35 Burst results for "inflammation"

Dr. Anthony Fauci Testifies ON Capital Hill

Democracy Now! Audio

00:40 sec | 3 d ago

Dr. Anthony Fauci Testifies ON Capital Hill

"Hill. Top infectious disease expert. Dr. Anthony falchi warned a senate committee that many of those who survived covid-19 suffer symptoms measured in weeks to months. They have fatigue myalgia, either and involvement of the neurological system as well as cognitive abnormalities such as the inability to concentrate doctor found. She warned many patients who appear to have that covered from covid-19 were found to have inflammation of the heart. These are the kind of things that tell us we must be humble and that we do not completely understand the nature of this illness.

Dr. Anthony Falchi Myalgia Senate
Big Ten Reverses, Will Play Football In October

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

02:38 min | Last week

Big Ten Reverses, Will Play Football In October

"While a lot has happened particularly in College Football Roy the big ten announced that its Council of Presidents and Chancellors as voted to allow the League to play football in October the big ten will open its season on the weekend of October twenty four th with teams playing eight Games in eight weeks and a big. Ten Championship game then scheduled for December nineteenth and that would make the big ten eligible for the College Football playoff as the final CFP ranking announcement of the season is now set for December twentieth. Now keep that in mind as I. mentioned this, Missouri's count of players who will miss the team season opener against Alabama on September Twenty Six, do cove in nineteen protocols is now up to twelve. Now, not all twelve of necessarily tested for the corona virus. The SEC mandates a fourteen day quarantine for those who have been in prolonged close contact with someone who test positive. As you and I both know there are a lot of colleges under now having a problem. With the pandemic for their students on campus I, you know you and I both have the same feeling about this health comes first but. Are you know did they kind of get pushed in this meaning the big ten in the pack twelve? I think clearly they did I mean I don't. I mean first of all this reversal on replay review, right the first time we called play the fact ten. Commissioner. He said they weren't GonNa play and then he got a lot of pressure from everything from donors to coaches to elected officials himself they decided that they could. You. Know the their excuse is, I. Don't mean excuse in a negative way I just mean pivotal changes they say is that they now have better rapid testing and they can test the players more frequently and get the results back more quickly. Bottom line is that they changed their mind and I think there was a lot of pressure around revenues that they were losing from football and the fact that the SEC. Big Twelve. We're doing it I think that probably was as much as anything what I worry about his health of the players. It's very simple I'm not I'm I'm not against College football I love college football but I worry about the long term health effects on these players particularly hard inflammation, which is something we're just starting to learn about.

Football SEC Council Of Presidents League Commissioner Missouri Alabama
West Coast has some of worst air quality in the world amid wildfires

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:11 min | 2 weeks ago

West Coast has some of worst air quality in the world amid wildfires

"Coppola. Much of the West Coast is covered in a blanket of thick smoke from the wildfires that air burning correspondent Alex Stone reports from Los Angeles. A four of the five worst cities for air quality in the world, are on the West coast of the U. S. And the Fifth is Vancouver. But Portland, Seattle L. A. And San Francisco are topping the world's list. People here in L. A are being told to try to remain indoors all day. If they can not to go outside. Definitely not to exercise in it. It's like a thick fog everywhere, but it's not fog. It's warm out in the smoke smell hits you the second you walk outside on multiple medical studies show that smoke from wildfires can irritate lungs and cause inflammation. That can affect the immune system, which could make people more risk of lung infection with covert 19 medical professionals are especially concerned because people are being asked to stay indoors. But being outdoors reduces the rate of infection, the White House announced today. President Trump will visit California on Monday for a briefing with local and federal fire officials. President tweeting Friday Friday, thanking firefighters and first responders who are battling the wildfires. Whence news time 8 31 time for traffic

West Coast President Trump Alex Stone Los Angeles Vancouver San Francisco White House Portland California Coppola. Seattle L. A.
Air Quality Experts: Wildfire smoke can increase risk for coronavirus

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:00 min | 2 weeks ago

Air Quality Experts: Wildfire smoke can increase risk for coronavirus

"Just one crisis after another these days and now the latest to strike maybe making the others worse. Okay, CBS reporter Caveman Cockney explains on unprecedented stretch of bad air from California's fast burning wildfires has health experts worried about potential health impacts on covert 19 patients? Jozias have professor of medicine. John Bombs points to a number of concerning studies that link exposure to find particles. PM 2.5 with increased risk of severe Cove in 19. What's behind that link? Well, for one, it's thought that wildfire smoke damages the lungs, immune response to viruses. Meantime, the smoke also seems to make the lung damage caused by covert 19 even worse, while fire smoke exposure causes airway and lung inflammation. So we think that the wildfire smoke, add fuel to the fire, so to speak. Bombs advice. Stay indoors as much as possible, as long as the pollution remains bad and use an air purifier. If you can keep

John Bombs Caveman Cockney Lung Damage CBS Professor Of Medicine Reporter Cove California Jozias
Optimal Health With Dr. Calapai: Vitamins and Heart Health

Optimal Health with Dr. Calapai

03:22 min | 2 weeks ago

Optimal Health With Dr. Calapai: Vitamins and Heart Health

"Vitamin D 3 may benefit patients with heart failure. Well, of course, and it certainly makes sense to me and we've seen this The majority of people that have a progression into heart failure have probably been deficient in vitamins and minerals and hormones. Overtime. I will also tell you, they probably have a significant burden of heavy metals on board. Because traditional medical literature talks about mercury Damaging the contraction of your heart. Remember everything that happens in your body has an electro chemical basis, Electric And chemical So if you need minerals that usually have two positive charged ions. To be in yourselves and to contract with your heart muscle to work in any organ. And you're displacing those by to positively charged heavy metals. Now you're destroying that normal. Biochemical process. And heart failure is correlated with heavy metal exposure. So if we learn about these things, and we correct your vitamins, minerals, hormones get rid of the bad things the medals and if need be, put new cells into become heart cells to get your heart contraction back. You can see pretty dramatic benefits We've had people go from the thirties in ejection fraction up to the 55 range. And you know doesn't take 10 years. It takes months for those things to happen. But remember what we're looking at all the things to correct and that's what we get for greater results than anybody else because we're looking at correcting. Every part of the picture. So it's not just Oh, here. I want you to take these foods and take those vitamins. I saw a patient yesterday. Who was seeing someone else. And someone else said Oh, just take out dairy. And here, take all these vitamins. And don't you get it? Inflammatory foods. And I asked the patients And what does that mean? Patient didn't understand why I said it. So what's the inflammatory food? Food that's causing inflammation said Well You can't look at inflammation and think it's on ly some random food you have to test for food, allergy and testing for food allergy. We found out foods. The person didn't realize they were producing antibodies against That's part of the inflammatory cascade and some people, it's a big part. Of the inflammatory cascade. So important to outline define what's happening. Not just randomly take foods and see what happens. And of course, we have people that say Well, I'm going to take out Grant greens. I'm going to take very many people do better, of course, but they're not hitting the nail on the head because they're not looking at all The other things that may be reacting to the testing would show And when people take vitamins, and they think that 500 of D or 500 of sea is good, and they're taking I'm taking my vitamins every day, But when you do the blood test on, you see they're deficient. Because the levels of what they're taking or too low, So you know, we see this all the time and have discussions every day about this because it's important for people to realize you know where they need to be and what their requirements. They require its need to be met. And then, of course, we would re checked the blood after we make recommendations for vitamins and proof that they're getting all the results. And of course they feel it so There's nothing more accurate than that. You can't just randomly take vitamins and expect to get your best result.

