35 Burst results for "insomnia"

Survivors of COVID-19, who received hospital treatment, show increased rate of psychiatric disorders

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

01:54 min | Last week

Survivors of COVID-19, who received hospital treatment, show increased rate of psychiatric disorders

"More than half of people who received hospital treatment for Covid nineteen were found to be suffering from a psychiatric disorder a month. Later, a study has found. Out, of four hundred, two patients monitored after being treated for the virus, fifty, five percent were found to have at least one psychiatric disorder according to experts from San. Rafael Hospital in Milan found. The results based on clinical interviews and self assessment questionnaires showed post traumatic stress disorder in twenty, eight percent of cases depression in thirty, one and anxiety in forty-two. Additionally forty percent of patients had insomnia and twenty percent had obsessive compulsive symptoms. The findings increased concerns about the psychological effects of the virus. The paper published yesterday in the Journal Brain behavior and immunity says PTSD major depression, and anxiety. All high burden. noncommunicable conditions associated with years of life lived with disability, the study of two, hundred, sixty, five men, and one hundred, and thirty seven women found that women who are less likely to die from Cova than men suffered. Suffered more than men psychologically patients with previous positive psychiatric diagnoses suffered more than those without a history of psychiatric disorder. They said, psychiatric efforts could be caused by the immune response to the virus itself. All by psychological stresses, such as social isolation, psychological impact of a novel severe and potentially fatal illness concerns about infecting others and stigma outpatient showed increase anxiety and sleep disturbances while perhaps surprisingly, the duration of hospitalization inversely correlated with symptoms of St Depression anxiety and OCD.

Psychiatric Disorder Covid Rafael Hospital Sleep Disturbances Journal Brain Behavior Social Isolation Cova Ptsd Milan SAN
How to Get Sleep in Anxious Times With  Dr. Donn Posner

10% Happier with Dan Harris

05:45 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Get Sleep in Anxious Times With Dr. Donn Posner

"Don't know about you guys, but my sleep has suffered at times quite badly during the last few months. Today's guest really got me thinking about this issue in a whole new way I. he normalizes the sleep problems. Many of us are having. If you're sleeping poorly right now, he says don't freak out. It's natural and normal. Second he has a whole bunch of tips for how to deal with insomnia. Some of which I had never heard before, and I'm already starting to operationalize my own life. His name is Don. Posner he's one of the leaders in the field of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia. Titles are founder and president of sleep, well, consultants and Adjunct Clinical Associate Professor Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine. Not only did done patiently answer all of my questions, but we also played him. Some listener voicemails from you guys. One last thing to say before we dive in here, you'll notice over the course of this week. That are episodes this week. Have a theme which we're calling primordial needs today. We're doing sleep. Wednesday it's sex, so it's fun week here on the show. Stay tuned for all of that I. IT sleep and on near here we go. Great to meet you and thanks for doing this. I appreciate it sure thing good to be here. You gave a talk recently. That got some attention. deservedly. We'll get now more attention now that we're putting you on the show about acute insomnia. Can you tell us what that means and why? You're worried about it right now especially. Let me clarify a couple of things. Let me maybe work backward. The best way to define acute insomnia is to define chronic or long term insomnia, which we in the field called insomnia disorder. And the way we define that is that a person is having trouble initiating sleep to begin with. Or they wake up in the middle of the night and can't get back to sleep. Or they wake up sort of at the end of their night and never get back to sleep, right? And so those are really three flavors of insomnia if you will beginning middle and end. We like to say chocolate, Vanilla Strawberry, and then there's neopolitan which is a mixed bag right so that's insomnia. If that is happening and we say what's problem with to sleep or staying asleep, it's if you take longer than thirty minutes to get to sleep on average if you are awake for some combination of thirty minutes in the middle of the night, or you wake more than thirty minutes earlier than your desired time. If that's happening three or more nights a week for longer than three months. And you have associated daytime symptoms, that's insomnia disorder and I want to underscore that last piece which is. Really, a twenty four hour disorder. It has to have impact on your day. For us to say that this is really an insomnia disorder problem. You have to have something like fatigue sleepiness. Concentration problems, performance, problems and so forth. So chronic insomnia is those symptoms more than three months. So now going back to your question about acute insomnia, acute insomnia is all of that. Less than three months when I give talks, and when I asked the audience how people here have ever had a bad night's sleep I know I'm going to get a laugh and one hundred percent of the hands go up. We've all had that experience. And all of that is normal nothing to concern ourselves about it, and we don't even talk about anything as diagnostic as acute insomnia until we get to at least three days. But then anywhere between three days and three months is considered acute insomnia, and that means that you're having those problems either initiating or maintaining sleep. And you may or may not have daytime symptoms yet. And it's usually due to some stressor, and we say anything from the Bio psychosocial spectrum. I now say to my trainees. You could probably open the dictionary. Put your finger down on a word and find something that causes insomnia. Whether. It's an illness physical pain a change in your environment, a psychological stress like stress at work tax time those sorts of things and I also hasten to add that. The Valence of that does not have to be negative. Right change is stressful so getting married and getting a new bed partner in your bed. Can Change Your sleep patterns. Having a child. Is a precipitate for an acute insomnia until you can get that kind of straightened away. The thought process is absolutely very much that that's a normal reaction distress. Maybe even a good one because. If we go back evolution narrowly speaking. Sleep is a dangerous activity. Right if you're asleep, you're vulnerable. It must be important for that reason because every species, does it. And so, it must provide very important function, but it's dangerous, so we always say that sleep is deferred when the lion walks into the mouth of the cave. and. Therefore, we could say that acute insomnia is adaptive. If, you understand so even now in our culture. It's adaptive in the sense that you're making changes. You're trying to deal with. Whatever's coming down the pike. But we always expect that. If you then adapt appropriately or the problem itself goes away, or you get on some medication or the stressor itself remits then we expect the acute insomnia to remit, and so all of that we consider to be normal, and it is for a smaller subset, but yet epidemic numbers that sort of gravitate into this chronic insomnia realm, which is where people like myself and my colleagues come in terms of helping people to treat that.

Insomnia Adjunct Clinical Associate Pro Founder And President DON Psychological Stress Posner Stanford University School Of Partner
FDA warns about 5 additional toxic hand sanitizers

KYW 24 Hour News

00:23 sec | Last month

FDA warns about 5 additional toxic hand sanitizers

"They are Grupo insomnia. Trans liquid technologies solution is cosmetic ahs and tropicals medicos. The FDA warning comes after the agency just recently cautioned against any of nine other brands of possibly tucks a cancer, then Tizer that may contain methanol. That Piper CBS News The federal judge will not stop Hawaii from enforcing a quarantine on arriving travelers that will take effect next month. A group

FDA CBS Hawaii
A Mental Health Pandemic: The Second Wave of COVID-19

Morning News with Manda Factor and Gregg Hersholt

01:15 min | Last month

A Mental Health Pandemic: The Second Wave of COVID-19

"Experts experts say say the the second second wave wave of of the the pandemic pandemic is is beginning beginning and and will will only only worsen worsen in in the the coming coming months. months. And And now now they're they're talking talking about about a a potential potential mental mental health health crisis. crisis. We We get get more on this live from Kemal's Carleen Johnson. Well, according to the state Department of Public Health. They expect 2 to 3 million Washingtonians to experience mental or behavioral health problems in the coming months as a result of the pandemic, this psychiatrist Dr Daniel Bober What I'm seeing in my own patients is an increase in depression, anxiety, insomnia, and maybe if they were using a glass of wine to take the edge off now they're using a whole bottle, so it's definitely something that's impacted them pretty hard. They call it disillusionment as people realized we're not returning to what was normal anytime soon. It is already leading to a surgeon, substance abuse, aggression and then criminal activity and the making matters worse across the state. Code 19 has caused revenues to tumble for a lot of behavioral health agencies and treatment facilities. According to the Everett Herald and the Homeless County Compass Help, which is one of the main ones has already shuddered several of its main sites due to financial troubles. Some of those may never reopen. Reporting live Carleen Johnson. Come on, is the driver

Carleen Johnson Dr Daniel Bober Department Of Public Health Everett Herald Homeless County Compass Kemal
Metabolism, Appetite, and Mindset

The Essential Oil Revolution

06:41 min | 2 months ago

Metabolism, Appetite, and Mindset

"I'm here with Sammy Burner. Who's a certified aromatherapist and health and lifestyle coach? Whose goal is to help create balance in people's lives, so they can feel as happy and healthy as possible. Her Passion for health and wellness is driven by her own past struggles with weight, anxiety, panic, disorder, and Insomnia Sammy. Welcome to the show is so glad to have you here. Thank you I'm excited to be here. Just based on your bio. It sounds like you have had quite a vulnerable. Vulnerable Past, and so thank you so much first and foremost for coming in just being so in sharing with us. I mean it's not easy to talk about this stuff. It's not but for listeners it so helpful to realize that you're not alone. And I've learned that from other people sharing their stories. It's been super helpful for me, so figure I, might as well share mine and hope I can help a few people nia absolutely well. Let's hear your story was starting with. How much weight have you lost in? What was that like for you? Yes, so this saul started lull I mean it's been my whole life, but I started this whole transformation about three years ago now and I had weighed like event I gained. Probably fifty pounds heavier than I. Am right now and I was completely unhappy in job that was toxic to me and just realized that something needed to change some family history came into effect, and I realized that you know I need to get my health under control, and I wanNA stop feeling like crap. I'm sick of it, and I decided to leave my job, and once I did that I mean a huge weight was lifted off me and I realized that I can do more I can find a new job I can take my own path. And jumped into some lifestyle changes I started just with a goal of losing I think it was five pounds at the beginning and was like this is never going to happen, but I'm going to set it. I'm going to try it. And I did a thirty day cleanse and had lost like fifteen. He's like Oh. Yeah, I think more of this can happen so. I kept changing diet more and more into a plant based Diet and have found that that's what my body thrives on. Can I feel more energized I sleep better. Digestion is regular and just mentally I am in so much of a better place I. Mean I still struggle with things -iety depression here and there, but the way I handle. It is completely did a couple years ago. So even just changes in Diet has been huge, and once I started losing weight I was like I can keep losing weight like a clearly have weight to lose, and can be so much healthier so I was tracking working with Dr on blood tests, and like even things like my cholesterol had changed significantly so huge transformation, and over like six months I had lost fifty pounds. and was feeling great so like I need to keep it this way because this is. This is where I feel good. This is my sweet spot. Wow, fifty pounds in sixty days. Did you say six five six months? Yeah, fifty pounds in six months. That is a lot that's congratulations into lot of struggle. Well, there's so many amazing takeaways from the story that you just shared and one that I took away. That I'm constantly reminding myself of reminding my listeners of is, don't try to bite off the whole chunk. Right at I just take. Some bites little baby steps to get. You started because you know. Had you started your journey outgoing? Will you okay I'M GONNA LOSE FIFTY POUNDS? You know that that is such a hit hard mentality to get into, but to start a journey off going. You know what I'm just GONNA lose five pounds. And once you achieve that little bit of success. It opens up these doorways. It opens up something in your brain. That allows you to say. Wow, I'm capable of that. What else am I capable of yeah I guarantee? If I had a goal of fifty pounds, I wouldn't have lost anything. It was all I need to start small I. Need to take it little by little, and once you reach your goals you. Successful you can do it so I. found that setting smaller milestones was a way to get me to my goal. I want also just the beginning of your story. It makes me think about how many people out there legitimately wake up every day and just feel like crap you know and we are magnificent human beings. We should be living life to the fullest and I know that that's that sounds like such a cliche, and it's super hard to do. I mean we live. Live in a capitalist fast pace, competitive, harsh society, and is not always easy to say oh. Let me seize the day. Let me get the most out of my life. Let me craft my life by design, but if you're one of those people that are waking up pretty much every morning and every night when you come home and every time you sit down at work, you go. I just feel like crap. Then I, guarantee you. There are little changes that you can do. Do to change your circumstances. Yes, like Sammy. What do you think was the key to just starting in? And what were some of your favorite tools that you used along the way I think for me like at the beginning I didn't realize how crappy I felt like I knew I didn't feel good, but I didn't know how good I feel, so it's like I'm just GonNa. Try a little bit I started working with the chiropractor and we came up with a thirty day. Day Plan for Diet changes, and that was huge I started a program and stuff to it and I. I think being able to stick to. It was really good for me, but I also feel like. I was almost overly dedicated. Focusing on other things I was really focused on that weight loss when I could have been focused on I. WanNa feel better. It's not necessarily about the weight and the number on the scale. I want to be able to feel better and. That was kind of my take away. After the thirty days I was really focused on weight. And then I was like you know what there's more to this because I can feel good, I can be less anxious I mean decreased medications, anxiety and insomnia so much since I started this, and it was just huge in realizing that food can kind of control you and it can control your body, so it's amazing. How just reducing that inflammation in the Gut can help heal other

Sammy Burner Insomnia Saul
How the Pandemic Has Changed the Way We Sleep

Coronavirus Daily Briefing

03:43 min | 2 months ago

How the Pandemic Has Changed the Way We Sleep

"According to preliminary results of a study of sixteen hundred people from sixty countries, forty six percents of people reported poor sleep during the pandemic. That's up from just twenty five percent before the pandemic insomnia and vivid weird dreams, both caused by the increased stress of the time we're living through has been evident anecdotally and as indicated by a fourteen percent uptick in sleep. Medication Prescriptions Melatonin sales in over the counter supplement for the natural hormone that induces sleepiness are up forty four percents. Philip Musket a professor of Psychiatry at Columbia University Medical Center said he's avoiding prescribing medications to patients preferring to offer sleep hygiene tips. He's seen that actually staying asleep is the biggest problem for most people and says some of the primary factors causing that is that people are lacking in structure and exercise. Stain active can help you sleep more soundly and boost your immune system Dr Musk's also advises sticking to a regular sleep schedule and avoiding naps during the day. The good news according to Kathy Goldstein physician at the University of Michigan and an associate professor of neurology at the Schools Sleep Disorders Center is that what most people are experiencing is acute insomnia or quitting the Wall Street Journal having difficulty for or staying asleep a few times a week for three months or less and quotes, the third of people will experience acute insomnia at some point in their lives usually caused by some stressor. stressor in their life like say a pandemic the key doctor. Goldstein says though is not letting the issue. Become a chronic one quote. It's important to avoid associating your bed or bedroom with a place where you were awake. Experts recommend that if you can't fall asleep or wake up in the middle of the night and are unable to go back to sleep after twenty minutes get out of bed and do something, relaxing and quotes. Natasha Bouillon a Phoenix based family physician at one medical, says most people's sleep problems right now either stem from a lack of normal schedule or general anxiety about the pandemic. Some tips she recommends mindfulness through meditation, exercise or cognitive behavioral therapy. To maintain a consistent sleep schedule, turn devices off an hour before going to sleep and make your sleeping space a device free zone, consider even ditching your smartphones alarm and getting an actual alarm clock, as for anyone, experiencing vivid dreams or nightmares Melinda Jackson, a senior lecturer at the Turner Institute for Brain and Mental Health at Monash University in Melbourne, says quote. During Times of stress, there's a release of narrow chemicals that can trigger these vivid dreams and nightmares in some people end quotes. And, Dearly Barrett a dream researcher at Harvard Medical School notes that waking up frequently throughout the night can also cause people to remember their dreams better. Contribute to the sense that your dreams are more vivid than usual. guardless of how? Your sleep has been disrupted. Or why here are a few more sleep? Hygiene tips to leave with quoting the Wall Street Journal eat at regular times than snacking day. Avoid, napping or compensating for poor night of sleep by going to bed, unusually early limit caffeine and avoid alcohol avoid electronic devices one to two hours before going to sleep, but if you do use a blue light filter and try to look at content that is not stressful. Get Bright Light in the morning. Try to find a workspace that isn't in your bedroom and stop working at a specific our and make time for relaxing activities end quote.

