35 Burst results for "infectious disease"

New coronavirus variant in New York spurs caution, concern

KYW 24 Hour News

01:05 min | 19 hrs ago

New coronavirus variant in New York spurs caution, concern

"Discovered a new variant of the virus in New York City, and that it is spreading quickly. Even more frightening. Current vaccines may not be as effective it fighting it. The nation's top infectious disease, doctor, Anthony Fauci said today. The best way to stop those new variants from spreading is to get Americans vaccinated as fast as possible. And as we come on the air tonight, the FDA is taking a big step to making that happen. The agency now says Fizer is vaccine no longer has to be shipped or stored at those sub zero temperatures. That's a huge breakthrough that will make it easier to get shots two sites across the U. S. And we're also learning that visor and Moderna are now working on possible booster shots of their vaccines. That could mean getting a third dose to help fight off these new variants At the White House tonight, President Biden is celebrating, saying 50 million shots have now been given out nationwide since he took office half of the 100 million he promised to deliver in his 1st 100 days. Combined with the shots given out during the Trump administration, That means nearly 68 million doses have been administered across the country. We've got a lot of new

Fizer Anthony Fauci Infectious Disease New York City President Biden Moderna FDA White House Trump Administration
Fauci urges Americans to take whatever vaccine is available

AP News Radio

00:52 sec | 1 d ago

Fauci urges Americans to take whatever vaccine is available

"A third vaccine is likely to soon join the covert nineteen fight but the nation's top infectious disease expert is urging Americans not to be picky Dr Anthony Fauci knows people look at vaccine studies and compare effectiveness seventy two percent versus ninety five percent and so on they may then decide well just wait for the next more effective one that I think is not a good idea algae on NBC news today show saying people should be confident in any vaccine the FDA approves for emergency use when the vaccine becomes available take it Johnson and Johnson's vaccine will take its turn before the FDA's independent advisers tomorrow and felt she's looking forward to with joining the dharna and Pfizer vaccines already in use they have to it's fine to have three is absolutely better soccer mag ani Washington

Dr Anthony Fauci Infectious Disease Nbc News FDA Johnson Pfizer Soccer Ani Washington
F.D.A. Analyses Find Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Works Well

All Things Considered

03:31 min | 1 d ago

F.D.A. Analyses Find Johnson & Johnson Vaccine Works Well

"May soon be available in the United States. The Food and Drug Administration could decide as soon as this weekend to authorize a vaccine made by pharmaceutical giant Johnson and Johnson for emergency use. The FDA today released its evaluation of the new vaccine and NPR's Joe Palka joins us to describe what they found Hijo. Hi, Ari. So there were a lot of details in the FDA is evaluation, but bottom line. Was it positive or negative about it? Well, they don't exactly give conclusions like that. But general, you'd have to say that the analysis was positive. The FDA based its judgment on a large study involving some 40,000 participants that was carried out primarily in the United States, South Africa and Brazil. Now, this vaccine only requires a single shot, so participants either got the vaccine or a placebo. And what researchers found was that overall, the vaccine efficacy was about 66% in preventing moderate to severe cove in 19. And 85% against more serious disease. Stacy Schultz Terry is a professor of infectious diseases at ST Jude Children's Research Hospital, and she took a look at the FDA analysis. I did not see anything that would make me pause in recommending that somebody would go get this shot. Joe tell us more about that 66% number because a lot of people have zeroed in on that to say, Wait. Does this mean it's less effective than the Fizer and Madonna vaccines, which reported close to 95% of efficacy? Yeah, The numbers suggest that but you have to have a little context here. First of all, you have to remember that. Initially people would have been satisfied with the vaccine that was just 50% of efficacy. So this is the first vaccine to come. If this had been the first vaccine to come along, people would have been thrilled. Second vaccines behave differently when the rolled out to millions of people, and so there may be changes in the numbers going forward and third variants have popped up around the world. And Schultz Kerry says the Johnson and Johnson vaccine is the first to be tested against those and it did well, African see against the virus circulating in the U. S Good African see against thesis South African and the Brazilian variance as well. And the Johnson and Johnson vaccine is easier to store and distribute than the other two. Tell us about that. Well, yes, I mean, the first obvious thing is that the only requires one shot And that means people don't have to come back. You don't have to chase after them to make sure they get a second shot, so that makes logistic easier. And second of all, it's not as it's easier to store. It doesn't require these special freezers that the modern a vaccine requires. And so what happens next? We said there could be emergency authorization as soon as this weekend. Well, the process works like this. The FDA receives a bunch of material from the company and then they evaluated and that's what they released today and then before they make a decision, they convened a group called the Vaccine Advisory Committee. And they will meet on Friday to discuss and evaluate and two over the data, and by the end of the day, they'll issue some sort of a recommendation to the FDA and the FDA generally follows the recommendations of this advisory committee. And how much of a difference is this likely to make in the supply situation if there are three circulating rather than to now? Well, it's going to make a difference. Maybe not right away. There's going to be a few million three or four million doses released almost immediately if the vaccine is approved or authorized. 20 million. They expect by the end of March and 100 million by the end of June, so it's not going to solve the problem right away. But it will certainly help NPR's Joe

