17 Burst results for "insulin dependent diabetes"

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on EAA's The Green Dot - An Aviation Podcast

EAA's The Green Dot - An Aviation Podcast

03:11 min | Last week

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on EAA's The Green Dot - An Aviation Podcast

"I spent four years for an airline learning the industry business Then i had a unfortunately in two thousand five. The industry was in a bit of trouble. Came to two dollars and doctors can be expensive. So i had a year and a half between working for an airline and coming on board with the faa The bulk of that. I was back on active duty as a reserve officer because i'd stayed in the reserves But i to work for a union. So i i spent some time seeing that side of the aviation business. Being pilot advocate And then i applied for the position with the faa and was ultimately selected in started in april of two thousand seven as the senate regional flight surgeon. No lot of Airmen don't really know much about how the region's fit into the aerospace medicine system. Can you explain a little bit. About what the what. The regional flight surgeons office does and also What services they'd be able to provide to the average airman out there surely So the the number one program that an airman's going to be interested in within the faa regional program is the medical certification activities. That is a burden that the regional flight surgeons share with the airman medical certification division in oklahoma city. There are certain things that have to be done in oklahoma certain things that have to be done at headquarters in certain things that actually have to be done in the region. The vast majority though the regional flight surgeons can work now some of the things that they can't they all of the initial Cardiac for first and second class airmen that have to meet the cardiology panel have to go through oklahoma city. There's a couple of other Cats and dog diagnoses. That have to go there of the ones that have to go to headquarters. Include the insulin-dependent diabetes first and second class airman The esus are is for pilots Some of the hymns work back most of the hymns work goes through headquarters. What's different about the regional program. When it comes to airman medical certification. I is not only do we work basic cases but heaven forbid you get crosswise with us or our attorneys. All of the emergency revocations And all the i our actions are done out of the regional program. Let's see but yeah so that that's part of it the other big piece that Acts with the airman is the regional. Flight surgeons are the designate managers for the aviation medical examiner's so the ama's out in the community are all managed by the regional flight surgeon. So we're responsible for designation of them for monitoring their performance and luckily very rarely for d. designating An emmy for poor performance or lack of training the most common reason to terminate a designation across the board is.

faa airman medical certification d oklahoma city senate oklahoma diabetes ama emmy
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

05:13 min | 9 months ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Dan Churchill's The Epic Table

"Type two diabetes and station diabetes and lo and behold. There's also now type three diabetes that has become pretty widely known in the past ten years so it can get really confusing but a simple way to think about here. Is that if you divide diabetes into two different groups group. One is called. Non insulin dependent diabetes guy and the other one is called insulin-dependent diabetes. That's one way of thinking about it. Another way of thinking about it is which is even simpler in my mind. Is you refer to it as either. Autoimmune diabetes or non autoimmune and that really makes the distinction very clear so the autoimmune versions of diabetes. There's only two type one and type one point five so type. One diabetes is what i have. It's what robby has. It's generally what affects young kids. You know you can either be born with type one diabetes or you can develop it at the age of two three five fifteen somewhere in. Adolescence is pretty common and according to the research type one diabetes generally affects people up until about the age of thirty. So it's an auto immune reaction which means that your body has been co worst or so your immune system has basically been tricked into believing that you're beta cells are actually dangerous to your health and we can go into detail about the sort of dietary and environmental causes of that maybe later in the podcast but for the time being suffice it to say your immune system is actually mounting the attack that's actually compromising your own beta cell status and as a result of that your immune system is destroying beta cells which then cripples your ability to manufacture and secrete insulin so people with type. One diabetes generally go from being quote normal and healthy to fully insulin-dependent within about twelve to eighteen months. Which is a pretty fast Reaction pretty sort of fast sequence of events that that goes from being healthy to completely insulin-dependent now type one point. Five is very similar to type one diabetes. But there's a couple of distinctions number one type. One point five diabetes people generally speaking over the age of thirty as a year older than the age of thirty which means it's adult onset. It is still an autoimmune reaction just type diabetes except it is a slow were progressing version of auto immunity and the reason for that is actually fascinating your immune system manufacturers proteins called. Antibodies and. antibodies have a specific responsibility to basically go and neutralize a foreign threat. So you know in the case of the corona virus or the flu Antibodies are what your immune system manufacturers in order to specifically neutralize a very particular protein sequence that comes from one of those two viruses in the case of type i diabetes and type worn your immune system manufacturers auto. Antibodies that are specific to the beta cells specific protein fragments on the outside of beta cells. And so in type one scenario you end up with usually multiple antibodies. Which makes it a fast of insulin..

diabetes Autoimmune diabetes robby flu
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

Acupuncture is my Life

03:44 min | 10 months ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Acupuncture is my Life

"Hello everyone and welcome back to my show. I'm dr lot from acupunctures my life. I have an interesting topic of discussion for this episode and that ten kobe. Nineteen caused diabetes. Now i've been in discussion with some of my medical colleagues on his topic over the past few days and quite surprised as to what was discussed as well as information come across as a result of recent studies. You see there are international groups of diabetes. Experts who believe there are individuals who may have developed diabetes but first time as a result of having been infected with this virus. There's research that suggests that this virus can cause sudden onset of insulin dependent diabetes. Now as i've stated in past episodes this virus gains access and can wreak havoc on various internal organs via ace two receptors. Now here's the potential connection. There were key metabolic tissues in the body which contain as to receptors in this case the beta cells in the pancreas in which the virus can attach to trigger changes in glucose metabolism. You seem beta. Cells of the pancreas are responsible for the production and secretion of insulin is a hormone responsible for regulating blood sugar now. Nothing is set in stone at this point because researchers are attempting to determine if the cases of infected individuals who would become diabetic as a result was due to the patient haven't become hypoglycemic as a result of let's say the stress response associated with infection or damage in which the pancreas sustained as a result of infection leading to insulin deficiency. Now there's been chatter among some of my colleagues estimate if this can be even seen as a new form of diabetes but i will reiterate it's just chat now when it comes to chinese medicine. Diabetes is termed xiao now as a state license board certified doctor vacuum puncture. I will say if you're feeling a bit concerned and are experiencing. Let's say irritability frequent drinking in dry mouth and tongue and chinese medicine those symptoms of upper shell whereas i could potentially focus on moistening the loans and claiming heat from the stomach as a treatment protocol. Now a few define yourself experiencing symptoms such as a propensity to hunger and dry stores. Some of the symptoms of middle show i would potentially focus on clearing heat from the stomach and nourishing the kidney says treatment protocol. Now if you find yourself experiencing turbine cloudy of sweet smelling urine or presenting with great a urine output then fluid intake as well as let's say an intolerance for coal co. limbs this can be a sign of low shower whereas i could potentially focus on replenishing. Say the kidney and tone of buying the lungs if you find yourself experiencing any of these symptoms contact an acupuncturist or myself if you don't have as well as a primary care physician if you'd like to be tested to see diabetic now. Don't forget to subscribe to this channel as well as download the acupunctures my life at from the google..

diabetes insulin dependent diabetes google
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Breaking Biotech

