35 Burst results for "influenza"

BYU-Hawaii: Student Must Vaccinate or Give Up College Dream

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:57 min | 3 months ago

BYU-Hawaii: Student Must Vaccinate or Give Up College Dream

"In nineteen. I was diagnosed with theon beret syndrome also known as gb s which hand because by vaccines and another a number of other viral infections. Lots of different I was paralyzed from the waist. Down or about a month was the scariest month my life. I was a fulltime dancer at the time. I thought my life is over as walking through pasta with my parents. One day i walked on the floor. And i remember the not walk. It was near fine. Was after you got a vaccine yet. So i got influence of and do you think that was the reason have so. That's what my medical providers. We're unsure. Because i got the influenza vaccine influenza and then i was paralyzed so you can get gps from having influenza or from the vaccine. So it's a little unclear was the vaccine. Personally yes because i. I think that's why got blue so i recovered from that which is seriously miracle. I relied on my feet. The whole time i knew heavenly father had plan for me. I said if he doesn't want me to walk again and if he has a plan from not the dance. So when i found out. Byu hawaii was going to be doing this. I reach out my medical providers and we decided yes that it was not a good idea for me to get back needed so. Byu hawaii came out saying that they would offer a medical or religious exemption and they made it seem very assessable. Those okay great all right out my exemption for him it'll all be fine. Whatever i submit it with my doctors my doctor's note than everything and i waited a month to hear back and they denied me a medical exemption and i was shocked to say the least. My whole family was like. Oh no it's fine like you're going to get it. You can't get back to nate. It's okay they're gonna let you in so as a big letdown. I decided to appeal this with my parents. My mom and my dad were very. They were just not happy because their daughter had always had this dream house being taken away from her for something she control like. It wasn't fair

Influenza Hawaii Nate
Analyzing the Four-Stage Transition Plan by Australia

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

02:05 min | 4 months ago

Analyzing the Four-Stage Transition Plan by Australia

"Joined first of all by. Karen middleton chief political correspondent for the saturday paper in canberra karen. The theme of this episode is basically how australia now gets itself out of the lockdown into which it has put itself cabinet has just this week announced a four stage transition plan. What does that plan consists of. Well it stopped in the face wary. Now which is trying to minimize. The damage is heavily. Reliant on a system of hotel corn chain and trying to veteran eight people and the latest of the states and territories have now agreed. Values lockdowns lost resort. What the practical impacted. That will be out because really. That's what they say they during now. So we're gonna go from way. We are now we the trial program in this first phase of home by scorn tain the people who've been vaccinated so we starting to say in this parkway a distinction between people who've been vaccinated and people who haven't the second phase is said to be the first vaccination phase prime minister's suggesting without wanting to put fan timelines on phase. Two will probably be next year and part of the first guys to have the number of inbound travelers so the state and territory latest have been complaining that too many people coming in with the joe to strain. That's where we're saying. These outbreaks got at the moment in australia. So the second phase will be increasing those caps again probably next year starting to look at the entry of students and economic as a holders and reducing the number of people in her show corentin in expanding use of harm car chain. They'll also be looking at a vaccine boost program because of the time next year comes around even though he's had the first two shots are gonna have to have another one. Vice ray is what they call in consolidation that ideally would have no lockdowns at all that we would say people moving around freely no caps on returning vaccinated travelers on again the emphasis being on vaccine versus vaccine and in the final phase two bay living with the virus trading virus like any other bars like influenza or anything

Karen Middleton Canberra Australia Cabinet Vice Ray Influenza
Dr Fauci On Gain-Of-Function Research

The Dan Bongino Show

01:17 min | 5 months ago

Dr Fauci On Gain-Of-Function Research

"Here's the audio. Here's Fauci and 2012 again. I'll put the link to the whole thing tomorrow if you want to watch it. He appears to be talking about here. Gain of function research with ferrets. Now I just wanna be clear is not talking about Corona viruses here believe he's talking about each one and one or another virus. But still, this is kind of interesting, given that they seem to be denying any role in gain of function research now. Check this out. Okay? And Fouche constructed variants of H five N one avian influenza in order way to identify which genetic mutations might alter the transmissibility of the virus. In their studies, they employed a standard influenza animal model, namely the ferret. This slide shows the basic design of the experiments in which the virus was modified to allow for aerosol transmission from one fair it to another. Guys, ladies. I mean, what is he talking about? He's been adamant up on Capitol Hill and in media appearances. We don't do this gain of function stuff. Well, what is he talking about there? At this virus H five n one. The avian flu was modified by by who? The tooth fairy.

Fauci Fouche FLU Capitol Hill
Flu Trends in Australia

Coronacast

02:09 min | 6 months ago

Flu Trends in Australia

"Is the time of year that we usually telling people to go out any good time to get you influenza shot and it still is but the numbers of influence at this year. Just invitee invitees mole compared to what they usually. I normal year. They are even infinitive smoke. I don't know how to say that. I was called smith's when i actually looked at these numbers so the numbers of notifications this year are an have been low for the last twelve months in two hundred thirty two notifications to the national notifiable disease surveillance system in australia. Ucla this year. And this is the year that testing a lot. More than we probably have in previous years and twenty-five notifications in the fortnight prior and so in in kind of in the last fortnight or so really fortnight prior to the thirtieth of april two thousand and twenty research. Thousand twenty right. Thank you very much You've got your own back on infinitesimal. And they went back and looked to two thousand and nineteen. Now you have to sit. She's thousand nine. Hundred was a bad a bad flu year. But just sit tight in the year to date to the fifth of may so almost exactly to the day in the year to date the fifth of may two thousand and nineteen. I mean applications. Do you think there were a thousand two thousand. You know it's going to be more forty. four thousand. One hundred and sixty notifications of laboratory confirmed influenza to the fifth of may two thousand nineteen from the beginning of two thousand and nineteen and in a fortnight before fortnight before thirty april this year twenty five cases in the fortnight before the fifth of may two thousand and nine thousand nine hundred seven thousand five hundred and in the previous fortnight it was eight thousand three hundred and so seasonal flu tends to start me measure from the beginning of april although you do get Early cases in twenty twenty twenty five quite a lot of cases in january for covid hit two hundred two people admitted with confirmed influenza to the fifth of may and fifty eight in the fortnight the twenty eighth of april two thousand and nine thousand nine

Influenza National Notifiable Disease Su Ucla Smith Australia
Park Howell: The Business of Story

Leadership and Loyalty

02:07 min | 6 months ago

Park Howell: The Business of Story

"I'm looking forward to this because as i said you're nine notebook both no big story not just story but how to construct story and the power of story and you and i talked about in our previous conversation. It's just it's a delicious subject a thing everybody can live from but before i jump into that We stopped by in this world of great influences. Every mondays dogs and influenza who somebody who's influenced you in your leadership who maybe we wouldn't consider all maybe wouldn't automatically think who's somebody who's had not influence on you want an automatically thinking boy. That's a you know. Dr seuss popped into my mind if i ran. The circus was my favorite book growing up. And i don't know why that is a lot of places a lot of people say. Oh the places you'll go. Which is another fabulous. Dr seuss thome. But if i ran the circus i don't know my dad used to sit down and read that to me all the time. He ran his own company which was heavy construction up in the seattle area Dams bridges tunnels. I mean big time stuff and he said yep life is a little bit like this book. So i would look at dr seuss and then Someone that you probably have heard of Sir richard branson. I'm large admire of him. But not a big surprise there. The surprise here though. Is i out of nowhere. Got a very fortunate invite to visit he in his island. A month ago was out necker In march with a company here called digital airstrike spent a week on necker working with Automotive groups in having a chance. To listen to. And be around. Richard branson and i gotta tell you everything he espouses as a leader everything you would think of him being he is and then some and i'll be honest with you. I was prepared to be disappointed. When i got there and yet i was still completely and utterly blown

Dr Seuss Dr Seuss Thome Influenza Sir Richard Branson Seattle
Carl Zimmer on Defining Life

The Book Review

02:50 min | 7 months ago

Carl Zimmer on Defining Life

"Carl. Zimmer joins us now. He is a columnist for the new york times and he is the author of many books. He was last on the podcast for his book. She has her mother's laugh. His new book is called. Life's edge the search for what it means to be alive. Carl thanks for being here. Thanks for having me all right so right now. You're kinda busy. You've been reporting on corona virus for the times. What is that leg. It's kind of overwhelming You know i am kind of startled that you know the whole world wants to read what we at. The scientists have to write about. You know this virus. But i will remember this experience of the past year for the rest of my life really. It's been exceptional as a as a moment in science journalism as a science journalist. Is this an area that you had been looking at for years and years. Were you especially interested in epidemiology or was this sort of switching gears for you. I've had a obsession with viruses for a long time. I'm actually wrote a book called the planet of viruses a few years ago. So you know. I've reported on ebola and influenza over the years of have done the virus thing. And so you know i i felt like well i can bring my experience to bear on this and and so basically it just started doing the same kind of reporting about this virus but now of course this is a virus that was causing a kind of pandemic that we have not seen for one hundred years. You're not the only journalist covering this pandemic obviously not even the only journalists covering this pandemic on the scientists at the times. How do you all kind of divide it up. Do you have an area in particular that you are looking at specifically yet. None of us can do this alone absolutely and we have to really roll with the punches. You know i was focusing a lot on vaccines for example in the fall overseeing our tracker and then we started to to see these variants were popping up. Then we're of serious concern so i basically had to carve out some time to work on variants but mental really. My colleague has also been writing about various. Like crazy and ben muller and we actually have several people who who just try to keep up with the variants. You know and and there are other people who are handling the store. All the stories of vaccine distribution geopolitics and long cova. There be other people handling that. It's it's such an enormous story. What about it most interest you personally. Well i'm most interested in in The pandemic ending besides that that and not being sick. Yes yeah is unsettling jim how this pandemic has played out exactly. As scientists had warned it would

Zimmer The New York Times Carl Ebola Influenza Ben Muller JIM
FDA panel recommends authorization of Johnson & Johnson single-shot vaccine

Weekend Edition Saturday

03:54 min | 8 months ago

FDA panel recommends authorization of Johnson & Johnson single-shot vaccine

"Panel. But advisers, the Food and Drug Administration unanimously says go for it authorized the Johnson and Johnson covert 19 vaccine for emergency use. An FDA analysis has found it to be 66%, effective overall in to have a quote, favorable safety profile. Doctor pull off. It has advised the FDA during the vaccine approval process, he's director, the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. Dr Offer. Thanks so much for being with us. Thank you. The Madonna and and Fizer. Vaccines have a much higher effective, right, Don't they in the mid nineties? So what makes the Johnson and Johnson version a good idea? Just 66%. The return in five for vaccines were tested in the U. S. Only. The Johnson Johnson vaccine was also tested in several countries and South America as well as Mexico and South Africa. So it's not exactly the same population, so it's sort of comparing Apple. Sarge is also the strange that were circulating in South Africa is primarily the South African variant in this strange circulating in Brazil is primarily the Brazilian variant. So there were different strains really that this vaccine was tested against I gather from reports of senior fellow Panelists asked whether Johnson and Johnson's vaccine might be more effective if it were given his two shots, not just one. And that the company is studying this. What's your view on that? So if you look at the studies, they did the pre clinical studies they did in nonhuman primates, as well as the phase one to a studies. They didn't people. What they found was that second dose did increase the tighter or quantity. Virus specific, neutralizing Anna by suggesting that it might be more effective. It's very effective, though it preventing severe disease after a single dose, And it induces the kind of response so called sailor immune response that looks like it's going to have a fairly long that memory, which is all good. But that second off, maybe more effective. I think we'll probably know that by the second half of this year in which case then one could get a booster does. But this certainly provides protection against what you care about, which is hospitalization. I see you admission and death. It's it's virtually 100% effective at doing that. And if authorization follows soon, when one might the vaccine come to pharmacies, another vaccination sites and and how much right so it was follows the pattern of what we saw with the visor and then Madonna vaccines. Usually the FDA advisory committee, in which I said makes the recommendation. The FDA usually follows that recommendation within a day or two, And then it goes to the CDC, which then makes their recommendations about which group or groups might best benefit from this vaccine. That all happens within about a five day period. And then the vaccine can sort of roll off the assembly line into the arms of the American public. Doctor. Often you're a pediatrician. What do you tell parents who are concerned about vaccine for their Children, Andreas tely getting it and also concerned, for example, about what seems to be an increase in multi system, inflammatory syndrome and Children. Were rare but serious disease that's connected to covet. Truthful. I think the Children can suffer from this disease and with that multi system inflammatories is and they can occasionally dime. It's rare, but about as many Children have died of this infection is died of influenza a couple years ago and as typically dive influence every year, so I think we do need of actually, but we can't give that vaccine so we've tested in Children. And I think you're now seeing studies done for in the 12 18 year old. I think when those studies As we lost Dr off it. I think, I think, Doc. I think Dr effect. Well, Dr Paul off it. Remember the FDA vaccine advisory panel? We thank him for being with us if he can still hear us and our regret that apparently, the line

Johnson Vaccine Education Center Children's Hospital Of Philade Dr Offer Fizer FDA Johnson Johnson South Africa Sarge Fda Advisory Committee U. South America Brazil Mexico Apple Andreas Tely Anna Inflammatory Syndrome
U.S. coronavirus death toll surpasses 500,000

Pat Walsh

00:32 sec | 8 months ago

U.S. coronavirus death toll surpasses 500,000

"S surpassing 500,000 covert 19 death Just 34 days since it passed 400,000. It took just 96 days for the US to double its death toll from 250,000 to today's 500. U. S death toll now about 3/4 of the number of recorded deaths from the 1918 influenza pandemic at the White House. We fighting this pandemic for so long, we have to resist becoming numb to the sorrow. President Biden, pausing to remember the losses, reminding Americans the stats. Represent real people in families.