FDA Johnson Joe Palka Hijo Stacy Schultz Terry St Jude Children's Research Ho Fizer United States Schultz Kerry ARI NPR Brazil South Africa Madonna JOE Vaccine Advisory Committee
Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine greatly reduces virus transmission, Israeli studies show

Pacifica Evening News

03:19 min | 3 d ago

Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine greatly reduces virus transmission, Israeli studies show

"To Israeli studies have found that Fizer Cove in 19 vaccine greatly reduces virus transmission. Shedding light on one of the biggest questions of the global effort to quash the pandemic. Data analysis and a study by the Israeli Health Ministry and Visor found the Fizer vaccine developed with Germany's beyond Tech. Reduces infection, including an asymptomatic cases by 89% and in symptomatic cases by 94%. The findings air from a pre published study not yet peer reviewed but based on a national database that is one of the world's most advanced a separate study. By Israel's Sheba Medical Center, published Friday in The Lancet medical journal found that among 7200 hospital staff who received their first dose in January There was an 85% reduction in symptomatic covert 19 within 15 to 28 days with an overall reduction of infections, including asymptomatic cases detected by testing of 75%. More research is needed to draw a definitive conclusion. But the studies are among the first to suggest a vaccine may stop the spread of the novel coronavirus and not just prevent the people vaccinated from getting ill. Dr Jon Swartz and Burn cold clinical professor emeritus of infectious diseases at the UC Berkeley School of Public Health. The implications of this are enormous Republicans standpoints in vermin individual standpoint. If if the If these numbers are even numbers significantly less than this hold true, that is that once fully vaccinated. Well, first of all we know once fully vaccinated. It's Very, very, very, very unlikely. We're going to get seriously all and there's no evidence that you'll die after you being fully vaccinated. So we know that. But what if after you're fully vaccine, you get reinfected. We know you're not gonna get sick, but you could spread it. But what if you can't spread it? Or what? If it's very unlikely for you to spread it? It's gonna really mean that our masks they're going to come off sooner that we're gonna be hugging her loved ones a lot sooner right now. I'm fully vaccinated have been fully vaccinated now for this Just actually, three weeks today, um If I knew that I couldn't transmit this virus to my loved ones, I would My strategy would be very different. If I may ask you really come off. I could be hugging. Uh huh. But I don't know that yet, And so I have to still remain vigilant. And that is where a mask and social distance to be absolutely certain that I can't do that and think about all the health care workers. If the health care workers knew that they didn't it once they're fully vaccinated, they wouldn't transmit that would make an enormous difference in the hospitals. And think about just Transportation. It's just goes all the way down the line. So the implications are

Fizer Cove Israeli Health Ministry Sheba Medical Center The Lancet Medical Journal Dr Jon Swartz Uc Berkeley School Of Public H Germany Israel
US coronavirus death toll approaches a half million milestone

THE NEWS with Anthony Davis

05:22 min | 4 d ago

US coronavirus death toll approaches a half million milestone

"I'm anthony davis the. Us stood on sunday. The brink of a once unthinkable tally. Five hundred thousand people lost to the corona virus a year into the pandemic the running total of lives lost was about four hundred ninety eight thousand roughly the population of kansas city missouri and just shy the size of atlanta the figure compiled by johns hopkins university surpasses the number of people who died in two thousand nine hundred nineteen of chronic lower respiratory diseases stroke outsiders flu and new monja combined. It's nothing like we've ever been through in the last one hundred and two years since the nineteen eighteen influenza pandemic the nation's top infectious disease expert. Antony found. She said the. Us virus death toll reached four hundred thousand on january nineteenth in the waning hours of president. Donald trump's office who's handling of the crisis was judged by public health experts to be a singular failure. The first known deaths from the virus in the us happened in early february. Twenty twenty both of them in santa clara county california. Meanwhile the ambitious claim of the incoming president a hundred million vaccination shots in one hundred days is close to being realized one month into his presidency. Joe biden is on a glide path to attain that goal and pitching well beyond it to the far more ambitious and

Chronic Lower Respiratory Dise Anthony Davis FLU Johns Hopkins University Kansas City United States Missouri Atlanta Infectious Disease Antony Donald Trump Santa Clara County California Joe Biden
Fauci urges vaccinations to stop new virus strains: 'Viruses cannot mutate if they don't replicate'

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:29 min | Last week

Fauci urges vaccinations to stop new virus strains: 'Viruses cannot mutate if they don't replicate'