Breaking Biotech

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Breaking Biotech

"They used to use the low and High Dose Call Ten milligrams at twenty, five milligrams of. Medical acid or Jose. and. Showed about a twenty three percent response at the high dose and about seventeen percent at the low dose but the Placebo was about twelve percent. So now if you look at the Delta between the difference, the efficacy rate, of Hebrew response whatever you WANNA call it. Between Placebo high-toss, it's only like twelve percent. So, that's that's a bit worrisome in I guess the other thing that. I think I think people have really debated whether it not as important is a side effect so that a lot of patients are showing through right us you know they each and so toward extent is that troublesome? I don't know. I do like if I try to put myself in the shoes of a layperson. Who just by chance find out that I have Some liver disease may fatty liver could lead to Nash. Because most of these people that have are asymptomatic. So if I may symptomatic and I see a physician physician says, you need to take this drug, those he at twenty five milligrams and old by the way you might have itchy itchiness problem. So I don't know how I would take that drug because I'd be a little bit hesitant. Take something we're on a dramatic now take something and I started teaching. So that's that's just from a layperson perspective that I can only imagine Yeah, and I think there's something to that as well as the injectables I feel like people are very can be very reluctant to take an injectable even though a lot of the FDA looks pretty good. If it's eysenck dramatic disease I don't know how how excited people are going to be to take injectable drugs. For Diseases Kimberly see can't really feel. I think that's exactly right. I mean. One of the things that we've been thinking of all since they one is, can we have an oral medication? Can we have once a day? You knows it convenient. Take it. Let's for a few months or weeks or do you have to take a lifetime You know we tried to think about all these things before we sort of get into this. And I think having a a drug that's not an injectable in our case it's oral wanted eight. Think it's pretty convenient and I think the other thing that's probably going to separate us out from most of the other companies working in Nash is that most other companies are working on the Metabolic Syndrome. So they're looking at how do you control fat liver Hati controlled Diabetes Control. You know, let's say people from being overweight. You know there's a whole bunch of these metabolic components. That can lead up to the fibrosis ultimately fibrosis. So for example, when I hear other companies single. Product. Drug. The first thing I wonder out loud most times is Are they having an antibiotic effect as a result of having a let's hear a reduction lymphatic reduction things like the CO morbidity like Diabetes Type Two diabetes insulin dependent diabetes are. Being, obese, are those things like hypertension? Feeding into the fibrosis or do you have directly antibiotic drug? and. So that that's that's where we fit I mean we're truly an antibiotic. Yeah and I think there's well and I guess given that the FDA, it's an it's an or question where you can either do one or the other. I think that the fibrosis part is probably the more difficult one to hit just in general. If you like once the Extra Cellular Matrix Proteins are deposited feel like it's tough to kind of get those out of there. So you can really hit the fibrosis program..

FDA Nash liver disease diabetes fatty liver Metabolic Syndrome asymptomatic Jose. hypertension
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

06:24 min | 1 year ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"And that we'RE GONNA do dental exam as well. You know where to look the inclusion as well. And then we take it in all of it and we take their past medical history right people with diagnosis fibromyalgia Amazon things like that. thyroid disorders, all these other things they play into it, and if you don't take those things as well as the medications were taking you to take all these things into play you're not going to get an accurate view of the whole person both medically and dental, but more medically. and. Especially from a musculoskeletal stamp, why you WanNa make sure you do the right imaging and really know how to read the imaging and know if they have you know significant osteoarthritis or displacement different types of jd and their history on that as well too and I really get a you know a whole picture and then you diagnose them and then you go ahead and you put together you think is the best treatment plan for that purse and again, all your treatment plans are gonna be different right some appliances some don't get appliances type of appliances that big ED will be different based on their problem. And then it comes into we different types of injections base again on of what's going on and medications as well. You know some medications that we do usually prescribe are not of a narcotic or an addictive nature. Most of the medications we do prescribe are specifically for the problem that we see that patient has and and we know that at some point we can get them off the medications once they're feeling better. So that I know I said a lot. You know real quick should present that that what you know has Dennis. what we do, what we're trained is significantly different and that stat kinda. Kinda sums up a difference between or facial pain. Experience for a patient versus the pencil expanse. It'd Howard you know like what do it's not two teeth, right? So We see a bunch of patients that have already been through those failed attempts. The goal for me would. Love to see General Dennis be educated to the point where they can understand how to discriminate between those types of patients that could be easily treated straightforwardly by simple conservative treatment in a dental practice or something. That's not quite exactly what it seems because the problem stemming from something else. That's kind of what oral facial pain comes in is helping to learn to discriminate between something that's not quite as straightforward as it appears. So those patients don't go through multiple failed attempts in delays of sometimes years in trying to get resolution or even just a diagnosed. In, we treat a lot of NEURALGIA neuropathies in those can be difficult and I mean every class I've ever taught. I. Mean we've all got x rays. Showing patients with thirty root canals where they chased the paint around a face and no matter what they do. It keeps coming back in the Nikki another root canal. So rather than treating a patient like an annuity. Diagnosis and treat them appropriately, and then they can have pain relief or he referred them to a surgical approach that might resolve the issue as well. But that's all part of the diagnostic. Thanks. So I think we spend most of our day kind of plan Doctor House and So it's a it's a it's cerebral stand said profession, but it's not physical. But most of what we do is from history, you know consultation exam and then we'd rendered the rate treatment after we get appropriate diagnosis. So the diagnosis is really the goal of what we're after. So you're basically, he's that oral facial pain is the bed bath and beyond the teeth journey. That's a good way to look at it. I'll go with that. Attribute that to you how I'm going to say, we don't have a twenty percent shoot. Well You know one thing I noticed that. You know I love that. You know it's beyond the teeth because I was wondering whenever you know you get dragged into bed bath and beyond you always want to know what the hell's the beyond part. But when. When you stand when you were talking. Just rolled out a whole bunch of clusters of autoimmune disease. FIBROMYALGIA thyroid amass arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis. The only thing you didn't say was silly expert diabetes because I. I've really fascinating paper is reading that once they start doing twenty three and me getting big family trees, they start finding out that if someone in your family has ms and diabetes and diary issues, you know if you expand the tree big avenue, you'll find. them all and so families. So with health histories when you see someone in your office with say insulin-dependent diabetes and his mom has arthritis I'm kind of looking at this person thinking God fight had the DNA of all your whole family tree I should be able to find the whole cluster. So my question is is a big part of oral facial pain an autoimmune disease. No no it it can be due to trauma right so you're going to post traumatic things. You, know whether it's neuropathy or you know musculoskeletal. In those are probably easier to treat than. Ben. Inflammatory diseases rally. Diseases and those become trickier you know to get under control, but we can get them under control. So like for example, with fibromyalgia patient I, usually have a disclaimer I, Kinda, give them an you know or manteca rheumatoid arthritis late patients they say I think you're paying better but I'm not going to get rid of it. You're always gonNA have some level of discomfort, right? So but if we can get it so that you can functioning you're feeling better and your pain levels or at least fifty percent better I mentioned that sooner they get excited they all fifty percent I'll take that in a minute. To get excited. So yeah. So you know it's it's a matter of knowing you know who these people are what they have. The other thing you mentioned you know clusters. So we have something called Co Morbidity East and there is there is a lot of morbidity with with some TMD patients. Such as migraine depression. What else? Thing Howard show you alluded to it earlier but one of the other things we get a.

facial pain autoimmune disease Howard FIBROMYALGIA jd migraine Co Morbidity East General Dennis neuropathy Nikki Dennis. Doctor House TMD Diseases
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Arty Farty