AstraZeneca vaccine could still be ready by year-end, CEO says

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

07:46 min | 2 weeks ago

AstraZeneca vaccine could still be ready by year-end, CEO says

"This morning, one of the nation's leading physicians, Dr David Vega, CEO of the Ellison Institute of Transformative Medicine, at U. S. C. Welcome back. Thank you. Great to be here Want to talk about the vaccine and the trial? AstraZeneca CEO said this morning that a covert vaccine could still be ready before the end of the year. Even with the whole interruption in the UK, the clinical trial due to that One person the adverse reaction If you could be first in line, Dr Egas to get the shot the vaccine when it becomes available, would you take it? No question. I mean, the data are going to be very transparent. You're the risk here, the benefits and scientists, including myself, We'll review them and publicly make a statement. I think this makes sense or it doesn't realize this hole. That has been a lot of the media over the last 24. Hours is routine is actually the second one on this clinical trial. The first one the media didn't take hold up now they're jumping all over it. It's pretty routine. When a patient has any side effect that we stop and see. Is this side effect related to the vaccine or not? In the first hole? It wasn't related. We'll see on this one, but realized it been close to 30,000 patients vaccinated twice with this vaccine. And there have been almost no adverse event, so it is very safe. Dr Rigas should also be reassuring for the American public in that, you know, in this political season, we're getting closer to Election Day and that there has been concerned about political pressure. The fact that AstraZeneca is following procedures and putting it on hold for a while, as you say, it's common to do that that they're playing by the rules basically. Oh, yeah. Every pharmaceutical company or clinical trial management group is playing by the rules. I speak too many of them daily, and this is without political pressure because it's going to be transparent if they do the wrong thing. They're obviously jeopardizing the health of the American people and their company. So I believe in science, and I believe in the transparency and science. I hope this transparency continues and buy all inclination. It will continue and again toward the end when we have data. There will be a declaration by many scientists and doctors that the public trust this makes sense where this doesn't make sense. But you know that there are still people who will just dig their feet in and say, I'm not going to take this. So is there any effort or can there be any effort behind the scenes to make the vaccine mandatory? Um, So the big question is. Do you want the inflammation in your lugs or your arm? Right? The vaccine. The inflammation is in your arm. You make an immune response with the virus. It's in your lungs have lasting ramifications. Ramifications for your lifetime. Will this vaccine the mandatory? No. Will there be certain privileges you get when you have a vaccine? No question about it. They're going to be state that I don't want you in my state if you haven't been vaccinated because you could spread the virus to the co op board of people in our state, who can't respond to a vaccine, the elderly people with immune disorders, cancer and others are not going to respond well to a vaccine. So if somebody comes in unvaccinated and spread the virus he or she can kill or harm those individuals. So states are going to say you need to show me a certificate of immunity before you come to my state before you come to my sporting a bit before you come to my restaurant. I do think we're going to start to protect people in our community by doing this Like to ask you about the Russian vaccine. We know that some critical testing's testing rather with the Russian vaccine were skipped. To get it to market sooner seems to be generating on immune response. We still don't know about safety. What are your thoughts? Perhaps your hopes your concerns about the Russian vaccine. I love that recording at the Russian vaccine the Ah. So this vaccine, Putin made a declaration. We're gonna put the vaccine on the market What he didn't do yet. Was due the face three clinical trial or manufacture the vaccine. So right now, the face three trial is ongoing. They have not yet manufacture the vaccine, so they're not administering it to the general public. It will take months to manufacture the vaccine. By the time the manufacturing is done. He will have data from the pastry clinical trials showing at work the initial data that were published a few days ago so that it was a very good immune response. The T cell characterization which is really important this virus wasn't done so we'll learn more about that over time. What good is is that that declaration was a political statement. And the virus is ready to be distributed yet, So by the time it's ready, I think we'll have more data or they will have more data. Governor. Newsome has said by one estimate that 44% of small businesses in California may be forced to close due to the pandemic. Shut down. They just can't survive. So I'm wondering You know, l a county is huge. Do you see a way we're businesses could reopen sooner rather than later. Maybe the county broken up into smaller areas that could re open rather than these counties being treated as a whole. It's a great question. Certainly there are areas of L. A county that are doing remarkably well with a little virus in other areas where the virus is really in high numbers, And so it's all about behavior. If everyone if there were a rule in L, a county that if you didn't wear a mask, you would get a $500 fine. Within a week. We'll be able to open almost every business in the county and we really doing very well. The problem is people, you know, it's a It's my civil liberty not to wear a mask. We have to get up and start to do the right thing. Can we micro dissect the county and have different rules in every area? It's gonna be very difficult and I think there's going to be a lot of this understanding and it probably won't go aswell as we hope it would. But if we start to enforce A mask wearing and start to find individuals who don't do it so we can actually open our economy. Allow kids to interact. I mean, really change our culture by Doing the right thing. Then I think we have shot. And so the question is. Do our politicians have the guts to stand up and make something mandatory and force that right now? They don't enforce it. My hope is they will You know, we saw Corona virus cases Spike after Memorial Day, Fourth of July. Doctor in each jaw. A prominent doctor wrote on Twitter over the weekend that there are actually more daily covert cases now than there were around this around Memorial Day, pointing to the possibility of much higher, much higher crush of new cases after Labor Day. Do you agree with that? You know the problem as you are all very well aware. I think everybody the LA's, where testing is limited. So we don't know the true number of cases, especially the asymptomatic cases anywhere. What I do know is that behaviors let down on holidays. We know that people get together. They realize they have to interact with their family friends, etcetera, and we get significant spread of the virus. We're going to know. Over the next several weeks. What those numbers truly are. We're closer approximation because there's a lag time between exposure and between ah symptoms and testing for the virus. And that lack time is several weeks. We're going to start to see it with increased numbers, increase hospitalizations and probably increased death from the virus. Yes or no Quick answer. Halloween. If my kid is masked up and keep social distance, Is it safe? As long as everybody else does the same. Remember it's not just your kid masking up. It's every other child masking up every parent asking, answering the door, giving out the Candies in the goodies masking up. So if we all play by the rules, it's probably safe. The problem is, we haven't all played by the rules. Historically played by the rules. Dr Rigas. Thank you. Thank you. Dr David David Eggers, Eggers, Eggers, CEO CEO CEO of of of the the the Ellison Ellison Ellison Institute Institute Institute of of of Transformative Transformative Transformative Medicine Medicine Medicine at at at USC. USC. USC.

Dr David David Eggers Of Of Transformative Transform USC Dr Rigas Ellison Institute Of Transform CEO Dr David Vega Ellison Ellison Ellison Instit Ceo Ceo Ceo Astrazeneca UK Dr Egas California Putin Asymptomatic
Penn State clarifies doctor's claim of one-third of Big Ten athletes with myocarditis

Mitch Albom

01:12 min | 3 weeks ago

Penn State clarifies doctor's claim of one-third of Big Ten athletes with myocarditis

"Doctor really assert that approximately one third of all big 10 athletes who have tested positive for covert 19 have myocarditis, potentially damaging or even deadly inflammation of the muscles around the heart. And his conclusion. Not exactly that very conclusion went viral Thursday after a story printed some off the doctor's comments this week. Now somewhere, and I'm reading verbatim from Dan Wetzel Sporting Dan Wetzel's article. He does a great job, Yahoo sports, he said Somewhere in the translation between zoom meeting and social media. Ah, lot of nuance and perspective was lost, and the doctor's comments had become a political football to be batted around. And that's exactly where we're at right now. Absolutely, positively is, the doctor explained, You could have quote you could have a very high level athlete who's got a very superior vo two max and cardiac output who gets infected with covert And he could drop his or her vo two max and cardio cardiac output just by 10%. And that could make them go from elite toe average status. We don't know yet. And I think that there's a

Dan Wetzel Yahoo
Penn State doctor says 30-35% of Big Ten athletes positive for COVID-19 had myocarditis symptoms

Tom Sullivan

00:22 sec | 3 weeks ago

Penn State doctor says 30-35% of Big Ten athletes positive for COVID-19 had myocarditis symptoms

"Word that Penn State's director of athletic medicine Says that memory scans revealed that about A third of the big 10 athletes who tested positive for covert 19. Appear to have my own card itis. A type of inflammation of the heart muscle.

Penn State Director
Flu-related death reported in Riverside County, its first of the season amid fears of possible 'twindemic'

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

01:20 min | 3 weeks ago

Flu-related death reported in Riverside County, its first of the season amid fears of possible 'twindemic'

"Already underway in Riverside County, where they have confirmed their first death Now, Ah man in his eighties from the San You Sento Valley, who died last week in a hospital. We're still a few weeks away until the flu season really begins to rant up, so health officials are urging everyone to get their flu shot before October if you can. They also note that some of the same measures used to curb the spread of Corona virus may also help stop the flu, like wearing a mask and frequent Hand washing. While we're talking about the flu, with so much emphasis on the search for a Corona virus vaccine, it's important to remember that now is the time to get that flu shot. The fluids here. Case is already being reported across the nation, including here in Southern California. But there are those who still just don't want to get a flu shot, even though they're readily available. Here's how Dr David Vegas puts into perspective the argument over taking it or not. Do you want a little bit of inflammation in your arm, which is the flu shot? Versus inflammation in your lungs, which is getting the flow and the answer. Obviously, as you wanted in your arm, there is no downside. With the exception of feeling potentially a sore arm and maybe a little bit of a fever for, you know, a few hours after a flu shot That's it. The downside of getting the flu can obviously be death but also can be other long term ramifications. Health officials say the flu shot is even more important this year because of the Corona virus pandemic.

FLU San You Sento Valley Riverside County Inflammation Dr David Vegas Fever Southern California
Georgia State QB diagnosed with heart condition related to COVID-19, to miss 2020 season

Waddle & Silvy

00:18 sec | Last month

Georgia State QB diagnosed with heart condition related to COVID-19, to miss 2020 season

"State quarterback has virus related heart condition. Georgia state freshman quarterback will not be able to play this season after being diagnosed with a heart condition related to covert 19. Team announced on Twitter. Several athletes have been stricken with my own card itis is a disease associated with Corona virus that causes inflammation of the heart. And again.

Twitter Georgia
Should You Switch to Fish Oil with PRMs?

The Nutrition Diva's Quick and Dirty Tips for Eating Well and Feeling Fabulous

02:57 min | Last month

Should You Switch to Fish Oil with PRMs?

"Fish oil is rich in the omega three fatty acids, EPA and Dha and most American adults don't get the recommended amount of these nutrients from their diet and officials supplement is one way to help fill that gap. Fish Oil is also used in higher therapeutic doses to treat and prevent. Variety of health conditions including heart disease, auto, immune disorders, arthritis, and even depression. There are a few different mechanisms of action here. Omega threes are anti thrown Belichick that means that they reduce the tendency of blood to form clots and they're also potent anti inflammatories. To how do they do all of this? Well, Omega threes are enzymatic converted in your body into various biologically active molecules and those then orchestrate the body's inflammatory and immune responses at the cellular level. There are a lot of different types of these active compounds including Prostaglandins I, cost annoyed and leukotrienes. Pro Resolving mediators or PRM's our newly recognized category of these active compounds. The three main types of these are protections, resolve ines and medicines, and the fact that three PRM's start with p. r. and M. is actually quite handy. Now, in some medical papers, you'll see these compounds referred to as s PM's which stands for specialized pro resolving mediators, but that's not nearly as handy under Monica device. So I'M GONNA STICK WITH PRM's. Like their name implies crow resolving. Act to actively resolve or turn off the body's inflammatory responses and I want you to remember inflammation is not necessarily a bad thing. It is part of the body's immune response and in the right place at the right time, it serves a very important and valuable function. Chronic or excessive inflammation on the other hand can start to create problems and that's where the PR come in their job is to switch off that inflammatory activity once the immediate threat has been dealt with, which allows the inflammation to resolve and healing to begin. Some research suggests that in diseases that are characterized by chronic or inappropriate inflammation, there might be some sort of disruption in the body's production of these. PRM's and other research shows that supplementation with omega three fatty acids like those fish oil can increase the amount and the activity of PRM's in the body. But if our body makes PRM's when we take Omega three, why would we need to take them as a supplement? Why indeed?