President Biden Influenza White House United States
US coronavirus death toll approaches a half million milestone

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

05:22 min | 8 months ago

US coronavirus death toll approaches a half million milestone

"I'm anthony davis the. Us stood on sunday. The brink of a once unthinkable tally. Five hundred thousand people lost to the corona virus a year into the pandemic the running total of lives lost was about four hundred ninety eight thousand roughly the population of kansas city missouri and just shy the size of atlanta the figure compiled by johns hopkins university surpasses the number of people who died in two thousand nine hundred nineteen of chronic lower respiratory diseases stroke outsiders flu and new monja combined. It's nothing like we've ever been through in the last one hundred and two years since the nineteen eighteen influenza pandemic the nation's top infectious disease expert. Antony found. She said the. Us virus death toll reached four hundred thousand on january nineteenth in the waning hours of president. Donald trump's office who's handling of the crisis was judged by public health experts to be a singular failure. The first known deaths from the virus in the us happened in early february. Twenty twenty both of them in santa clara county california. Meanwhile the ambitious claim of the incoming president a hundred million vaccination shots in one hundred days is close to being realized one month into his presidency. Joe biden is on a glide path to attain that goal and pitching well beyond it to the far more ambitious and

Chronic Lower Respiratory Dise Anthony Davis FLU Johns Hopkins University Kansas City United States Missouri Atlanta Infectious Disease Antony Donald Trump Santa Clara County California Joe Biden
Astra approved! But do we have a boomer problem?

Coronacast

03:45 min | 9 months ago

Astra approved! But do we have a boomer problem?

"We finally got the therapeutic goods administration approval of the oxford university astrazeneca vaccine in australia. Which was something that was hinted that was coming soon last week. By paul kelly Yesterday it happened. Norman fine print. Well i'll give you a big print. I look at the big print is this is a really good decision. Untrustworthy decision on the part of the therapeutic goods administration. It creates a political problem for the government. But it's it's it's a sound decision based on the evidence so they've they've maintained an independent position so it's really quite impressive so the first thing is that they have said and i think we've presaged this on corona cast. They've said that the ideal dozy jr is twelve weeks. Apart at standard does of the astro vaccine twelve weeks apart now the evidence is from the clinical trials and presumably they got more since they published trial in december. Is that if you give the vaccine three months apart. Then you get ninety percent. Efficacy in terms of preventing symptoms mild to severe symptoms of covid nineteen and it gives one hundred percent protection against severe disease so in fact the dosage reaching recommended brings it up to the performance of the pfizer vaccine. When you say a standard dice is that the original standardise that was always being used or is that the half dose that was used in one of the parts of the trial that we were talking about las g. no martin standing is to standard doses according to the trial not the accidental. Half does that was given as part of the british trial so it's two standard doses three months apart. And if we're able to do that there's a problem with that. By the way is that you can get variance coming in as a long time to wait in new things can happen with the virus but it does give you that high degree of efficacy which is great news. The detail here is that they had a problem with their trial is that they were late. In recruiting people over sixty five and the trials do not have a large number of people aged over sixty five who actually got infected so they can't actually give you a number for the efficacy of the vaccine in the over sixty five they can give you the average but not offer the over sixty five themselves now. What they say is that in the an. It's true in the laboratory testing over sixty-five very strong antibody response. Which makes you think that you will get efficacy in new over sixty five. But they've got no proof of it in trials yet that will emerge as time goes on and there in lies the problem for the government because in the light of that they probably you know and they're going to go with the evidence people over sixty five shoud get the pfizer vaccine to be absolutely sure. It's highly likely astra one will work in over sixty five. It'll certainly prevent severe disease. You would imagine. But there's no solid evidence of that. At this time you'd be going on the antibodies on the on the flip side of that just so too negative about all this. Is that when you bring on a new vaccine into the market like influenza vaccines or others which is already being tested. Randomized trials you do tend to go on whether or not the having effective antibody response and rely on that so it's not unusual to rely on an antibody response. It's just that the moment we'd like to know that it does prevent disease. So that's the story what we'd be. What's been approved. As a ninety percent effective vaccine and therefore it will prevent severe disease and be really good at malta mortar disease and maybe prevent transmission because one of the few vaccines to be tested for transmission.

Dozy Jr Paul Kelly Oxford University Pfizer Norman Australia Martin Astra Influenza Malta
From wild idea to COVID vaccine  meet the mRNA pioneer who could win a Nobel

Science Friction

05:20 min | 9 months ago

From wild idea to COVID vaccine meet the mRNA pioneer who could win a Nobel

"Renew and november. When the first cases started the pop up and wuhan china their description of the virus there description of how easily it was transmitted between families once. We heard that we knew that. This virus had the potential to be a bad actor at that moment in time we said. How are we going to get the sequence for this virus and we started calling our friends and china. We called our friends at the cdc trying to get the sequence of this virus the minute that was published. We started to make our vaccines back on. I think it was january twelfth. We started making the first aren a vaccine that day. It has all happened. Unfathomably fast has an at twelve months later and the pfizer and maduna vaccines have made their way through large clinical trials with good results into syringes and now already into millions of arms. But this quite a back story here. We thought that it would be useful in a pandemic. We thought it would be influenza pandemic but you back in two thousand and five. When we made the initial observation we knew that aren a had a great potential therapeutics. Who with his collaborator catala career. How is a good bit to win a nobel prize for the science driving. Mri vaccines. he's one of my guests on science fiction today. What's been lost in the fast pace race to develop covid nineteen vaccine. This past year is a hidden story of dogged. Pursuit of a nollie scientific idea over decades often in the face of skeptics and nice ideas we went through pharmaceuticals venture capitalists. All other people. it said. Hey we have a great new invention here. And they weren't interested. They said now aren as too hard to work with. We don't think it'll ever work and they just weren't interested now with a pandemic bang with suddenly counting on mri vaccines lock eyes and medina's to help save us. But before this pandemic this brand new technology of marigny vaccines had never been approved for use in humans before. It's incredible isn't it. The heddon even made it to the stage of large scale clinical trials in humans. I don't think anybody could have predicted. Just how effective these vaccines were. And i still get chills. When i remember the moment when that announcement was made a few months ago biologist onto fox is future fellow and associate professor at the university of western australia. It has proved the nice as wrong. I mean given that fifty percent effective is the baa that the world health organization would've liked to say as the minimum to be getting ninety. Five percent is just astounding really hardly any vaccines have that level of efficacy. Cullen pat and professor of pharmaceutical biology at monash pharmaceutical sciences. He's team is working on two different. Mri vaccines for covid. Nineteen in collaboration with the doughy institute in melbourne change from the point of view the future of emo toy syrupy and we haven't had a vaccine working against corona virus. Before i could understand the science. And i could see how theoretically it might work. But i just couldn't see how we could actually make enough to be the billions of doses needed for the world. And that's still looking doc- rod it's entirely contingent on just to pharmaceutical companies meeting. The world's entire supply demands including ours here in australia. Will you receive the pfizer vaccine together just before christmas. We did the vaccine driven by your discovery. Can you describe what that moment was like figuring. My family always yells at me. Because i'm not excited enough. And they're right for man who co owns the intellectual property licenses to medina and i dream osman humble kind of guy. We were incredibly excited. When we saw the results of the phase three trial that are vaccine. Worked and of a safe and had ninety. Five percent efficacy. I'm already moved on to the next thing the next back scene. The next gene therapy you. I'm incredibly excited. That this vaccine is working that it's gonna make a dent in this pandemic many think that there's a nobel prize in chemistry waiting in the wings for you and dr katie. Rico what do you make of that. So people tell the too modest. And i really don't do things for prizes or recognition or anything else.

Catala China Pfizer Aren CDC Cullen Pat Monash Pharmaceutical Sciences Medina Influenza Doughy Institute University Of Western Australi BAA World Health Organization FOX Melbourne Osman Australia Dr Katie
Trevor Bauer signing with Los Angeles Dodgers

Mason & Ireland

01:49 min | 9 months ago

Trevor Bauer signing with Los Angeles Dodgers

"Was a big day in the history of the los angeles dodgers. They went out and signed the biggest free agent on the market. The biggest free agent of the off season that is trevor bauer who will now join a dodgers rotation that includes bueller and kershaw and price and may and some combination of that. Trevor bauer coming off the national league cy young award. He was unbelievable last year. He was unbelievable the year before in cleveland almost won the cy young they're lindsay. You're a big fan of a actually. You broke the news at some point that he was leaving. Cleveland is that what it was now it was. I traded to cleveland. It was huge. There's a three way trade. With cleveland. The arizona diamondbacks and the rights. And so first. Here's powers lineage. He went to heart high in valencia. Then he started in the d-backs organization. They traded him to cleveland then. He went to the reds and won the cy young award. And now he's going to the dodgers. Wow and he almost won it certainly. He was a contender at least once if not twice with the indians and he's got a bunch of he. He has a weird training methods and he's into spin in the ball and he's he he works with that. Spear you know that. I don't know if you've ever seen if you want to learn more about our google. Trevor bauer hbo real sports. They went out and did a whole story on his training methods mostly which he doesn't a garage influenza and it's really interesting he's he's a he's like really eccentric and it's gonna be really fun to have him here. Yeah it's gonna be absolutely loaded absolutely loaded

Trevor Bauer Dodgers Cleveland Kershaw National League Arizona Diamondbacks Lindsay Valencia Reds Indians HBO Google Influenza
Flu cases near historic lows during pandemic, Houston

Houston Public Media Local Newscasts

01:05 min | 9 months ago

Flu cases near historic lows during pandemic, Houston

"The number of people in houston coming down with the flu and going to the emergency room has dropped dramatically. Compared to last year our own matt tells us what the houston health department believes is behind the drop. The department says january and february are typically the most active months for the flu to spread in greater houston and southeast texas last year at this time slightly under four and a half percent of emergency room visits to hospitals in the region were people with severe cases of influenza this year. It's just above one percent and the last three months in particular they say flu. Er visits have been trending downward health. Experts say the primary reason for this is because precautions like mask wearing are being taken to prevent the transmission of covid nineteen therefore it's also stopping the spread of the flu. The department says they got an early indication that the flu season would be mild this year based off the low number of cases being reported from countries in the southern hemisphere. They experienced flu season before we do to date. Houston health says there have been zero. Flu related deaths among children in texas. I'm matt arab in houston

FLU Houston Health Department Houston Matt Texas Matt Arab
You thought herd immunity would save us? Maybe not