Schools Sleep Disorders Center Philip Musket Wall Street Journal Natasha Bouillon Kathy Goldstein Melatonin Columbia University Medical Ce Associate Professor Of Neurolo Professor Of Psychiatry Harvard Medical School Dr Musk University Of Michigan Dearly Barrett Caffeine Phoenix Melinda Jackson Family Physician
Going All In on Sleep Hygiene

Forever35

09:05 min | 3 months ago

Going All In on Sleep Hygiene

"I love what you wrote here you do in our in our little prep document. He said okay. Gone all in on my sleep hygiene. Those words are music to my ears. Well you know I wrote this document before I went to bed last night and then last night was just in party with Mehan insomnia just a sexy dance between the two of us but it was okay. I figured it out I worked through it. I would say insomnia is probably not the maybe it is the right term but just I had a really hard time falling asleep. I could not do it last night. I did all my little things that I try but then finally I've mentioned this on a recent episode of here for you but I got mentioned again. A listener recommended something called good day. Chocolate sleep supplement candy coated pieces with one milligram of Melatonin per piece. Now got some in a grocery order. I should tell you Dorie yes I ordered it. I had done like a whole foods pickup order. Okay and I put this on my list thinking it'd be like a big bottle of vitamins. It is eight pieces of. Oh my gosh. It's so tiny. It's literally like the size of an a little cardboard box the size of an eraser that you get an elementary school. It's a very small. Wow or eight pieces of chocolate and I've already had two of them last night. So like you now loops and I just dropped. What on my desk so just FYI. I I don't know I need to do a little more research on if I can acquire more but they are basically giant chocolate eminem like candies that have Melatonin in them and at one thirty last night I took to them and that did help me transition into sleeping. Okay do you know. Do you know why you weren't able to fall asleep last night. Okay as I confessed to. You already pre recording. I was doing the thing where a looked at my phone late. Yeah and I regret it. I deeply regret it. So let me let me. May I fill listeners? In on kind of just what? I'm Lee the steps. I am taking s please. I would like nothing. So our we've talked about sleep hygiene a lot on forever thirty five and I have always found it to be a struggle and I've had sleep issues in the past and they go hand in hand with my anxiety so i. It's pretty clear to me that this is pandemic related. Yes omnia and stress like I know what it is and I do feel very fortunate that like while I do have to wake up and work and take care of my family. It's not like I have to wake up and be at an office eight o'clock so because when I used to get this kind of sleep. Insomniac used to be at work at eight and it would be this kind of like all night panic about it So so that is. That is very lucky for me. I feel like right now. That is that does help. But I'm trying to figure out ways in which to not Trigger this kind of bedtime sleeping Zayed's so the one thing I need to do that I think really helps get off my phone about an hour before I plan on falling asleep. Okay and that is hard for me because like when I go to wash my face a bring my phone okay. Do you do this studio the no? I put my phone away before I start my whole bedtime routine brain. It's like I want be looking at facebook while I'm washing my face. That's what I do. Here's what I do and like you. Can you're welcome to do or not do this? I don't care if I'm if I'm doing something in the living room like say watching TV. I will finish watching TV. I'll take one last look at my phone. And then I'll plug my phone in the kitchen and then like I'm done with the phone for the night. Ooh And I go into my bedroom. I change into my pajamas or maybe. I'm already in my pajamas. I do my whole you know. Wash my face put on my serums my lotions. I brush my teeth floss etc. Do Yoga Toes. I write in my journal I'll usually read kindle for a little bit Last night I was on my ipad looking for something but I will talk about in a little bit but I try and I try to stay off my ipad because then I get then. It's tempting to look at news websites and I don't want to be doing that and then I usually get so tired. I often fall asleep while reading. Yeah that's amazing like lights on kindle in hand and then I like jerk. Oh Okay and then. I'll put the kindle away turn up late and like really go to sleep. I feel like that's how you know that you hit Middle Age because I do that too and I feel like I would watch my parents do that and be like they are so weird though kick in their bedroom and they both leap with the lights on with books on their totally but like now we're there and it feels good and like you get why you just Kinda like close your eyes mid book. Yes I I've had that experience in my better sleep days and I and I I really admire that. You are so consistent with that that and not the just that it works but that like you. So much of it is forming the habit. And you've done that and you've done that as long as this podcast has been in existence even before you know well. Yeah I mean as discussed on this podcast. I have had to be consistent because of my sleep disorder and even though I still get night terrors. Having a consistent sleep routine does help. So did you talk to anyone. Like did someone guide you through figuring out asleep routine in terms of dealing with your sleep disorder or is this something. There's a lot of articles about it that I consulted. It's also partly why and Matt Matt and I are at odds about this. I like to have my bedroom be cave like I like it pitch dark preferably like blackout curtains. No late getting in quiet as to WHO and he likes to like. He likes to wake up with Natural Light. Which means that there's late seepage. All the time and I so yeah so so that's been that's often been a source of conflict but lake ultimately. I think the person with a sleep disorder wins out a man But yeah like some of the like I've talked about this before but like going to sleep at a consistent time every night is also very important. Yeah Yeah having that wind down period is important earplugs. I mask like do earplugs at night. I do okay okay. Do you have a certain brand of that? You like or is it just kind of like a generic drug store earplug. It's a generic drugstore earplug. I believe the one I have right now are from walgreens great shoutout to Walgreens shout to Walgreens I so I don't know I like a very loud white noise eight. Yes yes and I love the variety of white noise. Machines have cranking up all over my house. I have been finding Melatonin to be very useful and as well as reading and journaling at night. That does really kind of helped me wind down. It's the transition from phone to non phone that has been really hard and maybe I need to move my phone out of the bedroom completely. I've been leaving it on my desk. Which is in my bedroom and as you mentioned you like when we were talking about this previously I think work needs to be kept out of the bedroom but right now. My workspace is literally twenty four inches from my bed. That's very hard right now. I'm sitting at my desk and I can reach behind me and touch my bed. So that is. That is a little tricky. Like I will look at my computer and I'll think of something I haven't done for the podcast and I'll be like oh just do this one flip it. Oh men and do it. So so. That's that's hard for me to. I need to kind of start figuring that out but I will say I have been wearing an eye mask a lot more in not only is it helpful and filtering the light. There's something about the pressure of it. That is comforting. You do you experience that like the jazz header. Caress of an eye pillow against my face. I'm finding very soothing. That's very

Melatonin Insomnia Walgreens Facebook Dorie Insomniac Matt Matt Zayed LEE
The Dark Knight Trilogy (Nolan #4)

Filmspotting

06:37 min | 3 months ago

The Dark Knight Trilogy (Nolan #4)

"Welcome to film spotting so Josh. We've arrived at the stage of our Nolan who've review where we've actually reviewed the films on the show previously the first three films in the series following Memento and insomnia all predate film spotting this week. We're revisiting Nolan's dark knight trilogy. Two thousand five's Batman begins which started. It was one of the first films reviewed on the show. Way Back in two thousand five. That movie came out in June. The show began in March of. Oh five unfortunately. Our Review on episode eighteen of the show has been archived in the basement of Wayne Industry headquarters along with all the other films. Spotting PROTOTYPES COW. Can't hear me out among the disappointed listeners. Who went to search for that review? Just today thinking I'd be able to hear Sam. I thought it would be good preparation you know like to do. My homework. Couldn't find it so we'll have to unearth that at some point. Yeah I'll have to give you a tutorial on searching the archive film spotting website. Because it's there but you can bet. I did not seek it out interest in listening to the archive that I found only went back to. I forget what show but it wasn't this one so yeah I'll have to get to to`real but with that review lost a time. I guess the best thing we can do for now is move on to version two point. Oh world like to disappear. Barron staff was not for the parents to serve. Justice cannot let pass. If you yourself and you become something else. Dialing our Christopher Nolan overview stays on chronological track at least for the moment with two thousand five's Batman Begins Adam. This is Nolan's big-budget high profile. Follow up to insomnia which itself was a medium budgeted studio. Follow up to his indie breakout. Memento what did I expect from Batman begins in two thousand? Five Nolan was already on my radar as a special talent superhero movies. Were something I enjoyed but aside from Tim Burton's Batman Installments and Sam Raimi's Spiderman Efforts Spiderman. Too by the way came out in two thousand and four I felt Comic Book Films. Usually fell into a fairly predictable box. The question for Batman begins then was whether or not the John. Laura would bend to Nolan's promise or Nolan would bend to the genre in two thousand five to my mind. Nolan's will one out even next to Burton and Raimi's Work Nolan's take on the superhero film stood out as distinct. It was dark. It was intense and above all it was rooted in a real world. Specificity that was recognizable while building his costume. I love that Bruce Wayne Orders some ten thousand bat ears that turn out to be unusable. This Bruce Wayne and even Batman could exist just like us he had to do Amazon returns. That first impression of Batman begins makes me think that I watched it through the Lens of a Superhero Movie. Perhaps with tempered expectations this time. Though in the midst of our review I was decidedly watching it through the Lens of a Christopher Nolan movie and from that perspective keeping in mind masterful later efforts like the prestige which was Nolan's next film the Dark Knight which doubles down on much of what made Batman begins so throwing inception and dunkirk. That begins played as far more conventional. It has Nolan touches to be clear deception traumatized characters narrative twist but they each seemed a bit better towards the genre this time around something of a compromise. If in understandable one given where Nolan was in his career ultimately I think my original impression is probably the correct one and we can maybe get into a tangent here atom on whether or not a films original context matters. Most I think that's especially applicable. Maybe to dark knight rises but either. Way Adam. I'm curious what frame of mind you're in while revisiting Batman begins for our Nolan overview. Did you approach it as a superhero movie which in twenty twenty means contending with the reality of the MC you or did you assess it more? On a Nolan scale you know from interstellar on the bottom to the top where you'll find dunkirk. How dare you? I love how you unnerve me heading into my reply here and maybe that's appropriate because even though you answered it. I see what you're trying to do I'm onto you. You're actually previewing are pending discussion of the Dark Knight by presenting me with a joker like Dilemma Harvey. Rachel press the button and kill the other passengers. Risk them killing me Nolan movie or Superhero Movie. Your just an agent of chaos. Josh always knew what do I look like a guy with plan on one hand? I wasn't looking at this film. This trilogy of films as a Nolan creation consciously and I am it would be happening unconsciously of course just by the nature of this little project that we have set out on at the same time. I was eager to see this origin story again because just like I suppose bruce being forever scarred by his encounter with the bats I'm gonNA forever be blessed with the memory of my first superhero movie. Richard Donner's Superman. It's been talked about a little bit over the years here on the show and among its many thrills it shows us who Clark is how we got Earth those early discoveries of his gifts running alongside the train kicking that football. This first demonstrations of his abilities and helping people as Superman. That's the stuff I ate up. Then that's the stuff. I still eat up now. The Fun stuff. I guess that equate with Superhero movies. That is lost the darker. You alluded to this the darker. The more realistic the more serious. These movies get honestly the more these films feel less like Superman and more like James Bond. And that's definitely the case in this trilogy. I think this is where we really see. It happen right. Where Superhero Movies did turn into? Something else became something else in pop culture. We watched it unfold over the course of these. Three movies didn't we? I think that's fair. I think you could roll in watchmen there but that was two thousand nine so this was ahead of that.

Christopher Nolan Bruce Wayne Sam Raimi Josh Dunkirk Wayne Industry Insomnia Adam Tim Burton Richard Donner Barron James Bond Dilemma Harvey Rachel Amazon Laura Clark Football
UN leads call to protect most vulnerable from mental health crisis during and after COVID-19

UN News

01:31 min | 3 months ago

UN leads call to protect most vulnerable from mental health crisis during and after COVID-19

"All countries should do more to protect people's mental health during the cave nineteen pandemic UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres has said spearheading the alert ahead of the World Assembly in Geneva beginning next Monday the UN chief highlighted how we must help and stand by all those most at risk now. They include frontline health workers in particular but also younger and older generations. Those with pre existing mental health conditions and others fleeing conflict. That message was echoed by the World Health Organization's at Deva Castell director of the Department of Mental Health and substance abuse past economic crises. Such as in two thousand and eight had increased the number of people with mental health issues and lead to higher rates of suicide and substance abuse. She said there are some surveys that were done in Canada. Where forty seven percent off healthcare workers reported need for psychological support forty seven percent so almost half of them in China. We have different figures for depression. Fifty percent and forty five percent insomnia thirty four percent Pakistan also forty two percent to twenty six twenty six percent of different distress the numbers side they add on these are just preliminary. We know the. Un's mental health guidelines indicate that depression anxiety before the caveat nineteen pandemic cost the global economy more than one trillion dollars per year depression effects. Two hundred sixty four million people in the world while around half of all psychological conditions stopped by the age of

UN Department Of Mental Health World Health Organization Secretary General Antonio Gute Deva Castell World Assembly Geneva Pakistan Canada China Director
Nolan #3 - Insomnia / Blow the Man Down / True History of the Kelly Gang

Filmspotting

09:42 min | 4 months ago

Nolan #3 - Insomnia / Blow the Man Down / True History of the Kelly Gang

"From Chicago. This is film spotting. I'm Adam Kanner and I'm Josh. Larsen can't be easy to keep working after three days. No sleep to keep focus. You're seeing things yet. Cause little flashes tricks alight that's Robin Williams with Al Pacino in Christopher Nolan's insomnia from two thousand and two as the follow up to his mind. Bending breakout hit. Memento insomnia struck some at the time as a frustratingly straightforward thriller. This week we continue our Nolan who've review with a fresh look plus we'll have thoughts on three new releases all available online more. Can I get up Pacino ahead? Unfilled SPOTTING Welcome to film spotting Josh. The theaters are closed. But the movies keep coming at least if you know where to look this week. We've got reviews of three new releases. Include ONE. That's definitely a golden brick. Were the debut. That's the cozy noir thriller. Blow the man down a feature debut set in Downey's main and the down under set the true history of the Kelly gang from director. Justin Kurt Sel and the high school set Sela and the spades one. You caught up with Josh Ross. Going to continue our Christopher Nolan who've review with two thousand? Two's insomnia the black sheep. Maybe of the Nolan filmography. We'll see if it does deserve that reputation later in the show first though let's talk some new movies for a change including that Australian import true history of the Kelly gang mother soldier pan. You cost me you. Can that back a child? It is already traveling. Full tilt toward the men are would become. That's from the trailer for True History of the Kelly gang which is available to rent ondemand this weekend. The director is Justin Kerr. Zal who previously made twenty eleven the snow town murders than in two thousand fifteen. He did Macbeth. Which starred Michael Faster and Marion Cotillard? All three of them re teamed for two thousand sixteen assassin's creed now. Kelly gang is set in colonial Australia. Where Kelly and his group of anarchists violently rebel against their British rulers nineteen. Seventeen George MCI plays Ned Kelly. The film also stars Russell. Crowe Nicholas Holt Thomasson. Mackenzie and Charlie Hunnam so strong. Cast their Adam. You're able to get an early look at this one before. It's on demand release. Did the cast live up to. Its Promise House the film in general some of it definitely did in terms of the cast. This is actually my first. Kerr Zal film. Haven't seen any of the other three that you mentioned despite the fact that Michael Fast Bender has been in those two that you mentioned and I'm always down for Good Shakespeare Adaptation. I can't compare obviously this film the Kelly Gang to his adaptation of Macbeth specifically but there is a lot of the Scottish play in his telling of Ned Kelly. Se Davis from our beloved. The Baba Duke plays his mother in this film and she is not someone to cross. She's domineering she's vengeful. It's born from years of oppression as a woman and as an Irish woman living under English rule in Australia. You hear her in the trailer. Seda a young Ned. You're a man. Now you go out and show the world. This isn't a gentle mother's encouragement. It's an order and like Macbeth himself. As ned gets closer to his fate the matter he gets and that unhinged hallucinatory spirit is. What colonel taps into visually think about the late nineteenth century? We get in. John Hill coats the proposition as a counterpoint. This is not that at all. This is realism clashing with fantasy to the point where there are times in certain sequences and shots. Josh especially a recurring motif of a man riding a horse. That feels more like more door than the Bush way outside Melbourne. And so I've dropped Macbeth. I've dropped Lord of the rings throw in the assassination of Jesse James by the Coward. Robert Ford and the pop aesthetic of Sofia Coppola's Marie Antoinette. Except with punk instead and you get some sense of what watching the true history of the Kelly. Gang is really like which may sound really amazing to you and other people. Yeah I'm I'm hooked so far. Yeah it's definitely a lot and honestly it was a little bit too much for me. Wants so much to be this fiery sneer. That doesn't conform do conventional biography and it's full of these big ideas about colonialism and storytelling and masculinity and challenging gender and sexual norms. The gang the Kelly gang actually wears dresses for me. It's just all too much of a performance of assault to really embrace and actually MCI is part of it. He's a really intriguing presence and has an unsettling physicality that he definitely brings to this role. A presence was kind of all he was in nineteen seventeen. That's kind of by the design of that film and I haven't read anything about his performance but I wouldn't be shocked to learn that he went really method here that he he went so deep. And as I said there's there's an intensity to it there's a real physicality to it but he's burrowed so deep into it. So deep into Ned Kelly psyche that he never emerges for me and I can appreciate the audacity of what Kerr's doing here and his. I our first shot of young. Ned actually is him peering through a slit in his makeshift home while his mother is engaged in a sex act with a paying customer. That's a British officer played by Hunnam and then later at the end it is big showdown with authorities. He's wearing iron over his head for protection. With the sliver is is that matches that exact same point of view so crucial knows what he's doing absolutely and he does have a really game cast Russell. Crowe shows up for a little bit in this movie. And there's a lot of fun as outlaw. Who Basically pays for? He buys a young Ned as an indentured servant to teach him the trade. And I really like Nicholas Holt. In this movie. He shows up maybe about midway through as a really charming despicable and entitled English constable. Who BEFRIENDS NED in the family? Until the family decides that they're not going to subjugate themselves to him like he expects everyone to do so some juicy fund performances here and crystals definitely doing allot as I said in terms of the filmmaking sounds like there might even be a little bit of animal kingdom in there too with the mother son Dynamic and of course the Australians setting so I. I'm intrigued by those comparisons. We'll we'll have to see if the catch up with if it works a little bit better for me. The True History of the Kelly gang is available to rent on demand right. Now the new one you caught up with Josh is called Sela and the spades the directing debut of Theresa Poh. It had its debut back in January at Sundance and it came to Amazon prime. This past weekend in your letterbox review you wrote any movie that mixes the DNA of mean girls. Brick and schooldays has my attention. We're all over the place with our references in this show so far. Tell me more. Yeah this this could be a lazy short and in some ways doing this exercise. But I think it's it is really helpful in this case because those are great films with distinct styles each trying to do something that maybe you hadn't quite seen before done in that way and mixing it all together is really exciting. That also puts a ton of pressure on a relatively small film like Sela and the spades and so I don't know if it's the sort of pressure this movie can entirely bare but I like that. All of these elements are in here that the basic scenario is selling. The speights takes place at an elite boarding school and we follow the illicit dealings and also the the relationships among various student factions there called and each of these factions. They're essentially like criminal gangs. So Sela played by Lovey Simone. She runs the drug-dealing spades. And you know there are maybe some Macbeth Lady Macbeth specifically comparisons to make here in her ambition and the way she holds grip on power. She does take an underclassmen under her wing. But as we come to learn you know it may not be the most altruistic reasons that underclassmen played by Celeste O'Connor now both of those performances are really strong by Simone and O'Connor There are some good supporting turns to. I could see this being one of those smaller. First films where two or three of the actors in them and this happened with mean girls as well right pop up in later films and you really see what what great talents. They have their There's also the whole criminal element calls on brick of course that this is going on among high schoolers beneath the adults is. It's kind of amazing. How little the adults have to play in in this world And then there are some really striking flourishes by PLO as director. And here's where some of the the school days Spike Lee school days comparisons come in because Sela is also the head of the spirit squad for the school and they have a direct address to the camera routine just about what. It's like to be a seventeen year old