Arty Farty

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Arty Farty

"A little bit is when I look at my books and they just architects so they they not those things just an entry point but allows each action explore really carry busy complex things on the books out. There that are that are not jerks and that's fine. There's a market for a bit One of the things that I learned when Nickelodeon a crazy fool to which was hot smart font The thought parties is is the GAGS jokes but the hot and smart Potter is important. Hot meaning it does. Does the story of the cavs had hot? Is it really stick relatable? And there's a SNOB. I've actually has been intelligence in what you're writing about the white you're right and it's not dumbs down Really really tried to still plus a screech. Deeply theories and the series. I'd like to talk a little bit about characters because the attorneys and the squeegee deeply books have a really unique and interesting set of characters. Do any of your characters by some people are guess definitely Firstly on lawsuits place every every watch especially put themselves into character There's no question about that I think The the the main character in the tournament is probably quite close to myself. Leo and it was only after a series of finish that looks back and looked at the the situation that they created In that story about a thirteen year old kid who You know just one day that he's different from everybody else. These kind of intrinsic. I'm thinking about his body. That's different everybody else. But he can tune into animals knowing surrounding Chandy con- control is When it happens And you know when all the cheese. Ihl insulin-dependent diabetes and say something. I felt very out of control. My buddy difficulty else but actually didn't make that connection until the book's publisher wait a minute. That's actually very very similar to what I was going through. Well they obtained my team So I think it's definitely some for myself but also some of the Some of the characters peacefully in scrooge deeply and feeling Of the of the deeply series. Awful awful teaching night. Vice-principal who'd Sleigh A lot of aspects of what he does and he gets up through of very much based on the high school teachers that I had back in the nineteen eighties Teaching standards were one every different from now and teach me. General was probably a lot less kind of Scrutinized today standards There was truly truly Outlandishly the high teacher's back in and And Monday and that was that was Terrible student but also backing. That's like wow what an experience you know to be taught by the eccentric. Strangely behave adults Since she lovely it's lovely now as a also mind back. The next from their infant experience should say and You know put it into characters like usually and on the other side of that. Did you have a teacher like Mrs? Truly iffley distributors on my favorite characters. In all my books But it's wonderful teachers such wonderful teaches and you know as as my kids are going through school. You really do say How important great teachers are and Yeah even in my visits to schools and meeting really really passionate Patriot librarians English teachers. I mean you really see the value of great teachers and teachers who really care about educating at about all of the things this rises we try to do to entertain and educate kids So yeah I had some great English stages particularly through high school quite trauma teachers. Great Aunt teaches I it's funny as you get older. Keel can really think of you teach as human. You don't think of them as being you know we'd when you're kid and you see a teacher outside of school shopping and you go. Oh my goodness there. Actually human being. That does normal. What everybody else So yeah they're definitely was very inspiring and wonderful pictures Still Remember to this day my school years. So you have a really large ensemble cast of characters in squish deeply. Tiffany interesting stories about how you came up with any of these characters which funny game some of them are based on actual Friends I had at school loosely. I mean that none of them is the cabin copy of People that I knew at school but You know we look back at school. I think you would have been kids in my class but there was some colorful. Gaga's let's just say Until as determined when I am when I was thinking of the cost of of carriages there in In the class in which typically they all have really distinct personality try and then something about them that makes them stand out to the raiders. And that's a really thing as a storyteller that every carrier didn't need to be clearly defined Mates have weaknesses needs to think that they want Search for example this one like character in streets deeply Nathan Nathan. This looks to eight paint. And He's told character is basically Based on the idea that any children he will paint him And so to be able to put a character into his classroom situation on And and the same with squeeze really needs Queeg He's a sort of a superhero. We got main today. But he's also it's launch. We call a kyle spring that he accidentally causes chaos around him and it was certainly Friends at school with you because Kyle but didn't mean to what's Your Best Character Development Tepe?.

Kyle cavs Nickelodeon Nathan Nathan Potter publisher scrooge Leo Queeg Gaga raiders Tiffany
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Plant Strong

Plant Strong

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Plant Strong

"Diseases where we are self diagnosing or self assessing meal by meal with our own instrument. You can't figure out did you. Heart disease get worse or better meal by meal. There's no test. But when a person living with diabetes eats a bunch of bananas and they test their self and their two hundred the two hundred and fifty they say. How can you tell me that the bananas are not the problem? They just made my bug assault. What are you talking about right? I get they're coming from but what they don't understand is the reason their body was not able to metabolize. The bananas is because of what they ate prior because their insulin resistant they have eaten a diet. High in fat particularly saturated fat that has resulted in the storage of fat in tissues. That are not designed to store fat and that resulted in insulin resistance. So they ate the Banana. Their body was not capable of using. Its own insulin. To Take the glucose in the banana are the stream into the cells insulin resistant. But it's not the bananas fault. No it's not it's fascinating. I think it's one of the reasons why you said in that. One study in four and a half months was at eighty percent or something like that. We're able to get off there going to get to you in better to want to go in one thousand nine hundred seventy nine. American journal Clinical Nutrition James W Anderson. He had twenty patients. Okay they were all using insulin and in just sixteen days. He got half of them off of their insulin in sixteen days eating high carbohydrate diets this diet was nine percent of calories come from fat as well over seventy percent of calories from carbohydrates it was a high fiber diet and in sixteen days half of them get off their insulin. The rest of them also decreased their insulin. And there's a lot of these studies. Yes they're small numbers of people in many studies. You know when you look at research but the consistency in small numbers is a very big deal from study to study to study. I mean in your work with Nasrin Diabetes. Because you've got a pretty sensational online program with literally thousands and thousands and thousands of members. Yes do you ever encounter somebody that is compliant and doing everything right and they're not getting results. I love this question so the answer is no. I have yet to see it. I personally see it with my own eyes. Now I've talked to some doctors and you know who've been in this field for a long time and they always like to say hey. Be careful rob. I have this example of that random example and one person was low in chromium or something so the doctor had to fix that. And that's all the problem but I personally have yet to see it. Particularly in people. Living with insulin-dependent diabetes whether that's type one type one point five or insulin-dependent type two. Some people have had type two diabetes for a long time and just a pancras as exhausted. And so they may need to inject and some for the rest of their life because their pancreas has been burnt out. Okay so in. People who are living with insulin-dependent diabetes all fascinating test subjects. We know exactly how much insulin we injected. We know exactly how much food we ate. We can measure our insensitivity immediately and so with people living with that every single time they will increase the total carbohydrate content and they will use less. Insulin repeatedly never seen. I would love for somebody listening to this. Podcast to a friend senator skeptic. Show me the person who can actually prove they truly did it right and they needed more insulin. Because it won't happen and to raise the ante there rip one of the things. I'm proud of is that I have documented every single thing. I eight for three hundred sixty five consecutive days. I have a picture of everything the winning my mouth every bug because reading every insulin injection for three hundred sixty five consecutive days. Now I've done that for many more total but there was a year. I said I'm going to do it every day so if anybody was like. Hey no I don't want to show you pictures. Well no excuses here CDU at post your pictures on Instagram and showing that it doesn't work because well what I love about that in in it. Sounds like your program is that you want people. That don't mind being accountable. Yes right and if you're willing to be accountable if you're willing to work the program it sounds like the program works. Yes as long as you're willing to be vulnerable number one thing if you come into our coaching program is all I ask. I one thing communicate with us Just having the willingness to write whatever's going on I don't care how bad you failed. How far are you out the way it doesn't matter? Yeah taking that step to communicate this happen. I'm struggling. Can you help me that you would? That person will succeed if a plant based diet is ideal for humans. And we've learned that dogs are. I'm divorce as well. Can we just share our delicious leftovers to our pets? Well the answer isn't quite dead simple and it's probably not the best idea. Dogs actually can't safely eat everything that we need specifically. Let's take a look at some green leafy for example Kale. It's a superfood for us. But according to Dr Ernie Ward. Who's the veterinary medical officer for Wilder Dog Food? It's not such a great idea for our dogs and the same goes for spinach and cabbage and some other green Levi's but luckily there are plant based foods and specifically proteins that are ideal for dogs and all of them are included in the wild earth. Dog Food formula that our dog jade love so much and that. I'm sure your dog will as well visit. Wyler'S DOT COM or Amazon and use the code plans drawn to save forty percent off your first order..