"It was humans learn to outsmart the coronavirus with vaccines, masks and social distancing the virus may be working on outsmarting US. The New York Times has a report about a new study that's identified seven new variants of the virus, which appeared over originated in the US and they all share a mutation that might make them extra contagious, just like the UK in South Africa variants. Virus variants or another reason why Americans need to get vaccinated as quickly as possible and continue to follow pandemic safety protocols. So, says the nation's top infectious disease expert, Dr Anthony Fauci, on ABC. Is this weak, masking the distancing the avoiding congregants settings. If you put that, together with the vaccine, we could be able to confront this variant as it were. And prevented from taking over. Of course, Dr. Fauci isn't the only medical expert reminding the nation of Basque up case numbers air coming down, they say, but are still very high Following the winter certain we're still at about 100,000 cases a day we're still at around 1502 3500 deaths. Her day. Appearing on NBC's Meet the Press, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Dr Rochelle Walensky said it is encouraging to see the daily infection numbers coming down, but they remain more than 2.5 times The rate seen last summer. They're coming down from extraordinarily high place. Well, I'm ski arches. We need toe all take responsibility to decrease that community spread. Including mask wearing Ben Thomas

Dr Anthony Fauci Dr. Fauci The New York Times Infectious Disease United States South Africa Centers For Disease Control An ABC Dr Rochelle Walensky UK Meet The Press NBC Ben Thomas
Daily Coronavirus Cases Drop Below 100K For First Time In Months

John Witmer

00:34 sec | Last week

Daily Coronavirus Cases Drop Below 100K For First Time In Months

"Reports. The average daily number of new coronavirus cases in the U. S has dipped below 100,000 in recent days for the first time in months, but experts remain concern. Learned about a UK very into the virus that appears to be more deadly infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci. The vaccine that we are now currently discriminating the Modano vaccine and the fires of vaccine clearly work against this variant, and we know that from both in vitro test tube studies, as well as extrapolation from other vaccines, found she on ABC is this week A Delaware judge has

Dr Anthony Fauci U. Infectious Disease UK ABC Delaware
US reports fewer than 100,000 daily new COVID cases for the first time in three months

The Joe Pags Show

00:34 sec | Last week

US reports fewer than 100,000 daily new COVID cases for the first time in three months

"Daily number of new coronavirus cases in the U. S has dipped below 100,000 in recent days for the first time in months, but experts remain concerned about a UK variant of the virus that appears to be more deadly. Infectious disease expert, Dr Anthony Fauci. The vaccine that we are now currently discriminating. The Modano vaccine and the fires of vaccine clearly work against this variant, and we know that from both in vitro test tube studies, as well as extrapolation from other vaccines, found she on ABC is this week A Delaware judge has dismissed a

Dr Anthony Fauci U. Infectious Disease UK ABC Delaware
Fauci says no 'red flags' after about 20,000 pregnant women vaccinated

Paul Murnane

00:29 sec | 2 weeks ago

Fauci says no 'red flags' after about 20,000 pregnant women vaccinated

"80, Dr Anthony Fauci says about 20,000 pregnant women have received the covert vaccine in his words with no red flags, the top infectious disease expert of the CDC and the FDA monitoring the situation. The pregnant women did not participate in either the finder of the Madonna vaccine trials about, she says clinical trials for pregnant women and Children are underway. CDC is suggesting that pregnant women talk to their doctor before taking their shot. The World Health Organization doesn't recommend the shots, though for pregnant

Dr Anthony Fauci CDC FDA World Health Organization
When will kids be able to get COVID-19 vaccines?

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 2 weeks ago

When will kids be able to get COVID-19 vaccines?

"One can young kids get vaccinated. Dr. Anthony Fauci is optimistic that Children his youngest first grade may have access to the vaccine in time for the school year that begins this fall. The nation's top infectious disease expert, says the government is in the process, starting clinical trials and what he calls aged the escalation. Dr Fauci tells pro public up By the time September rolls around, kids entering first grade will likely be able to get the vaccine presuming trials are successful in those age groups. This C tells NBC's today show that the rate of adult vaccinations should accelerate in the coming months. I would imagine By the time we get to April that will be what I would call for. You know, for better wording open season, namely virtually everybody and anybody in any category could start to get vaccinated. That small w T o P news

Dr. Anthony Fauci Dr Fauci Infectious Disease NBC
Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:31 min | 2 weeks ago