Kelly Gang NED Josh Ross Christopher Nolan Macbeth Sela Director Kerr Zal Adam Kanner Crowe Nicholas Holt Thomasson Australia Justin Kerr Insomnia Charlie Hunnam Al Pacino Larsen Robin Williams Chicago Justin Kurt Sel Jesse James
Mastering the Menopause with Emma Bardwell

Get Your Glow Back

06:57 min | 4 months ago

Mastering the Menopause with Emma Bardwell

"We're GONNA be talking today about menopause which is a topic that probably we talked enough about until it happens to US often. Vet Light you pelvic floor or things that until you have to get to know it. You don't speak our set so I felt like let's just start off with. What is menopause for those the Dayton Yup absolutely? So you're right. It's not talked about and it's particularly not talked about. I think for younger women such as yourself so in a nutshell it is when your period stops Meno poor say menstruation Meno pause stop. The average age is fifty one. And it's usually a kind of natural part of aging Bart for some women. It might occur earlier and that might be because of genetics or it might be because of surgery and how about Peri. Menopause is at the stage leading up to us yet so paramount applause is actually probably the most important bit of the journey. I think because that's when all the kind of symptoms tend to rare and it can be quite a long journey actually for lots of women. I think there's this real kind of misnomer that it happens in your fifties and it happens overnight whereas actually that lead up that parry menopause can last up to a decade island and I always women often particularly younger. Women feel really kind of freaked out by that so I think it's really important. We don't WanNa kind of catastrophe is it. It's a totally natural part of aging. It happens to every single woman but yet I think it's really important that we are prepared and more interested in that way we kind of dive. Deep into the subject could question. I think because I realized through my own journey. There's a real lack of evidence based information out there so there's lots of women who have been through the journey and so therefore kind of thing that they know everything about it but actually there's a lot of misinformation so I think it's really important for women to get their information from experts. You know people who are actually qualified and also I think women are really underrepresented when it comes to kind of health particularly things I research. There's not enough research being done so I think there's a lot of women floundering. It can be really isolating menopause. I just wanted to kind of turn on its head. I wanted to support women and I wanted women to realize that it's not kind of game over. It's very much a time to be kind of embracing the fact that you've reached this life stage because it's a real privilege to age to get to that point absolutely. I'm touting thirty tomorrow got Michigan very old and I feel like every year every better. Have I WANNA be kind to myself have more wisdom and everyone says that my step mom said to me she would never want to go back to her twenty s because she feels so much happy within herself as he got older and. I think that's really wonderful thing that comes with age and probably something. We need to embrace more and talk about more thing. Yeah I think that's a wonderful way of looking at it and I think for my clients who come see me. It's not just about nutrition or Zeiss style advice. It's actually about regaining a sense of identity. Because you know it's amazing time to be alive you'll middle-age midlife honestly and how about premature menopause? Because I was saying to you before I know a few people kind of distant need that have gone through menopause or menopause symptoms in their twenties. Which is like you said. The average ages fifty one to lose. And you saying kind of ten years before that. You don't think this is going to happen to you until your forties all year. So why are potentially people getting it early? What is the reasons behind that? We don't actually know. It can be genetics or it can be the result of something like chemotherapy or if women have had their ovaries removed. We don't know but the stats are surprisingly high. Actually so early. Menopause which is sometimes go premature. Menopause happens to one in one hundred women to that under the age of forty. So that's quite high her and then under the age of thirty one in a thousand women and then under twenty one in ten thousand while. It's still possible. You liked everything. How many people are on the planets that still quite few people experience absolutely. And how does that impact your ability when you become Perryman? Who is making you less likely to conceive or are you still able to? Who's you're still getting periods but maybe less frequently? Yes so premature ovarian insufficiency which is early menopause. Basically you can still get pregnant but your chances are much reduced so you can still be late. So that's something definitely to bury. Mike's I think a lot of women have a real sense of panic if they want to have children. So that's different something to talk to your GPA about but in your forties if you'll just naturally going through peri menopause. So your eastern levels are plummeting. The not necessarily plummeting but they're kind of on a rollercoasters. They can really kind of p control and that is when women often get symptoms but you can still get pregnant but your chances are reduced. Okay how Stephanie. Get to know and so what are the symptoms? What are they simply? We're talking about? You might be getting todd ten years or less onerous yes. Let's not testify. What are the physical symptoms? That's talk about them fast. I was thinking of hot. Flushes is the kind of hot flashes. And night sweats. A kind of the most obvious common ones but there are. I think it's thirty. Four symptoms are. I think that's actually probably more like seventy so in a really diverse kind of range of things from ACNE SA- changes in skin oversee sagging because eastern plays a big role in college and production. So often women find. Baskin is more lax. There is things like insomnia. That's a pretty common one but also the psychological things so things like memory loss brain fog just a lack of

Menopause Meno United States Dayton Insomnia Bart Michigan Baskin Midlife Perryman Mike Stephanie Todd
A Ward of the Probate Court

Big Book Podcast

09:23 min | 4 months ago

A Ward of the Probate Court

"Welcome back my friends to the big book podcast. My name is Howard and I'm an alcoholic sober since nineteen eighty eight one day at a time in this episode the Thirteenth Story from the personal stories section of the first edition of alcoholics anonymous published in nineteen thirty nine. It's entitled Award of the Probate Court and was printed only in the first edition of the big book. This relatively short story provides a glimpse of the formative years obey when old timers were those with two or three years sober but whose perseverance and dedication made possible a solid foundation for the entire a movement and now the original story award of the probate court at about the time. My graduation from high school a State University was established in our city on the call for an office assistant. I was recommended by my superintendent and got the position. I was rather his choice in pride but a few years later I met him in a nearby city and panhandle him for two bucks for drinks. I grew with the institution and advanced in position. I took a year off for ten minutes at an Engineering College at College. I refrain from any hilarious celebrating. Drinking War was declared. I was away from home on business at the state capital where my mother couldn't raise objections and I enlisted overseas. I was on five fronts from Alsace. Up to the North Sea upon relief from the lines back in the rest area being rouge and Cognac helped in the letdown from trying circumstances. I was introduced to the exhilaration of intoxication. The old spirit. What the Hell Heine may have you tagged. Didn't help towards any moderation in drinking then. We had many casualties but one of the real catastrophes was the lost of a POW. A lieutenant who died from the. Dt's over there after it was all over. This didn't slow me up and back in the states I had a big fling before returning home. My plans were to cover up with my mother and the girl I was to marry that I had become addicted to alcohol but exposed the fact on the day. Our engagement was announced on the way I met a training camp. Buddy got drunk and miss the party booze had got over. Its first real blow on me. I saw her briefly that night but didn't have the guts to face. Her people the Romance was over to forget I engaged in super active life and social fraternal and civic promotion of my community. This all outside my position. In the president's Office of the State University I became a leader. The big flash in the PAN are organized and was first commander of the American Legion Post. Raised funds and built a fine memorial. Clubhouse was secretary a belks. Eagles Chamber of Commerce City Club and active as an operator officer in political circles. I was always a good fellow and control my drinking indulging only in sprees and private clubs or away from home I was deposed from the executive position at the college by political change in the governorship of the state I knew the sales manager of Securities Division of a large utility corporation in Wall Street and started to sell securities the issues and the market were good and I had a fine opportunity. I was away from home and I began to drink heavily to get away from my drinking associates. I managed to be transferred to another city. But this didn't help booze had me. My sales and commissions diminished. I remained almost in a continuous stupor on my drawing account until I was released. I braced up got sober and made a good connection with the steamship agency. A concern promoting European travel and study at most all important universities in Europe. Those were the bathtub gin days and for drinking in about my office. I held out in this position for only a year. I was now engaged to be married. And fortunately I got another position as a salesman for a large corporation I worked hard was successful and my drinking became. I was married and my wife soon learned that I was no social drinker. I tried hard to control it but could not. There were many separations and she would return home. I would make pledges in a sincere effort and then my top would blow off again. I began here to take sanitarium treatments to satisfy my wife and my folks I had a great capacity for drink and work with the help of Turkish baths BROMO SELTZER ASPIRIN. I to the job. I became top notch or in the entire salesforce of the country. I was assigned to more special territory and finally into the market of keenest competition. I was top rate and salary one bonus awards and was bringing in the volume but there was always the drawback. My excessive drinking made at times I was called in once twice and warned. Finally I wasn't to be tolerated any longer. Although I was doing a good job I had lasted five and a half years. I lost my wife along with my job and find income. This was a terrible jolt I tried for a hookup but I had a black eye marring a good record. I became discouraged and depressed. I saw relief with booze. There began the four black years of my life. I had returned home to the community where I had been so prominent these were dry days still and I hung out at the clubs with bars. I got so I would last on a job but a few days just until I could get an advance for drinks. I began to get entangled with the law arrested for driving while intoxicated and drunk and disorderly conduct my folks heard of the cure at the state hospital. I was picked up drunk and sent there by the probate court. I was administered. Parral to hide and came to in receiving ward among lunatics. I was transferred to another word of less violent cases and I found a little group of alcoholics and junkers dope addicts. I learned from them the seriousness of being award of the probate court. I felt then if I ever got released. The old devil alcohol would never get me in a jam like this again in times of great distress. Such as this I would pray to God for help. I was fortunate and was released after eleven days and nights brought up in the laughing academy bughouse. That was enough. I wanted no more of it. I took a job as a manager of a club and put myself to the old acid test. I was going to really assert my willpower. I even tended bar part of the time. But never imbibed a bit. This lasted about three months. I went to an annual convention of my overseas division and came to locked up in a cheap hotel room. New shoes suit coat hat and purse missing. I must have slipped badly then followed much drinking in trouble. After a few arrests for intoxication the law decided another sojourn to the State Hospital would tame me. They jumped the stay this time from eleven days to eleven weeks. It was getting tough for me. I came out in good physical condition and held the fear of getting probate again thinking the siege might be eleven months. I got another job. Stay Dry for about two months and off to the races again. I became terribly weak. Couldn't eat and try to get nourishment from booze and mostly only bootleg that one time. I just made it to a hospital and another time. A police patrol took me to the hospital. Instead of jail. I suffered badly from insomnia as many as three shots in the arm had no effect I would get in shape and back at it again. I was going to battle to finish. The time came when I was to be paid. My soldiers bonus I had the limit or maximum coming friends. Advise my folks to send me to a veteran's hospital before I got this money in my hands. I was pro baited again. Held in a county jail for two weeks and sent again to the asylum. This was my summer resort for three months. I was on the waiting list for the Veterans Hospital but I got into such wonderful physical condition from eating and working out of doors that I was released. I reached home full of resentment against my folks for their having my money tied up in a guardianship I went out and got saturated and landed in jail. I had been free from the asylum for about eight hours behind the bars again. So soon this was bad however I was freed again the next day and this was my last confinement with the

Probate Court State University State Hospital Alsace Engineering College At College North Sea Superintendent Howard Europe Veterans Hospital Eagles Chamber Of Commerce Cit Insomnia DT Sales Manager Of Securities Di Bromo Secretary American Legion Post Salesman Commander
"insomnia" Discussed on Today in Focus

Today in Focus

03:55 min | 5 months ago

"insomnia" Discussed on Today in Focus

"<Music> <SpeakerChange> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> in the distance. <Speech_Female> Locusts worm can <Speech_Female> look like a black site <Speech_Female> then <Speech_Female> by the time you're in the middle <Speech_Female> of it. They're everywhere <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> on the grind <Speech_Female> air <Speech_Female> on plants <Speech_Female> trees. David <Speech_Female> got in my shoes. <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> The ones in Uganda <Speech_Female> Armitage. Were <Speech_Female> so close up <Speech_Female> there yellow and <Speech_Female> bigger than you'd imagine. <Speech_Female> I think <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> it's like nothing <Speech_Music_Female> I've ever experienced <Speech_Music_Female> before. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Female> The <Speech_Female> desert locust is <Speech_Female> actually type of grasshopper <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> accepted moves in <Speech_Female> swarms <Speech_Female> desert locusts. <Speech_Female> Cross the <Speech_Female> Red Sea last <Speech_Female> year coming <Speech_Female> to East Africa <Speech_Female> from Yemen. <Speech_Female> They've now reached <Speech_Female> at least eight. <Speech_Female> African countries <Speech_Female> including Somalia <Speech_Female> Kenya <Speech_Female> Ethiopia. <Speech_Female> Uganda sightsee <Speech_Female> non Tanzania <Speech_Female> and even <Speech_Female> the Democratic Republic <Speech_Female> of Congo <Speech_Music_Female> during <Speech_Female> Naito to be billions <Speech_Female> of locusts in <Speech_Music_Female> east Africa <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> a swarm <Speech_Female> of locusts covering <Speech_Female> one square kilometer <Speech_Female> contains <Speech_Female> foresee million <Speech_Female> locusts. That <Speech_Female> can eat the same <Speech_Female> food in one <Speech_Female> day as thirty five <Speech_Female> thousand people <Speech_Female> while <Speech_Female> two older locus. <Speech_Female> Don't do <Speech_Female> that. Which are mainly <Speech_Female> the type that are any <Speech_Female> staff. Got The moment <Speech_Female> they're laying <Speech_Female> eggs <Speech_Female> and so the new <Speech_Female> focus are GONNA <Speech_Female> be born from. Those <Speech_Female> eggs are <Speech_Female> likely to eat a <Speech_Female> lot more <Speech_Female> if not <Speech_Female> properly tackled <Speech_Female> the. Un is saying <Speech_Female> that the locusts <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> could multiply five <Speech_Female> hundred times by <Speech_Female> June so <Speech_Female> that could have terrible <Speech_Female> consequences for <Speech_Female> people's <SpeakerChange> food <Speech_Music_Female> livelihoods. <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> This is the biggest <Speech_Female> focus. Daybreak <Speech_Female> in most of the <Speech_Female> countries in east Africa <Speech_Female> in decades <Speech_Female> international <Speech_Female> organizations <Speech_Female> are calling for more <Speech_Female> money. Different <Speech_Female> governments <Speech_Female> sending people out with pesticide <Speech_Female> essentially <Speech_Female> in some countries. <Speech_Female> They have airplanes <Speech_Female> to do <Speech_Female> an in other <Speech_Female> countries. It's <SpeakerChange> just people <Speech_Female> on I <Speech_Music_Male> <Music> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> and Uganda. <Speech_Female> The government has deployed <Speech_Female> the army <Speech_Female> on day launch <Speech_Female> nighttime <Speech_Female> early morning operations <Speech_Female> while <SpeakerChange> the locusts <Speech_Female> sexy thing <Speech_Male> you <Speech_Male> know I want <Speech_Male> to look <Speech_Male> you have to make sure <Speech_Music_Male> that I <Speech_Music_Male> resent <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> your as <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> possible. Before <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Sunshine <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Com <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> you know the <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> oldest active <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> windy <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> audit but <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> when Sunshine Com. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> They <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> become more weight <Speech_Music_Male> and you may not <Speech_Male> actually do <Speech_Male> the work of <SpeakerChange> spring <Silence> in kiddy them. <Speech_Female> People <Speech_Female> have been speculating. <Speech_Female> About why this <Speech_Female> locus worm <Speech_Female> has happened now <Speech_Female> but the UN has <Speech_Female> said that <Speech_Female> it can <Speech_Female> be climate change related <Speech_Female> dot. They're <Speech_Female> helping abnormal <Speech_Female> rains. Which <Speech_Female> are good fruit <Speech_Female> locus to multiply <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> then also <Speech_Female> countries are getting hotter <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> and dot <SpeakerChange> so good <Speech_Music_Female> for locusts <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> for me. The surprising <Speech_Female> part about covering <Speech_Female> the story <Speech_Female> was that <Speech_Female> some of the people <Speech_Female> I interviewed <Speech_Female> some of the farmers. <Speech_Female> Omay seem <Speech_Female> quite excited <Speech_Female> about having seen <Speech_Female> the locusts <Speech_Female> locust recent <Speech_Female> thing that they had just <Speech_Female> heard about from their grandparents <Speech_Female> and freedom <Speech_Female> to get to see it <Speech_Female> was actually quite exciting <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> having said that <Speech_Female> the way <Speech_Female> they explained it is that <Speech_Female> this was just <Speech_Female> one of many climate <Speech_Female> related problems <Speech_Female> that they've been <Speech_Female> suffering from the past <Speech_Female> few years <Speech_Female> including dry <Speech_Female> particularly <Speech_Female> and so <Speech_Female> they're kind of getting <Speech_Female> used in a weird <Speech_Female> way to having <Speech_Female> to deal with these things. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Female> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> That <Speech_Female> was Sally Haydon. <Speech_Female> And that's all <Speech_Female> today <Speech_Female> my thanks to Simon <Speech_Female> Parkin and Sally <Speech_Female> Haydon. <Speech_Female> This episode was produced <Speech_Female> by Nikola Kelly <Speech_Female> Elizabeth Casson. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> And Courtney <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> USA sound <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> design was by <Speech_Music_Female> chambers and <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> Axel Cocoon <Speech_Female> <Advertisement> the executive <Speech_Female> producers. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I'll fill may not <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> aniko Jackson. <Speech_Music_Female> <SpeakerChange> We'll be back <Speech_Music_Male> tomorrow.