Belichick EPA Crow
Vaccines, Masks and Handwashing: A Coronavirus Update

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

05:13 min | Last month

Vaccines, Masks and Handwashing: A Coronavirus Update

"You have probably been hearing about a virus, a sickness that's been going around the world. We did an episode about it back in March five months ago. Now when we were all still just starting to learn about it. And now although we're still learning new things about this virus, we've also had some time to experience the way our lives have changed because of it. Some people have gotten very sick but even people who haven't been made ill have been affected by this worldwide situation. Many of you probably had to stop going to school in the spring or it would have been the fall if you live in the Southern Hemisphere. and. Some of you aren't going back to your school buildings at all as school starts up again in many countries. Others of you will be going back, but maybe not full-time or you might have to wear a mask when you're in your school or maybe your family is trying to find a different kind of arrangement to make sure you can learn new things and stay healthy at the same time. Today we're going to get an update on this virus called Cuvette Nineteen Andrew and answer some of your questions about what's called a vaccine a medicine that can help people not get a sickness. Now I WANNA say if talking or hearing about this topic makes you feel nervous or anxious or scared and listening to an episode about it is not going to make you feel better. It's okay to skip this episode or to ask your adults to listen first to see if they think this would be good for you to hear. For some people, it's really helpful to get as much information about something as possible that actually makes them feel better about something that's on their mind. But for others, it doesn't feel better and it's Ok to listen to a different episode instead if that's the case for you like maybe our episode about Unicorns and other mythical creatures or our recent episode about making ice cream. For those of you sticking around, let me introduce you to our guest. She might sound familiar. Hi, my name's Critique Cappelli I. Am a doctor that takes care of people that get infections from each other and also they get rare diseases. Critique of CA- polly's official title is Assistant Clinical Professor of Infectious Diseases at the Medical University of South Carolina. I said she might sound familiar because we actually spoke with Dr Cappelli in our first episode about Covid Nineteen, the virus that's making some people sick all over the world. Because it's making people sick in lots of different countries it's often called a global pandemic. You might also be hearing the word Corona virus a lot covid nineteen is one type of corona virus. So sometimes, people refer to Cova nineteen as the novel Corona virus novel just means new or sometimes people just short and say the corona virus, but the official name is more technically called covid nineteen. We ask Dr Cappelli to come back to talk with us about some updates to our understanding of this virus and the work scientists and health officials are doing to try to keep us safe including working on a vaccine. I can't believe that it's only been since March since we've talked it feels like it's been a very long time. So we've learned a lot about Kobe nineteen since March, we have learned that this disease can make people quite ill. I think when we were first talking, we spoke a lot about how it really was elderly people. We were most worried about an all those are the people that we think about being at greatest risk for this disease. We do know that really all people can get quite from covid nineteen. We, primarily worry about people getting very bad infection or pneumonia in their lungs but we are now learning so much about how this can cause. So many other problems it can cause problems with your heart. It can cause long term problems with your central nervous system that's your your brain and some of your coordination and things like that your ability to smell and taste. We see people who develop things like blood clots and overall. It seems that it causes a lot of inflammation and people. So that is something we are still continuing to learn about now I WANNA stop here and check in with you 'cause that was a lot of scary things that she was saying that can happen to people who get this virus but I, want to also let you know that most people who get this virus don't get that sick. In fact, some people don't even realize they have the virus. So although it sounds scary, the vast majority of people who get it are going to be okay and the more steps we take to protect ourselves and everyone around us. The fewer people are going to have to get covid nineteen at all and the more people we can protect from getting really really sick.

Dr Cappelli Sickness Covid Official Polly Pneumonia Medical University Of South Ca Cova Kobe Assistant Clinical Professor O CA
Vaccines, Masks and Handwashing: A Coronavirus Update

But Why: A Podcast for Curious Kids

04:36 min | Last month

Vaccines, Masks and Handwashing: A Coronavirus Update

"You have probably been hearing about a virus, a sickness that's been going around the world. We did an episode about it back in March five months ago. Now when we were all still just starting to learn about it. And now although we're still learning new things about this virus, we've also had some time to experience the way our lives have changed because of it. Some people have gotten very sick but even people who haven't been made ill have been affected by this worldwide situation. Many of you probably had to stop going to school in the spring or it would have been the fall if you live in the Southern Hemisphere. and. Some of you aren't going back to your school buildings at all as school starts up again in many countries. Others of you will be going back, but maybe not full-time or you might have to wear a mask when you're in your school or maybe your family is trying to find a different kind of arrangement to make sure you can learn new things and stay healthy at the same time. Today we're going to get an update on this virus called Cuvette Nineteen Andrew and answer some of your questions about what's called a vaccine a medicine that can help people not get a sickness. Now I WANNA say if talking or hearing about this topic makes you feel nervous or anxious or scared and listening to an episode about it is not going to make you feel better. It's okay to skip this episode or to ask your adults to listen first to see if they think this would be good for you to hear. For some people, it's really helpful to get as much information about something as possible that actually makes them feel better about something that's on their mind. But for others, it doesn't feel better and it's Ok to listen to a different episode instead if that's the case for you like maybe our episode about Unicorns and other mythical creatures or our recent episode about making ice cream. For those of you sticking around, let me introduce you to our guest. She might sound familiar. Hi, my name's Critique Cappelli I. Am a doctor that takes care of people that get infections from each other and also they get rare diseases. Critique of CA- polly's official title is Assistant Clinical Professor of Infectious Diseases at the Medical University of South Carolina. I said she might sound familiar because we actually spoke with Dr Cappelli in our first episode about Covid Nineteen, the virus that's making some people sick all over the world. Because it's making people sick in lots of different countries it's often called a global pandemic. You might also be hearing the word Corona virus a lot covid nineteen is one type of corona virus. So sometimes, people refer to Cova nineteen as the novel Corona virus novel just means new or sometimes people just short and say the corona virus, but the official name is more technically called covid nineteen. We ask Dr Cappelli to come back to talk with us about some updates to our understanding of this virus and the work scientists and health officials are doing to try to keep us safe including working on a vaccine. I can't believe that it's only been since March since we've talked it feels like it's been a very long time. So we've learned a lot about Kobe nineteen since March, we have learned that this disease can make people quite ill. I think when we were first talking, we spoke a lot about how it really was elderly people. We were most worried about an all those are the people that we think about being at greatest risk for this disease. We do know that really all people can get quite from covid nineteen. We, primarily worry about people getting very bad infection or pneumonia in their lungs but we are now learning so much about how this can cause. So many other problems it can cause problems with your heart. It can cause long term problems with your central nervous system that's your your brain and some of your coordination and things like that your ability to smell and taste. We see people who develop things like blood clots and overall. It seems that it causes a lot of inflammation and people. So that is something we are still continuing to learn about

Dr Cappelli Sickness Covid Official Polly Pneumonia Medical University Of South Ca Cova Assistant Clinical Professor O Kobe CA
Some Conferences Are Determined: There Will Be College Football This Fall

All Things Considered

03:48 min | Last month

Some Conferences Are Determined: There Will Be College Football This Fall

"There There will will be be college college football football this this fall. fall. Maybe Maybe that that is is the the message message this this week week from from some some top top football football schools schools and and conferences. conferences. It It comes comes after after two two powerhouse powerhouse conferences. conferences. The Big 10 in the Pac 12 announced they were canceling their full seasons because of the Corona virus. NPR's Greg Allen reports how colleges that are planning to play hope to protect the health of their athletes. Even many hard core college football fans are skeptical how Khun well over 100 people on a typical team training play without spreading the Corona virus, possibly shutting down the season this week, three of the top conferences, the SEC, the SEC and the Big 12 said their plans this fall to play and do so safely. John Thrasher is president of Florida State University, which is part of the Atlantic Coast Conference. And what we frankly want to send is a message to some of the other schools that may be teetering on whether or not to play football. We think it's a bit in the best interest of our student athletes. For us to play football. We could do it safely and we can do it productively for them for fans, athletes and the multi $1,000,000,000 sports entertainment complex built around college football things looked bleak Tuesday. Two major conferences, The Big 10 in the Pac 12 canceled their fall schedules because of the uncertainty and health risk surrounding the Corona virus. The announcement by the remaining three of the power five conferences that they would have a fall season came after athletes began a hashtag. We want to play movement on social media. At Florida State Wide receiver Keyshawn Helton says he believes training and playing with regular testing and medical protocols in place. Maybe safer than not playing. You talk about 18 or 22 year old Just quarantine at the house. That's unrealistic. There's really there's so many other things that you know God, I'm going to go do which is not safe. So being here with my team, and all of us together is the safest forth. The college conferences are pushing back the start of their seasons to give them extra time to get ready and perhaps learn from the experiences of other sports. Putting players inside a bubble like the N BA has done in Orlando isn't feasible for student athletes who live on campus and have to attend classes. University of Miami coach Manny Diaz believes college football can learn from the English soccer leagues, which resumed play in June. Without fans with so much at stake. He believes his athletes will be careful. They're aware that they've got to keep their bubble small. They understand the value of what a mask doesn't and who that protection If you're around people who don't have mass on, you've got to find another place to be, but with all that there's risk and going ahead with the college football season. One concern that was reportedly a factor in the decision of some conferences to postpone play is new information about a heart condition. My card is that has been linked to the Corona virus. It's an inflammation of the heart that can lead to long term problems. Announcing its decision to play the Big 12 conference, said any players who test positive for the Corona virus would receive an E K g echocardiogram, cardiac Emery and further heart tests before returning to play. Gabe Feldman, the director of the Sports Law program at Tulane University in New Orleans, says If the schools are transparent and take the right precautions he thinks they can play. Every school in the athletic department has to be very clear with all of their athletes. About what the risks are and what the unknowns are. And then the athletes have to have a choice. It's one thing to play. But can there be fans in the stadium? University of Florida athletic director Scott Strickland says he hopes so We want to be on a have fans, and we hope we're in a position to do that. But you see, this is the NFL season now starts earlier than ours, and A lot of NFL teams and still have a made determinations. Yet that could be the riskiest. Part of all some schools were opposing plans that would limit attendance to 25% of a stadium's capacity, which would still bring together a huge crowd of 20,000 or more cheering, screaming fans. Greg Allen. NPR NEWS Miami

Football Greg Allen Manny Diaz NPR NFL Director Florida State University SEC Florida University Of Miami Atlantic Coast Conference Keyshawn Helton Scott Strickland Orlando Gabe Feldman University Of Florida John Thrasher Khun
Researchers identify biomarkers indicating risk of complications with COVID-19

Mitch Albom

00:35 sec | Last month

Researchers identify biomarkers indicating risk of complications with COVID-19

"Washington University have identified five key biomarkers that they believe indicate how deathly ill an infected person with Cove in 19 might become. These bio markers are basically medical indicators found in the blood, and they can indicate ah persons risks of complications like inflammation and bleeding disorders. The researchers figured this out by testing the blood of 299 patients with covert. And what they found out was that 200 of those people all had these five biomarkers and required more extensive care in many cases ended in death.