Nasrin Diabetes Heart disease assault Levi Dr Ernie Ward James W Anderson senator medical officer Wilder Amazon Wyler
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

07:05 min | 2 years ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Needed and recently medical probes and others have raised concerns of many diabetics are in danger thanks to the rising price of insulin and an increasingly common practice known as insulin rationing well Laura Mustin lives in Washington DC she's a thirty seven year old lawyer who suffers from type one diabetes that means she was born with an inability to produce sufficient insulin she's reliance on administering a by a synthetic version to herself to control her blood sugar levels and keep yourself alive lord knows well how in America diabetes is an expensive illness I had to cash out my own retirement plan pay penalties for that I had to borrow money every single month for my retired parents I went into debt I was on you know multiple payment plans at a time I was over twenty five thousand dollars in credit card debt that's Laura talking about the call she could when she was out of work and having to pay for insulin herself back in nineteen ninety six she was paying about sixty dollars a month today it works out at about one thousand dollars a month lowers okay though her insulin costs are covered by a health insurance which like so many Americans she gets through her employer but Laura had to move states and leave your home town to find a job which gave without insurance cover in every other country I'll say every other developed country on earth the government for insulin specifically but it you know in different places for all drugs either sats price controls so they tell the drug manufacturers you can't charge more than this amount or the collective people negotiate for lower prices I mean why do I think that the US hasn't followed the examples of so many other countries of the wonderful health systems they answer is money in politics for me as a type one diabetic I will pay you anything for insulin because I will die in a matter of a day or two without it and without the government stepping in and especially with insulin leaving it to the free market you're leaving something within an elastic demand meaning no matter what you charge for it I'm a finance have insulin dependent diabetes I'm going to have to purchase that and so in my opinion and lost the federal government steps and and until they do nothing's gonna change and because the pharma companies that make the insulin are making so much money and they can give that back to the politicians in the form of campaign donations so you point the finger at the pharmaceutical companies but also the government for just letting it happen and not just the government meaning Congress but also our fair trade commission and forces are anti trust laws the manufacturer my insulin and the manufacture of the competitor and so on the two companies have raised their prices by the exact same percent twice a year for the past twenty years on the same day it's almost price fixing on its face yet for some reason our Federal Trade Commission will not enforce anti trust laws against these companies is there no possibility of that being a generic version of incident that would be cheaper and widely available to everyone insulin is a biologic it's not a chemical compound where another company can put a and B. come close together and get the same drug as we we usually think of a quote unquote generic with insulin it's the process itself that creates the drug that's an almost impossible to duplicate and so even when you have what we call bio similar insolence come out which are supposedly the same as the original product even when you get those it's still going to act differently in my boss I never want change and phones further for the rest of my life because consistency is key is anything going to change in America when it comes to how incidents priced things have changed for instance all of the presidential candidates have discussed insulin prices there been numerous congressional hearings on insulin prices we took this issue from something that no one was talking about Thomas the poster child for price gouging and in that process where are the insulin companies were raising their prices by an average of fifteen percent a year twice a year they slowed their rate of increase I do think with the deaths increasing we are at a tipping point where the federal government's gonna have to do something is there any reason that you can see why the insulin may because I felt the need to increase that prices by so much over the last decade or so because they can because there is no law in the United States preventing them from doing so type one diabetes suffer and campaigner Laura moss in them in the US the route incident takes from drug manufacturer to patient is extraordinarily complex involved on numerous middlemen and rebates a sort of discounting system the rebates are supposed to benefit patients but that's clearly not happening congressional hearings earlier this year try to make sense of how prices but incident a set they were hampered by the fact that price negotiations are confidential result a lack of transparency the American diabetes association centers of complicated flow chart which sketched out the insulin supplying price change we on business daily couldn't figure it out so we tapped some internal BBC expertise said Nick trickle hair health correspondent for the BBC right recording we all okay so so there you go that is the diagram by the American diabetes association which explains how insulin is price would you commit well it it looks complicated doesn't it I am let me have a look see what the consumer they're in the left and the cost they pay to their insurance company and there's rebates given lots of rebates are lots of arrows with rebates going in various directions from the the pharmacy benefit managers who basically the middle man to the insurance company the rebates from the drug companies to the pharmacy benefit managers is fiendishly complicated it certainly is in if you to compare the study to the the.

twenty five thousand dollars one thousand dollars thirty seven year fifteen percent sixty dollars twenty years
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:41 min | 2 years ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Typically, when someone use the word all by itself, diabetes? It is implied. It is diabetes Melodist that's the sugar diabetes. That is an issue, where insulin is not being secreted in adequate amount. Or in any amounts. By the pancreas, what we call the endocrine pancreas, remember, the pancreas has an Oregon has an auction and excellent function. Meaning that it also lies. I just events that's the execution, and the endocrine function on the islet cells will secrete insulin insulin signals the body to, to absorb blood, the sugar glucose in the blood into sells for attrition. So when we have a dog that has diabetes melodies, the one of the things we can tell is that we take a blood test, and the blood sugar is super high. Hi, why? Because the sugar glucose is not being because of no insulin transported into the cells for nutrition. So these animals get very sick. Even though the sugars they are they're eating they're getting all this, the sugar to use for energy for the sales, but the cells aren't getting it, it just accumulates in the in the blood and when it gets very high cost a lot of other problems. Now, we call one of them is called decay diabetic, US doses this, where the because the diabetes is not controlled the animus getting very, very sick. Also another diabetes, that we see called, diabetes insipid, and that is the water drinking diabetes, that is where the body is not able to concentrate the urine, because all of the water that we take in is basically being urinated out. And so it's a problem within the kidney itself, and it's very, very complex pathway where the bodies, not reading how much water we need to save. The kidneys are supposed to do. Do that. They're supposed to see what the body needs, and they get just grenade out the excess the more dehydrated, we are the more water, we're going to keep, and therefore the darker, the urine will be the more concentrated, if we're just drinking a ton of water like this, the conditions that make us do that. IBD's Melodist, by the way, is one of them, then we drink a lot of water. But the urine is coming out, just pure clear. Like I say, it's an example, go out with the guys go out have more than just a few years. And before you know, it, they're visiting they restroom quite frequently. And the urine is pretty much clear because they've tapped out the body doesn't need anymore hydration. It's got all it needs to everything that goes in comes right back out. So again, both diagnosis both treatable but diabetes, this is more common. So we have basically just people there types of diabetes melody who have type one, which is the insulin dependent diabetes..

