whether you've got fda approval or whether it's a quick turnaround um type of investigation some of them though quicker than others um in the life sciences are typically the longest because you eat is so complicated yeah yeah but we life yeah yeah but we in the meantime if you go to www die nasa die of the it's forward slash station benefits we have a whole page dedicated to these two examples plus tons of others that you can learn what has stationed on for me like in my daily life now cool everything from a brain surgery robotic leave because it was designed based on the canadaarm that we use on the space station too uh identification of lost boats ships on the ocean thanks to some of the signals that space station was able to pick up so there's lots of their stories there wow that's amazing yeah so a lot of a lot of things being brought down to earth to benefit a slightly to two to benefit humankind and that's a very very important part of of ice s right so as what we like to say off the earth for the area that's right as cool um so i mean going away from earth towards mars you know what are we learning i know we're talking about the human body in and some other stuff but what are we learning specifically on i assessed is really gonna help us get to mars boots on the ground air so a couple of things we get technology development um miniaturized most efficient systems for maintaining humans everything evolves around maintaining the humans rare year are the ones going to mars so every system needs to cooperate with that.

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"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"We had a really one of my favorite experiments is a very elegant a simple handheld experiment uh developed by mark wise little out at portland state university and he's a phenomenon with fluid behavior and um and what we got from the his experiments was a whole new set of open source code now understanding how fluid behaves in space in different geometry is of of containers so a square triangle honeycomb whatever he's got all those models and now if you as a researcher or anyone interested in building propellant tank or of fluid tank for space have a cad mal you can go stick your design into that software program and see how fluids is going to behave in your system and yes so for the first time ever we have these models that we can design more efficient propellant tanks more efficient water handling systems that's going to help us explore a now also because we now are getting a better handle line fluid behavior in space uh we're also able to apply it to groundwater ing of our agriculture okue that plants take up water in the soil it's all the same it's capillary fluids capillary action the way that water moves through a a medium to get to its source um because we took gravity out we could really focus on looking at cavalier behavior and now we can apply it to groundbased watering systems we can apply it to a tiny little lab on chips anything that uses fluid movement and you don't want to use a battery you want to leverage gravity and in all kinds of advancements are coming out of this simple elegant um series of research of that came out of uh i s s so it's really really cold that's amazing so going back those those cad models are is that assuming you're you're system is in a weightless environment or is that for any system that's assuming that yours designing for a weightless environment i c yucca so if you wanna designed for the next vehicle that you know that we launch.

portland state university source code researcher mark wise
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:38 min | 4 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"See and find those countermeasures that happen last really intense i mean imagine get like landing on mars and you can't see anything had become a buzzkill travel sixty million miles and get out everything's blurry that yeah the the the wouldn't make me happy so i know light when a here's another thank when astronaut so astronaut now they're doing on the international space station pretty regularly they're doing longduration increments right so they're doing six months at a time yes uh so this is longer than any of shuttle missions allowed the mission's before it and it's it's all to practice for for emissions missions beyond a lowearth orbit but when they come back to earth right they generally right now they come back in a soyuz landing khazakstan and then we have recovery teams i go get them at but they have a hard time walking right when i when i get out some do it so that's that's part of again the the human body reacting to the different environments when when nash routes i get into space some will nausea some all have some adverse reactions to being a microgravity the same is true that when you're in microgravity furui long time and he come back down to earth hold the sudden there's this this huge weight pressing down on you though hasn't been there for the last six months or vr vr longeuro there there's year your inner ear goes crazy and like all the fluids pulling down again wherever either used to be no up and down but now the sudden there's definitely a down and so it it can be tough just to just a walk i mean we.

adverse reactions six months
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:34 min | 4 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"We can launch air just like we can launch water you can lodge a tank of super pressurized air usually in a liquid form and then feet it into the atmosphere but the main way we get it is from water we use the system called the oxygen generation system that actually takes water splits the atom split the atom but uh splits at the or water molecule into oxygenhydrogen and then we could take that oxygen and pump it into the atmosphere then they are in the pure oxygen atmosphere so there's other stuff in there there's a lot nitrogen share so very sanita earth's atmosphere right yes airbase cleaning act same composition atmosphere that we have on earth and actually the same pressure to so there's there's no big difference there uh that feeds into some of the stuff that do for spacewalks but that's completely different tanja and go on it so we we we split the water molecules so then you have your oxygen which you just feed directly back into the cabin and then you have hydrogen which you can vent overboard if he just bill up a bunch of excess hydrogen or there's of process in a in a payload up there it's it's used as more of a technology demonstration so it's not really in the in the critical path so it's not a critical piece that we have to have run at all times but it's called the sobotta uses this abbadi a process where you can take that hydrogen the ad left over from your water.