Coronacast

05:06 min | 9 months ago

You thought herd immunity would save us? Maybe not

"We're talking about pandemics norman one of the phrases that was bandied about a lot especially at the beginning was the idea of herd immunity that we get to a stage where the virus con spread willy nilly through the community anymore because enough people have had it that it doesn't spread as rapidly anymore and the theoretical threshold for that based on how much a single person with covid sort of tends to spread to was about sixty seventy percent. So what do we know about places in the world where there has been a lot of cover transmission whether we're reaching this community threshold and it's actually making a difference. Well funny you should say that because a couple of days ago in the lancet published a report from brazil which is actually quite disturbing. So the reported from a city in brazil called monas- who are monogamous. Which is in the amazon northwest brazil. I think it is and they had done a study of blood. Donors indicated four seventy. Six percent of the population had been affected with sars cov to by october of last year. And therefore you would assume with fat pie attack rates. You've got herod immunity which is above sixty as you said between sixteen seventy percent except that happened in january in other words just this month between the first of january in january nineteenth compared to december first two thousand nine hundred they had three thousand four hundred thirty one hospital admissions for sars coffee to for covid nineteen compared to five hundred and fifty two in the first twenty days for three weeks of december right. So they've had a big spike last year. It's dropped off. And now the saying a big spike again now. This and hospitalizations had remained low for about seven months. And you've just seen this spike in january and The question is what's going on here. So you could have overestimated the attack rate and the haired immunity ratio so possible that it's a high estimate in terms of when people were immune but even their low estimates based on perhaps errors in their assumptions of Wayne people what antibody response. It's still about fifty two percent as their low estimate there and that should still can fair some degree of immunity. But they do say that when you compare. The blood donors to average population. There was no difference in the university seems to be quite a representative sample of the general community. So they assume but seventy six percent is accurate so then they go onto looking at whether or not. There's been a waning of antibodies. During that time that could be other response but they showed that you and british healthcare workers reinfection was rare up to about six months after the primary infection. It could be due to variance because we've talked a lot on kron cast by the variance in brazil and they've really got to three lineages of variants in brazil which could be both more virulent and indeed war contagious. So the worry here is that we don't really know why they've had a resurgence in a community that should be pretty immune and it's not that these people are getting a model infection the second time around either because the measure that they looking at his hospitalization so presumably people quite sick. Yes and there is growing evidence that some some of these variants are were virulence. Although that's that's not been confirmed in any pure view jr journal. In fact one thing i need to say. But this paper is that it's in the lancet. And therefore it has gone undergone some degree of peer review rather than some of the other pre publication papers. We sometimes court from. So what are we. Take away from this. It seems like a pretty scary fact is is heard immunity. A false goal. Do we know whether vaccination is going to have a long long lasting immunity associated with it like this kind of worrying. It is kind of wearing. The good news is that consistent evidence from immunization at least with the astro vaccine and the fis vaccine even though the astro vaccine may be less efficacious at preventing all disease is that they do seem to generate an immune response. That's bigger and deeper than you get from alive infection which is very unusual. 'cause usually live infections. Give you a better degree of immunity particularly with influenza. But it seems to be contradicted in this. So it's likely that vaccination gives you a better immune response that lasts longer. But you'd have to say that from the study you don't have to watch pretty closely whether or not immunity wayne's faster are your vulnerable to variants more than people have thoughts. I mean it's it's mystery could be wrong but it's a it's a real warning sign.

Brazil Norman Amazon Jr Journal Kron Wayne FIS Influenza
Reinfections More Likely With New Coronavirus Variants, Evidence Suggests

Forum

01:03 min | 9 months ago

Reinfections More Likely With New Coronavirus Variants, Evidence Suggests

"Lila wants to know. With even comment on information that there may be new variants of the virus, which the vaccines may not target. Yes, that's a very active area it the bottom line is In some people, it may be the case that certain variants Uh, reduce the efficacy of the vaccine Somewhat, so that's a very iffy If you feel kind of statement, I know, but so far we don't have evidence that they're variance that Uh, completely evade the vaccine and are causing significant problems. But but more generally I think it's likely and most experts feel it's likely that This coronavirus like this may for a number of 10 or 20 years be a period maybe a little bit like influenza viruses where we have to periodically beat get re injected, or, you know, like tetanus shots that you get boosters. Every so often we may need to be re vaccinated eventually, but We don't need to figure that out just yet.

Lila Influenza
How the Pandemic Transformed a Small Diagnostics Company

The Bio Report

06:04 min | 9 months ago

How the Pandemic Transformed a Small Diagnostics Company

"Joining us. Thank you for having me. We're gonna talk about longhorn vaccines and diagnostics. Covert one thousand nine hundred and how the pandemic has transformed your company. My guess is most of our listeners will not be familiar with longhorn which is long been focused on addressing infectious diseases in developing economies. What was longhorn founded to do. And what has its business been through two thousand. Nineteen longhorn was founded to address a coming influenza pandemic We started the company in two thousand and six looking for ways to develop a better diagnostics and vaccine products for preparing for an infectious disease outbreak With the expectation that that coming pandemic would be influenza. We originally had our current diagnostic products available for the two thousand nine. Two thousand ten h one n one o-9 pandemic. We were one of thirteen companies that received an e you way back during that pandemic much compared to the hundreds that have received as during this e way is emergency use authorization. That's correct up until about two nine months ago. I don't think most people knew what that was. I don't think many people in the industry or even at the fda knew what that was. And i think now it's something that has been a critical component to developing tests. And now vaccines for this pandemic. when the covid nineteen pandemic emerged. What were the internal discussions at longhorn. What needs did you see. And what opportunities you think there were for longhorn to address. Well we knew that our product would be on an important product. This pandemic One of the things that we had taken to the us fda in two thousand sixteen was this product that could collect samples and inactivate all of the viruses and bacteria and other pathogens immediately upon collection. So that there was no concern about spreading the virus through The transmission of the tubes and to make it safer for the laboratory people as well so as we saw how infectious virus was and and how much it was putting people in the hospitals and ultimately causing death What we realized was that this was really the moment in time that that this novel product that we created and that the fda had approved two years earlier really this was. It's it's key moment in time and we were surprised that the fda actually reached out to us In january and asked us to begin ramping up production and they wanted to ensure that we also realize that what they saw which was the distribution crucial product in helping expand testing across the country are current diagnostic products available for the two thousand nine two thousand ten h one n one. Oh nine pandemic. We were one of thirteen companies that received e way back during that pandemic much compared to the hundreds that have received e- ways during this. That's correct up until about nine months ago. I don't think most people knew what that was. I don't even think many people in the industry or even at the fda knew what that was. And i think now it's something that has been a critical component to developing tests and now vaccines for This pandemic you've long thought about ways to address issues in emerging economies. You've developed some breakthrough technologies to do just that have these had implications for addressing pandemic in a developed economy as well. Well we knew that our product would be unimportant product for this pandemic One of the things that we had taken to the us fda in two thousand sixteen was this product that could collect samples and inactivate all the viruses and bacteria and other pathogens immediately upon collection. So that there was no concern about spreading the virus through the transmission of the tubes and to make it safer for the laboratory people as well so as we saw how infectious virus was and and how much It was putting people in the hospitals and ultimately causing death What we realized was that this was really the moment in time that that this novel product that we created and that the fda approved two years earlier really this was. It's it's key moment in time. And we were surprised that the fda actually reached out to us in january and asked us to begin ramping up production and they wanted to ensure that we also realize that what they saw which was the distribution crucial product in helping expand

FDA Infectious Disease Outbreak Influenza United States
Why Does the COVID-19 Vaccine Require Two Shots

WBZ Afternoon News

01:02 min | 10 months ago

Why Does the COVID-19 Vaccine Require Two Shots

"Were accustomed to require a single injection with a booster several years or even decades later, Why do the coded vaccines currently in use to require two doses? Andrew Peck Kash, vaccine expert at Johns Hopkins explains with Corona viruses. We have no immunity. So the first time your body sees the Santa Jin. It recognizes it is foreign, but it doesn't really go to the EMP degree in terms of making antibody responses. It makes some And actually this vaccine makes a significant amount. But it's really the second time you see the an Injun that your body now says. All right, this is foreign and I'm seeing it again. Now. This is really a threat. So now I'm going toe increase my amount of antibodies that I'm making and really generate a large, strong amount of antibodies. Hecker says. Most childhood vaccines do require a couple of doses. And the flu vaccine requires a single dose yearly because most of us have had some previous exposure to influenza at Johns Hopkins. I'm Elizabeth Tracy.

Andrew Peck Kash Santa Jin Johns Hopkins Hecker FLU Elizabeth Tracy
Is There A Way To Speed Up COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution?

The Takeaway

07:20 min | 10 months ago

Is There A Way To Speed Up COVID-19 Vaccine Distribution?

"The question for today how can the. Us turn things around and quickly get vaccine distribution on track. Here with me. is dr amish adultery. An infectious disease physician and a senior scholar at johns hopkins center for health security. Thanks for coming on the takeaway dr short. Thank you for having me so doctor. Let's start with hospitals. They were rightly given priority for the vaccine. But now they're getting blamed for the slow rollout and for not vaccinating workers fast enough. So you're you work at several hospitals. Can you give us a look into what's happening there. You have to remember that. There's no such thing as a hospital worker. Whose only job is to vaccinate people. So what hospitals are doing are pulling people with other jobs to ronco vaccination clinic and these covert vaccines are not. The same thing is giving employees. Tetanus shots hepatitis b. shots influenza shots. There's a lot involved and the same hospitals that are tasked with responding to an inordinate number of patients are being asked vaccine so there's a lot of precautions that they have to put in place got to set up timings for people to be vaccinated. They've got to find a place to vaccinate people in a place where people can stay fifteen minutes after their shot. In case they have an allergic reaction. They have to be in close proximity to an emergency department. In case severe allergic reaction happens and it it just takes some time to scale this up so hospitals. Don't have the resources to do this in a rapid fire manner and i think they shouldn't be blamed for this. They're being actually tasked to do something. Where the government really has failed because there was not much planning done for that last mile of vaccination and it fell to hospitals to set up their own programs and their own prioritization. And all of that in it's in. It's not surprising to me that there's been lags and delays but it is speeding up and i do think the answer. Here's more resources. What could hospitals do with those more resources. If hospitals had more resources they could have vaccination basically happening twenty four seven instead of at specific times. They can vaccinate more people at a given time. Instead of having certain slots for people to to come to be vaccinated they would have other people to be able to monitor people after their vaccination so if there is an allergic reaction. It's not the same people that are giving the vaccine that have to kind of keep their eye on. Who's who's around in the in the room. That might be having an allergic reaction all of that would make vaccination more seamless and faster but some of the slowness because this vaccine is available on an emergency use authorization and that requires forms consent and checking that consent to make sure it's all accurate. All of that does take time which is very different than when you go to get a flu. Shot at employee health at hospital. Just they basically just jab you as soon as you walk in the door. You yourself have had your first dose. Is that correct yes okay. Have you witnessed any reluctance or skepticism in one of the hospitals. I'm on staff at. There's a lot of misinformation being spread among certain members of the healthcare staff including nurses and doctors where basically every conspiracy theory that you've maybe seen on. Social media is getting repeated in a hospital hallway. So yes that does happen in my experience. It's been really minimum of people and not something. That's generally reflective of what healthcare workers think of this vaccine but clearly the anti vaccine movement and all of those conspiracy theories healthcare workers are not unfortunately immune from it and that has played a role trying to combat that misinformation with facts. And so doctor. How do you balance the need. To prioritize healthcare workers and the elderly with also just getting as many people vaccinated as possible. Who want the vaccine. You have to remember that the overall goal is to get all the eligible populations vaccinated so that this public health emergencies behind us and we cross the herd immunity threshold and hospitals are not inundated. There is a reason for the priority scheme though in order to get the vaccine into people where it will have the biggest impact fast and that's healthcare workers nursing home residents and then kind of moving through other priority games. But you have to remember that we can't be dogmatically wedded to that in if that schedule is an obstacle to people getting vaccinated if it's causing hospitals consternation on how they're going to evacuate and how they're going to deal with excess doses. Maybe they've unfrozen a lot more doses than they needed that day and they've got some that they're gonna either throw out or give to somebody. That's not priority group. One a the answer. There is to give it to somebody. Who's in another priority. Because you have to remember. The overarching goal is to get people vaccinated. And we can't let an overly bureaucratic process steiner that goal and it's not right for governors and other politicians to try and penalize hospitals for doing the best they can and i think that's the most counterproductive is finding hospitals or decreasing their allocation. If they're going outside of the priority group because the goal is always going to be to get the shot into people's arms and who would be the next priority group would it be people with preexisting conditions for instance so overall the cdc says priority group one be would be people that are above the age of seventy five years of age as well as front facing workers so meat packing plants or in grocery stores or transportation workers. That's the overall phase one beat but some states are saying we're going to go to maybe above age sixty five so there is some variation from state to state. But it's generally people that are going to be dealing with the general public but they're not healthcare workers as well as people of advanced age because we know they have a high risk for severe complications. Are there states that have done a particularly good job so far. Well if you look at states in the number of doses that they've allocated north dakota south dakota standout They were places that got hit very hard and most recently and they seem to be rolling out vaccine at a faster pace than many other many other states some states only maybe fifteen percent of their doses have been allocated but again that may be a lot of the idiosyncrasies of each state and you likely will see things homogenize soon as state start ramping up and getting things in order but would say in general. No state is doing the best job Everybody could do better and we have to do better in order to put this epidemic pandemic behind us. So what are you looking for. The biden administration to do what can be what can be done to speed things up the by the ministration can ensure that hell that states have. The funding in there was a funding. Bill passed on christmas eve. But it's also just trying to understand what's going on each state and meeting states where they are. Some states may need different types of help. And i think that's going to be important as having the cdc step into its role of being this coordinating body for the states and allowing the public health response to to really be fine tuned by the cdc adding its expertise to what's going on in each in each state. I think it's also the case that we need more guidance on what to do when you have leftover doses and nobody left in the priority group. Yesterday the cdc did have a press conference or a meeting where they did talk about the fact that the goal is not to have vaccine in the fridge but into into people's arms and we shouldn't be wasting doses or doing anything like that so that type of work that kind of leadership of how this vaccination program should go would would be very useful. I also think the federal government should think about trying to help coordinate mass vaccination sites especially as we get into the community dwelling people people who aren't in hospitals nursing homes who are relatively easy to vaccinate but people who live at home can be done. It's at stadiums. Can they be done at convention. Centers Can we use old school gymnasiums during h one n one i got vaccinated at an old school gym. Can we start doing that to make things move much more seamlessly faster sort of borrowing from what israel is doing. Which is the country. That's leading the world in