diabetes Oregon IBD
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"Typically, when someone uses the word all by itself, diabetes. It is implied it is diabetes Melodist that's the sugar diabetes. That is an issue, where insulin is not being secreted in adequate amounts or in any amounts. By the pancreas, what we call the endocrine pancreas, remember, the pancreas has an Oregon has an immigrant function and excellent function. Meaning that it also lies. I just events that's the execution, and the endocrine function on the islet cells will secrete insulin insulin signals the body to absorb blood, the sugar glucose in the blood into sells for nutrition. So when we have a dog that has diabetes, melodies, the one, one of the things we can tell is that we take a blood test, and the blood sugar is super high. Hi, why? Because the sugar glucose is not being because no insulin transported into the cells for nutrition. So these animals get very sick. Even though the sugars they are they're eating they're getting all this sugar to use for energy for the sales, but the cells aren't getting it, it just accumulates in the in the blood and when it gets very high and cause a lot of other problems. Now, we call one of them is called decay diabetic, hito doses this is where the because the diabetes is not controlled the animals getting very, very sick results, another diabetes that we see called diabetes in separatists, and that is the water drinking diabetes, that is where the body is not able to concentrate the urine, because all of the water that we take in is basically being urinated out. And so it's a problem within the kidney itself, and it's a very, very complex pathway where the bodies, not reading how much water we need to save. The kidneys are supposed to do. Do that. They're supposed to see what the body needs, and they get just grenade out the excess the more dehydrated, we are the more water, we're going to keep, and therefore the darker, the urine will be the more concentrated, if we're just drinking a ton of water like this conditions that make us do that. Diabetes Melodist, by the way, is one of them. Then we drink a lot of water. But the urine is coming out, just pure clear, like I say, as an example, go out with the guys go out have a few more than just a few years. And before you know, it, they're visiting the restroom, quite frequently, and the urine is pretty much clear because they've tapped out the body doesn't need any more hydration. It's got all it needs to everything that goes in comes right back out. So again, both diagnosed both treatable, but diabetes Melodist is more common. So we have basically just people there are two types of diabetes, melodies, who have type one, which is the insulin dependent diabetes..

diabetes Oregon
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:19 min | 2 years ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on 600 WREC

"To take drugs for the long haul. You take them every month, for example for the rest of your wife. So we're asking people to pay more frequently because they're using drugs more. This also shows up though in places like cancer treatment. So people are being asked to pay a lot of money for cancer treatments. We've done some studies on this and found that even paying more than fifty dollars out of pocket per month for cancer drug a lot of people weren't able to stay on their treatments as prescribed. So I think it goes across the board. But as you could imagine the more drugs that you need and also the longer you need to take them the more likely, you are to run into these problems, and obviously not taking meds. We'll have an effect on people's health drugs. Don't work if you don't take them. This is a very dangerous thing for people with certain kinds of conditions. The one that comes to mind. Most quickly is insulin dependent diabetes, insulin is required for those people to live. And when they start stretching out there dose and not taking enough they risk going into insulin shock and dying. In fact, people have died from not using insulin as much as they should because they could not afford to a lot of people figure there'll be enough benefit to get by if they take half of their medication, but Doucet seen says sometimes a little dose is worse than none at all. There are some drugs where if you take less than prescribed you could actually develop resistance to that treatment. So it wouldn't work for you any longer. So there are definitely cases where taking part of your fill is actually maybe even more harmful than taking none of your fill. And then there's the psychological wear and tear of living on the financial edge with a disease or disorder looming over you as well..

cancer Doucet fifty dollars
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

Pet Life Radio

02:43 min | 2 years ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Pet Life Radio

"What is diabetes two types? Typically when someone uses the word all by itself. Diabetes. It is implied. It is diabetes. Melodist that's the sugar diabetes. That is an issue where insulin is not being secreted in adequate amount or in any amounts by the pancreas. What we call the endocrine pancreas. Remember, the pancreas has an Oregon has an end consumption and excellent function. Meaning that it is I guess events. That's the execution and the endocrine function on the islet cells will secrete insulin insulin signals, the the body to absorb blood the sugar glucose in the blood into sells for the Tristesse. So when we have a dog that has diabetes melodies, the one of the things we can tell is that we take a blood test and blood sugar is super high. Hi why? Because the sugar glucose is not being because of no insulin transported into the cells for nutrition. So these animals get very sick. Even though the sugars they are they're eating. They're getting all this the sugar to use for energy for the south. But the sales aren't getting it it just accumulates in the in the blood, and when it gets very high, and cause a lot of other problems now, call one of them is called decay diabetic acidosis this where the because the diabetes is not controlled the animus getting very very sick is also another diabetes that we see called diabetes insipid, and that is the water drinking diabetes. That is where the the body is not able to concentrate the urine because all the water that we take in is basically being urinated out. And so it's a problem within the kidney itself, and it's very very complex pathway where the bodies not reading how much water we need to save. The kidneys are supposed to do. Do that they're supposed to see what the body needs. And they get just gurney out the excess the more dehydrated, we are the more water. We're going to keep and therefore the darker the urine will be the more concentrated if we're just drinking a ton of water. Like this the conditions that make do that IBD's Melodist, by the way is one of them. Then we drink a lot of water, but the urine is coming out just pure clear. Like, I say, it's an example, go out with the guys go out have more than just a few beers. And before you know, it they're visiting the restroom quite frequently. And the urine is pretty much clear because they've tapped out the body doesn't need any more hydration. It's got all it needs to everything that goes in comes right back out. So again, both diagnosed both treatable, but diabetes melodies more common. So we have basically just people. They're two types of diabetes melody who have type one which is the insulin dependent diabetes..

Diabetes Tristesse Oregon IBD
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

KHVH 830AM

11:53 min | 2 years ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on KHVH 830AM