Pinning Down Prostate Cancer

"Well i of course. Our hosts quadruple board. Certified doctor of internal medicine pulmonary disease critical care and neuro critical care and still fighting on the frontlines over the war on. Covid my very good friend. Dr steven tae back. How you doing steve. I'm well thank you as you've heard joining us from johns hopkins medicine. Doctor kenneth pinta. He's the director of research for the james buchanan. Brady urological institute. He's the co director prostate cancer research program for the sidney kimmel cancer center. He's a professor of urology. He's a professor of oncology. he's a professor of pharmacology and molecular sciences. Welcome dr to. What do you do with all your spare time can. This is not meant to be a softball question. But it's going to sound that way. I'm trying to understand from your inside. Perspective. what is it about the environment you work in a johns hopkins that produces these kind of outcomes. These ratings and the international recognition part of it is tradition. Johns hopkins was founded as the first research university in the united states and we've always placed the tripartite mention of patient care education to students and research on equal footing. So that we're always seamlessly combining those and the other piece of tradition is johns hopkins hospital in the medical school itself. We defined american medicine at johns hopkins with william oastler. Starting out saying we're gonna do medicine differently. Use the term. Medical residents started at johns hopkins. Because ostler made. The doctors live in the hospital to be trained in. So that's where the term came from. You know we have this dome at the hospital. With with the wings of the building and medicine rounds what referred to the fact that they would go round and round the dome to the different wards. And you know we carry that sort of tradition with pride and people love to work there and we've always attracted really smart people who love madison in love taking care of people and really love combining that with the research that powers the next generation of medicines. Forward dr parton. Your department chair talked about. While other hospitals use reports for urological surgery hopkins actually makes their own. Robots isn't making davinci robot. No we use a commercial robots like everyone else but what we are doing is creating the next generation of robots to work with mri machines. We have danced in. Our department is making a special robot that does that. The hopkins whiting school of engineering is developing the next generation of robots to integrate imaging with robotic surgery. A lot of that is not just hardware. it's software we're living in a pretty high tech era. We've come a long way in medicine but still so many men die of prostate cancer. What are we messing up here in. We have to do to fix this. So you know in this time of covid and so many people dying of kobe. You know it's an infectious disease. We gotta do better and we tend to forget about these other illnesses that are plaguing the planet you know if you look around the world. Ten million people a year are dying of cancer in the us. Six hundred thousand people are dying of cancer. Thirty thousand men die of prostate cancer. Every year and cancer of all kinds including prostate cancer is curable if you find it in time because we can do surgery or radiation in jewelry you but unfortunately in about fifty thousand men per year we find the cancer too late. We find the cancer. After it is escape the prostate and metastatic cancer virtually of all kinds is incurable and prostate cancer. Unfortunately metastasized spreads to the bones as first sight and it causes a lot of problems for guys in the bones including pain and eventually kills them and we can talk about how that happens but essentially we fail because we don't cure people because we don't find the cancer in time. Let me ask you a question about that. Actually because i've been quoted by colleagues that if you're fifty years old you have a fifty percent chance that you actually have prostate cancer and at sixty sixty percent chance that you've probably already have prostate cancer and so on and so forth and it would beg the question. Would it not make sense to prophylactically. Remove the prostate. And then obviously the the major impediment to that is the major side effects. What does the thought process about that in. Where are we in terms technologically of mitigating the terrible side effects of impotence and incontinence. So i think there's two aspects to that question steve that we just need to touch on because the other thing you hear. All the time is that oh prostate cancer. You don't have to worry about it. You're going to die with it not from it. You know we do see that. Eighty percent man age eighty if you look in their prostates. If they've gotten killed by a car accident you'll see prostate cancer. So essentially prostate cancer exists in two forms one form. Is this indolent slow growing low grade cancer. That probably shouldn't even be called the cancer. But it still is in we find it by screening and and those are the guys that can be treated with active surveillance. We don't need to treat their cancers where a lot smarter about that now than we were even a few years ago. The other kind of cancer is the aggressive prostate cancer. That is not the kind you find on all types whereas the kind that's growing quickly that we have to get out before it spreads so prostate cancer is definitely has a hereditary component. If you have a father or an uncle who had prostate cancer your your risk of developing prostate cancer is double if you have to family members. It's quadruples you had three family members. You're gonna get it so it is familial. There are some genetic drivers. Like vr rca to that lead to a higher incidence of prostate cancer. And we definitely say if you've have family history us should start screening sooner.

Prostate Cancer Pulmonary Disease Dr Steven Tae Cancers Kenneth Pinta Brady Urological Institute Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center First Research University William Oastler Johns Hopkins Dr Parton Johns Hopkins Medicine James Buchanan Hopkins Whiting School Of Engi Johns Hopkins Hospital Ostler Metastatic Cancer Steve
AP-NORC poll: A third of US adults skeptical of COVID shots

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

AP-NORC poll: A third of US adults skeptical of COVID shots

"News poll finds vaccination math might not add up to stopping the spread of covid of how many americans might not be willing to get a shot about one in three. Us adults are skeptical about co vaccines according to an associated press norc center poll which finds fifteen percent are certain they won't get vaccinated seventeen percent. Say they probably won't many expressing doubts about the vaccine's safety and effectiveness. Sixty seven percent. Say they do plan on getting inoculated or have done so but the government's leading infectious disease. Scientists estimates at least seventy percent of the population needs to get the vaccine in order to stop the spread of the virus. The poll also finds resistance runs higher among younger people. Those without college degrees black americans and

Associated Press Infectious Disease United States Government
Boston Man Had COVID Variant For 5 Months Before Death