Dr Amish Johns Hopkins Center For Healt Ronco Vaccination Clinic Tetanus Shots Hepatitis B Allergic Reaction Influenza CDC Steiner Biden Administration North Dakota South Dakota Bill Federal Government Israel
"influenza" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

05:05 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on No Agenda

"First I we start by realizing that corona virus is connected and he's an openly being connected to climate change. You're crazy if you don't see them. Feeling. Wouldn't you want to get tested. In my entire life, I don't remember hearing about influenza tests. Could make people afraid and. Round. Regularly scheduled programing..

influenza
"influenza" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

05:42 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Percentage of population susceptible than. I don't anticipate a significant drop off in edited in a disease, and as you know as I just said it's already in the nineties throughout the south in. We're saying plenty of spread We. Never really had a first wave. We stop the first wave. We probably have half a million at least half a million dead today in the United States. But we intervened. By stopping it. That, you know kept so much of the population susceptible. The virus is still gonNA work its way through the population sooner or later. Until we get good. Therapeutic drugs are vaccine. If. We don't get those vaccine for four years, although much more optimistic, there's no reason to think it'd be anything like that will end up with sixty or seventy percent of the population exposed the virus infected by the virus. It'll just take a lot. If, we don't intervene at all. We could get to that number. insect sponsored than monster. Something like that. We are interviewing. We're not intervening in the way we were. On April first. But we are still trying to intervene. You know it now looks like the virus is not all that easy to catch. It's you know. Somebody. Sneezes right on your yet. You're you'RE GONNA. Get a pretty heavy viral load. but if you're walking pass somebody on the street. That's not that's pretty low risk off Mites in other words, things like doorknobs. That seems to be lower risk than we originally for beer. There are two studies. One said twenty percent of those infected respectful responsible for eighty percent of the gates's and other, says ten percent. They're responsible for eighty percent of the cases. You know if you can I D and we know from SARS Moore's some people shed more virus than others. Trouble finding an identity and and getting. On in addition, other super spreading events occur are from. Situations rather than an individual consumes shed web, Iras. Say in terms of actual projections. To quote my my op Ed. I would see not so much. A series of waves in a second wave as I would see a series of swells. Within, occasional, angry white cap. How high that swell gets? Really depends on what happens in that particular community. Living in New Orleans you know another analogy would be could see hurricane storm surge. If we really screw up. You know the the. Piece that I the the study that I co author with. oostrum in. Lipstick Talked about three scenario else one very similar to what I just described one. Really a huge wave coming in the fall. A, which personally I think is less likely a I guess a point of raising it in that study. was you have to prepare for the worst case? In another little bit. Essentially the same thing is is swell site. Know slight difference shopper. So in terms of the course of the disease. Right, now I'm less optimistic than I was. Because of the number is coming out of Texas. Florida Arizona and so forth a pragmatic California. But you know you can still. To a significant extent, protect yourself. An expert import. I think maybe in right now. Best case would be if things got bad enough. In some of the states that are now seeing significant growth. That could remind everybody. That it's not over. And they may rededicate themselves to social, distancing wearing the masks over and so on. And a realistic worse cases that doesn't happen and we get a really really. Big outbreak again. It can be regional. Have to be national. And you can probably still protect yourself, but it's or if there's more community transmission. John Thank you so much. We really appreciate you joining us afternoon for a stimulating conversation very interesting that you're both about your a indepth research that led this really phenomenal book for those who haven't read it with great influenza is certainly worth your time as well as for sharing your your perspectives on what might be ahead for us in immigrant brand crisis, but we really appreciate your time and your insights. You're very welcome. Thank you -joyed. Thanks for tuning in, please join me on Monday when my guest will be deep Lonnie. The chief digital officer of Mars..

United States influenza New Orleans officer hurricane storm Texas Moore John California Arizona Florida
"influenza" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

07:20 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"Thank you so much for for joining the conversation, it's Great great to see you, thank you. been looking forward to our conversation as well. With up to talk about some of the specifics of a the virus in one, thousand, nine hundred. began to be records team to show you correct me where avenue this off January of Nineteen, eighteen some of the first reported instances of it relatively mild in the early stages, but it like a lot of corona viruses. You tasted and really deadly vein. Of Its can't came in September of that year and glebe is a four month period where a lot of the killing you estimate. Worldwide somewhere in the neighborhood of fifty, two hundred million at a time when the population of the world was a third of what it is today, a a six, hundred, seventy, five, thousand roughly. The United States alone audited about some of the differences in the virus in nineteen, eighteen versus the one. We are currently. In fact, one of the reasons January was when I was first in Haskell which was the first place anywhere in the world, where there was a report of lethal, ours and the first known outbreak woods. For Riley and I could actually trap people from rural Kansas too far Riley where their families had people with influenza pneumonia, which is why game with Alice it based on. You Know Eucation, -cation rates and dating modeling, and so forth it looks now that the virus probably was around longer. Than January nine, Eighteen Haas as early nineteen fifteen. Nineteen sixteen. Maybe That's all based on my lane. We don't really know. I think the virus initially in its first way was not very good at infecting people. I. Get more of the world than it hit was pretty widespread in western Europe. It did hit some US cities. But a lot a US cities probably most US cities did not experience any spring wave. There was not a single death. In Los Angeles in the spring of Nineteen, eighteen, not one. But the virus did get better at infecting people and turn more virulent. That fifty to one hundred million figure, the first person to come up with that was McFarland Bernadette laureate. Expand who life studying influenza. Spent pretty much backed up by epidemiological research more recently. The two biggest differences between corona virus. Implants virus. number one in twenty mutates much much much rapidly. Virus does mutate, but they're both aren a viruses are viruses or Single Strand. DNA. Virus has that Helix so that double helix serves as a proofreading mechanism two strands because they have to match, so it didn't take much less rapidly aren't a biases a mutate faster than Danna viruses? But drawn Mirus does have a proofreading mechanism to correct its mutations which is quite unusual for an IRA virus? So that's one of the differences. In, one, thousand, nine, hundred eighteen in the spring. Even though is generally mild. There were. Plenty of pockets. where it looked really really dangerous. Plenty of hints that it contained within itself. The possibility of train Berry Berry Lethal. There's been incredible surveillance. This virus there isn't the slightest hint anywhere in the world that this virus could become more lethal. There's any mutation that's in that direction. There's some question that there are some mutations that may make it. Easier ailing allowed. Get more, efficient at infecting Cells that's possible. Although there's been a lot of pushback on at, but there has been a mutation that at least in cell culture Looks like a like it might be the case. But Another huge difference bearing important is timing duration. Incubation period for influences wanted to four days must get sick to. Viruses to to fourteen days. Most people get sick little over five. You're sick longer. You said viruses wander. All this. When when influence strikes a community whether one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighteen or today with seasonal influenza. It'll go through any given particular community basically six to ten weeks. in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighteen, probably two thirds of all the deaths occurred about fourteen or fifteen week period, but in particular community was even faster bat. And Crown our. It's positive moves to are slowly. It's just hangs around longer. That created much of if you had closed everything down. In one thousand nine hundred team, the duration would have been much much less stress on economy would have been much much less. And so forth and so on so that's one of the big problem sacred chronic virus. Creates a both of them transmit. Before people have any symptoms. Virus at a longer period. But by the same token that length of time gives you an opportunity. You do it right to do the testing in the contact racing which is being done. In many places around the world quite effectively, not so effectively in the United States Influenza. You wouldn't have time to do that really because the incubation area. So I. Guess That's probably the biggest difference is the timing. And Yeah. A little bit similarities though are. The sort of from. Grainger? I mean it's it's? It's not I, mean the. Site of kind storm is killing mechanism at the same one, thousand, nine hundred and many people died of secondary bacterial infections. The way, the nineteen eighteen biracial would infect pretty much every Argon, which is not the case for influenza normally. The way, this virus infects pretty much every. Are you know cardiovascular drugs neurological? You know whether. I mean I could could quote.

United States influenza seasonal influenza Riley Haskell Europe Los Angeles Single Strand Helix Kansas Mirus Argon pneumonia
"influenza" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

05:21 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Influenza like surveillance system that Dr Redfield talked about this is the monitoring this is sort of the radar the weather radar that it would be out there that we're not testing people who are symptomatic we want to do testing on people who are a symptomatic because you can have a symptomatic carriage she got you know you could you could have this virus and shot it and not have symptoms or only mild symptoms so what is the strategy here the strategy here this is an unprecedented strategy okay this is this is really unprecedented but we're going to do prop between three and five hundred thousand tests per week in the most vulnerable populations that we note that the virus could circulate and what are the number one nursing home and long term care facilities we know that from the history of this of this virus that that can circulated be devastating it could circulate even in a way that you don't have symptoms so we're gonna survey in a very controlled way driven by the CDC supervised by the CDC surveys over it we're gonna get to everyone but serving in the areas to cover in a selective way the fifteen thousand or so nursing homes secondly we want to work in vulnerable members in cities in this is the way we think about that is community health centers I'm a huge fan of community health centers that are led by her so on there are there are about thirty thousand community health center sites they take care of thirty million people children adults elderly they care for about one third of Americans below the poverty level they are afraid to take care of our most vulnerable populations so we want to survey on a symptomatic people in those community health centers we also want to do and some of our indigenous population and you know very early I was out here bringing machines to the Indian health service and in fact eighteen hundred members of the public health service provide care to the Indian health service and their director and chief medical officer are both admirals in the Indian health service plus work for it workplace monitoring particularly for workplace environments that may have very close contact or may have a high risk in some of those could be agricultural facilities so let's is total that up we have two hundred thousand people who need a diagnosis to make that diagnosis we want to test two million okay so that's two million we're gonna contact trace with a million and let's just throw you a fudge factor of about twenty five percent on that so that's four million and we have this background testing of about four hundred of about four hundred thousand per month so to safely do the testing we need to be in the range of four and a half million you followed my number's gonna want you to understand per month that party official for phase one right for phase one and I want to tell you that's really how it adds up and that's where we are right now we're doing about one one million to one point two million per week we're going to continue to push that farther and further as we open up the laboratories and were able to open all the supplies that we need for that and I think I think that's where I would like to add thank you thank you all as the team to step back up for questions and we do anticipate as his schedule prevented the president be returning momentarily place phase one will lose will there be enough testing for phase two you have to ramp up capacity that you deal with that yeah that's a great question and it what we will be doing is monitoring how much we have to use in phase one to really help inform phase two because it what they're really unknown in this to be completely transparent is a symptomatic and asymptomatic spread and so if we find that there is a lot of a symptomatic individuals that we find in this active monitoring and what we can Sir are very much concerned about the most vulnerable then we will have to have increased testing to cover all of those all of those sites and and as we made clear to the governors and other health officials we're we're going to continue to scale testing his presence made clear we want we want governors and states to manage the testing operations in their states we've given we've given criteria we've given guidance for how we think that would best operates but we're looking for the states were looking for the governors to manage it but in the midst of that all these great experts working with all these great facilities are going to continue to use their great American ingenuity to scale and increase the availability of testing for states to be able to implement as they move closer and closer to that that day the president speaks of often where we re open America and put all of America back to work well they all did well I think the media is about president trump's the.