"Back everyone. This is Steve the white Eye Radio show. I we're talking about different types of diseases and how they can show up in the eye. We're talking about iris issues next. How about the lens? So the lens is the tissue in the eye that allows us to focus and the lands is what becomes cataract over time. That's clouding of the lens and a cataract is something that occurs naturally over time. About other lens issues that may indicate that something else going on in the body. This is a condition that we don't see too often. But it's a condition called echo Piet lettuce where the lens is displaced. So the lens should sit. You know, kind of centrally in the I however in this condition. It's kinda displaced arts off to the side. So that's not where it should be. It's kind of a loose. So if the lenses displaced than can't focus as well. And you can't see as well. So there's sort of conditions that can cause it while the most common being trauma trauma of the eye perhaps like a blunt force injury or something like that. It can damage the lens, and it can be displaced off to the side. There's other condition called Marfan syndrome. So this is a connective tissue disorder. That affects the entire body. And in this condition can cause displacement of the landlords of offset and this mar fan since it's a connective tissue disorder as I said affects the other parts of the body. So patients who have mar- fans tend to be a long limb d- on the long fingers. And they have other issues like that to the heart and stuff like that. And it can show up in the eye as well. So if the lens is displaced either trauma or or through some systemic disease like mar fans. The can't see so often that lens needs to be removed and and lens implant needs to be fixated in place. So that's kinda complicated lend searcher complicated type of cataract surgery that they require so that's one type of issue affecting the lens. Let's go inside the I further. How about the retina? So the retina the tissue inside the I that that detects light. So that's that helps us to see I mentioned diabetes earlier, so diabetes affects the blood vessels and the blood vessels. We can see this on the retina saw the retinal tissue their blood vessels there. And we do is them dilated eye exam with nationally see these blood vessels on the retina. So the retina as good place where diabetes can be seen readily or the effects of diabetes. So what are we looking for when we type better guy exam? So when we light the is we'll get a better view inside the eye and since the diabetes affects the vessels the vessels get of leaky. And we can see bleeding on the retina. So sometimes we see spots. Of blood on the retina. Sometimes we can see bleeding into the inside of the eye or the victories of the I sometimes the we can actually see the abnormal blood vessels growing. So these are all signs that the diabetes has affected the I and that and that the person may need further treatment to the I because we don't want that to that bleeding to get worse because that can definitely affect the vision and supplies caused blindness. If it's untreated. So it's the important. People with diabetes to get at least an annual dilated exam. So there they're two types of we'll call insulin dependent diabetes, non insulin dependent diabetes, and and the effects can be on the I can be seen in both types and often the person with diabetes may not know that something's going on because they can have perfect twenty twenty vision. But still have this bleeding in the is. So it's really important for our diabetic patients to get at least an annual checkup annual dilated exam. And one of the findings that we see is swelling of the retina. So when these blood vessels got leaky, the right not swells up like a sponge, and that's the most common cause of vision change and diabetic. So if that swelling gets worse and effects at the area that affects the central that controls the central vision. That's definitely going to affect your vision. So other conditions that we can see the ice is high blood pressure. So people with high blood pressure, you know, that that affects the blood vessels as well. So people who have had chronic high blood pressure, the blood vessels tend to kind of Hardin one way to put it. And if if the if their body blood pressure's, consistently high the vessels actually start to too hard. And we can see these changes in the eye since we can see the blood vessels in the eye. So those are signs of chronic changes from the high blood pressure now people can have kind of acute or sudden changes in the high blood pressure. The blood pressure becomes super high. I mentioned the subcontract have hemorrhage while we have bleeding on the surface of the eye people can have really high due to high blood pressure, and that can be kind of an emergency situation, and we can see other findings inside the eye as well. We have a caller Debbie from. Oh, hey. Hey, Debbie money. Here. You have a question for us. Yes. Strange sensation in my is almost like a feeling. Not a lot. But a while. Before. Okay. Is it like like a scratchy feeling like? Like, there's a hair lash. No. Pinprick or something. Describe it. Okay. Okay. Like, not only surface even inside of your eye. But no vision changes or anything like that. No on. Oh. Okay. No, I read Ness or. I don't know. Okay. So sometimes. Yes, I've had patients with similar issues. If you like almost like a stabbing sensation that that that really comes on quickly in either one or both eyes. I mean, the most important thing to rule out is is I guess something like on the surface of the I like a foreign body or anything like that. But if it's recurring on and off, you know, sometimes I think people have like almost neurologic or like a vendor get stimulated in some way and causing that sudden almost pinprick or some people describe it as I can ice pick sensation. There's no like vision change or license ity or I read nece. It's probably not something that's urgent. But if you're getting recurrently, you might want to just, you know, get an eye exam. If it's been awhile since your last I exam. Yeah. So. It's been a while. Yeah. So especially if it's recurring like that. I would maybe just checked out now. I can't see anymore without glasses. I talk about like or something like that. Okay. I think definitely get an assessment. Like a complete I exam. Make sure they check your vision. Dilate your is to make sure that nothing's going on inside. And you'd never had surgery before. No, okay. Okay. Divisions been stable, and there's no, you know. Read the or or pain in between the currences just be kind of like a a neuropathic. I mentioned before sometimes nerve stimulator there. But if it's recurring maybe maybe get to get that checked out. In either. I. In the meantime, before you see the eye doctor, try using some lubricant drops, you know, that that might help especially if you have some surface irritation, the is drying out. So that might be helpful prior to seeing your eye doctor. Okay. Condition. Okay. Okay. Okay. All right, Debbie. Thanks for your question. Sure. Bye. Bye. So. Yeah. On on occasion, we have patients, and I myself have felt this too. I just out of the blue I feel like pricking sensation in the I but everything else is fine. But if it does something like that does occur, you know, recurrently or if it is affecting division or having some vision change best to get checked out. So why don't take another break and we'll be right back. If you need the personal attention of Dr Christopher Tortora, Dr Steven rea Dr James pits, or one of the other. Doctors of the Hawaiian is.

diabetes Debbie Marfan syndrome Steve dilated Pinprick Dr Steven rea Dr Christopher Tortora Hardin
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

WIBC 93.1FM

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on WIBC 93.1FM

"Done speaking in a. A large gathering medical students are Marian university. And I made a comment about the fact that I didn't really know anything about medicine jumped into it. I'm going into it. It's just a career path to feed myself that kind of stuff in I was one minute. I was hanging out tailgate college football games next minute. I was being tossed in the middle of the HIV epidemic. I mean, literally, that's how quick it happened in. You know, that's where I really understood boy, this is something bigger than me. I guess in that was a horrible time mid eighties and your all your patience and see like on your internal medicine service were dying of HIV. And you know, we didn't knows much about it. There was still that stigma associated with it in. We even had those times because he had so many other illnesses associated with them, and tuberculosis and hepatitis and a lot of other secondary infections that we had protect ourselves from. We're always count up masked up bonnets gloves, everything like that. So you couldn't really make a. The personal connection as much with these patients in so many of them didn't have family visiting and they were dying horrible deaths. And it was just awful awful time to be doing internal medicine. During during that timeframe, and then just disappear, but I've mentioned that to describe medical students, and you could just see the sort of blindness. It would be like me telling you what it was like to practice during the Spanish flu epidemic. Frame of reference, and I realize these students had no idea what was talking about. Wow. Had no idea. And we'll only talking, you know, twenty five thirty years after the fact they were clueless had no idea what I was talking about how that's. I've listened we do that here in this building for with with certain topics. You know, we'll be talking about in. You're looking at the young kids that come in. And they they they do look at you like what even even makes becoming more about nine eleven, you know, talking to younger generation about nine eleven this really young generation I'm talking about. But yeah, it makes you feel old fast. Very interesting. How's that? Yeah. Blank knows. They just didn't get what I'm saying. I got I got them with this article, Dr Profeta, and I wanted more. I mean, it was interesting because one of the last things you say is you know, how light switch it all seem to stop. When the drugs HIV and drugs were discovered and actually worked and it just kind of stopped. And then I I kept reading I was like oh his articles done, and it got me thinking about HIV and age an aging adults, and the fact that nearly half the population in the US alone with HIV or over the age of fifty oh, wait say that again. Half the population nearly half of the population in a US living with HIV are over the age of fifty. But but the thing is our healthy. And that's what you know. It's sort of a side note, even when you see the three Jamie positive it hardly ever impacts with her illness. Whatever we're seeing form sing them for nowadays. You're almost it's almost it's almost worse to have something like insulin-dependent, diabetes is to have HIV. Now. That's how treatable it is. Now, an American that's a lot for how how the advances in medicine that we have made this country to be able to tackle something. It's incredible. It really really is. Is that because of a lot of funding? Absolutely. Absolutely. We talk about because we raising money for everything in of Alzheimer's and cancers, and and sometimes we hear good news. Sometimes we don't hear any news. But some stuff is easier solutions are easier to find another other thing that funding obviously, you say funding is necessary. It's necessary employee. Funding is always good also creative imaginative people that are that are bent on finding answers to the. Speaking of that. And I I don't know how much you can or wants to speak to this. But there is that what's it called cartesian cell treatment or something like that for cancer? That is now something that's being tested and tried. Anybody familiar with that, certainly I know that the future the future for cancer in having. We had a son had leukemia will secure seven months. I think you may have brushed my.