How Does Jet Lag Work?

BrainStuff

05:34 min | 5 months ago

How Does Jet Lag Work?

"GonNa talk about jet lag. I grew up flying back and forth between America and Singapore. So I wanNA share what I know about jetlag with you. First of all jet lag occurs when you travel between two or more time zones via air travel and the thing is it disrupts your circadian rhythm. Your body's natural cycle and you're sleeping patterns now. The Circadian Rhythm dictated by the daily appearance of the Sun. So light and darkness. Influence our bodies. But when this is disrupted it's official name is D- synchronous symptoms include insomnia fatigue loss of concentration irritability depression and even gastro intestinal ills but look jet lag or decent. Kronos is prevalent a nineteen ninety. Eight study found that ninety four percent of Americans get it and forty five percent reported that their symptoms were severe. So what causes jetlag? Well there is a whole field that exists to study how life is affected by time it's called chronobiology and here is what it's taught us. I late triggers a reaction in a special I pigment this activates response in the neurons of your brains hypothetical. Mus The twenty thousand nerve cells located. They're they're called the Super Cosmetic nucleus or S. C. N. for short are what starts your body's daily processes and also the lack of light causes other developments in your body. Circadian Rhythm tells you when to sleep and went awake and it regulates your body temperature blood pressure digestion urine production and hormone secretion so for example when it's time to sleep the SEM releases Melatonin and that encourages you to go to sleep when you cross into multiple timezones though your body has trouble resetting quickly and this is worse when you fly east. This is called phase advance. Flying West is called phase delay. This is because our circadian clock is actually closer to twenty five hours. Going East would require going to bed earlier. A study showed it takes four days to adjust to a twelve hour phase delay. In comparison. It takes more than eight days to adjust to a twelve hour phase advance and also jetlag is worse when you have to awaken when your body is still at its minimum temperature. There is also research from the Salk Institute for Biological Studies. The indicates jet LAG is connected to your L. H. x. One gene and this gene regulates neural development and Circadian Rhythm. And Sleep. Okay. So we've got what causes it. What are the symptoms? How do you know if you've got jetlag? Well it's time to talk to Dr Christian beyond the insomnia fatigue loss of concentration irritability depression and even gastro intestinal ills. There's even more symptoms. It can aggravate menstrual discomfort or contribute to the development of heart disease and diabetes jetlag also releases stress hormones. Which make you anxious and grumpy? It drives up your blood pressure. It sends inflammation stimulating chemicals here arteries it also disrupts your appetite regulating hormones. It disrupts the release of Melatonin which we mentioned earlier. Not only does this affect sleep but it can also protect you from cancer in finally research on animals shows that there's other symptoms as well. A twenty ten study at the University of California found that when subject to jetlag the brains of hamsters created neurons? At half their normal rate they showed memory and learning deficits. And a two thousand. Six study at the University of Virginia. Found that younger mice rebounded from jet lag but making older mice undergo the equivalent of a Washington to Paris flight. Every week would actually increase their death rate yet. That's how big it is well for mice at least so we've got what causes jetlag and we have it's symptoms. You're wondering Dr Christian where the remedies. How do I fix this? You've probably heard of some of the common remedies like operating on your new time zone before you fly there or wearing yourself out before exercising by exercising in two thousand nine researchers recommend the following regimen to beat jetlag. I you readjust your rhythm before the trip by using a light box that simulates daylight now depending on whether you're flying phase advance phase. Delay us the light box either. In the morning or the evening to stimulate your circadian rhythm another suggestion from the same researchers was to take a Melatonin supplement by changing when you take the doses in relation to going to sleep. You can alter your circadian rhythms the CDC actually recommends exercise to a balanced diet. And lots of rest in the weeks before you fly. They also recommend avoiding alcohol and Caffeine as well as drinking water. Finally they recommend wearing loose comfortable clothing. While you're flying and moving around the cabin this can help avoid thrombosis or blood clots so do not take sleep medication. So you can sleep it off in your seat. In mobilization for long periods can actually raise your risk for thrombosis and this can actually lead to a stroke. So there you have it. The causes symptoms and remedies for jetlag.

America Melatonin Dr Christian Singapore Salk Institute For Biological Insomnia Official Cancer Caffeine University Of California University Of Virginia Washington CDC Paris
There is so much we don't know about cannabis

Second Opinion

03:32 min | 6 months ago

There is so much we don't know about cannabis

"As best. We know one in. Eight of Californians smokes cannabis that puts California at position number ten in nine other states. People consume more of the drug. Alaska has the largest number of cannabis users followed by Vermont and then Colorado in the US. The number of marijuana users is nearly as large as current cigarette smokers. And as we've all heard cannabis in California is big business three billion dollars and that's just licensed sales given the huge us we know shockingly little about the real benefits of cannabis or about long-term harms most of what we heard growing up as teens turns out to be false. But that doesn't mean that there's not a lot more. We don't know old as any fifteen year old can tell you. Cannabis contains at least two active ingredients. Thc that's responsible for the high from marijuana and CBD Kenna by dial which may be an inflammatory and pain reliever both THC NCD can be smoked. Vaporized ingested applied as oils creams or patch is the route of administration is a key factor in determining how much of the drug is absorbed as doctor. I am not sure what conditions these drugs help. My patients claim. The drugs provide huge benefit for variety of conditions. Anxiety Insomnia blood pressure epilepsy addiction and more studies. Show that people with anxiety mood disorders and depression often self treat with cannabis to effectively manage symptoms with some opting for cannabis rather than antidepressants or mood. Stabilisers what we do know. Is that many of the drugs that doctors prescribe and some that are sold over. The counter have far greater dangers than cannabis products. What is urgently needed are studies that compare THC or CD in known doses to a placebo or other effective pills. Why because we know that about twenty? Five percent of people will claim benefit from a placebo drug. So the question becomes. Does the cannabis perform better than a placebo? We do know that. Heavy marijuana use can cause dependency which is very different from addiction. We also know that marijuana can impair judgement. Fine Motor skills pregnancy and certainly driving. But the dangers of cannabis are poorly understood. Cannabis is known to produce smoke with toxic gases which are then inhaled one. Very recent study published in Jama reviewed twenty-five moderately well conducted studies examining links between marijuana use and developing cancers in general. There were no or very weak associations with the development of cancer. It turned out that few people smoke only marijuana. Many also smoke. Cigarettes and the level of marijuana exposure is difficult to measure and reports from research subjects were biased because of their memory and recall but we really need to know more meaning. We need more research meaning. We need more federal funding to look at the risks and the benefits.

Cannabis Marijuana California Kenna Alaska United States Jama Vermont Colorado
Unlock Your Hormonal Advantage by Harnessing the Power of Your Infradian Rhythm with Alisa Vitti

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

08:43 min | 6 months ago

Unlock Your Hormonal Advantage by Harnessing the Power of Your Infradian Rhythm with Alisa Vitti

"I'M GONNA jump right in to hormonal advantage. You know a few weeks ago my girlfriend I were having a conversation and it was before she was about to get her period and she was basically in a state where I won't get into all the words but you can curse on this podcast. And so she was like the gist of it was like this does not feel like an advantage right now. This feels like a big weight and a lot of women have thought that before. Why us we go through all the stuff then the top of that the gender pay gap and this thing and that thing and it just feels like. There's a lot of huge burden. That's there on women but in your subtitle you say hormonal advantage. Tell us what's more. I just love that. You bring right to the beginning of this conversation. The cultural narrative and mythology that we're dealing with right. We have inherited a cultural narrative that says that our periods are hormones are a curse that they're problematic that their mysterious that they're unpredictable that they're problematic and that there's nothing to be done and that you're going to enter the mythology is going to be painful and they're going to have symptoms and there's just nothing you can do. Just bide your time until menopause right. That's that's pretty much you know in the nutshell so to speak the narrative that we have the problem with this is a. It's not based on real science. Be It it. Perpetuates a huge behavioral problem for women which has them basically when you believe that something is supposed to be broken when you see it as broken you then do what you take no action right so puts them in in this situation where they don't think that there's anything to do and then they do nothing which then keeps them having symptoms. It's a vicious cycle. So you know it feeds then. It goes right back and feeds this cultural narrative this mythology. That says it's going to be a burden. It's going to be a big problem and women just feel stock and they feel unhappy and the truth of it is. It's completely false. It doesn't to be this way And and I figured out a way for women to liberate themselves from the mythology from the cultural narrative and also from the actual real symptoms to which you're so excited to share about. I can't wait to get into it. Let's talk origin story. Yeah what got you interested in this topic. And what education were you brought up with? And when did things shift for you? Okay so I mean for me I definitely have had my own run in with a hormonal issue That opened my eyes to the limitations of conventional medicine for chronic. Gyn issue so there. I was you know At Johns Hopkins planning to become an Obgyn and had sort of the apex of symptoms. With what I now at what? I now know to be the polycystic Ovarian Syndrome that no one knew that I had so you know at that time for at least seven years. I went undiagnosed I grew up in Massachusetts. I had access to Harvard trained gynecologists than of course at Hopkins. I had access to Hopkins trained gynecology. I had the best of the best and I went undiagnosed for seven years when I finally was able to get a diagnosis. It was through helping my gynecologist by bringing her a report from a medical journal that I had pulled out of the library at school to that had identified all the symptoms that I was having and I said I have this Kendra is what could you share. What the symptoms were. All I had I was. I was fifty pounds heavier than I am. Now I saw had obesity. I was covered face chest and back and cystic acne. I did not meant straight from the age of twelve to twenty two. I had maybe five bleeds two of which were chemically induced with synthetic progesterone. Which if anybody has done that knows that it is delicious experience and so you know it was and I was anxious depressed. Insomnia cle was a mess. Couldn't really function in my day to day. Life with any sort of regularity predictability. I would never know today going to be a day when I had energy was. I going to be in a good mood It was kind of a really negative scary isolating experience And then all the physical symptoms certainly didn't make anyone feel good about themselves. So you know in one of my insomnia coll- nights at the library. I like any young woman in her. Twenty s we do on a Friday night or Saturday night I was like researching medical journals in obstetrics turtles to figure out what was wrong with me because no one had any answers. Everyone was just saying. I'll just go on the pill and that'll solve these problems and I said but you don't even know what the problem is. They said that's true but we should try this anyway and I just didn't feel like that was good medicine for me to to without a known cause take medication for no accurate reason. I believe in more precision kind of based medicine so I found this journal this obstetrics journal and there was a little tiny article about The Stein Leventhal disorder that described my symptoms to a t and all the bells rang inside of my head and I said Oh my gosh this is what I have so i. I waited in the parking lot of my gynecologist office the next morning. She was literally like walking in with her coffee. And just like what are you doing here and I said well you know what I'm doing here is that I would like us to do to specific tests that we have not yet done that. I think will lead us to the conclusion that I have this disorder and she was intrigued enough and gracious enough without having an appointment to do these tests and was able to confirm my diagnosis that. In fact I did have polycystic ovaries and politico very syndrome. And when I I? I was so excited drew like Oh my goodness after years of confusion and dead ends and no answers to have something on a name for it. It was very validating since identity that I'm just crazy right. I'm not something actually going into something going on and I said excellent and I said so now what you know which is sort of like the new Englander in me like now. What do we do? Let's take action and she said well. Unfortunately there isn't really much that we can do for you. This is incurable. And you know we can. You're going to continue to have problems. The obesity that you have today is going to get worse. It might turn into diabetes You will have problems with fertility you may not be able to have children You will have an increased risk of heart disease and cancer. And I'm twenty at this time getting this prognosis after the diagnosis and asking for what support. My Medical Support Team was going offer me and she said we really just don't have anything we can. Just medicate your symptoms along the way and hope for the best but there's nothing that we can do and it was in that moment which I you know. You don't plan for these things. I wasn't like looking to react to particular way I was. It was all happening real time. But in that moment this very specific loud voice or see you know. I don't know how exactly to describe. It was just like that's not your future. An internal wisdom. Good way to describe it and I just repeated that to her. I said that's not my future. So he goes. I was terrified was very terrifying moment to just have to be facing this and so I just repeated what this voice was saying she said well what are you gonNA do. I said I'm going to go take my very expensively trained mind and figure this out and she said well. I'll be here when you want the prescription for the pill and first of all you chase me down on the Paparazzi me. And then tell me. I'M NOT GONNA listen. It was great you were forging your own journey so what happened from there. So that's I proceeded to really get deeply more into the research around functional nutrition epigenetics chronobiology Chinese medicine and really started piecing together what the endocrine system needs to be brought back online. Because fundamentally what I discovered in my research was that most of these conditions these castaway. Gyn conditions like fibroids like Dimitrius like P. C. O. S. Where there's nothing really that we have from conventional medicine to help women like us. That's why I called him castaway because we're kind of like left to figure it out. Is that this. They're fundamentally caused by systematic disruption. And if you simply start to support the endocrine system the body resolves the symptoms and it just works so efficiently and safely across the board for these different conditions. And that's that's really the origin story of my transformation. It was amazing to watch my body. Just recover fifty pounds coming off without deprivation without intense workout my skin clearing up and my ovulation and my cycle coming back. It came back at twenty two and has not left yet.

Obesity Menopause Cystic Acne Massachusetts Harvard Johns Hopkins Hopkins Progesterone Insomnia Stein Leventhal Medical Support Team Dimitrius P. C. O.
Minding Mental Illness with Esmé Weijun Wang

Unladylike

09:14 min | 6 months ago

Minding Mental Illness with Esmé Weijun Wang

"I really wanted to be able to be seen as high functioning and I wanted to be able to be seen as normal and if people found out about my diagnoses. I wanted them to see me as like. Eah The person who had this serious diagnosis but who also graduated from Stanford with a three point nine. Gpa So it scared me that. I had these symptoms that I couldn't control ninety minute. All and welcome to One lady like they show that finds out what happens when women break the rules. I'm Kristen I'm caroline. And that was today's guest as May wage and Wang author of the New York Times bestselling essay collection. The collected Schizophrenia Carolina. I've been wanting to talk to as may for a while now. I stumbled across her a couple of years back when I was going through a scary mental health period of my own. As I mentioned before on unladylike I have generalized anxiety disorder and at that time like on paper. Everything looked good. You know but I was spiraling on the inside and it was honestly so unsettling that I didn't know how to talk about it and I didn't WanNa talk about it or not. I think I was scared. That talking about it would make it feel even more real and it felt like a burden. I didn't WanNa put on anyone else like. I just desperately wanted to figure out how to get myself back together. And that's actually how I ended up on as May's website. It's called the unexpected shape as basically all about getting your creative work done while also living with mental or physical illness and I was just so struck by how openly she talks about having a serious mental illness. Yeah in her. Mid Twenties as May was diagnosed with schizophrenia disorder which she describes as the fucked up offspring of manic depression and schizophrenia is almost like a demon that takes over a person The schizophrenia causes a person to no longer be themselves whereas depression and anxiety think are often considered to be quite awful but they are more considered to be things that are layered on top of a person. You know there's something that somebody is dealing with. they're not something that takes over or empties out a person or places. The spirit of a person in the collected schizophrenia is as may details her journey to what she calls the inappropriately crazy end of the Mental Health Spectrum Aka. A the most unladylike end and she's far from alone there an estimated one hundred thousand five. Americans live with serious mental illness or SMS. The most common ones are schizophrenia. Spectrum disorders severe bipolar disorder and Severe Major Depression. But as may also occupies a very particular space on that unladylike end of the spectrum. She doesn't fit. What we think schizophrenia. Looks like you know. She's not visibly unhinged or unkempt. She's a Yale and Stanford educated award-winning writer. Who's married her? College sweetheart has plenty of friends and frankly dresses. She gives fog. She does and I was really drawn to this idea of someone who is killing it on the outside all the same time. Her mental illness is sort of escalating on the inside. So today we're talking with asthma about navigating serious mental illness. How it shapes her ambition and why wanting to be seen as high functioning is so important to her and quick note. Y'All we're getting into serious mental health issues in this episode including psychosis in suicidal idealization. So heads up. If you're sensitive to those topics only as I grew up in Michigan and was raised by her Taiwanese immigrant parents. She started reading at two and wanted to be a writer by the time. Most kids are learning to tie. Their shoes. Baby was not messing around when she was about six as me. Sent a letter to the publisher. Little Brown asking how she could get her works in print already and they actually wrote me. Back I remember. They wrote me back the types letter typewritten letter and they said I needed an agent. So yeah I I've I've wanted to be a writer for a very long time. That's funny to tell a child that you need an like yeah. I've imagining some kind of like intern or assistant just thinking like you know. How should I respond to this kid? But alongside her big writing dreams. Sba had to deal with extreme evolving and often completely mysterious mental health issues and they also started when she was really young. When I was four or five I remember having issues where I would just filled with anxiety in compulsion. I remember this one evening where I was going to get up and get a drink and then we go to the bathroom and then I would feel like I needed to go to bed and get a drink and then go to the bathroom and I did this over and over again. Compulsively fan ended up standing at the top of the stairs and I just burst into tears and my mom said why are you crying and I just said I can't stop with puberty. Came depression anxiety and insomnia. By the time she was a teenager as me was having suicidal thoughts inserted seeing the high school counselor and at some point. She told me you're going to have to see a psychiatrist. This is getting really serious and so one morning. I told my mom before school. I've been seeing a counselor and she thinks that I need to see a psychiatrist and Mommy yelled at me. She was so upset so angry. She said we've always given you everything you've needed. You have close to where you have food. Who have a roof over your head? How could he do this to us? And I. I remember crying in the car on the way to school and crying I skipped first period and I was just crying in the art room. Eventually as May and her mom went to see the psychiatrist together he was a white man and he asked my mom in front of me. Is there any history of mental illness in the Family? Which is a very ordinary question to ask in this kind of like diagnostic meeting. And my mom said no. There's no history and I learned years later that there was quite a strong history of mental illness. My family and I asked my mom. Why did you tell that first doctor that there was no history of mental illness and she said In Chinese essentially wall? It wasn't his business and I think that kind of cultural stigma was a lingering factor throughout all of my diagnoses. Her diagnoses plural started with clinical depression and anxiety then the summer after as graduated from high school. She was exhibiting enough signs of mania that our psychiatrist diagnosed her with bipolar disorder. And my mom was just like okay. She didn't know what it meant. Really she told me years later that if she had really understood what it meant she wouldn't have let me go to school especially not across the country and not by myself as May was eighteen and a couple of months later she left home in California to start her freshman year at Yale. Now as many psychiatrists recommended that she wait to start taking her new bipolar medication until she got settled. Yale and could start working with someone there. This meant that there was a stretch of months whereas may was dealing with the stress of starting college and experiencing bipolar symptoms. That delay was the first domino to fall. That ultimately resulted in as May being hospitalized at the Yale Psychiatric Institute twice her first year there after the second time Yale sent packing then in her early twenties after she'd restarted her college career at Stanford as me began experiencing intermittent symptoms of psychosis. Psychosis is either hallucinations. So false sensory experiences hearing bang seeing things feeling things physically in the actually hearing things like you hear them as though they're actually there and then delusions are false