Influenza Dr Redfield
"influenza" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

03:08 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"That's the the yearly sick with influenza we're looking at a Katrina like storm surge of patients and it comes in it's high volume it's intense and it's destructive because it still water virus it's not that much more damaging than influenza about ten times but ultimately the amounts in the training are are devastating our healthcare system so that's why we need to keep people from getting it now they get in the future help you protected in the future but now the concern Missy thank you quick call Dennis Illinois Dennis you're on the Sean Hannity show doctor Constantinou Betsy McCourt real quick or short on time very good my wife as a flight attendant and flying all over the country continues to fly as we know airfares not err therein should not shut down yet and she's really concerned about the fact that her protective apparel or is is not limited to none she can't work should not permitted to wear a face mask passenger coughing in that she's still crying they say they're cleaning the planes especially at night but that had happened that night why would they prevent her from wearing a mask and gloves that's that is just ridiculous No shoes allowed to wear gloves with what's happened she has to bring them from home because everybody's feeling the passengers are actually stealing toilet paper and hand sanitizer a complaint I don't time to be a flight attendant very unsafe time I agree I mean Dr Peter concertino I'm far more concerned airlines and they say you can't wear gloves and masks I'm saying goodbye and you got a I think a potential lawsuit down the road yeah I'm having trouble with that one as far as the risk I wish I could tell you that she wasn't at an increased risk of my assessment is that she is any materially increased risk when you put droplets in the air they go six feet to ten feet minimum and they can persist for three hours at altitude because the very low humidity the droplets tend to evaporate much more quickly so there is some decrease risk inside in an aircraft alternately it's greater than it is on the ground and I don't think mass to be great but it sort of gloves they should all be wearing gloves and not to mention the fact that all the surfaces in the up in the airplane or contaminated by the expression of these droplets are going to travel to Europe as having you guys have been great doctor P. Constantinos thank you Betsy record thank you trying to extinguish conservative voices these for your beliefs right now like so many of you I used to suffer from insomnia no matter what I did couldn't sleep well I gotta tell you my pillow dot com that has been my lifeline my pillow yes the best pillow ever made the my pillow mattress topper and I'm telling you the MyPillow Giza dream sheets wow just the most.

influenza Katrina
"influenza" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Influenza even though we live in a very different time the nineteen eighteen there was no internet it in there there was plenty of media but radio hadn't even really been invented they were using radio for ship to shore and mostly telegraphic kind of ways but that was it there was no mass communication or the the newspapers and other than the Associated Press and early films newsreels the information was it took a lot longer for information to get out to people it was easier to compartmentalize groups of people in there to keep some people completely in the dark and at the same time to in nineteen eighteen you didn't have the ability that we have now which is somebody who is infected in Kansas could just get on a plane fly around the world and single handedly if they knew they were infected and wanted to or even if they didn't it is spread a virus because we can we can do it in twenty four hours thirty six hours it took the this transport ship I Eric can doughboys on their way to England and then to to wrap up even though they didn't know it yet World War one the great war it took them having the guy that Spanish what the misnomer the Spanish flu in order for them to spread the disease or it would have been more isolated so I mean that there are some things that are readily compare a bull about nineteen eighteen and two thousand twenty and some that aren't we'll continue to explore that with John Barry author of the great influenza the story of the deadliest pandemic in history next on coast to coast AM this is the opponent gosh waking up over and over.

Influenza Associated Press Kansas England John Barry
"influenza" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

NewsRadio KFBK

10:20 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on NewsRadio KFBK

"Get influenza and colds in the middle of summer I am all the time so that may give us a break and we're really in a you know race to get therapeutic to drugs unlike influenza this does look like there may be drugs that will have significant impact on this disease we hope so they are being tested some of them right now although one of the ones that was supposed to be promising in Shanghai they've already abandoned that because it was not effective then the other thing of course is a vexing there is a pretty good possibility I think although you never know until you test it that we could have an effective vaccine against this virus probably more effective than you get against influenza but you know there are a lot of technical problems and and before you get there and it's certainly probably I the the fastest is going to be a year and that would be even eighteen months would be an all time record producing such something like that but so the longer we delay things you know the closer we get to either a drug or vaccine or both and obviously there's a warrant the book is called the great influenza the story of the deadliest pandemic in history and yet I also I'm sure you would back me up on this that based on what you said that we're we've crossed from epidemic to pandemic to endemic because it's going to be with us for a while right I mean wherever yeah you know there are countries in the foot developing world that have basically no public health infrastructure where the case counts are very low but more likely there's no surveillance and the violent virus is circulating there like crazy I mean Indonesia has had direct flights from Wuhan there are tens of thousands of people went back and forth between China and Indonesia and they've got a case count of under a hundred I don't think so I think there's no surveillance you know so I think it's circulating wildly in Indonesia I it gets after her I think it's going to circulate the air which means even if we manage to contain at which I don't think it's possible we may be able to suppress it we can't contain it even if China Singapore Hong Kong successful there's going to be re infection from through other countries eventually so this viruses is going to be around I think you know it's gotten going to be in another human disease the the the so called Spanish flu is generally spoken of his lasting from nineteen eighteen to nineteen twenty what was the white why do they listed that is sort of the the year of its demise well I mean I think two things happened more most clearly I think people's immune systems adjusted to it they had seen that you know there are three waves in nineteen eighteen those spring waves is very intermittent or if some cities had very pronounced ring weights others were not like Los Angeles was not it at all completely miss Los Angeles at Chicago and New York and you know same thing around the world then you had those gleeful fall wave then you had a a third wave in the spring of nineteen nineteen which was legal by any standard except the fall wave and then in nineteen twenty again in the in the fall it it came back again not too sweet as either the third or the second way but still pretty lethal non people's immune systems again they they'd seen that they recognize that there's also the virus itself began to mutate as all influenza viruses so that's why you need a new vaccination every year and it became a little bit quite a bit milder and sort of just marched into regular seasonal influenza which is not a pleasant diseases I think you know a couple years ago killed sixty one thousand Americans so its influence itself is a disease to take pretty seriously yes but if the past is prologue and we look at the model of nineteen eighteen and we have a milder spring then people perhaps scientists had extrapolated and health officials had planned for it and suddenly now everybody looks like well we we over reacted it's like Y. two K. all over again or like a category five hurricane that when it lands it lands as a cat too and some people say see if that happens again when do you think you would come back if it were on that same trajectory that the covert nineteen based on what we know about the Spanish flu I I don't think there's any different viruses and and you know both virus influenza viruses in this virus mutate very rapidly this is not quite as fast mutating isn't ones about still pretty fast I mean there's no way I could make a prediction even if I were a skilled virologist which I am not it's impossible to predict nothing would make me happier than to be wrong about iris right all of this I think it would be better to be wrong as a country better to people is a government I think personally but a lot of people are worried about government overreach I got it a tweet on that somebody saying you know that's a great fear is government overreach what what what did government over reach did it have would you define the government's reaction in between nineteen eighteen and nineteen twenty as over reach in anyway or what would you learn to reach okay right he didn't do much anything and you know the the concerns about privacy and and antipathy to the government and the United States and much of Europe two you know the free society that frankly is one of the problems that we're going to have dealing with this disease we will not tolerate as a free society but forget about what they did in China just what they do in South Korea or Singapore and you know we just don't want the privacy concerns you know tracking self on your GPS finding out exactly where you are who you're with I mean it is fine one of the reasons China was so successful because they have such a tremendous malady geared toward the domestic spying so they could do contact tracing a very efficiently and very accurately and and get people who've been exposed to make sure they were quarantine and they weren't self quarantine either they were locked in in in our society we're we're we're not gonna like that and it's it's one of the reasons on and I'm concerned that the disease could be a lot more serious than the United States and we will not have the kind of success in fighting the disease that they have had and some of the Asian countries you know I it if it starts killing tens of thousands of lives lost hundreds of thousands of Americans by that time frankly it's too late to intervene so you know we are you know I'm I'm hopeful but honestly I'm a little bit pessimistic understanding the the power of the virus and yeah as I can not careful no no no as I continue to read through the great influenza as I said at the beginning of the hour I was getting mad and it and the times that you can like put to put first second it just like and I was sort of you know ge ge shouting it to history you know it's a cookbook you know with that sort of that sense of it so it is over they're gonna eat us I mean this is like a horrible thing that's going to happen and and that was and nobody was nobody was listening in nineteen eighteen how can we get them until how can how can science get people to listen today based on the failure of of those Spanish flu perhaps to raise awareness faster that is a key question you know it's funny the as I said earlier I was part of the working groups that develop and that my preparedness plans and based on my experience researching this book and the message that I question every time I was in a group was tell the truth and every single pandemic pro plan in the United States the federal plan in every single state plan incorporates that but the question has always been that someone has to tell it and you know the CDC isn't telling that Tony Fauci has been telling that but you were getting mixed messages from the White House itself which is you know they haven't exactly been line I'm not accusing them online although some of the things that that is been set admin falsehoods but basically just the whole different tone and then the idea that this is some kind of democratic plot you know a hoax it's you know it's just crazy I mean you were sick giving a reason not a justification but sort of a logic as to why they may have done that earlier regarding the stock market and so forth and you may well have been right that you know I'm not going to speculate on what was what was in the minds of of from side is just.