HIV Marian university cancer Dr Profeta US football Jamie Alzheimer hepatitis twenty five thirty years seven months one minute
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

10:03 min | 2 years ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on WJR 760

"Revolution dot net. What maybe now is no longer necessary and trying to just hone it year after year to make sure that our students are coming out with the latest that they need to operate in today's contemporary medical kind of environment. That's a very near term goals. Just to demonstrate that we are improving the curriculum making sure students are successful one measure of that is to make sure students always have the availability. If they choose to go into pediatrics or choose to be an orthopedic surgeon or vascular surgeon or geneticists that once they get out of the college opportunities. They're perfectly trained and ready to be recognized and be given the opportunity to go the next level of training. We also want to increase the research experiences of more students in our college. And I'm trying to increase the time that students can maybe dedicate during their time in the med school to research, if they choose to desire that path, and I have indirectly noted there probably about thirty percent of our students at one point or another would like to participate in some research. I mean, these are bright individuals. They've got they've got insights, and they're able to identify real term real real time problems. And they know they're sitting on this university. That's so great that they maybe they can tackle them. We want to foster that. And then we also want to improve the the outreach and volunteer abilities of our students to participate in. So we support a number of as I said international. Volunteer opportunities for our students through institute for global health. They do a tremendous job, and we're growing that as well. Some of the local volunteer outreach activities we have in the community and beyond. So that those are the near term long term, we need to focus on the fact that medicine is changing rapidly hospital systems are merging and becoming big monoliths. How does today's contemporary medical school graduate fit into that? How do they not lose their? Kills in being patient centered. While you've got all these outside forces insurance government corporate structures, pushing the doctor patient relationship, those are issues that are evolving, and I think long term we we we have to keep an eye on that how is medicine changing in for ten years from now. But preparing today's graduate medical school, incoming class for that reality downstream that that's something that we really are. Working onto to address and Dino Malfa town or urine acclaimed researcher in your own right? Can you tell me a little bit about your own research, and how in the world you balance that with being a dean? Well, my research, I I'm a product of the DO PHD program here at Michigan state one of the early graduates I won't say how early but it was several years ago. But I've always wanted to combine the latest and greatest in that science had to offer. And maybe bring it to patients that I was seeing I always knew I wanted to be a doctor, but I I've always had this scientific kind of you. So my research has evolved through the years, but it it always focuses on can I develop something in the laboratory and bring it to patients soon like within a couple years. There's a sobering kind of reality to what I do. I see families that are affected by very devastat. Many times diagnoses genetic diagnosis can tend to be that way. And there's nothing more. Emotional than having a family with their child affected by a devastating illness. And you don't have an answer you can provide supportive care and many times, you know, that that is important and families are grateful for that. But I always wanted to do more. So my research is focused on how can I take the latest in genetic technologies that you hear a lot about in touted a lot about but really distilling the hype from reality, and what can we do to bring that to today's patient? So my research is focused focused on using genetic engineering to develop technologies to treat a variety of conditions. So my research is focused on developing what's called genetic medicine. How do we deliver genetic information into patients affected by any variety of disease to maybe improve their health outcome? So my laboratory studies, viruses, and we've engineer. Near D engine neared viruses. Typical cold virus and turn it into a medicine that now we use. It's actually being tested in clinical trials to try and stimulate facials immune system to fight cancer. We're also looking at conditions that result in autoimmune disease. So this is when your body sort of gets a little too aggressive and starts attacking itself and you end up with diseases like arthritis, multiple sclerosis, non insulin-dependent, diabetes Melodist. These are common conditions that are due to. Sort of a over vigilant immune system, and so we're using genetics and genetic understanding to now develop new treatments to maybe slow down the system, actually and taking the knowledge from the laboratory back into the clinic. So. I have I think every physician has multiple talents. And we juggle that summer administrative summer teaching some do research. Some to outreach, and we all do it at various levels. So my kind of you know, the specialties is combining research, I do see patients, but combining it I think that's what I was trained to do. And I've had the opportunity to be successful at some level. I would say in in conducting that and I hope that. By setting that example, to our students and faculty that we all are working to try and do more than one thing we can all kind of move forward. And can you tell me about how some of your research, actually, affected state policy? Yeah. Well, I was able to participate in the first in human studies of a novel recombinant protein is what it's called to treat a devastating actually lethal disorder called Pompei disease. This is a muscular dystrophy that affects infants children and adults. I have some patients affected that are, you know, in their sixties and seventies with this condition. It could affect you anytime. And we through those initial studies showed that this new unique type of therapy could work and show. It could literally save lives, especially the sooner that you intervened. The better so young child affected with this condition. If you could get the drug to them before their symptoms got very bad. We would have a much better outcome. So sooner. Sort of preemptively, which is you know. Certainly not St. Patrick technically, we try and espouse to but that that holds true for many diseases wait long story short, but multiple years. Multiple studies thousands of patients worldwide that drug is now approved and so now I routinely prescribed their drug to my patients in any physician, particularly geneticists who have expertise, neurologists. Prescribe this now available drug worldwide to the thousands tens of thousands of patients affected by Pompeii disease. Well in the state of Michigan now, I had the luxury of participating what's called a newborn screening program state of Michigan every baby that's born in the state of Michigan. So last year about practically hundred thousand babies born, if you were called you had a child recently, there was a little form, you filled out and your babies he'll had a little pinprick done in a little spot of blood was drawn and sent off to the central state of Michigan labs, where we screen for about eighty different truly devastating disorders in which we know we get in sooner rather if we can identify a baby sooner rather than later, we can have great impact actually, the state of Michigan is probably one of the state of the art programs in the nation. And so I'm proud to help. Well, anyway in the state of Michigan now, the all babies and now screen for Pompeii disease. So within twenty four to forty eight hours of birth. We know if a child is going to be affected with Pompeii before they show any sign or symptom. We can get them to the appropriate specialists. And if necessary we'll get them on this new drug as soon as possible. A number of babies have already been identified that may have not been identified until it's too late. So that's how something can move from a laboratory to clinical trials to actual deployment in the clinic, where physicians are. Able to prescribe a new drug, and in fact, now impact sort of health policy at a population level. Those are. Just wonderful things to have been able to be a part of my training. Put me in a position to be there. And we will continue to look for -tunities to to repeat that over and over again as a college. This is MSU today. My conversation with MSU college of osteopathic.