Stanford Writer Psychosis Collected Schizophrenia Caroli Yale Anxiety Depression Bipolar Disorder New York Times Kristen I Wang Yale Psychiatric Institute School Counselor Intern Little Brown SBA Michigan Publisher
Steve Albarran CEO of Confident Cannabis on Transparency, Lessons from Big Data, Chemotypes, Market Trends

The Curious About Cannabis Podcast

06:08 min | 6 months ago

Steve Albarran CEO of Confident Cannabis on Transparency, Lessons from Big Data, Chemotypes, Market Trends

"Everybody this. This is Jason Wilson with the curious about cannabis podcast. Thanks so much for tuning in once again. Today I'm joined with my friend and CEO of confident cannabis. Steve Auberon Ron. Thanks Steve for being willing to chat with me today. Thank you good to be on. Yeah totally so I know by now. There's probably a lot a lot of people in the canvas industry. That are familiar with confident cannabis. But there's still plenty of people out there that are maybe just now starting to hear about the platform and some of the worked. You're trying to do so. Do you mind just briefly. Going into what confident canvases and why he started. And we'll spinoff from there. Sure so we started the company somebody about four years ago to try to help solve what we think. Is the biggest problem in the cannabis industry. which is that businesses? Have a hard time doing business with one another so. Cultivators and retailers have a hard time finding each other assessing each other quality of inventory and actually fulfilling transactions so that the problem is what we set out Saul we started by building a lab testing platform that we gave to labs for free or very cheap to acquire the supply side site of the market And once the inventory information is available we make that available to the buyers on the platform who are licensed retailers distributors or manufacturers. Good analogy might be auto trader plus Carfax for cannabis cool. Okay yeah that's A. That's a really good analogy and and basically what your platform is doing is essentially Bringing a lot more transparency to the industry itself as as well yeah yes the mission or vision that we that we set out to achieve the real reason why it's hard for businesses to trade trade with one another because there's a lack of transparency. There's a lack of information about the inventory quality. What's out there who's making it what it's made up And so bringing green conspiracy to cannabis's sort of our tagline because Without knowing what's being made who makes it and what it's made of nationwide in real time and businesses can transact in operate in transparency. Yeah and what got you interested in trying to provide the service to the industry. Yeah Yeah so When when my co founder Tony and I were thinking about starting a company of the cannabis industry together together? We basically just asked operators what problems they had so rather than rather than come up with an idea and go see if it works We had the opposite. We said we'RE NOT GONNA come up with an idea yet. We're just GONNA ask a lot of questions and find a problem and then we'll solve that problem in if we're successful doing on a business will come out of it and so we basically spent nine months Getting on planes going into retailers cultivation facilities saying what's hard for you. When was the last time that there there was a problem that you wish you could saw? You don't know how And we kind of collect it all that feedback and you know the common things came up. You know payments and banking A- access things like that that we didn't think that we are best suited to solve the other bill. The other problem that came up over and over was that it's really hard to stop my shelves with consistent insistent high-quality supply or it's really hard for me to stand out from the crowd when selling my inventory or as a as a patient. I'm looking for a very specific chemo. Typer you know chemical composition to to address my insomnia anxiety. My pain whatever they might be and I don't know how to find it. I found something that I like once but I can't find it again how I do. I do that so All that together. Let us the realization. While you know cannabis is highly complex. It's highly opaque And it's highly variable all right. It's not a commodity where flowers the same as the other flower. It's very much not a commodity. And so to bring that information to the forefront front. We needed to partner with with testing labs and we saw that you know. There are a handful of labs in the in the country's Info at the time there were about fifty David out two hundred good labs and which is a relatively small market and they're completely underserved. Nobody's building software for them so opportunity to help them out and tapis of software for free and they start using it and then that's what allows us to You know reveal that information to the market Nice. Yeah Yeah Yeah what. What year was it that that all started because I remember when I was in the candidates testing space? We're one of the first labs to try to really the early iterations of of canvas. What year was that? Those two thousand fifteen. Yeah so we we. We formed a company inmate that the team. And then we. We launched our first customer in Oregon in October. And I think I think you are probably customer number five something like wow yeah. Yeah we've come a long way since then. Yeah I know I noticed the very recently You you launched a marketplace feature For confident cannabis. So when I was using confident cannabis it really was just Primarily lab service stuff stuff and trying to figure out how to get consistent data. I think you know into that database and figuring out what to do with it and and now it looks like you're actually connecting buyers and sellers together partnered with that data. So it's been really cool to watch that evolution four years we haven't we haven't committed or or you know it's not sort of a new idea. We kind to be as open about our plans as possible from the very beginning But you know tickets a good solid three years to get to step two of the vision. which is the marketplace side of things And it's because we were talking about. Hey we're in this lab thing because we're going to marketplace one day and three years people didn't believe us but it feels good to finally do what we said we're GONNA do.

Cannabis Steve Auberon Ron Jason Wilson CEO Saul Chemo Insomnia Co Founder Oregon Partner David Tony
Sleep & Parenting with Therapist Christine Lawler

Babes and Babies

03:28 min | 6 months ago

Sleep & Parenting with Therapist Christine Lawler

"Right. Everyone have Christie lawler here. And she is the peaceful sleeper. She's a marriage and family therapist and asleep specialist. She's passionate about helping MOMS feel more empowered in parenting and a huge part of that is getting some rest and I would argue just a huge part of feeling empowered in your life in general is getting some good rest so thank you so much for being here Kristie. I'm so excited for what you have to say in offer everyone listening listening so thank you. Thank you so much for having me. I'm excited yes so I'd love for you. I guess to kind of tell us in your own words. What exactly you do and how you got into to it? Yeah so I'm marriage and family therapists have been doing this for ten years. And even before I had babies I was realizing all the time that my clients that were the most stuck the ones that were the most depressed the most anxious the most annoyed with their spouses where it felt like nothing was really shifting. Those were the clients that had the biggest sleep problems and as an insomnia sufferer myself and a perfectionist. I hated that my answer would like. Oh yes sleep is hard Let's talk about the the real stuff and so I went ahead and I got trained to treat chronic insomnia and that's where I learned not surprisingly but kind of surprisingly that eighty eighty percent of people with mental health problems have underlying sleep issues. Wow which is so huge and I realize like oh my gosh. The key to mental health and wellbeing is getting good sleep and then fast forward. I had babies of my own and struggled with postpartum depression. But I knew ooh that it was because I was sleep deprived and then anyway fast forward. I delve into everything that could about sleep training. I kind of hated it as a therapist and like I said as perfectionist. I hated it that so many of the books in resources were very mom shaming. I felt like everything was very like fear. Fear driven. Like if you don't do it this way then you're crafty parent and then somebody else's like no no you don't do it this way. Then you're a crappy parent and I was like I wanna be a really good parent and I don't know how to do it but I know that I need sleep and I know that my baby needs sleep and so I kind of figured out my own method blending in all of them together and then I had another baby and it worked again and I was helping my friend sleep train. Their babies and I kind of realized like wait. Maybe I'm onto something that I can be voice in the space. That says sleep is really really really important. I research detachment for years. That's another thing that kind of drove me. Nuts is so many people were like fostering unhealthy sleep habits and the name of good attachment which just wasn't correct. I feel like a lot of moms now with all the resources versus. We have an all this stuff on the Internet. We can get really overwhelmed and kind of go into a rabbit hole of mom shame and fear and so anyway I just. I don't know I kind of realized that I wanted my voice in the space to help. MOMS feel empowered and really restore the the magic of motherhood. That comes when everybody is resting. Well 'cause like like that. I battled with postpartum depression and being tired tired and exhausted and looking at my sweet perfect little baby but not feeling that magic feeling guilty about it and I realized like the magic totally totally came back when I had good sleep

Christie Lawler Insomnia Kristie
"insomnia" Discussed on Chat Sematary

Chat Sematary

11:41 min | 7 months ago

"insomnia" Discussed on Chat Sematary

"But you can't stop himself because he just is so outraged by this injustice and this this hurt that's been perpetrated against this person Helen Helen who he obviously cares a lot for I get the impression he kind of like loves her like a daughter by the end of the book and that is such a a brave thing for him to do and King deals. It deals a lot in abuse in particular domestic violence against women. Dan and he's never afraid to show it be really terrible and show people being incredibly upset about it and that is you know. That's the reaction they should have. And Ralph is His his voice in this is very powerful. I think and his sacrifice for for Natalie just makes the character even more of a powerful presence in this story because he's clearly nearing the end of his life funeral. Anyone who is over seventy year always kind of like Oh boy you know. We've hit that spot where you're not really sure how much time someone has left in the fact that Ralph has sort of been given this second life so to speak by serving this purpose. I think is something that makes him feel like a younger character than he is by the end especially when he makes that sacrificed for Natalie right and that set up so well so well okay like the setup for it where he refuses to choose. He refuses to choose between saving the little boy that this is all about out and saving his surrogate granddaughter and daughter is just kind of casually tossed off like it's just mentioned like Oh so the promise the agreement and then it's a you know the final scenes of the book and it is like it comes back acteal like whole damn. That's right. What's what was the promise? What were the details of this promise because it never really goes into it? It's you know it said that. Atra roasted going to cause an accident for Natalie. But how they're going to stop. That is never mentioned at that time. We don't find that out until the very end and and that it was like a even though I read this book a couple times. There was this dawning realization of what was what was coming and it was like. Oh Oh my heart. 'cause I felt like froth sacrificed a lot man. If he should get more than like five or six years you you really do feel for his character at the end and yours stole grateful for sort of this time he was was able to have even though you know. We're just the readers of the story and I really just like how his character arc went from from start to finish. I didn't see any real flaws with that part of the story and like I said a lot of the reason. I didn't like like this as much as you did was. Because of the elements that I just didn't have enough knowledge about you understand better and I feel like with fantasy compound to happen because at least with something like you know Harry Potter. A lot of it was just completely made up. which is wizards words? And you know. Obviously there's a lot of Lord behind those things and same goes for Lord of the Rings. I felt like the stories themselves. Were just a little easier for me to understand Dan and obviously one being kid series of books plenty of adults like them and Lord of the rings being something a little deeper than that. Those are sort part of the main two that I am familiar with an honestly I have not read all of the Lord of the rings books so a lot of what I know comes from the movies which maybe isn't the best place to get all of my information from Oto. They're very good. I've read the Lord of the Rings Series Like Seven Times until I've read the Hano the movies the hop it is great but the Lord of the rings the Three Fellowship. Two hours in return of the king are really dense. And they're amazing seizing but they are not for everyone starting to see a theme of tower here in fantasy. Yes yes there's lots of towers and fantasy novels. There's a tower castles. Yes lots of castles. Lots of keeps Yeah I think there is a lot of I don't know what's the word tropes. That's the word tropes in fantasy like towers that King kind of taps into this book book a little bit. Yeah if you don't have that pre knowledge I think this one is definitely one where he doesn't do a lot of hand holding in usually in his books. He's a little more doc explanatory and in this one I think he kind of just throws you into it and says figure it out if more in the shadows in comparison Harrison to a lot of the other things he's written as far as the dark tower goes but it was definitely interesting to kind of think through this after the fact and be like. Okay I kinda see where this went. I think I ended up giving this a three out of five overall which isn't horrible. It's just it wasn't one of my favorite things because because I didn't understand it right off the bat so is there anything else you want to bring up before we go. I did one talk about dairy. Just a little bit and like okay. What what was it like for you going back to dairy because I think this is the first book since it that set in dairy and that we really on picture of it and since dairy it's such a a big part of it you know it's a character in and of itself out? Did you feel going back. and seeing essentially the the ramifications of what the end of it is or what the the ending of it brings. I was kind of nervous because like I said I didn't know if there were going to be more connections beyond bringing up Mike Hanlin a few times names and if you know something weird was going to happen in there were like remnants of pennywise still which I think would have been interesting in a sense because then it it would mean. The story wasn't completely over and given how much people love that story. I'm surprised Kingdon. Do something along those lines but just to see the town in how it's not in the best of shape. It's kind of like you know not to the extent of the aftermath of carry Gary but maybe to the extent of the aftermath of needful things for castlerock. That's kind of what it felt like to me. It's like okay. This town just had this major. The thing happen and it's going to take a long long time for it to get back to normal if it ever does yes. That's how I felt too. It's like the the needful things comparison that was totally how I felt like. Oh this is you know. It's picking up the pieces and there's not very many pieces left you know it's kind of trying to like cold water in a sieve. Almost and I just I really liked that. He said it dairy. Because of if you've read it you have all this history behind it and you know what Ralph has experienced at least a little bit. 'cause seventy I was trying to figure out how old would he have been during Penny wise because I think he would have lived through at least two cool. Pennywise yes and so yeah because I believe it ended in like eighty five and before that it was like fifty eight so he he would have definitely been alive for both of these given that this came out in ninety four he would have been you know in his twenties. I believe in fifty fifty eight and then twenty seven years later closer to his fifties give or take right and so that means you probably wasn't right in the path of pennywise but I do think it would have meant that he was maybe alive for the The big massacre that happens in the middle of the street so I thought that was. It's really interesting to kind of think back about what would these people's lives have been like and they talk about playing on knee built street. Yeah in the old train yard and it was just. It was so many interesting little recalls. There is the mentioned With ed deep nose ring. That feels like it's been invested with all all this poisonous energy that falls into the sewers and he has this line about like it wasn't found for a long time but things that go into the sewers and dairy. We have an unpleasant way of coming back or something like that and it was like ooh Chill Ana. Yeah yeah I thought that was just a another layer of interesting background that we get this other. This glimpse of dairy without it like you said directly tying into pennywise it gives us a good sense of what what the town has become like. And you don't need to know or have read it before reading this necessarily just to get the sense that this town has been went through a lot and I liked that. He makes that obvious in this. Because it's hard when you have so many different connections in the Stephen King Universe. I believe I've showed you that crazy poster where it's just like lines going to every single thing and you're just like this is way too many connections actions to keep up with an. I know one of my goals with this podcast was to read through everything chronologically and sort of see what I could see reading everything so closely together because like I said for anyone who is following his career from the start they had much longer waits between books. I'm basically just doing doing one right after the other. There are very few times during this process where I have not been reading I king book so it's just kind of like one after the other so even though I feel like in some ways that might be a little bit of a hindrance just because I have to go through them so quickly I mean I don't have to I'm choosing to but it's one of those things where it's interesting what I've caught onto and what I've maybe missed with some of the connections. Yeah Yeah you gives you an interesting perspective love and that's something. That probably aren't a whole lot of people who have it. who were living at as it happened? You know I'm sure they're not more than a few people who owe new king book out after read it given how much money he's made. And how many books he sold. There's multiple multiple people who've done that yes but to catch every single boat and read every single one and the same order. That's a that is a feet or two rather catch every single king related products. Because you're not just reading the books. You're watching yeah most of the movies. Those children are the corns are. We've brushed those off now. I have one more and then I'm done. Yes what more than I'm done with those by It's one of those things where there's just so much volume that there are some people who don't like fantasy so they aren't going to read the dark tower series but the read these other books not realizing they tie in with the dark tower and I know some people who like fantasy. But don't Mike Horror so they only read the dark tower books so I think king offers this flexibility where you don't have to like everything. He does to be a fan of some of his writing right right. He makes he tries to. I'm sure it's not. He tries to like the stories that come to him can be for everyone or you can just read something like you know. The Green Mile like the Green Mile.