influenza
"influenza" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

KLIF 570 AM

10:17 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on KLIF 570 AM

"Get influenza and colds in the middle of summer I am all the time this is that may give us a break and we're really in a you know race to get therapeutic to drugs I'm like influenza this does look like there may be drugs that will have significant impact on this disease we hope so they are being tested some of them right now although one of the ones that was supposed to be promising in Shanghai they've already abandoned that because it was not effective and the other thing of course is a vexing there is a pretty good possibility I think although you never know until you test it that we could have an effective vaccine against this virus probably more effective than you get against influenza but you know there are a lot of technical problems and and before you get there and it's certainly probably I the the fast this is going to be a year and that would be as even eighteen months would be an all time record producing such something like that but so the longer we delay things you know the closer we get to either a drug or vaccine or both and obviously better shape or size the book is called the great influenza the story of the deadliest pandemic in history and yet I also I'm sure you would back me up on this that based on what you said that we're we've crossed from epidemic to pandemic to endemic because it's going to be with us for a while right I mean wherever yeah you know there are countries in the foot developing world that have basically no public health infrastructure where the case counts are very low but more more likely there's no surveillance in the vial virus is circulating there like crazy that has had direct flights from Wuhan there are tens of thousands of people went back and forth between China and Indonesia and they've got a case count of under a hundred I don't think so I think there's no surveillance you know so I think it's circulating wildly in Indonesia as it gets after her I think it's going to circulate there which means even if we manage to contain it which I don't think it's possible we may be able to suppress it we can't contain it even if China and Singapore Hong Kong successful there is going to be re infection from through other countries eventually so this viruses is going to be around I think you know it's gotten going to be in another human disease six the the the so called Spanish flu is generally spoken of his lasting from nineteen eighteen to nineteen twenty what was the white why do they list that is sort of the the year of its demise well I mean I think two things happen one more most clearly I think people's immune systems adjusted to it they had seen that you know there are three waves in nineteen eighteen those spring waves is very intermittent or some cities had very pronounced ring weights others were not like Los Angeles was not it at all completely miss Los Angeles at Chicago and New York and you know same thing around the world then you had those gleeful fall wave then you had a a third wave in the spring of nineteen nineteen which was legal by any standard except the fault wave and then in nineteen twenty eight and then the and the fall it it came back again not his weasel as either the third or the second way but still pretty weak phone then people's immune systems again they they'd seen that they recognize that there's also the virus itself began to mutate is all influenza viruses so that's why you need a new vaccination every year and it became a little bit quite a bit milder and sort of just marched into regular seasonal influenza which is not a pleasant diseases I think you know a couple years ago killed sixty one thousand Americans so its influence itself is a disease to take pretty seriously yes if the past is prologue and we look at the model of nineteen eighteen and we have a milder spring then people perhaps scientists at had extrapolated and health officials had planned for it and suddenly now everybody looks like well we we over reacted it's like Y. two K. all over again or like a category five hurricane that when it lands it lands as a cat too and some people say see if that happens again when do you think you would come back if it were on that same trajectory that the cove it nineteen based on what we know about the Spanish flu I I don't think there's any different viruses and and you know both virus influenza viruses in this virus mutates very rapidly this is not quite as fast mutating as influenza but still pretty fast I mean there's no way I could make a prediction even if I were a skilled virologists which I am not it's impossible to predict nothing would make me happier than to be wrong about the iris right and all of us I think would be better to be wrong as a country better to people is a government I think certainly but a lot of people are worried about government overreach I got a tweet on that somebody saying you know that's a great fear is government overreach what what what did government over reach did it happen would you define the government's reaction in between nineteen eighteen and nineteen twenty as over reach in anyway or what would you want to reach okay right he didn't do much anything and you know the the concerns about privacy and and antipathy to the government and the United States and much of Europe tuning out a free society that frankly is one of the problems that we're going to have dealing with this disease we will not tolerate as a free society but forget about what they did in China just what they do in South Korea or Singapore and you know we just don't want the privacy concerns you know tracking self on your GPS finding out exactly where you are who you're with I mean it is fine one of the reasons China was so successful because they have such a tremendous now G. geared toward the domestic spying so they could do contact tracing a very efficiently and very accurately and and get people who've been exposed to make sure they were quarantine and they weren't self quarantine either they were locked in and in our society we're we're we're not gonna like that and it's it's one of the reasons on and I'm concerned that the disease could be a lot more serious than the United States and we will not have the kind of success in fighting the disease that they have had and some of the Asian countries you know it if it starts killing tens of thousands of lives lost hundreds of thousands of Americans by that time frankly it's too late to intervene so you know where you know I'm I'm hopeful but honestly I'm a little bit pessimistic understanding is the power of the virus and as I do not care for no no as I continue to read through the great influenza as I said at the beginning of the hour I was just getting mad and anytime that you can like put to put first second and dislike and I was sort of you know ge ge shouting it to history you know it's a cookbook you know with that sort of that sense of it so it is a they're gonna eat us I mean this is like a horrible thing that happened and and that was and nobody was nobody was listening in nineteen eighteen how can we get them until how can how can science get people to listen today based on the failure of of those Spanish flu perhaps to raise awareness faster that is a key question you know it's funny the as I said earlier I was part of the working group that developed and that my preparedness plans and based on my experience researching this book and the message that I question every time I was in a group was tell the truth and every single pandemic truck plant in the United States the federal plan in every single state plan incorporates that but the question has always been that someone has to tell it and yeah the CDC isn't telling that Tony Fauci has been telling that but you were getting mixed messages from the White House itself which is you know they haven't exactly been line I'm not accusing them online although some of the things that that is been set admin falsehoods but basically just the whole different tone and then the idea that this is some kind of democratic plot you know a hoax it's you know it's just crazy I mean you were said giving a reason not a justification but sort of a logic as to why they may have done that earlier regarding the stock market and so forth and you may well have been right that you know I'm not going to speculate on what was what was in the minds of of from.

influenza
"influenza" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

Newsradio 970 WFLA

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on Newsradio 970 WFLA

"Get influenza and colds in the middle of summer I am all the time this is that may give us a break and we're really in a you know race to get therapeutic to drugs unlike in forms of it does look like there may be drugs that will have significant impact on this disease we hope so they are being tested some of them right now although one of the ones that was supposed to be promising and Shanghai they've already abandoned that because it was not effective and the other thing of course is a vexing there is a pretty good possibility I think although you never know until you test it that we could have an effective vaccine against this virus probably more effective than you get against influenza but you know there are a lot of technical problems and and before you get there and it's certainly probably I the the fast this is going to be a year and that would be even eighteen months would be an all time record producing such something like that but it should so the longer we delay things you know the closer we get to either a drug or vaccine or both and obviously better shape or in the book is called the great influenza the story of the deadliest pandemic in history and yet I also I'm sure you would back me up on this that based on what you said that we're we've crossed from epidemic to pandemic to endemic because it's going to be with us for a while right I mean whatever yeah you know there are countries in the developing world that have basically no public health infrastructure where the case counts are.

influenza
"influenza" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

01:45 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Influenza even though we live in a very different time the nineteen eighteen there was no internet it in there there was plenty of media but radio hadn't even really been invented they were using radio for ship to shore and mostly telegraphic kind ways but that was it there was no mass communication or the the newspapers and other than the Associated Press bye and early films newsreels the information was it took a lot longer for information to get out to people it was easier to compartmentalize groups of people in there to keep some people completely in the dark and at the same time to in nineteen eighteen you didn't have the ability that we have now which is somebody who is infected in Kansas could just get on a plane fly around the world and single handedly if they knew they were infected and wanted to or even if they didn't it is spread a virus because we can we can do it in twenty four hours thirty six hours it took the this transport ship hi well of American doughboys on their way to England and then to to wrap up even though they didn't know it yet World War one the great war it took them having the guy that Spanish what the misnomer the Spanish flu in order for them to spread the disease or it would have been more isolated so I mean that there are some things that are readily come parable about nineteen eighteen in two thousand twenty and some that aren't we'll continue to explore that with John Barry author of the great influenza the story of the deadliest pandemic in history next on coast to coast AM this is the opponent.

Influenza Kansas England Associated Press John Barry
"influenza" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:57 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on KGO 810

"The principles of the fair housing act and equal opportunity act hello this is coast to coast AM on KGO eight ten hello greetings Mr Mrs middle America and all the ships at sea this is Ian Punnett and I'm going to dispense with some of the opening frivolities because we have just an hour with author John berry the guy who wrote the great influenza the story of the deadliest pandemic in history certainly up to now and let us hope that the Spanish flu of nineteen eighteen king is to hold the record what we're going to we're going to get into the subject right away there's a lot to cover and there and there is then after that first hour Charles Pellegrino is gonna join us you know a friend of the show an old friend of mine Charlie researches historical events especially when it comes to microbes and he's always very interested in some of the the sides of scientific history which art told well or haven't been told enough and then he extrapolates them into some of his works would be that you know scientific books that are non fiction or whether he's doing one of his speculative fiction books and he just happened to have done some research in this field we're gonna talk about that coming up next hour and then open lines later on which were really interesting last night so thank you if you missed it and you have coast insider go back and listen to last night show anytime you want but we'll talk with John berry and we're gonna talk about the great influenza because I'm I'm not Sylvia Browne right yeah even Sylvia Browne wasn't solely around but I mean I I don't pretend to be able to predict the future based on some supernatural power what I am always interested in is history and how we can learn the lessons of history and avoid repeating them as much as possible and if the past is prologue on the great influenza we've got a lot to learn we'll start next on coast to coast AM this is the end product gosh waking up over and over to P. is not okay.

America Ian Punnett John berry Charles Pellegrino Sylvia Browne influenza Mr Mrs
"influenza" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

06:16 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Influenza that killed millions and yeah we we need to keep our heads and and move forward when it comes to our price gouging do you do you expect him to see and I mean obviously you're gonna be looking for how to how do you know what it is is one of those cases where I'll know when I see it well that that really close to the matter the matter whether the government can entertain your price a year the price of gasoline in the summer goes up because of demand and people are getting on the road driving on vacation check price gouging so now I recall that supply and demand so at what point does it cross the line and X. knowing your would you see it in the eyes we can all also say if you're charging a hundred Bucks for a roll of toilet paper we would all agree that that's price gouging drawing a line could be a little bit it's a little bit tough here and I know some attorneys general are are more proactive when I hit you it's kind of a this may be able curve ball here too so be forewarned if you charge a hundred thirty dollars for case the waters at price gouging yeah that wouldn't pass smell test for me okay now wait here's here's a twist Dave I know you're right I'm sorry to get to this early on a Monday but I was kind of like this let me give you the perfect man with the answer because you have a juris doctor and I don't so it it's here we go hundred thirty two dollars that's the that if you were to go to let's say Paul Brown stadium to watch a Bengals game a Reds game they charge five dollars fifty cents for bottled water at least Apollo brown St I'm not quite sure at the great American but the opening day coming up I'll throw that in five fifty that's a hundred thirty two dollars a case now that's just for going on as you know you go to a game you can't leave your kind of stuck there if I'm thirsty I gotta buy the bottled water how was something like that night but not tonight not not price gouging and if you charge a hundred thirty dollars and time of the crisis that would be press guys went to different well because you if you created a problem with the way you set up properly they set up the question use it to buy a case of water and of course nobody at Paul Brown stadium is buying case what other buyers single father I could be really thirsty Dave could be hot he are we all know that it's cheaper to buy things in bulk is to buy things individually which is why when I go to speedway if I'm looking for a bottle of water on the road I will frequently by the three ninety eight case of twenty four bottles rather than pay a dollar sixty nine for one stinking exactly but yeah I thought it went yeah I have I go to a game you know the outrageous price of concessions because you got to pay the athletes in the my I get the whole thing you're you're willing participant this whole thing but it got me thinking like well I can't really leave so they have me and I have to buy their product I can't really bring out you know I I maybe bring one bottle of water but I can't bring several in if you can charge five fifty and how you can help out your way down to the concourse I have some of that fine drinking water disposal girls around look out of the Ohio River or something along those lines but Dave Yost on the show this morning so we'll let you know it we'll see what happens I guess when it comes to corona virus and just how crazy it gets but that to me I'm glad you came and explain the Wrobel call thing are you hoping that at the very least you'll be able to get some gain some ground here the least although well Ohio's not that friendly stadium to go somewhere else for the bigger suckers you know in the nineteen nineties it with the kind of the birth of all of this this annoyance Ohio was tape recording these things and then prosecuting people the royal Canadian Mounted Police today search warrants on a call center that was located in Canada and tacked up on the wall of the call center was a sign that said don't call Ohio wow I don't want to go back to that well let's increase the pain their ecosystem their supply chain so they just say the costume business is too high in Ohio what we're we're just we're going we're going to go somewhere else that's where I want to be at no it's good it's good it's up could take several years to to get that kind of back pressure because these cases are are not quickly not easy to make but man we gotta do something this is getting out of hand do some of these it is part of the problem to reciprocity though because you know candid obviously we have a relationship some of these areas the world got another call from we don't so that that's what it comes a criminal informant there's not much you can notice saying is is by simply trying to make it more comfortable for them to do business then they're just going to go or not yeah they've still got to get the money which requires interaction with financial system they've still got to get access to our telecom system here in the United States there are actors that are aiding and abetting here in the United States and they're going to feel the pain of a higher you member Mr T. is there an Apollo creed yeah but it productions local fight tonight Mr curried it looks at the camera he says that could be the worst Mr T. I've ever heard but I will I'll take it on Monday David I'll take on a Monday Attorney General Dave Yost on the Scotts lawn show A. B. well good do good to catch up with the appreciate the times always thanks but I'd be well they got discounts lunch yesterday go robo calls and see what can happen maybe in a few years I will be a no go zone but relative to our to the to the coronavirus he sent a lesser price gouging is I I I I kind of like the fact that I said let's see what the free markets do if we lose there's a couple batters act will go after but we're not going to do what they've done in other states and have the Attorney General have a press conference and get all all on the muscle for something that has not yet happened yeah I like that kind of prudence it's lonely here this is seven hundred.