WBZ Midday News

00:50 sec | 2 weeks ago

Boston Man Had COVID Variant For 5 Months Before Death

"This is the case of a 45 year old Boston man who had a covert 19 variant for five months before he died that reportedly mutated More than 20 times. The nation's top infectious disease expert says even if someone already has cove it or had covert before they can still contract this variant or any of these variants. Dr. Anthony Fauci is really been warning about this. He's saying there's evidence that people who've recovered from the coronavirus Can get re infected with these various and that's why there's more urgency than ever to speed up our vaccine rollout so more people have some measure of protection and the virus will have less of an opportunity to mutate. It's also gonna give vaccine developers Timeto work on boosters to better protect against mutations. CBS's Carter Evans reporting

Dr. Anthony Fauci Infectious Disease Boston Carter Evans CBS
AP-NORC poll: A third of US adults skeptical of COVID shots

AP News Radio

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

AP-NORC poll: A third of US adults skeptical of COVID shots

"A new poll finds about one in three Americans say they definitely or probably won't get the covert nineteen vaccine the Associated Press and O. R. C. center for public affairs research poll finds sixty seven percent of those surveyed do plan to get backs needed or have already done so but fifteen percent are certain they will not and another seventeen percent say they probably won't many in those groups expressed doubts about the vaccine's safety and effectiveness even though more than a month and a half into the vaccine Dr if you have any serious side effects of turned up experts call those numbers discouraging if the U. S. hopes to achieve herd immunity which the government's top infectious disease expert Dr Anthony Fauci estimates would require somewhere between seventy and eighty five percent of Americans getting inoculated I'm Ben Thomas

O. R. C. Center For Public Aff Associated Press Dr Anthony Fauci U. Government Ben Thomas
A Third COVID Vaccine is Poised to Enter the U.S. Market

Business Wars Daily

03:14 min | 2 weeks ago

A Third COVID Vaccine is Poised to Enter the U.S. Market

"From wondering. I'm david brown. And this is business. Wars daily on this tuesday february night twenty. Three million americans have already rolled up their sleeves to receive at least the initial dose of either the pfizer vaccine or the moderna vaccine designed to prevent covid nineteen. Well now a third vaccine is on track to enter the us market. Johnson and johnson's corona virus vaccine just wrapped up a long-awaited trial and hopes to clear. Fda authorization by the middle of this month. The lure of johnson and johnson's vaccine is that unlike modera advisor it can be delivered in one shot that make distribution simpler with no need to follow up with a second dose. It's also relatively inexpensive compared to the others and while moderna advisors vaccines have to be stored at just the right temperature. Well below freezing. Johnson and johnson's doesn't have those stringent requirements for storage. It can stay viable in just a refrigerator for around three months. That means the vaccine will play a big role globally because it's easier to distribute to low and middle income countries. According to the new york times but the results of johnson and johnson's trial were a bit disappointing. At least at first glance trial results indicated that it was seventy two percent effective at preventing moderate to severe symptoms of covid in the us. That number is sufficiently lower than modern and pfizer's overall efficiency rates of around ninety four percent and johnson and johnson's rate drops to sixty six percent in latin american countries and to fifty seven percent in south africa which is dealing with a variant strain of the virus. But don't let those lower numbers food you scientists and immunologists say that johnson and johnson's vaccine is still extremely effective and researchers have warned that you shouldn't compare the effectiveness of the three vaccines because they were all developed and tested at different periods of kovic evolution. Dr william shafter an infectious disease expert at vanderbilt told the new york times that pfizer and moderna had an advantage because those companies did their clinical trials before the variant strains emerged. He said quote. Johnson and johnson was testing. Its vaccine not only against the standard strain but they had the variants now in a perfect world. Consumers might get a choice of which of these vaccines they'd like to receive but that would only be possible if there were enough doses of all three and right now. That's just not the case in early january. The new york times reported that the us only had one hundred eighty five million doses of pfizer and moderna vaccines to cover americans through june and at the same time doses that were produced quickly now risk expiring before they can get into the arms of those who need them. Johnson and johnson says that if they're vaccine is approved they can produce around one hundred million doses of their

Johnson Pfizer Moderna Advisors David Brown The New York Times Dr William Shafter FDA United States Moderna South Africa Infectious Disease Vanderbilt
Dr. Anthony Fauci warns against Super Bowl parties to avoid coronavirus spread

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:41 sec | 2 weeks ago

Dr. Anthony Fauci warns against Super Bowl parties to avoid coronavirus spread

"The super bowl. They're always big parties but not this year at least health officials hope not fox's eban brown reports if dr anthony fauci the. Us government's most senior expert on infectious disease. Says you shouldn't host a super bowl party. There are plenty of people who will listen both bouchier on the cdc recommend against gathering with people not in your immediate home. The cdc even published guidelines about having super bowl. Sunday fun like doing virtual ups with your room decorated with team logos or start a chat thread and text about each play in real time. A reminder one doesn't need a large group of people to eat nachos epic brown fox