Michigan MSU autoimmune disease vascular surgeon Pompei Dino Malfa Michigan labs engineer researcher forty eight hours thirty percent ten years
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Gets out he escapes i think gets out and then clinton was president when i wrote this he gets out somehow it gets to like clinton that this town is like holding people hostage basically own constitutionally and so's springfield gets invaded and years was one hundred and eighty pages long no i think it was like appropriately we'll link yeah i think so actually a different life where i wrote for the seventy show that seventy show when you wrote for the simpsons and we like ate lunch together on the fox lot can i that'd be pretty cool you know can i tell you something though sure i would i prefer this oh yeah yes i prefer what we do as someone who's never written for the simpsons prefer this humana i've been to the writer's room before i know what it looks like a chain them to the desk i like we'd get those you don't have to live in la yeah i like la i've noticed a lot of our friends from new york starting to move to la of you notice that it's like a hemorrhaging all right should we get back to diabetes we should probably just add it all that out no i think that's a nice tangent okay all right so in the case of diabetes like we said it is well we already said what it was but there are three types type one type to ingest ational diabetes type one is by far the in the minority it's it says here five to ten percent but i saw like kind of a straight up five percent number for the number of diabetes cases overall okay but they say five to ten percent in this article or it's called juvenile diabetes or insulin dependent diabetes and this is caused by a lack of insulin either not much insulin or sometimes no insulin at all in their blood and this is this is clearly genetic right it says an also could be environmental but yeah they think it's possible possible that it's caused by virus exposure to virus early in childhood interest egg that sets off an auto immune reaction so your immune system attacks your beta cells that produce insulin some just destroys them yeah and so you don't produce insulin and it happens in your younger years maybe adolescence which is why it's called juvenile diabetes and you when you have type one.

clinton president springfield writer new york diabetes hemorrhaging ten percent five percent
"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Depth of Echoes

Depth of Echoes

08:36 min | 3 years ago

"insulin dependent diabetes" Discussed on Depth of Echoes

"Me as in the media part of the way. I like to look at things. I is with statistics in finding out. How prevalent different things are so. Although i know numbers can be a little boring. I tried to pick out some of the most interesting or important notable statistics so that we can kind of examining get a picture of what's going on approximately one in five adults in the us or forty three point. Eight million people experience mental illness in a given year ninety percent of those who die by suicide underlying mental illness and suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the us at any given time there are more people with untreated severe psychiatric illnesses living on america's streets than are receiving care in hospitals proximate. Ninety thousand individuals with schizophrenia. Or manic depressive. Illness are in hospitals receiving treatment for their disease the prevalence of bipolar disorder among adults is about two point eight percent the highest occurrence of disorder occurs among eighteen twenty nine year olds where it affects roughly four point seven percent of the population. Now let's take a look at schizophrenia. One percent of us adults live with schizophrenia. And that's pretty consistent worldwide but what that means that america is about two point. Four million american adults live with schizophrenia. Now to put that into perspective. Let's take a look at four other disorders that you have probably heard of and compare them against the numbers with schizophrenia. Schizophrenia is twice as likely to occur as alzheimer's it is five times more common than multiple sclerosis. it's six times more common than insulin. Dependent diabetes and it is sixty times more prevalent than muscular dystrophy. And yet you probably know more about all those disorders. Then you do about schizophrenia. Why aren't we talking about this. I believe that depression as a mental illness has gotten more press in the last couple of years maybe the last year especially and so it has become something that is more permissible to talk about and more. You're allowed to admit that you have depression but any other mental illness in my experience is something that you hide. It's not something you admit. And it's not something that society knows how to deal with normal people. I guess you can take don't know how to handle it and don't know what it means when people are struggling with mental illnesses van depression. I wish that that being depressed or anxious isn't the same thing as being suicidal. Even when you want to die. It's not the same thing as being ready to kill yourself and when you self-harm i wish that people didn't think that that was the same thing either as trying to die. It's actually more of a way of trying to live And it's frustrating. That people assume if you're depressed it means you wanna die one thing. I wish people understood about mental illness is that i don't like being the person who says that i'm feeling down for that. I'm too tired or too mentally exhausted or too emotionally exhausted to be able to hang out in hate to be the person who cancels at the last minute. I hate feeling like everything is my fault. It i hate. Click a burden because i have all of these emotions that i feel like. I have to get out when really i. Just don't wanna be anybody else's problem and i don't want my problems to bring them down my meaningless whining to make their lives any harder than it already is. Because everybody's got their own problems and my brain just decides to make things a little bit harder than maybe they have it but because we're all on their own are on on our own journeys. It's hard for me to say. Yeah my life harder than yours because it's not we all have our own struggles and it makes me feel that. I can't handle my problems the way that they can. If i had to choose one thing that i wish people knew about mental illness having grown up with a family member with mental illness. It's that a person can seem perfectly normal and even sweet and connected well at the same time being completely out of touch with reality and unable to connect with the people that they love because the way they experience life is so different from the way they the way others around them experience. Those same events. Something rail or my friends have suggested. Usually i don't see it. It's like i'm capable of scene but choosing my wife or friends who are looking like man. You're in a spy in this place and you need to get help because you're on edge or in could do something like that online and it's been them i don't have anyone Near me that is dealing with mental illness. But i think as a society if feels like it's kind of swept under the carpet a lot that no we do not deal with it. And there's a stigma to it. We all are aware of you know. Ooh they must be crazy. They didn't take their prozac. And that's not right and unacceptable. I i really do feel like there needs to be more address about it and not Not a stigma. I mean it's an illness. It's up there with cancer or anything else. We often hear the word. Stigma used with mental illness diagnosis. But what does that actually mean stigma. According to the dictionary means a mark of disgrace or stain as on one's reputation. Hey guys it's liz. I am a person living with mental illness. And i'm also the stepparents who a fifteen year old girl living with mental illness. I don't worry at all for myself. i'm capable adult. Who's been out for a long time now and fully capable of articulating. What my needs are advocating for myself and combating stigma discrimination myths stereotypes all that for my fifteen year old step daughter. I'm cautious. i wouldn't say that. I'm worried because i don't believe that anybody should be ashamed of who they are. But i'm cautious. Because she's fifteen the world's a cruel place people are mean and because of all the misinformation out there. I think that i would feel better if she was more grounded as a person before she took on being open all the time about what she's going through just because of the world being what it is. Here's my friend. Josh weighing in on his experiences. I've worked in the mental health industry for roughly ten years. And the one thing that i can say is that after working with people with mental health illnesses We tend to go to the professionals to gain a better perspective on what. It's like to have a mental health illness when we should also be going to those with mental health illnesses so that they can describe what they go through on a day to day basis. I've learned i've gained a lot more perspective by going to an individual with mental health illness. And then couple that with what the professionals teach us. This is such an important part of the whole system. I am afraid of people finding out. Sometimes i'm fairly open about my mental illnesses as far as depression and anxiety but there are certain people that i'm still very cautious around to make sure that they don't know because i'm worried about how it will affect not just our relationship but things like my job. Will i be seen as incompetent. Just because i deal with this and i have unfortunately had people treat me differently because of it so it does bring a lot of fear into being open and honest when he struggled with these things as a teacher a mother and someone who has a mental illness. I wish that people understood that mental health is has categories like some are minor and some major. Some mental illnesses can be controlled just by deep breathing or simple medications. Others require more trips to the psychiatrist.

schizophrenia manic depressive alzheimer's depression america muscular dystrophy multiple sclerosis mental illness diagnosis diabetes Stigma liz cancer Josh anxiety