Cove Washington University
The Strange Myth About Oxygen And The Yin-Yang Gases With AJ

My Seven Chakras

04:37 min | Last month

The Strange Myth About Oxygen And The Yin-Yang Gases With AJ

"Ever since which urine witold that we need a lot of oxygen to survive were to breathe in deeply so that we can get enough oxygen oxygen has been touted as life giving gas that US earthlings can art survive without but is this entirely true or is there more than meets the eye on today's episode we're going to explore this very interesting and profound dodig, and by the end of this episode, you will actually understand in a very simple and easy manner how you're breathing translates to more energy deeper relaxation. Oh mind and better hilt. But before I, continue our request you to please hit the subscribe button on your phone especially if you're on an iphone. Something to the podcast algorithm that ensures that people who wouldn't normally see this episode Ashley come across. So please hit the subscribe button right now. All right. So before we dive deeper I, think we need to take a few steps back and understand how energy is produced in the body from a scientific perspective and this is really interesting when you breeden. You're taking oxygen which goes down your throat into your lungs and into your bloodstream. The oxygen then binds to the him global in your blood cells. Now, the oxygen is then transmitted into the mitral. Contra. And if you remember lessons from school, you'll remember that it is the powerhouse of your cell and through a chemical reaction the Oxygen Burns with the glucose in the cell to form Energy Carbon Dioxide and water vapor, and then when you breathe out. You exist the governor dockside along with the water whip. The energy is then transmitted to wherever it is needed in your body. Isn't that amazing? All of this happens between your in him. An exile. Now oxygen can be likened to fuel that Burns to release energy too little fuel and you really can't start a fire and what happens when they're stu much fuel. Well, there could be a fire or literally an explosion. So what do you think happens when for some reason, you inhale too much of oxygen. You can't be good for you. Right. It turns out that it actually isn't just like when you expose I n to air for long periods of time, the oxygen in the atmosphere reacts for the through a process that is called oxidation to cause rust in the same way when you breathing too much oxygen or a period of time that can lead to oxidative damage in your body. In your disuse in your muscles in the form of inflammation and cell damage. Now, this can be tricky. Because on one side, I'm saying that we need oxygen to produce energy but we're also saying that or exposure to oxygen can lead to inflammation and cellular damage and the key to understanding this lies in a process guard bores effect. Be. Or are bores effect when you breathe in Oxygen Surf. The oxygen binds with your haemoglobin in your blood and a member the oxygen needs to get released from your hemoglobin and has to reach your mic Andrea, which is a powerhouse of yourself for the energy to be produced. So if there's a high level of oxygen. Did remain bound to your hemoglobin and over a period of time this can cause tissue damage and what happens is the free radicals actually start attacking your own system. This can lead to depression Lou Energy Fatigue and immune disorders does this sound familiar the solution to the challenge lies and somehow decreasing the level of oxygen which leads to the hemoglobin releasing or ejecting the oxygen, which can then go to the Powerhouse, off your cell the Mitochondria for energy production. And the UNSUNG hero over here is Garvin Dioxide in other words for cellular hilt optimum energy. You don't just need oxygen, but you also need carbon dioxide for your body to be able to produce energy

Oxygen Surf Garvin Dioxide United States Andrea Ashley Breeden
Sick of COVID: The Long Haulers

The Naked Scientists

03:22 min | Last month

Sick of COVID: The Long Haulers

"Miss, we will learning about long covert the condition where corona virus sufferers recover from the acute infection. But thank God wants to develop a teague another very bizarre symptoms. The Ken lost months and hints are starting to emerge about the damage or complications that are going on in multiple different or in these patients and a group of medical scientists in Germany have recently discovered ongoing heart issues in a significant proportion of people that only ever had this mild covert cardiologists. Valentina Portman explains we investigated patients that recently recovered from covid nineteen illness. So we have the very, very deep look at their hearts. And in these patients, we found that many many of them even if they didn't really have a rough course of the original illness, they still had persist and ongoing cardiac inflammation a little bit like a flu of the heart. How many of them had this kind of inflammation? We scan total of hundred patients seventy eight off. Those have had some findings in the heart. Of these sixty had very active inflammation. Inflammation within the heart muscle something that we call myocarditis as well as inflammation of the lining of the heart pericarditis. How long is this after they were originally sick? The average time from their original causative task was seventy one days. Wow that's a long time since they had this, you know positive test what's going on? This is the question that obviously I can only speculate on and it is not due to an ongoing infection of the heart muscle. So it is not the virus remains within a heart cells. The body itself is understanding the inflammation of the heart is something that it has to fight against or tries to control it but this is obviously at this present point hypotheses. Juno whether this kind of heart inflammation might linked to any specific symptoms that people are feeling months after they were supposed to go better from covert. That is very difficult to say because Hark inflammation does not present with specific symptoms being knocked feet especially young patients. This is one of those symptoms definitely can make aware of it. However inflammation takes a long time to present itself with what we call text book symptoms, chest pain shortness of breath swelling of the legs. But in general, then this might be kind of a hint as to why these people are still unwell. Absolutely this is definitely one of the things that we should look for very early and very fast if possible. In konic inflammation trying to be very sporty very fast is probably not the right thing and I think if any message can be given the present point is that we just need to give the heart as well as the rest of the body time to heal. Balancing appointment from the University of Frankfurt explaining her study from the Journal of Cardiology.

Valentina Portman University Of Frankfurt Pericarditis Journal Of Cardiology KEN Germany
AIP eBook and Listener Question  Episode #17

Pep Talks

05:22 min | Last month

AIP eBook and Listener Question Episode #17

"Hello I'm Dr Jackie and welcome to today's pep talk e book and Listener. Question. I am so excited to share a new resource I created for you. I feel like I need a drum roll I feel like I. Need to build this up a little bit more versus just saying it however, I'm just going to share it with you. I have created the second AIP, recipe. Book. In case she were unaware on my website I already have two free recipe even looks that you can download. One is Paleo and the other one is AIP. It has been five years since I released the first two recipe books and I have been collecting. AIP recipe since that time and I felt compelled to share them with you hence the second AIP e book. I want to share a little bit about AIP and why I think it's important for people to follow this wave eating when they're dealing with health issues and then I want to share a little bit about the actual book and then I have a listener question that I want to answer. To start what is a IP? AARP is auto immune a protocol and I think of it as being an anti inflammatory diet people who are dealing with auto immune issues and really other health issues are typically dealing with inflammation in their bodies and AIP removes many of the inflammatory foods that can create problems for people. It is. Paleo. It's also then removing some additional foods that typically people will eat an appeal your diet. For example all with Paleo, we remove grains, dairy, White, sugar, and soy. And then with an and some people with Paleo remove beans where others will eat beans. and. Then with a Ip, you're also. So it's Paleo you're removing grains, dairy, soy white sugar, and then you're you are removing beans and a Ip you're removing sincere leads eggs. And then the the vegetables from night shades, and then you're also removing seasonings that are from seeds as well as night shades and night shades would be your eggplants, peppers, white potatoes, and seasonings that you are removing. That are seeds or nightshade would include Paprika Kumon. Chili. Pepper black pepper and on and on and I know when people hear that they think, oh my gosh, what am I going to eat I'm not there's nothing to eat. It's going to be Broccoli and grilled chicken for the rest of my life, and that could not be further from the truth eating AIP. Can Be equally is delicious really more delicious than eating a standard American diet because you're eating nutrient dense foods you're providing your body with the nutrients that it needs to be healthy and to perform optimally, and this is the reason why it was so important to me to put together a second a Ip recipe book because I do hear people when when we talk about nutrition and we talk about eating nutrient dense foods particularly when I'm working with someone who is dealing with health issues. And I start talking about food and really wanting to follow a whole foods approach to eating. One of the first things that the person will say is, what am I going to eat and then it's the meal planning right? Where am I gonNA find recipes to do this and I already had the one AIP recipe book. But the second one is. Is Full of even more amazing and delicious recipes and I really want people to have accessibility with regards to recipes. I wanted to be right at your fingertips. So that isn't an excuse that an individual would give themselves for not eating helpfully that you know they're saying themselves, I don't know what teed I. Don't know where I could find recipes that would be healthy for me because I have given them to you and they're right on my website for you to download. Again with AIP what we're doing is we're working on removing inflammation in your body, and I know personally when I first started following AIP kost five or six years ago. Now it it was huge in helping me to reduce the inflammation. In my body and I noticed some significant reduction particularly in physical pain.