Eban Brown Dr Anthony Fauci Super Bowl CDC Infectious Disease Us Government FOX Brown Fox
Marjorie Taylor Greene: US House votes to strip Republican of key posts

TIME's Top Stories

05:15 min | 2 weeks ago

Marjorie Taylor Greene: US House votes to strip Republican of key posts

"Report. That they're covid. Nineteen shot may not only protect against disease but also help to prevent spread of the sars o. V. two virus the news was heralded by policymakers desperate to see a vaccine that can curb the spread of the disease but scientists have been a bit more cautious if confirmed the results would represent a breakthrough in the covid nineteen vaccine race so far the shots authorized or approved around the world have shown strong protection against moderate to severe disease but haven't definitively proven that people who get vaccinated are less likely to spread the covid nineteen virus but the data say. Some experts is confusing. So it's hard to adequately evaluate the companies claim that the shot can actually slow the spread of covid nineteen or not in the study published on the lancet pre print server which means the results have not been peer reviewed a gold standard for ensuring the scientific rigor of the findings astra zeneca and oxford scientists. Report that two doses of their vaccine was overall sixty six point seven percent effective in protecting against covid nineteen disease as part of its analysis. The research team also collected nasal swabs from and unvaccinated study volunteers in the uk every week and tested them for the virus. The scientists found that positive tests were about fifty percent lower among people who got two doses of the vaccine compared to those who weren't vaccinated because people who don't test positive are less likely to spread the virus the researchers extrapolated from those data. The astra zeneca shot can transmission of the covid nineteen virus. However that may be a bit of a stretch says dr carlos. Del rio executive associate dean of emory school of medicine. It's a leap of science. That i think still needs to be proven. He says what they show is that there was either decreased viral shedding or decreased detection a virus however they do not actually show that transmission was decreased. We can say less. Transmission is a possibility but the data on. That needs to come out says del rio. We wanna state the facts and don't want to overstate the facts. That concern was echoed by health officials. In switzerland who decided this week to reject the astra. Zeneca shot the data available and evaluated to date are not yet sufficient for approval. The country's regulatory bodies swiss medic said on february third part of the concern has to do with the fact that the astrazeneca study underwent a number of changes after the phase. Three trial was begun. A fact that some infectious disease expert say makes it difficult to interpret the results for a clinical trial as crucial as this one modifying the setup once it's underway is similar to changing the rules in the middle of a game the study originally set out to investigate a single dose vaccine but was changed to two doses when concurrently conducted early studies show that to set doses of the vaccine produced a stronger immune response further because of what astrazeneca said. Were mistakes in measuring doses. Some people in the study in the uk received a half dose for their first shot and a full dose for the second. one people also got different placebos. Some god benign nina cockles solution and some a saline solution. That could mean nothing. But it's also unusual to have two. Placebos sends that has the potential to introduce con founders into the study and because of limited supplies. Some study participants had to wait more than the three to four weeks originally planned between their doses while others when told they couldn't come back for their second dose at the time they expected chose to simply not get their second shot entirely. Frankly the way they did. These trials was really confusing. Says dr paul off it. Director of the vaccine education center at children's hospital of philadelphia and a member of the us food and drug administration's advisory committee that reviews vaccines for authorization or approval. This is the stuff you figure out in phase one. You don't fool around in phase three and see what works he says. Here's what the researchers report after getting a single shot. Seventy six percent of participants were protected against disease for up to three months. Afterwards from their their levels of antibodies generated against the virus which scientists believe are important to protect against disease began to drop those results suggest that while two doses of the astra. Zeneca vaccine preferable. A single dose could still be useful for about three months in controlling covid. Nineteen that might be especially useful information to act on if vaccines are in. Short supply.

Astrazeneca Dr Carlos Astra Emory School Of Medicine Zeneca Del Rio Oxford UK Infectious Disease Switzerland Dr Paul Vaccine Education Center Children's Hospital Of Philade Us Food And Drug Administratio Nina
A Father's Fight