Natalie Ralph King Dan Helen Helen Green Mile Stephen King Universe Three Fellowship froth Harry Potter Mike Hanlin Mike Horror Harrison Gary Penny
"insomnia" Discussed on Chat Sematary

Chat Sematary

13:57 min | 7 months ago

"insomnia" Discussed on Chat Sematary

"I had no idea about the ties to the dark tower. But I'm reading rose madder now and it's like that is also kind of tying into the dark tower so there are more dark tower books than King has labeled essentially. Because you have the stand. You have this then you have rose matter almost immediately after this or immediately after this actually I think and then who knows how many more of his books will have these little tidbits but I feel like with insomnia. You're getting even more important information than maybe what we get from the stand about the dark tower. Yes and I have been told that 'cause I again haven't read the last book this ties in incredibly heavily with the last book like it is. It is something that you should read if you're reading the dark tower series. That's kind of how it's important side material will say because it gives you more background. But the connections to the tower kind of very slowly creep in and I wonder what someone would think if this is like the first Steven King Book they picked up like I feel like I. I would feel bad if you've been reading king for a long time like even if you've never read any of the dark tower books like you're kind of aware of the tower as thing and you've seen scene Rowland mentioned because he's mentioned couple times in this one never in any real capacity but he's talked about and you've heard mentioned mentioned. You've you've seen other things in that kind of hint that there's some other bigger world going on in the background of all of kings books but if this this when you like. Why do I care about this kid? Who's what's what so but if you've read any of his other stuff like I feel like this is a really rewarding read in not because of how how it manages to take the dark tower mythos and bring it into his other books and help it? really flesh out wrote how diverse works like you said like the tower has the levels and this gives a different metaphorical reading on what at those levels are and how the tower exists in all dimensions. I guess that's the word we'll go dimension. I feel like that's the only word that might suffice. Because when it comes to the fantasy elements of kings storytelling. Fantasy isn't necessarily my in January. I mean the most I've dug into fantasy really is like Harry Potter and Lord of the Rings and some of Neil gaiman stuff so it's not like I'm An avid fantasy reader by any means I got into king because of his horror elements and I felt enough of that in this book for it to kind of keep me wanting wanting to figure out what happens at the end but I feel like because I've only started the dark tower and I don't really know how this ties in yet. It made it a little less enjoyable for me if that makes any sense because now I'm kind of like okay. Well did this story serve any purpose other than serving as a connection to the dark tower or is it just one of those things working was like. Oh Hey I have all these dark tower stories in mind so let me just give you a random piece and not label it as dark tower book. Yes I can totally see that 'cause I think how well the ending works for you and like the the under arching structure of why the story is happening because you're right. This is very much a on a certain level. This is very much a explanation of of character in the dark tower But it's also like a story about Ralph because the story is indirectly about the person. It feels like it's kind of trying to work at two purposes. You know trying to like tell two stories at the same time almost and it. It's really going to depend on how it works for you because I liked it but I do read a lot of fantasy novels. I went through a period of reading a lot of epic. Fantasy like big tomes So it wasn't that they do that a lot and fantasy books. That is not unusual usual to have kind of multiple purposes going in a story so for me it was like. Oh Okay I see. We're we're trying to world build and tell a whole complete story and it's a real tossup of how it's GonNa work for the individual. Yeah because the grounded rounded parts of the story certainly take place in dairy so then you're like okay. Maybe this has more than just the connection with Mike aac being part of the story and then it Kinda doesn't go that direction and once the Greek mythology came into and I was like I don't know any of these names so there's probably probably a lot that I'm missing here so I'm glad that you have clarified some of that for me and then the character in question for the Towers Patrick Danville and he appears in this book and then in the dark tower which is book seven of the series. which you said is the last book? It's not the last published book but the one after as like a space between books four and five so you know he just really stood out of order for whatever reason but as far as I know that is at the end of the dark tower series. So the fact that I'm going to now have to wait like I don't know twenty more books. Take before I get to that. I don't I think it's twenty but it's pretty close so I have quite some time before I'm going to get to it. And that's probably how people who read these books as they were being released felt because there's a huge gap between this and that dark tower book right and I mean this was ninety. This was published in nineteen ninety four and was was the dark tower. Like you said like twenty bucks and I mean I think this this would have been after the fourth one but before the big rush of the last three that it happened because he didn't publish any dark tower books for quite some time and then he had learned three back to back to back right and I think that was the from what I've read. I think I think it's an on writing. He talks about that he realized like Oh shit I better finish the series right right right and so there's at least ten years if not more space between this and the last star tower. So it's it's very very interesting to me that this character has been was set up so long in advance because it would have been weird if he didn't didn't use it but that's a lot of setup for something that doesn't come to fruition for an incredibly long period of time and from the From what the the apropos season. Not Atra Pos close and leases. Tell him like. It's kind of clear after that king knew what he was going to use this character for. It wasn't just like oh well we'll just tell this interesting story. It's like he had a plan of like okay. This character. Patrick has this purpose that he needs to get taken care of. So we'll tell the story of his life being saved so he can fulfill that purpose. Yeah and you were right. It was ten years so book six and seven both came out in two thousand four and five came out in two thousand three so he really just like cranked out the material. And from what I can tell from the gunslinger booking knew what story he was going to tell because in the early books he kept saying and you know the story will continue so obviously he had this idea in his head for years upon years because the gap between the gunslinger being released in eighty two all the way to the series quote unquote ending in two thousand and four. That's a big gap. That's a Lotta years twenty two years and then you have the wind through the keyhole which came out even later in twenty twelve so to really get get the entire story. People had to wait thirty year. So that's just crazy for a series to drag drag on that long and it's because king was putting out so many other things he didn't want the dark tower to be his only thing he was working on right that that man is ahead is obviously stuffed with ideas. They're constantly begging like commanding to be get to be released. And you know with that kind of book or that kind of series rather you have to be so careful with what you're doing because it's usually has to come at the right time it's hard to just I force that to come out and have it come out right especially for someone who's constantly coming up with new ideas and like. Oh well I really want to write this book now. Oh and I want to write this book now. And he just didn't get back to it and I think my guess would be by the time he hit the fourth book he was like. Oh God this is. This is really complicated. I'll just put it off and keep putting it off keep putting it off until like okay. I better finish this because I might die type of situation and I think that. But he's still kinda like gives us little tidbits from this and rose matter and a few other books Later on in the series are in his collection of writings were. Yeah I definitely found Ralph and Lois as a team very compelling and like I mentioned earlier that sort of what kept me going with the story because I was so invested in those two by the time you had the little Oh ball Dr doctors playing a bigger role and trump does so you have this buildup that makes you like these characters and I think that's something Matt King does so well because if I didn't like Ralf in lowest other than this podcast I would not have had a ton of incentive to want to finish that book especially with that being as long as it is. Yeah I think they're they're so compelling there so interesting and like they're so different like you just don't get to see these kind of people who and as always he writes people who are different than him because obviously he was not seventy when he wrote this book Quite a ways away from it at that point and but yet they feel so lived in as most of his characters do and I just wanted to know and I think it was a it was really good idea a start. START US getting to know Ralph with the death of his wife because when you see someone in a book who's going through that kind of trauma like you get to. I know them on this very deep vulnerable level pretty quickly. Because you're seeing how they're reacting to all of this pain and it makes us feel for Ralph and want him to feel better and then he gets the insomnia any just starts to go downhill from there and it's like I just want this guy to have win. He's got to have a win right. You know. And then his relationship at his Ann Lewis is relationship with bill McGovern who's Ralph's downstairs neighbor And I really love how the three of them have the relationship between the three of them and how they all interplay with each other because McGovern is such which so different from the two of them so it allows them to bounce off of him and creates little conflicts. Wants to keep us going as we're building to the bigger conflict exactly and a lot of what I enjoyed about this has to do with how king structured the the story as a whole but also just the various character arcs within the story. Like you said if we didn't start off with seeing the trauma that Ralph had gone through and how he was suffering with the insomnia and everything like that we wouldn't have cared as much about his story and how so it led him to lois how it led him to ultimately in the end his sacrifice which will talk about in a little bit but just the way king rights characters. I he really knows where to drop them in in the story. It's like okay. We're going to give you this character. Who has been through this horrible thanks and is struggling so much to get over it because of this other thing that came about because of it right right and that it gives us such a recent isn't root for him and I think in particular? I think one of the things I've really loved about Ralph's character is how he interacts with a deep know. WHO's the puppet bit of the puppet? Yeah he's Atra posts human puppet and how immediately Ralph is like. I've gotten no time. I'm for you once Ed. Because we see ed in the very beginning of the book where he's acting completely out of character and he's got some road rage going yeah and cursing cursing and hitting this guy who was much bigger than him in. Ralph Kinda helps defuse the situation. But then that all gets Kinda lost once You know his wife dies which is like the next scene and then we see where Ed has beaten Helen and sheet the scene where she is walking after after he's horrifically beaten her and she's walking with her baby and how Ralph becomes so enraged despite his age seventy year old man again. Dan Goes to confront this like early thirties. Dude who literally just beat the shit out of his wife and knows he.

dark tower Ralph Kinda Matt King insomnia Steven King Atra Pos Neil gaiman Rowland Lois Ed Harry Potter Mike aac Patrick Dan Towers Patrick Danville bill McGovern trump Ralf Ann Lewis Helen
"insomnia" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

02:53 min | 7 months ago

"insomnia" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"Tim's Ren- it. And then I'm going to watch a movie made about added that I made about it. No that Shiloh. Buff made about it to make holes the movie there. He made it recital above. Yeah what what about with with me instead I mean it's like word in a young team. Well I don't know anything about this book and if you don't know anything anything about it why not go to patriots dot com slash complete guide. Save yourself a few bucks on the book by signing up to our patriotic new episodes every week. And Uh you get the back catalogue to Tim. How do you think you're going to sleep tonight at all baby? Yeah you think you're GonNa Get up to pee in the middle of the night so you've had a beer a couple of beers I feel it's eight. PM Right now I feel like if I if I don't drink anything after ten. PM I'll be fine water or anything. Anything Okay Yeah. Can you what time to go to bed. Generally around ten thirty the eleven do you go to bed. That's another year till four. AM watching Joel. rogin videos on Youtube of the four. AM and. I don't watch Joe Rogan occasionally as somebody talking about the occult and then I'm interested ever a couple of weeks ago I was talking about the Mothman and a listener reached out and he was the freaking guy who made aide the thing that I was watching the documentary. I got a bunch of stuff wrong. No it's true but it. It was the craziest he he Like added me on twitter and was like hey as like somebody that You know noses does this stuff like You got a lot of stuff wrong. And I like looked ammo Mike. This is the guy that made the documentary that I was watching and completely misquoted. Seth breeds love is his name or at least I know this this guy. I'm telling you go on on Amazon. Prime they got a bunch of his documentaries boggy Creek Monster. The Mothman of point pleasant the bray the road beast and then the one I watch which terror in the skies terra of the sky. Something like that. They're Amazon prime. They're they're a thousand sometimes better production wise than most of the other weird documentaries on Amazon. I I thoroughly enjoy them. CNN week that was a hit gum podcast..

Amazon Tim Shiloh Joe Rogan twitter CNN Youtube Seth Mike Joel.
"insomnia" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

02:27 min | 7 months ago

"insomnia" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"These other timid. Tom's these imposters bringing them into it. If I were either of them I I know I have no stake in this. I limited differed room altogether but ah I also feel like if they're at least somewhat normal they'll of course side with you and be like no she shouldn't have had sex in your room in the first place. And that certainly is not a reason to swap it. She could also offer. Well look if you if we swap rooms homes then all of a sudden. This isn't a special places the same old place where you know you're doing your day to day thing. How about as a compromise? Every six months you get to have sex in my room. Why would why would she says Das- A as a compromise? I mean she. They did offer that I would kick her out of the apartment. It's fine it's fine. Everything's Fine Tim if you what is your bedroom Ed Room. I would have done everything I could to kick you out of that apartment. Well guess what I don't know why you would have. Yeah I a game of hide and seek. He was sexy hide and seek. Yeah Yeah I'm due mainly I just read that one because I'm angry. Also Alan is you look. I don't WanNa get too logistics here. But how far could things have gotten in a closet. You don't have. It could be a walk in closet. She did say was. There's a wardrobe. Yeah I don't know what a wardrobe is see. I'm thinking of a wardrobe like you buy it I- Kia were like. It's not even big enough to stand right so I'm just thinking in light not that much get a really happening. There could have been that special. But you're right if it was like a walk in closet. That's the sky's the limit as to what could have happened in there. Yeah UH put mouse traps. That goes without saying yeah steph would put traps or the glue traps. Yeah we're both Wolf. Yeah that cover all your bases snap them up and stick them to the floor and then when you get home and the new. Oh Yeah I think it is salt. ATM thanks a lot on that one..

Tom Ed Room steph Das Alan
"insomnia" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