AIP Paleo Dr Jackie Aarp
"inflammation" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

05:52 min | 7 months ago

"inflammation" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Has no other effects other than completely wiping out. One of the two primary pro inflammatory. Cytokines it just it kills inflammation which is why these drugs are so good for Crohn's disease and rheumatoid arthritis psoriasis and stuff like that. We took sixty depress people. We gave half of them three infusions of this inflict some APP to block their inflammatory. We gave the other half three infusions of saltwater and nobody knew who is getting what and then we follow them for twelve weeks and and and you know the results were quite striking. The saltwater worked a little better than the anti inflammatory agent. It wasn't significant but to saw what had a very powerful antidepressant effect. You talk about the power placebo. 'cause he's where people that have failed other antidepressants but we saw something really interesting. This is important point the placebo and the anti inflammatory cytokine blocker the if you look at the the the two groups their effect on depression was almost identical. But it wasn't because they were the same they were actually opposite in so before we gave people the first shot we measured inflammation and we found that if you were depressed and had high inflammation the Inflicts Map. The Sadikin antagonist worked significantly better than placebo. But if you were just as depressed and had lower inflammation. This was two thirds of the study population. You did so much better with SALT WATER THAN INFLICTS. Some add that the only conclusion we can draw is that you know if you're really depressed. Inflammation is not elevated blocking it. Furthers doing some bad for you. It it it it. It's it's at the very least make you not able to respond to placebo. So it's it's interfering with your ability to hope and trust and whatever placebo response is and there've been a number of studies several studies after this that that sort of shown. Same thing one. In particular from Mark Rappaport is chaired at emory. He did the but will forever be probably the world's largest study of omega three fatty acids of just as a single treatment for depression no antidepressants just placebo or Omega. Three fatty acids and the fatty acids didn't work for squad. They they don't they. Don't have General Antidepressant Effects Buddy. Bet He took a page from our lesson book and looked at their inflammation levels before they started the Omega threes. He saw exactly the same thing that if you are depressed. Elevated inflammation the Omega threes worked better than Placebo. But if you're just depressed and had lower inflammation you placebo. You don't want to be taken Omega. Three fatty acids. So you know if those are true results you know Mega. Three fatty acids may help your heart. But if you're really depressed and you're one of the least half. Maybe two thirds of people that do not have elevated inflammation taken omega three fatty acids probably not doing yourself any favors. So no we may. I do not suggest that people routinely try anti-inflammatories for depression. At this point caveat. There is a good study found any Jonathan Savage at glory brains to relooked at low dose aspirin versus something called minocycline which is an antibiotic which is anti-inflammatory versus Placebo. The minocycline only worked in people with elevated inflammation. Just what you'd predict but the aspirin worked in everybody and it's not because it's an anti inflammatory at that low dose. It's doing something else. We don't know what you know so there's a little bit of evidence if you're going to do something you know off the grid that taking low dose aspirin may have some antidepressant benefit so that of course the next question. Everybody asks us. Well okay. We'll shoot you know. Should I go get my inflammation measured and my answer these days? Well maybe five years ago I'd say no it's preliminary but you know there's a thing called c reactive protein or CRP. You can get it easily done. It's a standard lab test is standardized. And it'll give pretty good. Read out on your inflammation you know if it's elevated you're more likely to die of a heart attack a stroke more likely to get diabetes and depression dimension and it's tends to be elevated depress people another reason why it's interesting inflammatory. Biomarkers is now a couple of studies including some work that I've done showing that it can predict whether you're going to respond to PROZAC or not and so there are now a couple of studies. One of them fairly large. Actually suggesting that if you just get to simple inflammatory measure she reactive protein or CRP if it's elevated elevated here is like a level greater than one one milligram per liter. You don't tend to respond. To Esera is the SEROTONIN antidepressants like PROZAC. Paxil Zoloft LEXA PRO selects UvA. Does the brand names. But if you're if you're syrupy is elevated. You're more likely to respond to something has dopamine properties of something like for instance wellbutrin which is the generic that is bupropion or in one. Study was nor tripling which is more of an effort drug. But it's a complicated. But it fits the pattern right but I think the key here is that you know. Almost all of us get depressed. Get stuck on a drug where the primary mechanism of action is blocking the Serotonin reuptake site. And there is now this gathering data to suggest that you know if you're inflammations elevated. You're not you're not as likely to respond to those. And then we've shown recently working with actually a large pharmaceutical company that CRP can predict people who don't respond to a very different kind of drug that used to treat bipolar disorder when people depressed as a drug called the Razz donuts marketed as la. Tuta atypical. Antipsychotic. It's a dopamine modulating agent and we measured CRP before before people started treatment with it versus Placebo and man. You know if you'RE CRP IS LOW. The the the antipsychotic Latour was no better than placebo. But if she was high it worked like.

Inflammation aspirin minocycline dopamine Mark Rappaport Crohn's disease Esera Latour emory diabetes Jonathan Savage mechanism of action bupropion
"inflammation" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

07:57 min | 7 months ago

"inflammation" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"And now back to the show so how. Why does our body when we experience psychological stress? Why does it create inflammation so I think people when they think of stress of Cortisol? They don't think my body's GONNA act like it's sick and send out signals. Yeah it's it's really interesting isn't it? I mean you'd think right that when the going gets tough the tough would get going and sometimes when I give lectures I will spend a whole beginning sort of trying to get people to marvel at this remarkable fact that we have this weird inflammatory bias. You know we think of inflammation making tired Sircana. Maybe not think straight. You know if you're being chased by the Sabertooth cat for God's sakes why would you want that but I think the answer is an and a number of us for the hit upon his it sort of the same time the the evolutionary answer we believe is that if you think about what stress has meant across a Malian evolution any before the mammals but we just a tour are ourselves here you know stress reliably meant usually one of three things right either? Either you're about to be eaten or more. You are chasing down some meat to eat and that thing has got horns and hoofs or you know you wanna make a baby and you're having to fight with the other guy with horns and hooves and so you know in all of those situations because other than that you know. Most animals tend to like Kinda hang out right sleep. Are they hang out? And and so so stressed. The argument goes that stress was so reliably associated with the risk of wounding over evolutionary history. That genes that evolve to pre potentally and an sort of jumped the gun activate inflammation in response to stress selected. Because you know if directly die from distressful encounter for no wounding. Well whatever you're dead but mo- many many times organisms would survive in a dive infection because skin is the greatest of all immunologic organs and and one of the absolute number one best ways to die before antidepressants was to get your skin opened up and of course now we know with the failure of antibiotics is becoming more and more of a risk again right. It's terrifying so the reason that inflammation distress activates inflammation is stress has been a reliable signal that you're in danger of having your skin opened up if your skin gets opened up. You're very likely to get an infection that puts you at risk for dying so rather than sitting around and waiting for it to happen. We're going to jump the gun. Smoke alarm principal right. And and we're going to turn on inflammation to be ahead of the game and to be ready for the the immunologic damaged or the pathogen exposure. We think it's going to happen right. And of course you know if you do false alarms a thousand times. Yeah you may you may occur some tissue costs from the inflammatory chemicals. But you know all you gotTa do is not respond once and you're dead and so it's like this color smoke alarm principle so what we're looking at here of course is an evolutionary mismatch in the modern world which is that for many of us especially in first world countries stress does not very often anymore. Mean that you're at risk for being wounded you don't. Humans tend to make things that are concrete abstract. That's one of the great things our brain does. And so now all these psychological stressors that are no longer associated with woundings still activate those ancient. Pathways they still activate those ancient reactions and produce inflammation even though the inflammation is of no value as far as we can tell and actually detrimental. So that's it's a good case of an environmental mismatch that we are the inheritors of because the the world has changed so fast in modern times. Evolution hasn't been able to catch up or is there psychological stress? But there's also other kinds of stress to like physical stress some exercise that creates inflammation in the body as well but also makes you feel good. So what's going on the dynamic there so this has been my little you know. It's funny how we all have our little sort of areas. That are fast nomads. For us that is true. That is a very fascinating observation. So we know that exercise. Acutely activates inflammation You know early on. You asked me what I who I wasn't what I did. I said I kinda studied ancient practices and one of the other antidepressant. Things we've studied is hyperthermia heat and we have shown announcement replicated by others that fact if you suppose humans to kind of a to really heat stressor for a time. Limited period produces antidepressant. Effects is why people go to saunas right steam rooms and stuff. So we measured inflammation before and after taking depress people and sticking them in this this hypothermia machine and low behold didn't activate the whole inflammatory cascade activated. Something that looked a lot like what excise does. And there was a signal in there that the more that inflammation got activated. The better people felt the less unimpressed. The more depressed. They were a week later. So there's a little bit of a mystery here and and but some of US including me think that the answer actually can be seen an exercise that you know what does exercise do it. Acutely it raises inflammation. What does it do chronically? It lowers inflammation and so I think for many of these systems. What happens is you can actually Strengthen them or toughen them or in some cases down regulate them by certain types of acute repeated exposure so so there may be cases in which brief exposure to stimuli that induce inflammation may actually have benefits for depression years ago back in ninety five and ninety six it was a small study out of Germany published biological psychiatry where they took a very small sailing. Took seven people but these were really really depressed in patients. They were in a psychiatric hospital and they they dismayed really cool. They shot them up with a bunch of inflammation into their veins and basically made the people sick and every single one of them had a powerful antidepressant response it. It didn't last in most of them but in several of them they actually continue for better for days and days afterwards. So you know what we can say is that when you're chronically inflamed it's pretty powerful risk factor for depression. There may be some instances for reasons. We don't fully understand where an acute inflammatory stimuli might actually have mood protective effects like the hair of the dog sort of like the hair. The dog while said. Yeah that's so this the sauna research is it? Have you guys figured out? Like how long you need a stain. Asana for to have that effect is like five minutes now. Well so so the the the the short answer is no. We have not figured that out my colleague Ashley Mason. At University of California. San Francisco is gearing up to do studies. Now the will the will really begin to try to look at that. We we got into. This is sort of interesting. I I had two young colleagues who were registered to mine and Austria of all places. Teach their sonically and they. They worked a sort of non traditional psychiatric hospital. That did my body treatments and one of them was an engineering founder. Old hyperthermia machine in a basement rebuilt it and we decided to stick depress people in it and we did we cook them up and we saw this really striking antidepressant response so as you can see it five six seven days after treatment so we brought one of the guys the United States and we we got another fancy machine and we did it really well with a control condition and all this stuff and we saw exactly the same thing now. The thing was though we in in in Switzerland we had treated people to.