tanja
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:11 min | 4 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"It they generate pretty much a comparable amount to keep everything that we want on board and that's that's all life support that's keeping the lights on a that's running all of the experiments on board all of the different hardware just keeping the station you know oriented and the right attitude and flying in in any time amin every everything everything everything race powered by the solar rays and it i mean it's it doesn't generate an overwhelming access of energy by any means because again you are spending a lot of time in darkness so those batteries are getting used pretty much constantly were in the process of swapping the batteries were upgrading yeah vardi upgraded uh one fourth of them go switched out nickelhydrogen for lithium ion that is correct that's right lithium ion if away more efficient right yeah but that i mean that's that's the power story it's it's it's all solar energy through those bigs and they are they are very large in we come back to the football field the american football field and alaji having clarified yet yet uh that the solar arrays or basically each each solar rays the size of an and so on and their eight of those yes that are the size of annan's her thing like a pair of their hero or you're a pair of four so yet for it's tough because like you one pair actually to array blankets and but they're are very large yes yeah okay so that's power right so we already talked about water because you need to recycle water and make sure you have enough and waters rates means have to launch and he recycle its ottmar fish in and it's very very clean so what about air right that's one thing you think about like what a human needs shelter for our water food you didn't really think about air but at something you definitely needs and a again that's something we kinda take for granted a hair is just it's it's air everywhere down here in europe they're the arena you're in a sealed environment you're basically in a big sealed ten can in the need to fill that with their so they.

solar rays lithium ion solar energy annan europe amin football
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"If if you're sixteen in half think is a number if you're if you're sixteen and a half a young you've never lived at a time where people haven't been in space how many people are espace right now six six anecdates international right so we got us we have two americans right yeah so international is the first word in the name of the stage sharing international space station so there's always an international crew up there the right now there's two americans peggy whitson and shane kim bro one french astronaut to mop us gay and three russian cosmonauts and so you you have member we had crewmembers for um and i'd have to look at the exact number but i mean countries all over the globe have flown crewmembers on board the space station elia almost in it tina thinks the number eight league eighteen has the latest and you've had well over two hundred individuals traveled to the space station and it is this global effort he have fifteen countries that are considered the main partnership so these two countries that signed all the papers and did everything back in the nineties due to form this partnership and you have five main agencies you have nasa here in the us the canadian space agency right to our north the european space agency which actually incorporates a lot of different space agencies from all over europe into one larger conglomeration i'll the russian space agency rose cosmos and the japanese space agency cold jackson the japan aerospace exploration agency 10 so lots of agencies but all of this alphabet soup comes together to make the station possible and so everything that gets done just about is done in this big collaboration so you have these countries with drastic language barriers cultural differences sometimes governmental differences all working together on this massive multi billiondollar peace science research rajic i think it's fair to say that space exploration is really a global interest rate amine exploring the cosmos is not just at u s unique faint it is really an international effort to make that possible it's something that will.

elia us europe jackson space exploration peggy whitson tina japan billiondollar eight league
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:31 min | 4 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"You know going to mars or you know our farflung aspirations of spreading throughout the the solar system and the galaxy and everything when you compare it to that it's you know doing hang quotes easy but it's still a monumental undertaking yet and that's why so we're doing that just like you said we are the in the future where we want to go far right so we wanna go to mars we wanna really just expand our presence in the solar system so the international space station is a great way to practice that it's a good like you have a good understanding of what it takes to live in space to operate in space you could do a ton of science and learn how things interact and then he learned how things interact he can design better systems to make them work better i think one of the once acc ethic capillary action i think was a it was a great one like the way that fluids move in phnom in spaces kinda cool because they sort of like create a ball and there's there's no down so if you're trying to design lega system that uh it like a rocket system in order to propel fuel you need to the fuel isn't gonna go down ranking kinda needs to have that sort of capillary action and a path to get there like little little those little tiny things are things that make the huge difference and then able to kind of explosives would all comes to down to gravity that's kind of the the old differentiator between why everything we do in outer space is different from the way we do it on earth total the most of you touch on his.

solar system acc
"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:58 min | 4 years ago

"international space station" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"So it's like a way to practice really for it is for things further out because it's not really far up rights linked to 150 miles think about it were still in their earth's protection men like oh yeah oh protected by the irs magnetic field will spaces funny in that going up it it feels like it's so far away space but it's two hundred fifty miles that's not that far i mean i feel like the city of houston is two hundred fifty miles it's not but i mean to 150 miles on a cars a is a short road trip but at two hundred fifty miles straight up at the rocket ride that's that's a slightly different road trip but it is it isn't that far away i mean we still kind of our right on the doorstep there's there's a a really great quote in the the paramount of space movies armageddon were only says you know we're not even our in outer space yet this is just like the beginning and that's kind of where the station is it's it's in space it's in what we call lowearth orbit so so pretty close i mean they could get into so you spacecraft and be back on the ground inside of a couple of hours so i mean you're so right on the doorstep you not really way out there yet but it's getting ready to go way out there well that's the whole so nasa describes it as earth when lyon two right so i i kinda like the way they section at off right earth reliant means exactly what you sent right so something goes wrong you can just happen spacecraft and the home in three hours and it's easy to get stuff there because it's only a i mean some so he's rise of in as little as like six hours ray relatively relative george speight is only rocket science side to trivial i hit it all and even the even after admonish myself it's still not easy to go to space it still i mean liz rocket scientist literal rocket science hugely complex and there's always inherent risk and all these other things but when you start comparing it to.

irs lyon george speight houston nasa scientist three hours six hours