Sounds of Science

04:58 min | 3 weeks ago

A Father's Fight

"Spastic paraplegia fifty or spg. Fifty is a neurodegenerative disorder that progresses slowly from infancy patients experienced developmental delays specificity and paralysis in the lower and upper limbs and microcephaly among other symptoms. It's an autosomal recessive disorder. Which means that. The child inherits the disease causing genetic mutation from both parents. I'm joined today by terry. Pure volek s whose son. Michael was diagnosed. This ultra rare condition. Terry and his wife georgia founded the organization cure. Pg fifty in order to find gene therapy treatment for michael and all other children affected by this disease. He will tell us his family's story and give us an update on how research is going for his son. Welcome terry thank you so much for being here. We really appreciate being able to share your journey with you. So can you tell us about your family's journey with this disease. So on december seventeen two thousand seventeen michael. Our youngest son was born. It was pretty much uneventful. We went to the hospital mill the night. My wife said her you know her. Water broke our third child so we were prepared. We got there. The midwife is there and michael came out in pretty much like an hour and a half. We were home within three hours so it was. It was very quick. It was completely uneventful and he was a perfect little kid he was you know he was quiet. He was the perfect child. Around six months of age we noticed that he wasn't raising his hands and he wasn't following the milestones are other children. Were following in. My wife said know. Something's up so he brought him to the doctor in the noticed that his head was starting to fall off. The charter wasn't growing as expected. And he he had something called low muscle tone to that kind of fell into the odyssey of finding out what was wrong with him. And i think it's important to note here especially for any parents that have gone through this themselves. How agonizing this step can be especially when it turns out that it's this sort of rare disease. I imagine there were all kinds of tests and all kinds of doctors. Who were just telling you that. They didn't know what it was. And how heartbreaking. That can be for parents obviously are. I thought you know what he has. Low muscle tone as you know. It looks like he's head is smaller but don't worry about it. He'll he'll catch up. And then you know that kind of lasted three months and then we were like okay. Will he still not progressing therapies and he is improving but you know his head still isn't growing. What's going on so then we went to sick. It's hospital in toronto. And we went to infectious disease. Because i was traveling at the time to latin america and he thought maybe he adds zeka so we went down the path of siyavizy ca testing. And all the other infectious diseases. What you didn't have any of them obviously and then we moved into neurology. Team did an ira. And they found that they they saw few. You know things that were not normal but nothing major. And that's when they started doing you know the panel testing which came back all negative and then finally let. We were very lucky that they did the genetic testing and then on april second of of twenty nine thousand nine. He was diagnosed with this. You know terrible disease. And how did you find doctors that were able to tell you more information about this disease. We were really lucky. That won't april second. We were told to go home. Love michael that there was nothing really the can do for him that he will most likely be completely paralyzed with limited brain function and As parents we were absolutely devastated by drove home that night. And i honestly i don't remember how even got home. Allie member his crying on the street in the car. But we found a family 'cause we're hearing the paper. I don't know what happened. I think i lost it but denied the emailed us what the disease was in the diagnosis and we found a family that had spg forty seven out of boston and call them up that night in a panic and the as she walked us through the disease and and who are the specialists and they took care of us for the next two weeks while we mourned this significance piece of our lives. It was almost like a while. It is like a piece of our soul was taken away from us. That's a really amazingly lucky to be able to find a family and have them be so willing to help you out especially in those early days will not just not the lucky that there are. She already going in the path of gene therapy. So not only do they tell us what the disease prognosis was. But they were telling us what they were doing for their disease and for their gene therapy program and spg. Forty-seven is part of a protein complex called ap four and under that ap four there's four genes their ap for eight before and one s one g one and be one in ours was the same essence. We all have the same disease so we were very fortunate. Karachi went on that path and and and kind of guided us for the next two weeks on what we should be doing and we took it on and did it ourselves from

Pure Volek Michael Terry Paralysis Zeka Georgia Infectious Disease Latin America Toronto Allie Boston Karachi
"infectious disease" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

02:02 min | 3 weeks ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on KZSC 88.1 FM Santa Cruz

"Allergy and Infectious Disease, said that we will continue to see the virus mutate as it spreads. That means that we as a government that companies all of us that are in this together. We'll have to be nimble to be able to just adjust readily. To make versions of the vaccine that actually are specifically directed towards whatever mutation is actually prevalent at any given time. Dr Fauci also said that in the meantime, we must continue to vaccinate as many people as we can as quickly as we can mutations occur because the virus has a playing field as it were to mutate. If you stop that, and stop the replication of viruses cannot mutate if they don't replicate. All three members of the White House Cove in 19 Task Force urged the public to remain steadfast and taking measures to lessen the spread of the disease, namely, wearing a mask, staying 6 FT apart. Avoiding crowds and unventilated space is And refraining from travel. All of these measures decrease the spread of the virus and therefore decrease conditions that lead to virus variants. Meanwhile, Nebraska health officials said the state could be days away from lifting restrictions on indoor gatherings, citing a low percentage of covert 19 hospitalizations. Other states. Seeing declining infections are also loosening limitations on restaurants and other businesses, though experts have warned the public to stay vigilant about masks and social distancing or risk further surges. While the rollout of vaccines has been slow. President Joe Biden has pledged to deliver one million injections in his 1st 100 days in office and suggested as possible the U. S could reach 1.5 million shots per day. I didn't talk to reporters outside of Walter Reed National Military Medical Center earlier this week and maintain that his $1.9 Trillion Cove.