14:45 min | 7 months ago

"insomnia" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"If you you got any kind of Pill for anything the problem was that a work too. Well Yeah Heroin Yeah. There was something incredibly strong. Yeah Yeah Probably Probably Herald and I think probably because back then. They didn't have as many pills as we have nowadays. We got Yo the drugstore the chemists and they're like our first things I would you like an egg cream what's an egg cream It's eggs his with Seltzer. I think great there I go. We have the Soda Jerk. Make you something else. You take a a lot of medicine right Tom. A lot of medicine. Last time we went to London. I get sick. I Yeah I'll All clean out a have you ever taken Z.. Quill yes yeah yes see I. I'm afraid Otas what is equal nyquil without the of the Oh without the medicine asleep snub No I don't think so by me but I took like a tylenol pm without the tylenol which might be the same thing. Yeah the that all that stuff I don't and here's the thing whenever I've had trouble sleeping sleepytime t really does the trick. Yeah some honey in there You ever have apple cider vinegar before bed. I'm not a Hippie. Yeah you gotTa buy this weird hippie brand stuff you know that Bragg brand stuff no. I don't know that Bragg brand who knows what I'm talking about Rica Desert I've talked about it's It's it's this old codger Hippie and you buy this apple cider vinegar that has all the stuff floating in it. That's called the mother why you know. Shake it up you put about two tablespoons evil spoons in in a cup of hot water. That'll put you to sleep. They also make nutritional yeast. Thank you really get on popcorn. I I've had nutritional yeast that's good It tastes cheesy. But it's not. She's exactly that guy's probably bathing in that apple cider vinegar. There are a lot of benefits benefits that you can get from apple cider vinegar like what I got. I got this book About the benefits of Apple CIDER. Vinegar about how it could cure every ailment right and the whole thing was like it was like this is the. Here's how you can Can Stop it two tables of Apple cider vinegar tables to tablespoons of Apple CIDER vinegar and hot water take that before bed and it said they held chronic diseases diabetes. Yeah yeah chronic diseases or diagnosis said her death that sentences and it's like mad two tablespoons of Apple CIDER. This whole book had just been reduced to one page through true. It's just you know put put two tablespoons into how water and drink. That appears all the Edelman said it will cure. I wasn't aware that that was like a sleeping made. It does everything. It's also something you don't WanNa fall asleep. No no they say they say take it before bed. You're right what if you don't WanNa fall in when you're going to bed when you're taking for energy now you don't really take for energy though. Is that you have. You're taking it just has to be a normal happy meaning to be normal because you like the taste of the mother in law. I hate now. Hey thanks you'd Z.. It's like allies. Anything called anything then. No things are called things a screwdriver drive screws. That's why it's called a screwdriver. The fact that the pulpit apple save apple cider vinegar is called the mother her does not make sense. I E it does tell me. This guy's got his mom floating at a VAT apple cider vinegar slowly so much of this stuff so well. Maybe he's killing other mothers out. There put put them in the vats man that I believe. What is the mother in Apple CIDER? Vinegar they ask who us the bacteria. Yeah Bag tyrian. Catalysts that gives rise to the vinegar. Oh so it's the mother of vinegar so when you drink it it's making more vinegar inside you that way you smell that way My blood is two-thirds vinegar right now. It's delicious for vendors. Not The luge. See You could see it through but I can. I can smell it through your veins settling. Yeah do you want to solve a problem now. Hold on what. What other things do you do? Oh actually I have two other things. sleep Bassey ever use a sleep mask. No because somebody might come in and kill you right. People put earplugs too small. Where you out of your mind? Yeah I was just GonNa dull my senses waiting victim. Yeah have some psychopath is going to giggle. Go himself before he slips my throat. giggle might be Myla chance to save money. Yeah but now I'm not even GonNa hear it. Yeah Yeah so do your plugs or mass. I'll wear I was GONNA say I'll wear an eye mask on a plane. But what if they come around with snacks spare you know it and then I'm not gonna I'm GonNa miss out come around with snacks. They don't fucking fucking wake me up. We should have a solution for this. Have you ever seen. There's like a thing of a woman online and she. Yeah Yeah. She's got like a whole apparatus on her head. She's got sleep masks earplugs and then like a neck brace but on the neck brace is a Like a name name tag. Laminated clip that it's nicely printed out. That says please wake me for snacks. And she's put that on the on the neckbrace nice and they waker presumably. They waited for snacks. Audi afraid to wake a person with that ghetto in my life pretzels please. Yeah I would. I would change that to be like just. Please give me a snack. Well you have a choice dealer's choice You just put a nave data your thing dealers. I've never regretted a choice in airline snacks like. I'm fine with the waiver. They give me. I like airline food. It's delicious. It's very salty. Yeah Hello and welcome to Tim and Tom Sawyer problems. I'm Tim time yourself from. If you have a problem with like as a salve emails of the complete guide to everything a g mail dot com. Yeah but if you want us it's a salvador right now. It's too late. This one comes from a lady named Amy Okay The the subject line. That was a very long pause. Yeah did you hear that. I had no stomach stomach made a noise. I thought time had froze CNN. I was waiting for my stomach noise to stop. Okay so you can edit it out. Very professional has a has has The beware no. I don't know why we make your stomach honestly causes more problems than I usually wind up. Just muting it. Oh but I have to go through in edits a few times The lesbian the B word and the wardrobe. But yes dear. Tim and Tom Longtime Listener. But the first time I have a problem for you to solve after being away for long weekend I returned to have my housemate. Lily Lily Tell me that we needed to swap rooms. I have the larger bedroom as the senior housemate. Sarah moved in earlier seeking to start calling yourself the senior housemate. Yeah I think she was just trying to be clear. It's not that she's you now. Over sixty five with a view of the garden an notably built in a notably a built in wardrobe. That's one yeah. So the reason lily gave for needing to the beautiful picture of this bedroom. Yeah the reason lily gave for needing to exchange rooms rooms was said over the weekend following flirting and a drunken game of hide and seek. She and her girlfriend lost their Savic Virginity in in my wardrobe. was that mean what virginity. No Scientific Brad pertaining to a lesbian is okay. Okay my own girlfriend. Thinks this demand is ridiculous and disproportionate to go and have sex. Lillies Brew Room to even the balance. While no that's just going to convince her. Even more lily seems very upset by refusal and wants to convene a House meeting with our two other housemates game and not a couple but also named Tim and Tom Clinton and could sort this out. I feel that this is an open and closed. I shut case but I wanted to put it to the finest legal minds of the podcasting world because of this the room is apparently now very special to them and she thinks thinks she should be allowed to move in. I don't think that fucking in a room suddenly denotes ownership. Also lillies girlfriend is a notorious quote player on the scene so so she certainly did not have her first time in my wardrobe. But I don't know about lily and it hardly seems polite to ask I leave it to you and your cute system sense of justice. Am I being some kind of callous. Antic B Word Levin hugs from a Gal and her desecrated wardrobe. Amy Wait they did it in the wardrobe. Yeah why oh it's hide and seek hide-and-seek yeah A few things I I feel like this Setup so that whatever we say Amy Can go to Lilly right as am I gain the names right amy. Any wrote the letter lilly. Yeah Amy can go to Lilly and be like well. I asked him and Tom and they said and they said you're acting like a real asshole and you should get a life. JV Like they said that. I swear to God that's what Tim and Tom said. I don't lie why we were roommates. Tom Yeah and you when we when we moved in To a a four bedroom yes apartment similar to this it sounds like yeah and You drew first. Dibs this. Yeah we do like drew straws. If you left for the weekend came back as like you. It's six in your closet. I love that room. You'd just be like what the hell no show in my room. Yeah we're not agony. We're not GONNA pretend I didn't hear that second bar because that's completely irrelevant. And what else like us on the first part. What the hell were you doing? Having sex in my are- have identified like hide and seek man. Then you'd have to be like okay all right Bro. Yeah you know. Yeah that's different this. Yeah this is an open and closed shut cases as amy mentioned. And Yeah. There's any you should go have sex with your girlfriend in in Lily's no because if they do that then lily it's GonNa be like well now. My Room special for you so we should swap but you should be like It's not special for us. I mean the actual solution to this problem is for her to say. Well I had. I lost my virginity to my girlfriend in this bedroom. That's why I chose it. No you know what. That's that's accepting lillies absurd premise yet. But it would. It would squash the problem with. Stop everything everything. Yeah but then lily is going to continue living her life by these insane rules. That's true and he's just kind of to go along along with it. What she should do is say fuck out of my room? No I was going to say as the senior housemate. Get the fuck out of this apartment. Yeah you you add sex in my room. I have the support of Tim and Tom on. Yeah I already talked to Tim and Tom. And they're in one hundred under percent agreement on this. Don't ask them about it or if if you want to ask them about you're going to have to email them at the complete everything at gmail.com I yeah. I know it's confusing but they. They're very non confrontational. They don't WanNa hear it. Let if Tim and Tom don't agree with amy me then give it to them to clean house you amy. You're the senior house made for Christ's seeing back. Yeah I was GONNA say EH. Two things bringing Tim and Tom into this not mean you..

Tom Yeah Tim Lily Lily Amy Wait apple Tom London Bragg Seltzer Heroin luge tylenol pm Quill Audi CNN Edelman Lilly Tom Clinton salvador
"insomnia" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

14:53 min | 7 months ago

"insomnia" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"Look me up to machine so I teach a teaching the computers and the deans of the top universities. Wanted wanted my mind and I keep my temple clean. I'm a perfect specimen. Yeah I've never been to a bar in my life. He said he's not bitter about not being not making any money from the TV show in decades because he and his third wife Tracy devote themselves to charity. They run the law. This is a confusing Arctic confusing sentenced to read. They run the largest giant dog rescue charity. The industry is the largest to say this a largest most giant hooked. I was like Oh giant. Giant dogs wavered. Yeah like Marmaduke. No KLUBER is a lot bigger. After the Marmaduke wavered is in some pictures Clifford is would change. All the time is very convenient. How those books ever got publish? It's beyond me. He says that fifteen thousand five hundred dollars or be would be dead if it weren't for me and my wife teen thousand five five hundred five hundred that's a lot of dogs and then he says now for me and my wife. Yeah this guy did ash then listen to this. He claims at all all times at minimum they fifty dogs in their house. And these are fifty giant dogs. You know this guy probably made so much money for that one always the TV show. What Batman Yeah? I don't think so back then. They didn't they didn't treat these guys. Well they were like The the Catholic League called you guys start taking pills and he had these big go back inside view. The final claim here. He says we make our own. We make our dog food. Our food is at all store at all the stores across America. It's called gentle giants and we don't take a penny from it. We've discovered a way to double and triple the life span of dogs. No they have no of course they haven't double. You're telling me they're like forty year old dogs out there now because they burt. Ward's Doug Food Kidding supermarket not every supermarket all store so good any sort word needs to be fucking take it down and I gotta go up to per ward. You're full of beans and we go to TIFFANY's on Fifth Avenue here today. I can't burt ward's awards Dogra the bike. Of course we have it in the bad. It'll make you lift a terrifyingly long time. Make your dog outlive you. Las Pinas media..

Marmaduke burt ward Clifford Las Pinas Ward Tracy Arctic pills America Catholic League
"insomnia" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

The Complete Guide to Everything

15:22 min | 7 months ago

"insomnia" Discussed on The Complete Guide to Everything

"Hello and welcome to the week to everything a podcast about everything. I'm one of your host Tom Tim Tim. How're you doing this week? No time to hear how I'm doing. I know that you have things that so you need to talk to you. Know there's there's breaking news as as we record team. This isn't the Sabbath this happened. A few tastes go. Forget it but it. It's breaking news to me are you. Do you know the actor. Burt Ward. Of course. I Know Port Burt Ward but I I would guess. Ninety percent of our audience does not. Yeah so who would couple of dopes couple of numskulls. You know what I got depressed earlier. Okay ongoing research earlier this decade that. There's my knowledge is worth Shit. Yeah everything that I know about. I take pride in everything that I know about It's all a bunch of useless useless knowledge and then I watch this jeopardy thing tournament of champions or even normal jeopardy. They're even team jeopardy and they don't even ask questions about the episodes of Alf or cheers spin offs or anything like that. Yeah but you do this educational podcast. That's true true as far as the sponsors. This is an educational podcast where people listen and learn. Tim healings belief Eddie many listeners. We have skype. Who Burt Ward is? You're not the described. Just say Julia. TV's Robin Yeah Well Not TV's current Robin Robin Robin Leach. No Robin Leach is dead. You know lifestyles of the rich and famous isn't even like a cultural touchstone anymore for kids. Yeah I I understand in that. I think the last time I saw that show when I was ten years old. That's the one of the things that I get who I never do it to people younger because there is nothing and to this day. There's nothing I hate more than when somebody's like Like a came and think of an example. Who's the guy that does the worst I agree? Who hosted the tonight show before Johnny Carson par then? Yeah when when you don't know Steve Allen Jackpot it's like no. I was born thirty years after that person died. Or whatever you own kids nowadays. They don't they. Don't respect the classics one. One time I was at a a a weekend away then it sounds like a sex camp. We're it's right on spot. How dare you? I was away with my wife and her family at a Lake House. I like her extended family right. And there are all these people who are older than me right there her parents and and we were also under the impression that that You were actually a little older than your wife's father you know. That's not out of the ordinary. The that happens in look. We don't Jugo. I've heard this is come on so it was kind of awkward anyway No these people had that you're live. People are thirty years my senior Tom. Okay jeepers creepers And it came up. They were talking about the show bosom buddies right and cures. These are people that that were I just got with that Pun is yeah is it a pun. Yeah because they're they've fig bosoms in the show. Yeah what is a bosom buddy. Deeds that dress up like women. was that where the phrase comes from. I don't. I've never seen seen an episode of Bosom Buddies but what I do know is that it was in the early eighties and it has Hanks and friend of the show. Billy Joel does opening theme song. Yeah it was it wasn't it wasn't the actual and I say did it. I mean he wrote it but so there are all these people who were around like. I was at best a a baby an infant when this show is on on television. Yeah but they're all Tom Hanks was in a TV show when he was when he he was younger because they were talking about. Sitting there at this big long table as you're thinking of family ties problem. I know it's bosom buddies. It's weird that they're wracking. Their brains are relative married at a closeted closeted old man. That's afraid they make like what is up with this Weirdo. He is he. I talked with them about other things that he's not knowledgeable college -able anything looks like. He's in his thirties but he has the knowledge of a man who's much older and he's going to pull this this Sitcom from nineteen eighty one. Even the claims he was born a year later and And even if you know he was a child at the time right and VCR's were not widespread yet now his before VCR technology algae so eventually they got to bosom buddies and there were like for the regular wasn't before VCR technology. It was just before his widespread. Yeah of course very expensive. Yeah that was during the view the VHS and Beta wars and he's walking that's at the Museum of the moving image in its Beta. And I was like man the world would have been different than that it would have been that different. Proudly that industry would have been today bay. Come up to you in the museum and say look at this. I Beta looking at a Beta that the insult doing anyway so anyway they got to. They finally after ten minutes bosom buddies all right. That's over now. I don't have to be like it dying in here. Like jumping out of my and then they're like Tom Hanks. And who is the other guy I think it was somebody in a man of such Jesse. Peter Scolari somebody please. Let's just say I don't know I don't think anything ever. I don't think he ever did anything after that. You Know Peter. School did other things after bosom buddies. Come on guys come money and I like whisper to speeches and she was like we you know had to be like end and then I was outed as a a guy with weird knowledge that he shouldn't have so embarrassing. Yeah so I got depressed. I'm depressed about the knowledge was robin in the nineteen nineteen sixties Batman in nineteen sixty six Batman TV show. Well Tim he's back in the headlines. Nice he got a I Elena if you've got a star on the walk fame yeah you got a star on the walk of fame. I'm GonNa get a star on the walk of all you have to do is pay for it. Let's raise the money. Let's let's have the ceremony. Tim and Tom. This is a podcast. I guess they probably just use the radio logo because they put a logo goes like a TV or a film or radio like whatever the microphone. Yeah yeah the microphone like Jack Benny. Yeah probably haven't put Somebody on the walk of fame with with the microphone in a long time had him corolla. But Timmy's a star of the stage and screen. Yeah Oh great man Tim. The headline your your dude. Joe Rogan. Did they put him on the walk of fame. No He's not my dude. He's like when he talks about aliens stuff sometimes. ABC and cancel culture. This is the headline Tim. ABC told Batman Actor. Burt heard war to take pills to shrink penis. His penis presumably for pills are these. I don't know so. Basically basically he's saying that the Catholic League of decency thought that he had a very large bold for television. This sounds sounds like an old man telling tales out of school. Well the church didn't like big. My Weiner was not only that. He's he's he's He's speaking king of the dead because he he said like it was all you know that it was all him. Unlike Adam West voight Batman with Adam they put Turkish towels in his undershorts. What's your right? That guy's dead like it's I wanted to be brought in quite a jerk. Burt Ward Oh they were chums old chums. I don't know these jemmy enough that like you wait a year. After he dies to be like his duke would mud dick was bigger. Also I I mean I remember watching watching the show all the time and I was a kid. I don't remember either of them having like even a visible genitalia let alone like a large bulge. It was just nothing down. There is flag back view the tapes. Yeah so the The studio was you know they were like. Oh we have to. You know. Get in line with the Catholic League of Decency So they they send him to a doctor who prescribed medication to quote shrink me up now this sounds I and then is is like it never returned and so I was really mad. It never went back to know. He's he says quote. I took them for three days and then decided that they can probably keep me from having children. I stopped doing that and I just use my Cape to cover it. He he didn't Robin as a I. Guess the sixty six Robin had a longer Cape but bike. I don't remember him like always having his Cape in front of his crotch. I'll just be like yeah taken. Those pills nets all working. Yeah Dick's tube. It's not on him to cover up with a cave. I think you know what just change changed pants a little bit. He probably did tell him he was still taking them. I bet he was just like no. I can't take these pills but also like the Reich keeps being a problem. Problem is like the sixties and like people would kill to be on television and I would kill to be on television bill. Go Oh to something more extreme. They'll tell me like he. I get this penis would alling surgery or something. A lot of people had that mistakes. It makes very sleek dynamic. This is from page six DOT Com. A Nikki Gaston ghosting. Yes so I didn't realize he was only twenty years old. And and you know I mean I don't know if they ever said how old Robin Kevin was supposed to be in that particular iteration motorcycle accident right burden hordes bear no robin. They died in a circus acts. Yeah they they were riding the motorcycles and they were trapeze artists remember and a mobster cut the cut the trapeze line. Why because I think a circus owed money to the mobster? And he was like e they're not paying up again You send them a message by killing the top trapeze. STAS never never borrow money from the Mafia is especially if you run a circus If you run a circus that's your holy hop Xi Yang. Go to the bank and be like I need more money for the circus. We need to buy some new Lianzi. Old Ones died. Why not if you were bank? Lee a long shot in the heart attack. The the lion team eight him. If you're a bank loan officer would you give a loan to the circus. If the financial order team the circus has their own train making skedaddle anytime let's stay on the run. One has their own training. They leave us. Follow the tracks. Eventually you'll find him. That's true later. You're bound to find him. Yeah do all latrine tracks in the world can not the world but the country connect now. That's started off as a serious question. I think halfway it through you tried to pivot all of them connect but I'm wondering what percent connect i. I would say ninety percent that can't be I mean we. You can kind of emails. Severity connected through stations at lease. Can you get to any train station from any train station. No I don't think so. Maybe maybe a roundabout way. I'm yeah it doesn't matter how long it takes all the train tracks in the world. So but they're more weight watchers their solution take these pills to shrink your genitalia. Instead of like we're we're going to get past him designer in here to make a slight modifications to to the to the costume. Yeah we're GONNA loosen you know at the costumes a little too tight. Yeah we're going to put some extra padding around there to to to make everything which I think is what they had because when you look at them again there's no visible genitalia like it. It looks like it's pad and you're looking on. HD television. Tom I'm looking at the remastered versions back then. It was like the the the six inch screen. Yeah Blurry now's in color but some people so black and white. Yeah Yeah some other revelations from this article. Burt Ward never smoked drank or did drugs and claims to have never been in a bar in his entire life. That's fair in his entire life. I mean he ran afoul of the Catholic applic- League of decency. Maybe keep my keep my nose clean here. He says he was a straight A. Student. Ucla and the Dean Ed. Ucla was upset with him when he left during his junior year. To Do Robin because she said he could have been. He should have been a nuclear air. Physicists that he was in the top three percent in the United States in science and math. It amazes me that you're a smart man and you still say nuclear uh-huh nuclear. What do you think about that? Do you think that that's true or again. Is this a tall tale. I just feel like like this guy's coming out. How old is he now? Ninety five seventy four That's not too old He's coming out and saying hey you know back then. My Dick was too big enough to smart to be on TV. It's a miracle TV at how smart I wasn't a big backwards report scientists..