Influenza
"influenza" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

06:04 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"With influenza vaccination we are ensuring that they are up to date and fully stocked in terms of all of the potential personal protective equipment that they might need but beyond that because we have no corona virus in our city we are focusing on ensuring that the basics are doing are being done well and consistently and in Manhattan on W. NYC with doctor above all high and thank you for taking my call can you hear me yes the congestion okay so I I take issue with the advice that mayor de Blasio gave yesterday and the department of health still has on its website and I think that certain hospitals are not giving the same advice it is not good advice to advise someone who suspects that they might have the corona virus to go to their doctors office why I will tell you doctors offices cannot get N. ninety five respirators that those face masks are on back order until something like may you're in a room spewing germs they are not set up with an infection isolation room there person there the personal protective equipment for their staff and for the other patients it's just not available and moreover I mean if some one of the things that I've seen at hospitals are doing is they're suggesting that you seek virtual care if you have you know mild symptoms like a cold you stay home you know make sure you you stay home until you're no longer sick if you have a worsening cold symptoms including fever muscle aches and pains that you speak with one of the emergency room doctors using virtual Arjun castle in forgive me just first time say is your concern here unnecessary contact with healthcare workers because they are the most that we sitting in the waiting room at the doctor's office I mean this is like the doctors have no ability to test in their office they don't have the ability to prevent to to protect other patients I gotcha and we're gonna put those questions to Dr bobo right now you hear her concerns about being infectious but going to the doctor if you don't need to go in person I couldn't agree with her more and what we are actually telling new Yorkers is to call their doctors not to show up and what we are advising our to our cities doctors and more training them on this is to have procedures in place so that if someone actually needs to be seen in the office the doctor meets that individual outside of the office or someone you know on his or her staff beats them outside puts a mask on them and then put them in a room by themselves until they can be evaluated because certainly you know in other infectious disease situations you know I'll use measles as the most recent example we did have situations where people came to doctors offices and couldn't infected other folks you know it's just the reality and so I want to thank the caller for reminding us that you don't just show up call ahead because the advice may be to then go to the emergency department or to go someplace else and thank you so much I believe you said in the news conference with the mayor yesterday that the city or local doctors I'm not prepared yet to test for the virus in New York City people who think they may have it is that still the case so we have specific tasks in the city that we are we can rule out the twenty six most common viruses that account for symptoms that can be consistent with coded nineteen what we don't have is the specific tasks to then say definitively this individual has covert nineteen and so we are working very closely with the CDC to try and accelerate getting that test here into the city there is a patient in northern California who is now reportedly the first case of so called community spread in the United States that's that is someone who came down with the virus not knowing where or how they got it the news is reporting that is a potential cause for concern nationwide what's the significance of that case of unknown origin according to you well this is a situation that just sort of is developing from last night and without knowing the specific details of this particular case you know I'm not surprised because from the very beginning we have said it's inevitable that we will have our first person with covert nineteen and that once that happens it's also likely that over time we will be seeing a person to person spread in the community that's just the reality of how viruses spread and that's why it's so critical for new Yorkers to lean into the advice that we've been giving them I know that I sound you know like a broken record but it really is the best way that we can keep our families our communities safe the other important thing is not to take for granted that I have a cold if you've traveled or you've come in contact with someone who is traveling you have these symptoms call your doctor don't go to work don't send your kids to school until you've been evaluated Dr oak series for both the New York City health commissioner thank you so much I know on a day like this with this going on you're torn in so many directions and you came into our studio in person we really appreciate it thank you bye Brian Lehrer on WNYC will continue on the corona virus in our next segment stay with us this is Brooke Gladstone asking you quite simply and directly.

influenza
"influenza" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

KSCO Pet Radio

02:20 min | 1 year ago

"influenza" Discussed on KSCO Pet Radio

"Us. Our doctor doesn't always want those dogs right in the clinic. If they're we're going to get better because they're infectious but That's some definitely voiced. Not eating feeling lousy. You need to see your bet. So how do you treat treat. Canine influenza are these other responding Tori viruses that type of really good question As many folks no they're not you know viruses. Don't respond to antibiotics rate. Those are really for bacterial infections So sometimes it's supportive care. If a dog is having a real dry cough and people feel really confident he is just a really annoying cough. But there's no Signs of pneumonia. Sometimes you can give a mild cough suppressant right just to try to break that cycle of coughing. If there's any bacteria that are suspected did to be moving in and out but that would be the time to do antibiotics. Sometimes you know the most serious cases those are dogs that are hospitalized for fluids support because they just don't feel like eating or drinking and more aggressive antibiotic therapy and maybe antivirals or those not indicated for Canine Influenza. That's a good question. There were folks that were using trying to use some antivirals back in the day. But the one that is most beneficial beneficial is one that's used for One of the ones most beneficial is used for people during flu pandemics the next rate. So there's some question about well maybe we don't want to use this really big gun antiviral for Canine influenza except in very extreme cases. Usually these dogs can do better do really well with supportive. Care the I think the really really acute illnesses that we saw at the very beginning with the worst being in Greyhounds doesn't seem we just don't see that many cases anymore viruses seemed seemed to mutate in ways that over time they become a little less virulent. Right right. And you've got a population that's not been exposed right at some some point so you don't have that vulnerable population and yes. You're absolutely right.

dry cough mild cough Tori pneumonia
"influenza" Discussed on Core IM | Internal Medicine Podcast

Core IM | Internal Medicine Podcast

08:33 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on Core IM | Internal Medicine Podcast

"Which they called pulmonary tuberculosis from the article quote? Someone has said that every cough of two months duration is due to to Bricusse. This is of course absurd. It's amazing and I wish we could write like that now if only so it goes on to mention that cases pieces of what they called chronic influence abroad. Cactuses were wrongly diagnosed as interestingly. It's because of the sputum from those patients often yielded something called. Influenza Bacilli wait influenza bacilli influenza virus not bacteria that threw me off to the thing is that this is the age germ theory. He's just taking off. And so the Monitor standing viruses isn't really there And it turns out that they were actually talking about the bacteria we now know as him office influenza Ferenza which at the time they thought caused influenza hence the name so we reviewed a lot of old journal editions from Nineteen Eighteen to nineteen nineteen expecting to find sensationalize is headlines about the one thousand nine hundred and flu pandemic but we found these instead. For example the health benefits of quote horseflesh as food or articles from World World War One about new diagnoses like war psycho neurosis and organic lesions shellshocked so Lee presumably the foreigners of PTSD. We didn't find much about what we now know of as the deadliest flu pandemic in modern history. Why is that Steve? So maybe because there are probably distracted by World War One dealer here well they would eventually get their rate by June July. They start to report about the flu outbreaks. But due to limited understanding by that point tens of millions of people had already died. Fortunately since then and we've gotten a lot better at preventing and treating the flu. It's no surprise that we're discussing this. As the flu. Season starts to heat up what she did. Their cases of flu are already on the rise in the US. So let's try to stay ahead of things and explore the ABC's of influenza welcome to mind the gap. I'm Nick Knutson and I'm Steve Lou. We'd like to thank Dr Nita Shot Chief Infectious Disease Fellow at the Mayo Clinic and Dr Denise McCullough Infectious Disease Fellow at the university versity Washington Tripura viewing episode during today's episode. We're GONNA jump right into our modern thinking about influenza and how influenza the prevention was developed namely we'll start with a little more history and well how it's named followed by a deep dive into flu vaccines answering in questions like how is the vaccine actually made and how do we select the strains that go into the vaccine every year from there. We'll discuss how effective the vaccine really is including this idea of herd immunity and lastly we'll discuss some concerns about the vaccine like weaning immunity and vaccine contraindications to jump back into are historical. Play by play. When did they first pick up on the fact that an epidemic was underway in one thousand nine hundred? The flu epidemic actually hidden three distinct waves. The first occurred at the tail island of what we now call the flu season in March of nineteen eighteen. So that's why by midsummer after the first wave. There's still no mention of the epidemic. In any major journal July nineteen eighteen eighteen the Lancet I notes in ongoing epidemic of respiratory illness. They wondered quote is the present widely spread epidemic one of influenza. Or is it something do. They were confused because they were unable to easily that him off. Louis Influenza Bacilli which at the time was thought to be the cause of influenza. They described the disease as follows quote. The most striking making symptoms are sudden onset with chills. Severe headache with pain and limbs and general malaise. The maximum temperature was one or three to one of four. Many cases. Develop a cough harsh in nature with Sound familiar to anyone. Who's had the flu? Yeah that's gives me the chills just thinking about it. I didn't think it was that serious. But then articles began to note that in some patients delirium and death occurred within twenty four hours by October nineteen eighteen. The second wave had already struck the Boston medical and surgical journal now. The New England Oakland Journal noted the spread of the influenza epidemic through Boston and the East Coast. They also noted a typical death rate at the time but rapid spread a week later later they noted that the epidemic was quote still maintaining unprecedented strength and drastic measures. Were being taken. The New York State Health Commissioner printed posters noting that it was quote vote get this unlawful to cough or sneeze without turning the face away from others and covering the nose or mouth with a handkerchief. Amazing is the numbers are pretty sobering at this point in October in Massachusetts alone over one hundred fifty thousand people got sick and just two weeks and five thousand people died by November number. They know that the epidemic was really starting to wane locally but had spread throughout the US and into the West. The reality is the second wave of flu smoldered catching fire in some in regions for the next month. What do they do about this? Well I they started telling people to get vaccinated but the problem is that they still thought they were dealing with him awful. It's influenza or another bacteria so they were using the wrong vaccine and so they got pretty desperate. Still other treatments advocated for including sprain people with Formalin giving anti streptococcal. STREPTOCOCCAL SAM to others or get this giving alcohol to deal always a good so the public remain confused. Some thought that disease was a form of malaria are you. The doctors were misled by culture data and debated intensely and multiple journals about whether the infection was caused by h flu or maybe staphylococcus. Now we know that the secondary infections by the time the third influenza way finished crashing over the world estimates range between twenty and fifty million people had died. Yeah that's pretty horrific. So why hasn't that happened again. The nineteen hundred virus was special. It had a W shaped mortality Steve. What's a w shape mortality curve? Most most of the time when we talk about the flu we talk about people dying young and dying old and that looks like a you. On a graph. During these specific flu outbreaks. Young adults died giving it a peak in the middle title kind of looking like a w backing up. When do they realize it was a virus? Not Bacteria that would actually come two decades later in nineteen thirty three. That's crazy and it took a few more years to realize that there were multiple species of influenza. There are actually three because influenza in humans. I bet you didn't know that. Influenza C exists more Trivia via firm nerdy cocktail parties though. Glad that line fell on you. Now we are GonNa talk about naming conventions and the creation of the Influenza Vaccine Influenza A. is the most common species and has caused the most pandemics in the world. Influenza B. is less common and usually only causes regional epidemics for example last year twenty eighteen to twenty nineteen ninety five percent of all influenza viruses. Were flew a but that was particularly extreme on average flu. It makes up around twenty five percent of cases. In addition it also tends to vary by region last year despite overall low prevalence fluky was actually more common in certain. Maria's the world specifically parts of Africa and South America it's also still unclear whether flew B is less dangerous than freeway it causes fewer deaths but that could just be with lower prevalence not actually lower variance new data coming from. ICU is calling this into question. CR show notes for more but across the board people recognize that fluency is the mildest list and also the rarest. Okay now that we've established which flew species we actually care about flu season on clinically. Relevant is what we're saying. Thank you remind me how to name them. How do we tell the strains apart? Glad you ask. Let's go over the exciting world of naming conventions you start with the species either GonNa be flew away. Flabby followed by whereas isolated the strain number and then the year. So let's give an example the infamous two thousand nine pandemic strain was officially called influence. A California oh four. Two thousand has nine wait. I thought that was called each win one for influenza. A there's a little bit more. It's actually divided into serotypes sorted by our antibodies. React to the Hema gluten and the Noor Amenities Molecules The end and just as a note influence in B. and C.. We don't use these serotypes. Yeah they don't as a refresher. The Hema gluten protein allows influenza Ferenza to bind and enter cells and their amenities protein helps the very on leave to infect other cells of Syrian. Janine let me use my fancy words Steve in is important because it's the target of the flu vaccine that makes sense after all that's viruses get into the cell and as it turns out near airman it is also important. That's what the target of inhibitors like us town. Move Your Premier in the Navy that.