inflammation psychological stress physical stress Sabertooth Cortisol San Francisco Austria Switzerland United States University of California principal hypothermia founder Ashley Mason Germany
"inflammation" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

The Art of Manliness

02:12 min | 7 months ago

"inflammation" Discussed on The Art of Manliness

"Take you put you in a psychological stressful situation and I can show that it activates inflammation with an hour inflammation shooting up and if you're somebody who was neglected or abused or You know for traumatizes kid. Your inflammation is gonNA shoot up even higher way higher fact because that early adverse experiences prime your body to respond to danger with increased inflammation so these pathways came together and you know Wallah. That's why it has now become this sort of widely thought about idea that that that that depression inflammation have something to do with each other. Okay so let's talk. Want to track backtrack about this idea. That these Side is cited. Kipnes side kinds. So you said you get to the brain and they cause all the things that we see in depressive. So we're talking about is like disrupt neurotransmitter stuff. Is it changed? The brains is that what's going on. Yeah Yup they. They the inflammation wipes out a necessary. Cofactor for nor transmitter. Production does it change like structures the brains that you've heard those things. People who depressed have sensitive sensitive. Agnello the the almond shaped thing information effect that Yup. Yup It absolutely does. It also induces bring changes similar to those seen in depression absolutely. Does it change the structure of the brain? That's a good question I've You know it's like everything where you know. There's such a huge field now. I've never seen a study that it actually changes you know like the size of the brain Or something like that we but but but the activity of the brain absolutely and and my old mentor. Andy Miller at emory. Who's really I think? The King of this field so many ways has shown that if you take just a big group of normal medically healthy depress people. You measure their inflammation the people that are depressed too. High inflammation have very different patterns of brain function than people that are depressed without inflammation Wednesday quick break forwards more sponsors the year. Two Thousand Twenty shows up a lot in science fiction. Lot of people predicted that by now we'd be teleporting to work living on Mars so waiting for that Hover board allow those predictions..

High inflammation Wallah Andy Miller depression emory
"inflammation" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

06:25 min | 8 months ago

"inflammation" Discussed on The Carlat Psychiatry Podcast

"There's a lot out of studies of Anti inflammatories depression. We ran review of them a couple months ago. Carla report and counted thirty six studies. The main ones they looked at were were the end said particularly silcock zip but also aspirin cytokine inhibitors statins which apparently don't just lower cholesterol but also have separate separate anti inflammatory effects. monocytes cleaned the antibiotic Piazza's zone. The Diabetes Med and that Luca quarter quits. The gist of all this data was that anti-inflammatories seemed to help depression. But what struck me was. None of these studies looked at the kind of inflammatory biomarkers. That you're talking talking about and so we really don't know in what you would expect that. Individuals with high inflammation that drug would work in an individual's with low low inflammation. The drug wouldn't work problem in the literature with the use of anti inflammatory agents to treat depression. The problem is that they treat everybody body and earlier in the interview. I told the only thirty percent of people have increased inflammation. So if you're Cox two inhibitors working for the sample as as a whole what is it actually doing. If we come up with a medication that targets inflammation and. That's not quite there yet. It is somewhat of the Holy Grail and Madison Inflammation as as you now is associated with a number of diseases so although anti-inflammatories make accents for people with inflammation. Dr Miller wasn't able to endorse them clinically. Because we just don't have the evidence but he did go on in the interview to endorse several psychiatric. Patrick Medications that work better in depression with inflammation. That's all online at the Journal. Now Dr Miller outside outside of those psychiatric medications. What kind of lifestyle? Advice what you give to someone. With inflammation the biggest offender in terms of increased inflammation snus obesity and sedentary activity so losing weight would be a very important piece of the puzzle as would be increasing physical activity so does not an exercise. The Diet that people recommend is the Mediterranean Diet as being the most anti inflammatory of the various diets. That are out there. We actually published a study showing that the closer your diet was to add a trainee and diet the lower your level of interleukin six so there. There is data out there suggesting that these diets particularly the Union Diet are associated with reduced inflammation as well as reduced depression depression. The other things that one might WanNa think about is meditation and Yoga. Some of these techniques Taichi we have been associated with increased para sympathetic tone. And we know that activation of the pair of sympathetic branch of the autonomic nervous system is associated. Ed with an inhibition of inflammation. Of course whether or not you're successful you can determine by going get your CRP measure after initiative. Whatever lifestyle change that you've decided to initiate so there there really is an opportunity for people to monitor their inflammatory inflammatory status and get it get down because we can treat the downstream effects of inflammation with various psychotropic agents talked talked about that targeting dopamine for example? We can do that but at the end of the day. You really want to reduce your location because it's doing other things to your to your body the Of the justice influencing neuro circuits in your brain it's also influencing your heart. Bollock there perhaps. Is the practice changing part of this podcast in my own practice. I specialize in treatment resistant depression. Russian and I have had a lot of success with some of the medications that he recommends for inflammation long before I even knew that inflammation was a cause of depression. What Dr Miller went on to say is that markers of inflammation and inflammation in the body is not gonna go down when we treat these patients patients with such psychiatric medications and get their depression better? Those markers are only known to go down through the lifestyle changes so what that means for me is two things when I see patients who have signs of inflation and got better on those kinds of medications. I now need to speak to them. That that these medicines might be making them feel better and more motivated and driven. But they're not necessarily treating the inflammation in their body and we need to do something about their lifestyle. How of course we'd I check their CRP to see if they indeed have inflammation after describing the lifestyle options to them? I'll tell the patient today. Let me know when they've started the lifestyle changes because we'll give it a couple months three to six months and check their. CRP again to see if if the inflammation is going down. This provides a unique external motivator for them to make those changes and it also gives a little incentive for them to be honest with me about whether they're doing it. Andrew Miller is the William P timmy professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Behavioral Sciences at Emory University. Where he also serves as Vice Chair of psychiatric research and Director of the Behavioral Immunology Program? His full interview view is online at the Carlisle report DOT Com. It includes two very useful charts one lists all the psychiatric treatments that have evidence to work better and inflammatory Tori. Depression bore medications three natural treatments and six lifestyle and psychotherapy approaches. The other is a list of eight signs that your depress patient it might have inflammation with directions for how to order and interpret the CRP. Our podcast listeners can get thirty dollars off their first first year subscription to that site with the Promo code podcast in all caps net helps us keep the car let report free from the influence winsome advertisers industry donors and all other sorts of entanglements..

inflammation depression Andrew Miller Vice Chair of psychiatric rese Patrick Medications aspirin Diabetes Med Carla Psychiatry and Behavioral Beha Luca Behavioral Immunology Program trainee Tori Carlisle Emory University dopamine professor William P
"inflammation" Discussed on Precisione: The Healthcast

Precisione: The Healthcast

06:39 min | 9 months ago

"inflammation" Discussed on Precisione: The Healthcast

"Ran labs and labs you know occasionally we'll get a call from LABCORP requests. They'll you'll get these lab alert lows and we got a call for her for a lab alert low for her cholesterol and what they had done unintentionally. I am assuming was given so much of cholesterol. Lowering medications are cholestrol was really low amongst many other inflammatory issues. Going on as well as you know. Twenty five percent of all your body's cholesterol's in your brain. Your brain is sixty percent five. So she was unintentionally starving our brain from very nutrient that needed cholesterol and she had lots of inflammation like C reactive. Protein was high. Mississippi is yet math deflation impairment so we used the principles in the inflammation spectrum really at large in functional medicine to really improve this. We improved her cholesterol show panel and lowered or inflammation levels and over a course of months. Obviously these things are not quick fixes but rebound a relatively quickly when you compare her to similar Miller cases and she was walking with a cane or a walker Out of the wheelchair and she was so sharp and witty and you you would not have even recognized this lady and it was something that she said to me that stuck with me beyond her. Not being my typical patient is she. She said I was planning my funeral when I met you now. I'm planning vacations with my grandkids. I thought okay. Look how many people whether the ninety ninety or fifty or whatever age they're at how many people settle for feeling horrible and having the quality of life in the gutter because they think gotz normal just because something's common just because something's ubiquitous doesn't necessarily mean it's normal and she was doing the same thing because someone with the White Coats said take and no one was really looking into it because she's Inter nineties and they don't really question medications that government and I think just a few questions that really was her husband I give it a credit to is that he didn't settle for that he went outside of all sort of conventional wisdom to say no look. Let's get a different different perspective on what she's going through bitterly saved her life basically by bringing her in to see you for sure her quality of life without a doubt I mean the quality of life was transformed. And that's the power of the bodies able to do and if we allow it in most cases again we just have so much influence biochemistry. Chemistry that statement as you said to me like cut to the core of like what we do in in functional medicine is that we improve quality of life in so many ways. That's amazing. I mean. Her doctors probably said you know your cholesterol's good the medicines working and you're just demented because you're ninety years old. Well now it's probably that's why did anything about it. Yeah exactly and I totally get it from one end but we need to be thoughtful about asking. These questions of her husband knew her better than the doctors did right. I mean He. He knew he saw he saw the difference. And I think that's we need to going back to what we said how he started. The conversation is listening to people listening to what they're saying really don't de legitimize that it's so important exactly while it's been an awesome conversation conversation. Do you have any special paroles. You like to share with everyone before we wrap up anything extra special that they can leave with something that is a mantra in our clinic. Vinik that we say a lot to patients because it is so profoundly true is that you. Can't he labata you hate. You can't shame your way into wellness obsessive about food into health. Also you have to come all the stuff. We're talking about of lowering inflammation or proving health or whatever we're talking about in the space of of health and wellness and functional. Medicine has has to come from a place of self respect and self love and I don't mean that in a fluffy new agey sort of way I really mean valuing yourself enough to to do good things for it if you see yourself as Tesla how are you going to amuse. People tests their parking way away taking care of themselves. They their car. They are treating it with like the value that it is. If you're old junker beat up car you don't care where you park you're gonNA fill it up with whatever and you're going to bang I and It's not going to matter a we need to see ourselves to the test so that we are. We are all unique and we all are beautiful creation. I think that self care is a form of self respect in that to me. Is the Genesis for sustainable wellness. Because then it's not a diet. It's not a program it's that no. I love my body enough. I respect it enough to feed good things to do. Good things for whatever. The active wellness is whether it's food or a nonfood acted the wellness. Really that has to be The genesis of a wellness. I love it I love it so tell us where our listeners can find. Mind you if they want to have a concert with you or find out more information about you. Where's the best place for them to go? Thank you yeah. Everything's doctor will. Cold continents the R.. Dr W I L L C O L DOT com and they can check everything out there we have tons of free content can preorder the inflammation spectrum. Were Kita Terry in my I book. We have video classes. I'm really pumped for this online group class for holding once a month because my day job. He's insulting patients one on one online. which is still still the same? But once a month we're holding these online group classes to we can talk to a hundred people at once and enables us to lower our overhead just because the goal with the online group class is to continue to make functional medicine more accessible more affordable. The more people so We just launched that this year. Some I'm really pumped about all of that and all that information's at doctor will call dot com awesome awesome and. When does the book come out? You said preorder so when when can people ended the Barnes and noble. I mean I think by the time yeah right I think by the time people are listening to this. It'll be out it comes out to over fifteen okay. Cool whenever whenever you're listening to this in the future it'll probably be on Amazon and Barnes and noble in any place. You can get a book awesome. Well thank you so much for being a guest on the show. I totally loves the conversation. We had a lot of good discussion. I really appreciate the time you took. Yeah thanks so much for having me and thank you to all of our listeners for tuning in today okay to listen to another exciting episode of precision the health cast..