Robin Robin Robin Leach Burt Ward Tom Tim Tim Tom Hanks Tom Catholic League of decency Dick ABC Ucla Alf Johnny Carson Steve Allen Billy Joel Robin Kevin Peter Scolari United States Jugo Joe Rogan Jack Benny
"insomnia" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

Medical Mysteries

01:30 min | 1 year ago

"insomnia" Discussed on Medical Mysteries

"Were grateful for you our listeners you allow us to do what we love. Let us know how we're doing reach out on facebook and Instagram at par cast and twitter at podcast network. This is our first episode food on the still incurable syndrome that came to be known as fatal familial insomnia and the anonymous Italian family. That's been haunted by this mysterious disease for centuries this week we'll trace the family's troubled history from the pre. Napoleonic canals of Venice to twentieth century Padua successive generations tried and failed to understand their biological curse next week will explore the discovery that revolutionized the study. We have infection and learn how fatal familial insomnia fits inside a much larger and deadlier paradigm of diseases than anyone could have imagined engined. We cannot help but sleep. We can try to avoid it it. As many a procrastinating teenager or anxious warrior has attempted but we will always fail eventually it might take a few minutes or a few hours but that familiar heaviness behind the islands eventually sneaks up but what if sleep didn't return to you after a long day of work what if no matter how you twisted.

insomnia canals of Venice facebook twitter Padua Instagram
"insomnia" Discussed on Mentally Yours

Mentally Yours

07:33 min | 1 year ago

"insomnia" Discussed on Mentally Yours

"Whatever is the. EU find resonates best for you and I think that's down onto each and every person to decide so you've created your own meditation approach. She is Jada. Can you tell us a bit about that wanted to do that. So what it's all about yes sure well the the majority of it is actually based on the orders technique in the world which comes from the Himalayas. It's about ten thousand years old and that's been passed from US issued student for all of that time and I'm simply twenty-first-century conduit to that butts there were a couple of gaps steitz discerned and so I'm woven in a couple of extra things for beginners to actually make it much more complete and much more relevance the twenty first century and then if shoots WanNa go on a journey and really if they wanna get that sorts of Jedi skywalker thing that I had then I can take people glowna journey and again there are things I've learned from other parts of the world and from other traditions knowledge basis which I we've in just to make it as complete as possible so I'm not doing anything particularly spectacular. I'm simply synthesizing the various various knowledge bases. I've encountered in a way that feels most comprehensive complete. Can you tell us a bit about your book and your APP as well please. I actually go approach by loads of publishers to write a book about all of this not sure I have time this teaching today but I took the challenge on and what I wanted to do was tell the story of meditation but not in a really dry why the teachers just saying this and that and the other says why don't we actually get case studies over the people who are lots of people that we saw and to give their sort of the story and to help the audience realize that they're just like me because that has been for so long this idea that meditation is <hes> monks or for hippies and that puts a lot of people off financial factors for every one of us because we're all human we're all subject to these same emotional oh experiences and we will have the same brain chemistry so meditation works for everyone but how do you communicate that well by getting people who are representative of the general population to tell their side and people who have all of these very common situations things whether it's anxiety depression insomnia chronic fatigue physical issues like ibs such like because not all these things again to epidemic proportions so they tell their stories in the book and it's rarely very hot woman and then what I do is I us what they say is launch pad to try and share all these wisdoms about meditation but also how you get the most out of meditation patience because Meditations really there to make your life better. It's not necessarily meant to be just this little escape. Hatch where you just go for twenty or thirty not minutes to shoot from the audit does serve that function but the best meditation is actually what they do is they power you up to be able to go back into the world and we more engaged in more vibrant and more yourself and so. I felt that there are these key messages we needed to get across to help people understand meditation more and to demystify so that people felt comfortable with and inspired to go and the APP up is my way to try to democratize meditation because I'm actually just finishing up teaching six people to to become teachers and they'll go to various cities around the world and that's great. We'll be in a few major cities in year-on-year they'll be more but that still depriving ninety eight percent of the world's population of having access to it but the challenge is trying to get quality teaching across Viren App any digital platform because you you don't have that one to one interaction and so it's actually quite tricky to deliver a high level meditation experience purely through digital medium so I held off quite a few years and then eventually I started to work out how it could be done and I also felt that a lot of APPS are out there. They're trying to make it dependent on the phone. You gotTA keep tuning in every day into your phone. Find which I felt was a bit paradoxical so whilst we have will those guided meditations on the APP really what is there to do is to help. You become self sufficiency so you don't need the APP anymore. If you want to use it as a support aid you want the game indication an extra content to give you wisdom outside of the meditation and it says all those functions but I want you to be able to actually go and do it by yourself. Wherever you are without being dependent on anyone or anything this this year and then you're empowered so I guess the book is there to help inform and inspire and the APP is actually there to help empower you to be able to be a your best self without needing anyone's help within a few weeks. The book is called effortless mind though right now and the APP is out yet or is it out soon. It's called. BG's Yes Bijan Meditation. It is our came out about ten days ago. Actually great congrats so both out now. Thanks very much for coming in just by that. Is there everything you like to add. All odd really say is if anyone listening is wondering whether meditations really for them or if they've tried it and they found it to be quite difficult Michael which is a lot of people's experience. Don't worry honestly meditation can be really easy and it can be more effective than you could possibly imagine and so the river would finding practice works view is so unbelievably high and it will change your life so if in doubt give a guy. I keep the first one doesn't work. Keep going keep trying until you find the right one because once you do your life will be forever improved and so I I get on with the show is mentally today <music>. The Farmers Assurance knows that when you're in the car and that song comes on no not that one now yes that's the one you have no choice but to pull pull out your imaginary drumsticks and smash though symbols and stop on that kick pedal which unfortunately is also known as the accelerator pedal and we covered it at farmers. We know the thing is too because we've seen a thing or two click for more we are farmers. Truck Fire Insurance Exchange Center affiliates products available in every state..

Jada Farmers Assurance Himalayas EU US Truck Fire Insurance Exchange WanNa representative Michael ninety eight percent ten thousand years ten days
"insomnia" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

01:36 min | 1 year ago

"insomnia" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"If it's on your brain right when you go to bed. It's going to be on your break up at two in the morning so get it out. Write it down whether it's journaling whether it's a to do list if you have a lot of worries stories that are just the same worries over and over again spend a little time in our before writing them all down on a piece of paper for ten minutes. Where do you stand on supplementation when not talking about prescription drugs. I'm not opposed to it at all but we do try to do. We try to treat sleep without anything at the beginning because we because that's for how we're supposed to sleep it really varies at least at home. Most people tend to use melatonin. It's not regulated by by any government agency and it's over the counter and so people miss this and it's not and you can get bottles that have one dose inside lied and another bottle have different dosage even though they are all labeled the same so melatonin. It's helpful for some people. It's really great for jetlag and certain certain disorders but not so much for insomnia but i have patients who swear by it but magnesium some people use for calming effect when it comes to hormonal issues platt coho sh <hes> there's def- def- definitely definitely things that you can try but i always encourage people to talk to her physician. I because just because it's over the counter doesn't doesn't mean it doesn't have interactions with medical disorders that you have other medications that you might take and just because it's over the counter doesn't mean it's not without side effects either so people take melatonin at home like it's candy but it can make you have more nightmares more vivid dreams.

melatonin insomnia ten minutes
"insomnia" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"insomnia" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"You're just there's no no way to get around the fact they have a big tummy and you just can't get comfortable at night peeing again throughout the night and then your brain. I had dreams teams in nightmares. About how am i going to take care of this baby. My brain was almost trying to prepare myself for the upcoming childbirth and so sleep really gets lost then and then the other two two big stages when we tend to have big sleep changes are after the baby comes right women. It's normal to not sleep well. You're breastfeeding a lot of the time or you're feeding a baby. We throughout the night babies don't know night versus day and then as time goes on women sometimes a lot of friends myself included have this issue they tend to to worry about their child at night and then or whatever else they have to do even though the child might not have any issues that might be sleeping fine. They don't sleep find. They're always keeping an era so they don't sleep well. Insomnia develops then and then we start to hit paramedic pause so that's one hormone changed drastically again. We start to have estrogen job. Drops progesterone drops hot flashes. A lot of women will report that they wake up in the middle of the night and their mind is just saying there dripping in sweat and they can't go back to sleep so throughout the life from adolescence adolescence all the way until menopause. We tend to have major stages when we can have more insomnia than men index. Yeah it really does. He does <music> actually intensive premenopausal. You mentioned eastern and progesterone levels changing. That's normally happens just before that so it would make sense that that the disruption the three to five days that you mentioned before your period exactly manifest itself as a bigger issue when those levels were really being affected by one hundred percent right yeah ah it's all the hormone drops the big swings is really what can affect the sleep problems but the good news is listening because it might sound doom and gloom. I never a lot of your women. Hello to the man is that they're all things that you can do practical things that you can change their tweaks that can be made to lifestyle. Yeah got some really useful tips. I love sleep hygiene but what can add onto all of their useful tips and then the other reason. I decided to write the book too that there's a lot of misnomers out there like some women just think that they're the only ones who are suffering from sleep problems during peri menopause or after having a baby. It's weird like at least from the people people that i work with someone and just don't talk about it. I don't know why they power through and they think they're talking about sleep disorders or not being able to sleep as a sign of weakness and wanted women to yeah no that okay having sleep problems during peri menopause or after babies or whatever actually there's a normal aspect to it. Some things can be treated..

progesterone Insomnia menopause one hundred percent five days
"insomnia" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

The Emma Guns Show

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"insomnia" Discussed on The Emma Guns Show

"Coping skills get better you can deal with life better data and so you don't always have to focus as much on xining depression but a lot of times there is other stuff going on too and we need to address that as well and that's why like doing it more in practice on the side yeah but i mean it's also interesting and as you said listen <hes> saying to shelby dr harris earlier shelby showing that <hes> i've suffered with insomnia and really disrupted into him to sleep for a long time and that's when i know will i need to look at other. Things is in my life because that's why sleeps being affected. Yeah i mean sometimes that is important. I mean it's always important to do that to look at all the areas of your life and look at your stress anxiety zayda levels depression whatever it might be medical there can be a million reasons why people have insomnia and sometimes i have come to me and they cannot pinpoint any reason why it might develop. Sometimes you just have insomnia. You just don't know why and yes you might have to address those other factors but sometimes you don't have to you have to address the things behaviorally that you're doing might be making the insomnia keep going on and on and it's not that you're doing anything wrong like if somebody's listening to this in the having the experiencing insomnia yeah they shouldn't be doing anything wrong. It's okay it happens yeah. It happens. It's super common. I've had insomnia myself. It's something that we just just as my patients all the time. I don't sleep perfect every night. We just have to know when we're starting to have trouble and one of the things we can do to get ourselves selves back on track to fix it now. One of the reasons that we are talking is because you've got the brilliant book that i i was saying to shell we before we started recording every chapter. After i read i would think oh. I really want to know the answer. These questions that i'd start the next chapter low behold we clearly have some of the thought process but the book is called the women's guide to overcoming overcoming insomnia and insomnia actually is unfortunately more likely to affect women. Yeah it is a rate of three read it two times more than men. It's really it's a problem and we've always just kind of lumped it together just insomnia that everyone has it but really we need to focus on it for women and more to and what does what does that potentially is it because of hormones is it because of load-bearing everything you hit it. There's a few reasons hormones or one really babies and that is throughout the lifespan so we actually see insomnia rates so trouble sleeping we see equal in children and young adolescents once we reach adolescence in our hormones for women we start to have estrogen levels. <unk> gesture unravels start to change engine women's start to earn young adolescents. I should say start to hit menstruation. That's when we actually see women's start to have more rates have insomnia over men and it's during that time immense race you're just before some women have trouble sleeping for about three to five days just before they menstruate and that can happen month after vermont so that's a very common time for insomnia for women and then pregnancy you're uncomfortable. Stress is a big one right. I hear from people myself included when you're in your first trimester having to urinate on time at night you just hormone j just napping during the day it can't sleep at night and then when your third trimester you're uncomfortable double right..

insomnia dr harris depression shelby vermont five days
"insomnia" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:43 min | 1 year ago

"insomnia" Discussed on KQED Radio

"To achieve is not a question of how much of an opportunity to have to sleep is the very fact that they called gets off to sleep when they want to that is the issue or even if they do you fall asleep is the the fact that they feel that that sleep quality is poor and so they read all this stuff about how a damaging sleep depravation isn't actually that increases the airings on him on the front they're not getting off to sleep and can result in this vicious cycle if you're a good sleeper you tend to associate being bad with being that place of comfort that place where you go to and you feel cozy and you drift off to sleep and you wake up in the morning feeling wide awake and refreshed but for people with insomnia they often associate that with great difficulty getting off to sleep with the dread of them only to hand with the fact that they know that when they wake up in the morning they will feel horribly on refreshed and I'm I'm rested and so you sleep the the the environment that we normally would associate with sleep becomes an instrument of torture for them we'll take pills like benzo die as opinions like Klonopin and medicines like consulted him the brand name Zambian good idea well there has been a bit of a sea change in the last few years away from these drugs we know that these drugs also perfects the sedative so too the first thing to know is that they do not mimic normal sleep there associated with some major problems so some of these drugs are for example associated with an increased risk of road traffic accidents in the morning because of a hang over effect their associated with an increased risk of falls in the elderly for example and we know that people can develop a dependency on these drugs and can also be traits by which I mean that they require ever increasing doses to obtain the same effect in the long term there are now some signals coming out of the work that is being done around the world this suggests that some of these trucks are actually associated with an increased risk of cognitive decline and dementia and while such stories notes completely understood and it may be that people who have it in so many are in themselves a predisposed to dementia or actually the insomnia may be a really early warning signs of dementia certainly gives us schools for concern of the perhaps we should be using these trucks qualities liberally as we have done historically and say that full the switch to you behavioral approaches approaches like cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia is being really driven by some of these concerns.

insomnia
"insomnia" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

The Virtual Couch

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"insomnia" Discussed on The Virtual Couch

"Ding sleep disorders treating insomnia caitlyn ask what's the best way to treat insomnia and video says cognitive behavioral therapy is the gold standard so unlike many behavioral programs for say like weight loss or alcohol reduction cognitive behavioral therapy or cbt cvt capitalizes on your body's inherent drive for sleep and your circadian timing of sleep it teaches you behaviors that maximize those biological drives and that's why it's so powerful so the biggest key there was cbt in helping with sleep is the fact that your body does need to sleep you have this so you have this drive for sleep in your circadian timing uh relegate yo is in charge of how how and when you sleep so how does cognitive therapy work one of its two biggest components a stimulus control this is where its key stimulus control it's about having the bedroom environment predict sleep and socie the bed with sleep so it's like going to bed only when sleepy getting out of bed when i'm able to sleep and not sitting there watching the clock and then the second is time in bed restriction so people with insomnia and try to get more sleep i any more time in bed but that doesn't work so in order to be the most efficient and effective sleeper you have to be imbed only as long as your sleep and this is where i really think things get to be key like how he said that there were people often feel like okay i got to spend more time in bed if i am going to be able to overcome this insomnia but what you're doing is now we're starting to go back to some of this stuff we talked about with the brain the way the brain works habit center the basil ganglia the brain where you're starting to deepen those neuro pathways of the brain that say the bed is not the you know it's not even just that it's not a place where i go to just think about nothing but counting sheep but it's also starts to become a place of that can bring on anxiety because we don't feel like we're getting a that we need so therapist also like to review it's called and i love this race sleep hygiene and then also i'm a big fan of in in video talks about sometimes adding relax asian techniques and.

insomnia
"insomnia" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

AM 1350 WEZS

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"insomnia" Discussed on AM 1350 WEZS

"On and insomnia is a modern and growing epidemic um and um you know there's two tests to excite pretty frightening so nice people are are getting significantly less than that personally i'm not one of them mickens team is one of my big big towns um we we also have we did a survey i'm in few weeks ago to find out which gave the week people had most difficulty sleeping on the runaway winner was sunday three times as many people out have trouble sleeping on a sunday as on any other day in the uh the day when people have least uh trouble sleeping is they're not used thursday night and the reasons for those two things are are um connected to the reason people do well there are a number of reasons people find difficulty sleeping on sunday night but the biggest reason is they disrupt their liedtke and they kind of go to bed late uh on a friday need more on a sunday undecided and then they sleet fitting laced on a on a sudden on the saturday morning and then by time against sunday night they're not they're not tire they're not fleet the and then so they can't get to sleep then they start worrying about they can't get to sleep and then they get into this this vicious circle i'm not being by thursday night that just about got back into their routine after spending a whole week getting back into the roof and then the weekend comes round again so yes teeth is a huge problem and um and ducks y one of the reasons that calm is growing so fast because people who use both the meditation programs out in the seats.

insomnia
"insomnia" Discussed on Optimal Living Daily

Optimal Living Daily

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"insomnia" Discussed on Optimal Living Daily

"This is optimal living daily episodes 748 ymt came back my evening spiky flanders of key flanders dark hominum just a mallik the guy that reads blog post to you every single day of the year with permission from the websites and today's episode is sponsored by talk space the online therapy company they'll as you choose from over fifteen hundred licensed therapists get match with your perfect therapist who can put you on the path to a happier life for a special offer just for our listeners visit talk space stock com slash old days poses from k flanders she has a new book coming out in just a couple of weeks amadou a special episode with her in about a week so definitely say to for that but for now let's hear her post as we optimized your life why am taking back my evenings by gay flanders of cape flanders dot com hello friends in hello december it's hard to believe that my year of slow living experiments is almost over it started with a slow morning experiment in january where i allowed myself to wake up naturally and have a slow quiet morning before the start of each day slow mornings are something i've managed to continue with all year and have helped lower my anxiety about both work and life now deserve experiments has come full circle and it's time to focus on slowing down my evenings particularly my bedtime routine if i've never mentioned it before i have always been a troubled sleeper the first time i can remember experiencing extended stretch of insomnia was in the ninth grade age fourteen i would either lay awake until three am and then sleep for only a few hours or i would wake up around three am and never fall back asleep this went on for weeks before us finally so exhausted then my body just knew what it had to do.

insomnia