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"influenza" Discussed on The Plant Path

The Plant Path

04:55 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on The Plant Path

"You know that's not always my the way I I think about it but you know if someone has you know for example accompanying cough with influence which is really common we want to to give indicated expectance and respiratory route anti viral remedies to just support the body in clearing out off that pathogen. Some of my top here would be lemay. Dissect them a shower liquors to comport Ri- liquorice. Great great remedy here. Hip is excellent timing Oregano really really great but really very broad spectrum and the other one remedy that I really like here as poplar buds that resonance bud from poplar trees. That's got that resin. Usually pick them depending on where you live like January ish. Sh- makes a really resonance tincture. That's very broad spectrum. Use Neha Lichen is actually another really great remedy here so of course we want to make sure that were you know giving remedies that are indicated for the Tissue State of that respiratory system though right so you know if it's really hot and dry maybe giving them Osha isn't the best way to go right. And if you do give you gotta give it with moistening. Cooling herbs to balance wants out the energetic so always making sure to attend to the energetics The other thing that I really like giving people during fever is n- Irving's If they're losing sleep if they're having a lot of muscle tension and muscle pain sometimes. I'll give someone a really heavy dose of off some herbs to knock them out right if someone's up all night there with fever. They're having a real hard time sleeping at night. That is an obstacle to cure right because the body is rejuvenating and replenishing itself during sleep. So I WANNA make sure people are sleeping sleeping really well so if needed. I will sometimes administer a heavy hitting irving like Valerian or or passion flower or hops or something just to relax someone maybe relaxed their muscles a little bit and just get them to sleep. That can be really helpful to and of course it's the last thing is water. Water Water got make sure people are staying very hydrated during a fever as they're sweating a lot and they're losing a lot of fluids so we gotta make sure they stay hydrated hydrated administering electrolytes can be really helpful if they're really really sweating a lot especially getting a lot of that muscle pain electrolytes really helpful there. I really like giving people so magnesium too that can be helpful to provide some relief and and yeah and unless it's getting dangerously high. I really just like to support things with diabetics and kind of some of those things that I mentioned and then just kind of let the body audie run. Its course you know you know. Usually doing something like that fever will be will be taken care of within a day or two uh-huh and and and the thing about that too is that you're going to emerge on the other side stronger right your immunity stronger your body stronger ultimately Mitty your healthier than you are if you just take an antibiotic or which by the way an antibiotic for bacteria and these viral earl infections. They usually don't work so well. If at all but for some reason Dr Phil give them which doesn't make any sense to me but or if you're taking like aspirin or something. That also is really suppressive. And you're not giving your immune system an opportunity to learn so really every time that you get sick like that and support the body with herbs follow the vital force. Allow things to the body to just do its. It's job. You will emerge on the other side healthier and stronger and ultimately more vital. And that's really what we're going for are in a vital Est.. Orientation of herbal medicine is not just curing disease or fixing. What's broken but really doing things? In a way that people will are ultimately Strengthening their overall vitality which translates into a longer happier healthier life. Thank you so much for tuning into the plant for more three training on herbal medicine. Edison and the wisdom of nature shirt on over to our blog at evolutionary mobile. Until next time take care Eh..

fever Ri Neha Lichen Dr Phil muscle tension Sh Edison aspirin
"influenza" Discussed on The Plant Path

The Plant Path

15:22 min | 2 years ago

"influenza" Discussed on The Plant Path

"Hey there everybody say John Popham here founder of the School of Evolutionary herbalism and and the other day I did one of our quarterly live sessions for all of the evolutionary herbalism. Students and someone asked a question about. How do we go about holistically treating influenza? And and you know we're here. It's December of two thousand and nineteen. And as I'm sure you know this tends to be the season where people were coming down and with the flu or people were getting. Colds got compromised immune systems. There's all sorts of bugs floating around in the air and so I thought it would be really fun onto to share some of the content that I taught during that Q.. In a Webinar. So you know one of the reasons why I think this is particularly important is because it's willy conventional for people when they get the flu and get especially especially with the accompanying fever for people to really reach for. You know taking something like aspirin to get that fever down and you one of the things that we see is that when we suppress a fever we actually ended up. Prolonging the sickness. There right we can turn what would normally be. Maybe a three day fever into a week long fever through suppressing it and one of the wonderful things about herbal medicine is that we have plants available to us that really support the body in going going about its natural response in the body reacts to a fever and the way that you know. I think it's important for us as herbalists to remember remember that there is a vital intelligence in the body right in the West we often times refer to that as the vital force and and as holistic herbalists. We want to really make sure that we're always honoring and following that flow of the vital force trusting rusting in the intelligence of the body trusting. In the fact that our bodies know how to self regulate into self heal and that our work with plants is really just supporting that process rather than biochemistry overwriting what our body is is trying to do in order to auto regulate an auto self heal so I thought this was a very fitting discussion discussion to be sharing here. Her in the late autumn transitioning in to winter time. So I just wanted to do a little introduction here and I hope. Have you enjoy some of the teachings that I shared here in our evolutionary herbalism quarterly Webinar. And we're going to be talking a little bit here about some some of my approaches to holistically addressing influenza and fever. What is my protocol for the flu? Well there's a handful of things that I generally consider here in the treatment of the flu and I think before really getting into that. I think it's worth kind of acknowledging the an interesting kind of dynamic in in our terminology where we tend to lump colds Flus right. We always say colds flus. Maybe because they people tend to get them around the fallen wintertime. Maybe that's why But really from I guess from a perspective of pathology. They're actually quite different in the sense that there have similarities and they have the differences. You know they're generally both viral infections affecting the respiratory system but one of the big differences is that the common cold generally affects upper respiratory. Right sinuses you get the stuffy nose. The kind of your head feels like it's floating on a balloon in ten feet above your head kind of tired sluggish sometimes a sore throat that generally is about the extent of it great whereas a fever this is typically yes can be upper respiratory but oftentimes flus tend to get much deeper into into the respiratory system so we oftentimes see a cough oftentimes associated with some bronchitis but the main differentiating factor is fever right and so- influenza infection generally speaking always is accompanied by a fever whereas a common cold is not so. That's a really important distinguishing factor. Here and really kind of changes the approach to you effectively treating the flu. The other thing that I think is worth mentioning is that no one has ever died from the common cold but people die every year ear from influenza. Generally it's usually young children or the elderly people that really don't have very strong immune system strong vitality but nonetheless. People do die from the flu quite often and not dimension every now and then there. Are these really big flu. Pandemics that come out and can be very difficult to treat at Cetera. So just wanted to give a little little background there when it does come to actual herbal treatment for the flu. There's a number of factors that I think are important shortened to consider. I is food actually so an old kind of rule of thumb. Is that you fast a fever and feed a cold so this is why during a cold. It's nice to like have a lot of like hot soups and broth often. You want to keep yourself nourished during the cold but during a fever actually eating food is not good. You know generally speaking when someone has a working fever usually they don't really have that much of an appetite anyway but it's good to keep that person in a fasting state. The reason for that is is that during a fever. All of the blood is being pushed out. Out to the periphery and is being circulated to circulate immunological components to keep things moving to try to push heat out doc and ultimately raise the internal body temperature to cook out that pathogen when you eat a meal all of your blood has to flow back into the digestive digestive system and so that can really inhibit the process of fever in pretty detrimental ways so it always say fast asked a fever feed a cold and the the other important thing before I get into kind of practical aspects of how I go about treating is that it's very important understand is that a fever is a vital response. This is an intelligent response of the vital force of the body in response bounce to a pathogen and so you know alip from an allopathic perspective. We see the fever as the enemy from a vital vital EST perspective. We see that the fever is the friend. And it's actually the intelligence of the body at work fighting off this invading pathogen. And so it's really important that we as Vita list we work with the vital force that we move with that intelligence intelligence of the body and don't suppress it or trying to you know biochemical so to speak shut it off which is essentially what get a lot of are over the counter kind of fever reducing or what we would call a Feb- refuge type drugs do aspirin and I be pro fin things like that. Those non steroidal anti inflammatory drugs. They work amazing but they turn off that fever response biochemicals speaking. And you know if you think of that. The fever is the body's innate way of basically raising the internal temperature so we'll Adina nature those whatever the pathogen is and so if you shut that down for however many hours during that downtime. We're the fevers. Not Active. Sure you feel better because you don't have a fever because if he doesn't make you feel good right but during that time. That pathogen is reproducing and so the suppression Russian of the fever is going to significantly extend the period of time. One is sick than a fever. That's just allowed to do. Its job now now from an herbal standpoint as I say we want to support the vital force we want to support the body. We want to encourage courage what the body's already trying to do with our plants and this is why we have this amazing category of remedies referred to as dia forensics and the diaphragm medics are really cool category of herbs because they are used to treat a fever and they do so so very successfully. But they're not suppressing it. They're actually helping the fever to do. Its job and they do this through a couple of different ways. And there's really I think of two subcategories of Dia Foretich so on the one hand. We have our stimulant dia. Forensics these are doc pungent hot warming circulatory stimulating type plants. That are GonNa you know again. Help increase that temperature and so really anything that tastes particularly spicy and makes you sweat. That is a stimulant diabetics. I Fredericks all of our really hot spicy peppers. Erbil Eli Cayenne is a big one here very powerful stimulant diabetic Ginger singer even black pepper. These are all stimulant diaphragm. Really anything that's going to move the blood. Bring the blood up to the surface now. The stimulant diabetics are really used oftentimes during an earlier phase of of a fever so generally when someone feels cold and this is because the Hypothalamus has set your Basil Body Body temperature from its baseline like whatever ninety eight point six or whatever it might be saying okay instead of ninety eight point six as standard one. Oh four as standard standard or one. Oh two or one three or whatever it is but so that's baseline but you're at ninety eight something and so you feel cold right so you get kind of Pale skin low energy. You feel. Chivalry feel cold and this is when you want to give a stimulant diabetic. The other type is the relaxing diaphragm. And these are remedies that are typically used later. You're on a fever when the fevers peaking when you feel hot your skin's red skins dry oftentimes. There's a lot of tension both psychological psychological and also physiological in the sense that your muscles start to get a little achey. Your back hurts. Your head hurts. Everything feels Kinda kinda tight. You're having a hard time sleeping and you feel hot right This is where we use relaxant dia forensics. Then what these are doing is they're actually relaxing constriction in the capillary beds just under the skin as well as the pores of the skin so I always say relaxant diverge close all the all the windows in a room and crank the heat up in that room gets really really hot. Well a stimulant diabetic traffic is like turning the heat up. A relaxant. Diabetic is like opening up the windows. Right and so that's really what those remedies are doing. They're opening up the pores opening up the capillary beds. So all that internal heat can release and ultimately break that fever classic remedies here. It'd be low billy. Korea pleurisy root bone set is a major remedy here. peppermint elder flower Yaro some of those have mixed emulate and relaxing diaphragm. Proper special. Like Yaro I find this kind of working in both ways so these are some really great remedies to consider that are working with in treating the fever side of influenza. Now the last part I wanNA say about diabetics is that it's really important that these are drink as hot teas. That is really what brings out that diabetic property much more as that hot T- taking a tincture it. It'll work but not that well if you are only have a tincture and there's been a lot of situations where I've had to treat fevers and all I have this tincture. What I usually do is boil some water or just get some hot water you you know not just like hot out of the Faucet but you know like tea drinking hot and I'll put the tincture in there and just have someone drink that because think of it hot water? What does it do volatile? Is it steams moves up an out and that's the whole energy of a fever. It's the whole energy of a diuretic addicts were pushing things up and radiating things out. It's like that fire element right. We're pushing up out so yes so dia forensics the other the other element of this is You know I just want to kind of spotlight on bone set a little but here Bone set is very very important. Influenza remedy I think it's the most important influenza remedy it has antiviral viral properties. Which of course is beneficial but it is an incredibly reliable relaxant diabetic specifically for the deep deep aches and pains in the muscles and the bones during a fever bone set has very specific for that and it works very very well so I just want to mention a bone set that's Taurean portfolio Adam. must have remedy for the treatment of influenza. The other aspect of this here is working with antiviral plants..

fevers influenza Colds stimulant aspirin School of Evolutionary herbali Dia Foretich John Popham founder bronchitis Vita Eli Cayenne Korea Adam. billy