Barnes LABCORP Mississippi Amazon White Coats Miller Kita Terry Dr W
"inflammation" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

Mark Bell's Power Project

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on Mark Bell's Power Project

"But the inflammation that you usually most Americans have, you know, when we talk about like, you have a highly inflammatory diet, or whatever it's usually because it's stimulating t NFL fan or Lucan interfere on NF Kappa. Beta, you know, these molecules that we're not even measuring and her blood tests, and that's what stem cells looking for they go into your blood. They're finding those sites of inflammation sticking in there and secreting things called axioms that are unique to that situation. And that's why it's difficult with X zones because you can patent next zome and say, look, let's do a clinical trial just this X zone, right which has one protein in it or one peptide or whatever. And that's positive right problem is like in a different person different situation that like stem cells secrete, different axioms based on the context, and it's too complicated for us to figure out so right now, we're just putting them in hoping for the best and some people works awesome. Some people doesn't work, right? It's not super well understood or characterized and I'm okay with that as long as there's not. We're not killing people in we're not causing harm, you know, love to see that research continue. But right now, you gotta go out of the free country. The you mentioned something about I think you mentioned C reactive protein. Correct. Or lemonade won't see all that stuff. Yes. Thought Syriac protein thought that was like kind of more check an inflammation of your heart. Or is it just checking overall body inflammation, period usually indicates overall? I mean, they they look at it in relation to your heart. Because you know, if you've got a lot of c reactive protein, usually leads to plaques in the arteries, right? But I don't know a whole lot about c reactive protein. And where it originates to be honest. Right. But I know that like if you have an infection, right? You could be through the roof. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. I've had that before like, I get my blood done every about four months or so. And I went one time it was like just staggering. But I two weeks. Try like tore my calf or something like that. So they're like, well, yeah. Could be that you could have a cold. The next time. I got tested. It was in the normal range against it's, you know, check checking your blood is a really interesting thing..

NF Kappa Lucan NFL four months two weeks
"inflammation" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

News Radio 810 WGY

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on News Radio 810 WGY

"Of inflammation, and they looked they looked not deep into the fat. Let's say the let's say the the the diameter of the vessel was, you know, five millimeters. Will they look five millimeters out in a circle around the fat? And they. Came up with the scaling, and they, you know, it's a very technically complicated procedure, but certainly possible in large population what they did and found that if you had this attenuation, meaning the fat becomes thinner, and and the and the and the protective fat in their becomes more liquid. Well, that is a predictor of future events both retrospectively and prospectively in a short period of time in sort of three to four year range, which is which is a pretty good number to look at right? You're not in not days three days, but four days but over a series of years, and that's better than ten years. So what we understand about this process is that when the fat around the arteries becomes inflamed or the fat itself becomes kind of unhealthy. The that's really a marker of inflammation in the plaque itself that inflammation sort of seeps out into the fat. And that becomes a marker. Now is it a, you know, which causes which does the lack the inflammation in a fat then caused the plaque to be inflamed. Or is the plaque inflammation caused the fat to be inflamed? We we haven't answered that question that's going to be further down the line. But let's just say the two go together they're related. I think it's more than their their true and true and not related. They're related somehow that you have inflammation the plaque and in the fat. And so in the cat scanner you can measure this, and we hope that this would be one of those markers that we can do with a cat scan a low radiation cats game take a look at the fat itself and say, hey, this person doesn't have stable plaque. This person has hot plaque and the plaque when we say hot just like, let's say you cut your your finger. And there was inflammation redness around there will that same redness that same amount of white blood cells or would you would see in your finger sometimes might be possible. Would also be in the arteries and a microscopic scale, and that is what leads to probably cardiac events in the shorter term in the longer term. It's obviously all the other things that we talk about blood pressure cholesterol, inflammation, we can measure in the in the in the blood with a blood test called high sensitivity c reactive protein. So it's that those those other markers, whether they're biomarkers in the blood or markers on a diagnostic tests, like a cat scan that we can look at and say, hey, we have an idea. This is a person we want to be more aggressive with this.

inflammation three days four days four year ten years
"inflammation" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

SuperTalk WTN 99.7

02:24 min | 2 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on SuperTalk WTN 99.7

"Inflammation most doctors don't even check for that they're just going by your symptom and that can give you a a stand drug in this case so you got to determine the cause of the inflammation some other things that could cause inflammation of course is poor diet and yes that's true but the poor diet can be changed easily and you still have inflammation i got people that are eating fantastically well and they still have chronic inflammation and the consumption of course processed foods remember most processed food is is foreign to our body it takes a lot of work for your liberty breakdown processed food it's missing certain things so you gotta be careful with that eating a healthy diet with plenty of fruits and vegetables that helps but if it's if you haven't gotten down on a cellular level and you haven't taken gotten rid of the heavy metals and chemicals then it's not going to help that much of course exercise exercise helps everything and we were talking about your or hdl we know that exercise helps h hdl brings up your good cholesterol and i'd say that's probably the hardest thing to get people to do that have an exercise is to get them to exercise so and then managing stress in your life obviously that would be helpful yep yes yes yes i'm taking blood or when right four one well i'm now there's that on the insert to it and has aluminum in ryan it might shot yeah a lot of a lot of medications they do use aluminum in there yeah no i had s stroke.

Inflammation
"inflammation" Discussed on 710 WOR

710 WOR

02:29 min | 2 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on 710 WOR

"Of heart problems their hearts inflamed the heart is agent they have less muscle energy lesson doorns less stamina when you give these people ubiquonol they flourish there's been studies where they've seen that people were plenty of inactive co q ten the one that most of you were taking they still had a lot of inflammation in their heart and when they caved in the active form which is our formed ubiquonol at reduced inflammation in their heart that's significantly important that's the cause of about half of all heart attacks about half of all heart attacks are related to high cholesterol high levels of ldl statins do a good job lowering that but the other half are due to persistent low grade inflammation in the heart statins do not do a great job of that but ubiquonol is helpful with that very quickly it helps lower inflammation in the horn so when they canvassed about nine hundred people they saw those with plenty of inactive co q ten they had inflammation in the heart when they had act of coq ten they did not have inflammation heart so then they took people with inflammation and they gave them the active form and the inflammation in their heart went down it's a measure on your blood test called hfs crp hse r p measure team out of inflammation your heart that's good because that's a major cause of heart attacks they also found that in people when they gave the active form ubiquitous will form of coq ten have made their hearts much younger people will plenty of inactive co q ten their hearts were aging at had to be the active foreign made what younger there's a series of studies showing us when they looked at populations those with inactive co q ten too much inactive not enough active so it was a poor ratio of inactive to active they had more inflammation and heart their heart was much older when they reversed it by giving them the active form every houston formation heart a reverse staging in heart so how important is that it's very important they've seen that when they give athletes of any age the active form of coq ten ubiquonol to one we have on special today in fact this one was one used of most of these studies they did much better in.

inflammation houston
"inflammation" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

01:36 min | 2 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on WTMA

"You know so when we started talking about paying their three categories i'd like to have put most things in you know so for those of you who have pain you know the three things in the three causes your we also want to say number one we said the the two categories are going to be these these kind of big things that happen these big traumas then we also have these micro traumas that can happen so a daily wear and tear oregon to like a big injury or big issue we pick up something the wrong way you those are usually the two big root causes of how these things happen you then once we get in east causes of pain you know we have number one inflammation which there can be multiple causes of inflammation pain that we have pain coming from muscles and the number three we have actually pain coming from nerves and ligaments so we'll be kind of look at these things all these are important understand we talk about the cause of pain as helping understand hey is my pain really cost from an inflammation issue is my pain may be caused for more of a muscle issue issue or is really my pain costumer nervous you so those are the three buckets we always gotta think about so we think are the process of how this works and we talked about the idea of how it you know maybe you sprain your ankle you know that's a process you that again begins to create a problem in your body because a crepe pain you're through this process of action ankle sprain so when we talk about inflammation let's talk about how inflammation works because you inflammation can work a lot of different ways and we talk about painting costs from inflammation inflammation is also at the root cause of so many disease processes now major causes of inflammation we talk about you know things.

oregon inflammation
"inflammation" Discussed on WTMA

WTMA

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on WTMA

"Over you know consumed a lot of these vegetable oils that are very unsafe when you cook them in bomb boom there it goes inflammation you know so that was a big thing that happened nutritionally now number two when the other big things that happen again to really kind of a trigger inflammation in our body is a lot of the amounts of grains and we we'd products that we consume in our country today so let me kind of show you how this chronic inflammation and chronic pain can lead to other health issues because you know things like joint pain or even things like osteoporosis so what's unique about this is actually a lot of grains when you consume them like when you eat them they go to your stomach and they can actually create a very acidic nature now your stomach obviously has acid in it to break down your food so what happens is again we take actually grains and we throw them in her stomach it actually gets converted into a form of what's called sulfuric acid now for example if you take sulfuric acid avenue throw in your eyes or you put on your skin it would actually burn you if you could imagine that so what happens is when our stomachs as being extremely extremely extremely siddiq from all these grains that converted to this form of acid what happens is calcium can leaving our bones and going our body to neutralize this acid so what's happening is your body is losing minerals and now you are becoming more acidic because again those minerals are being pulled from your body to help with this process everybody loses calcium your joints and bones become weaker and you become more susceptible things like osteoporosis and also pena now what's crazy about this i just read an article this week talking about how you can lose as much as sixty percent of calcium in your body or in your diet again and people do this who are on diets that are high and grains okay and that's how this works as a crazy fact is nutrition does matter you know these grains if you're listening you know you'll last week we talked about this is these grains i also contain an acid that actually block the absorption of minerals called fight a gasset and and again so for some people you know even in a moderation these things if you're really inflamed these things can really against set you.

inflammation osteoporosis pena sixty percent
"inflammation" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

The Healthy Moms Podcast

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on The Healthy Moms Podcast

"Location right off the end but essentially what they found was that your teeth three levels while you are fasting which is your bioactive your form of thyroid that fiber hormone that is present at that point in time yes it does go down while you're fasting and that scares people fixed people out but what they found doesn't change is that your thyroid stimulating hormone and you're t four does not change and those are the precursors to your thyroid so with those not changing it goes to show us that any down regulation of the firearm is only temporary literally during a fasted state other than that you're you're golden and that makes perfect sense and that probably awesome is why i've noticed in a lot of people seem to notice this being cold on the first few days of a fast but if your teeth 3s down that would make sense the you'll feel more cold something like a point i would love it you could send us on make sure there in the show notes as well totally awesome so let's talk inflammation more indepth 'cause i feel like that seems like it was a huge part of your story and something that's a huge focus for your research now and i know i've seen a lot of studies about how inflammation plays a part in pretty much every disease in some way but to start let's talk about what exactly is inflammation and why are we seeing more but right now i think the reason we're seeing more but nowadays is mainly just because this is more awareness online period i think uh you know what the argument of like the whole thirty in some of these some of these other publications the talk about it we're just it's more top of mind the simplest way that i can explain inflammation is if you've ever bumped her elbow you bumped her new year you've got newspaper be staying you know it gets all swollen that swelling is acute inflammation which means that it is inflammation that is responding to a given stimuli now we had inflammation that's called chronic inflation this chronic inflammation is inflammation that is not necessarily respondent dini stimuli it's just constantly there so if you can visualise the swelling and the readiness of.

inflammation
"inflammation" Discussed on House of Carbs

House of Carbs

02:12 min | 2 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on House of Carbs

"Insecure than maybe people would leave me alone and i could go about my business and i could trick them will what i discovered once i cut out the gluten and in the weeks that followed um was something that i did not anticipate which is just as the inflammation in my body decreased so it appeared and it felt did the inflammation and my psychology so what would inflammation anisa college e b well if you think about the nature of insecurity it's taking some sort of a stimulus that could be ambiguous and nature and then going ahead an analyzing it as a threat so now you're scared of something that might not even be scary that sort of what insecurity is to a certain extent and um as it just so happened i became less scared of so many things i started to see the ambiguous stimulus as ambiguous rather than as threatening and suddenly um i was able to take people and to take situations um uh in at face value and they would consume mm far less anxiety or they would produce far less anxiety and consume far less energy for me so suddenly i found myself more confident and uh with the energy to tackle things that um in the past i had avoided part of what stuck with me from that revelation you know many years ago and the way that you share that with me that 'if i found soaked so compelling was that it also provided a sensible narrative to a lot of your experiences from from growing up where you didn't otherwise have a construct within which to kind of fit these experiences and you just described it in terms of the insecurity but also you know i i recall you describing it in terms of you know athletic endeavours and and you know a lot of different kind of interactions and how the path that you you ended up on was was steered by this food challenge that you didn't know you had we'll so there was a couple of things number one is.

inflammation
"inflammation" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

Ben Greenfield Fitness

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on Ben Greenfield Fitness

"So it really kind of checks and balances at first but i would say by and large from a mindset perspective being able to stick to something longterm i would say was intermittent fasting that really ended up making it easy for me to drop that much weight that fast now i returned to this role of of inflammation and fat loss i'd like to actually dive into that from a little bit more of a scientific standpoint because i i spoke with dr a k shanahan who wrote this book called deep nutrition and in that she went into some studies i think they were in mice where they found a lot of issues with the conversion of white fat cells in into metabolic lee active brown fat cells which basically will burn calories to generate heat if inflammation was present basically inflammation seemed to shut down i believe what's called cg mp signalling which which was you know basically she gnp is almost like a fat burning turbocharger and in a state of inflammation that didn't seem to be active and and what you shutdown inflammation you actually restore the body's ability to convert adipose tissue into something other than adipose tissue in those one thing that she talked about but in addition to that you know you you you talked about and tara cites a little bit ago hinted at that and and carries what else you found when it comes to link between inflammation and foul yeah and we can touch on this more when we start talking about sort of bacterial strain that i've been looking at two but a lot of on weight and we can jump into that right now if you so it circles back to that a lot of time so when you hearth different strains of bacteria in gut of course you can have a natural level of inflammation that's occurring there and you know backed what he had said i've read a little bit of her stuff i'm not super familiar with the white fat brown fat conversion that you're mentioning guides the simple point is that when you do have a level of inflammation yes it does disrupt that but also if you call inflammation too much it actually disrupt set to so there's a there's a fine line there and the same kind of have.

shanahan tara inflammation shut down
"inflammation" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on EOFire | Entrepreneur on FIRE

"My recommendation though is that this this stuff is not difficult if you start to look into it and there's the underline recalls now one of the symptoms though for almost every disease named a man it will be hard right now to think of a disease or hell tissue or weight loss issue because weight loss as one of the same just keep in mind ju if you're trying to lose weight right now forget about losing weight it's too hard to get in your body healthy if you get your body healthy you will lose weight a healthy body it can't be overweight it's physically impossible to be healthy and overweight i don't care when airways says it's that's not possible and inflammation is a big reason why so here's the thing inflammation right now we're treating its popular right turmeric curcumin aloe vera cats clawed dg alec all these things are great they are and i don't want anybody who's suffering there so well i use things like turmeric and like phospholipid base curcumin absolutely but here's the thing i'll use it in the short term so someone doesn't have to suffer they don't have to take and says and other drugs instead but what i want to understand is this the inflammation is there for a reason and we're not going to treat inflammation with natural health mean like with turmeric like we would with advil okay that doesn't make sense that's called green medicine and there's a lot of doctors doing that and again is that better than using advil yes but you're still not trying to figure out you still not going deep enough why is the inflammation there in the first place and if we start to look deeper you mention it earlier and he said seventy seven thousand plus manmade chemicals the environment cosmetics the average woman right now is wearing over twenty eight cancer causing carcinogens 100 in moisturizers an spf they put it every day and hair products and shampoos and the plasticizers in waters and and i'm i'll tell you this right now.

inflammation advil
"inflammation" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"But there is another possibility as to what's going on and i'd like to share that with you and and give you some recommendations as well any inflammation in the brain and and i've been talking about this a lot on the air it's just impossible for too much to be said on the subject any inflammation inside the brain is going to cause a failure or at least a weakness in the neurons that are affected by that inflammatory process how might this of happened in such a surgery well this this almost an infinite number of things that could have occurred that would have resulted in an inflammation but what i would definitely assume is that it's seated primarily this inflammatory thing is seated primarily within the motor cortex open perhaps sensory motor cortex which lies towards the top of the brain more frontally so if you for example draw a line up from the ears linking it up at the top so you're in the very centre of the heads between fronton back and you sought going forward from there all of the cortex forward from there is going to be sense remote or cortex up until let's say the very prefrontal which is like about the far area because that then becomes focus and attention multitasking brain so as we we have a neurologist and she's got a tested hopkins this tuesday in fact okay while i sure hope that that will shed some light and they're all things that could be seen in the traditional kinds of imagery so one of the possibilities than i said that the almost infinite i guess it's not infinite but there are quite a number of things that could have happened during the surgery to have caused this one possibility is that she did have a tea i a which sometimes can be seen on very high resolution mr i if they focus the mri very very closely in that frontal area to try and get the highest resolution possible in that part of the.

inflammation motor cortex
"inflammation" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

WSRQ Talk Radio

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"inflammation" Discussed on WSRQ Talk Radio

"Because i don't have chronic inflammation but i have many girlfriends especially and friends that have chronic inflammation like my one fan she gets up in the morning and she's got to take a hot bat before she could started on the day just because of the aches what is causing this inflammatory condition that now seems to be an indicator in major degenerative diseases on on it is really the indicator and i think pretty much every disease that we have inflammation and something that we have done to art felt we leave incredibly struck whole lifestyle we don't eat correctly we don't we don't exercise we don't breathe clean air we are in on and contact with chemical or an hot and contract with light we don't ground the earth anymore i think it's a combination of all of that i know some that found a little out there aren't weird but a inflammation and you can't deny that inflammation causes heart disease or what causes diabetes or what causes it'll be headache or will call those eight and pain that your friend has every single morning it not normal wake up with eight and paint like that and it's normal to wake up and take a um alive and it's another day let's go to work or let go play tanit so let go do whatever it makes you happy but that really to me to be bogged down inflammation and let's not forget that imf one man who live and reside in at belly fat that most people have that belly fat is just one big alop of inflammatory what we call quite a kind.

inflammation diabetes headache