Walter Reed National Military President Joe Biden White House Cove Infectious Disease Allergy Dr Fauci Task Force Nebraska U. S
"infectious disease" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

02:27 min | 3 months ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Yeah i absolutely would have a mask on during that period of time as as knowledge is evolving regarding masks. The cdc is once again you know pivoting on the information and saying that we do have evidence that the mask also protects you. Not just you know others from you. It's protecting you from others as well and that viral load right. We talked about last week. That's a huge thing all right. let's go back. let's go right to the loop. let's go to erc. who standing by dirk. welcome to reset. Good morning do you know what work has been done to rule out That the virus is being spread through common Heating and ventilation systems especially in like buildings apartments condos understood. Thank you for that dirk. Because we've heard so much about filtration systems air filtration systems. Unlisted weeks. it's it's one of those where you know. The newer and the more advanced technologies. That are working towards a rapid circulation of air space You know multiple times in an hour certainly going to be best and better than any stagnant rooms. There's tons of studies ongoing about hvac systems and ventilation regarding the transmission of the virus in that Capacity so you know. It's it's one of those things where the data's still forthcoming all right. So as we wrap up here. I i'm i'm i wanna get one more call before we wrap because they're right at the at the end here so. Let's see if we can get tom in waukegan. We'll go back to waukegan tom. Welcome to reset my question. Is this for a friend. Who's a schoolteacher. If the kids are wearing masks and protecting themselves from covert and also flu and colds and everything like that when we finally take our masks off will the kids be more susceptible because their immune systems have been exposed. Thank you thanks for that. Call tom dr turner you know. There is that possibility that we have been so stringent with hand washing and alcohol. Hand sanitizer use wearing so many basques that it has limited our exposure to other things potentially making us more vulnerable to them when we do get exposed to them but it's a risk benefit that we do have to take. I think we are going to see mask wearing for a long time to come even well. After covert is over with just sort of normalizing kids that are under the weather But not sick enough to be home just having that usual colts perhaps be masked the entire time for.

tom dr turner waukegan cdc colds dirk.
"infectious disease" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

Medicine, We're Still Practicing

06:04 min | 5 months ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on Medicine, We're Still Practicing

"Of course, , I my friend and Co host Dr Steven Tailback. . He's a quadruple board certified doctor of internal medicine, , Pulmonary Disease Critical Care, , and neuro critical care and he's on the front lines of the covert battle out in California, , for which we are eternally grateful Steve How you doing. . Thanks remotely tuning in. . Hey Bill. . Good to see. . And a very special guest Dr Kristen Mufid. . She's an associate physician in the Pediatric Infectious Disease Division at Boston Children's. . Hospital. . And she's a multiple award winning physician and professor of Pediatrics at Harvard Medical. . School. . Christie is also affiliated with Brigham and Women's Hospital She's certified in general pediatrics and Infectious Diseases by the American board of Pediatrics Doctor Moffett. . We'd like to thank you for breaking away in. . Joining us today. . All right. . Thanks for having me. . Tell me how is Boston Children's focused change during this virus Boston Children's like every hospital in Boston March and early April were all frenzied months as we were preparing like hospitals I'm sure all around the world for what we were anticipating to be a surge in Cova infected patients. . It became fairly clear relatively early in the pandemic with data coming. . Out of China that children did not seem to be suffering the same severity from this infection as older individuals in adults did we were not completely sure whether or not that data would hold true as the virus swept across the world. . Luckily, , that has actually held true but that should not be taken it all to mean that children don't get sick from this some children do get sick. From . this some do require hospitalization in some studies up to a third of children who require hospitalization require ICU, , level care. . So Boston Children's was in a unique position in Boston as you know, , Boston has an abundance of hospitals for people to choose from excellent hospitals, , all of them, , but Boston Children's is the only free standing children's hospital. . There are several other children's hospitals in Boston but they all. . have their physical spaces, , their units, , their hospital beds contained within larger hospital systems that treat adults. . So a decision was made within the city for Boston Children's to be able you take care of all the after patients in Boston who required hospitalization so that the deatrich beds in those other hospitals that were within adult hospitals could be committed to carrying for adults with cooking seems like a good. . Plan well, , even you just mentioned that children are substantially less susceptible to this virus than people at risk of the children who do get seriously affected by this virus apparently more than seventy five percent of the fatalities in children related to this virus are those of minorities? ? Can you explain why that's happening? ? Yeah. . That is very true. . The disproportionate effects that this infection has had on black and individuals. . That has been seen in adults is playing out very much children as well, , and that's true. Both . of Acute Kobe infections, , and then as you may know, , we were all surprised in the pediatric. . Rome to start to understand this other entity called MISC or multi system inflammatory syndrome in children that seems to be overwhelming inflammation that occurs in children largely two to four weeks after a covert infection. . So both acute colon and MISC are impacting minority populations in pediatrics substantially two ways that the most likely explanation is that children are most likely exposed in their households in in their communities, , and those are exactly the households in the communities in which the adults are suffering the most serious consequences in highest incidents of covid nineteen infection. . So I think that children really very much are reflective of that. . So interesting statistic when you look at it, , I know from the adult side, , we certainly see in that population, , there's a lot of multifamily housing multiple families living under one roof and that sort of social crowding a seems to have an impact but also of those people who are not financially immune. . So to speak from the virus in that, , they must go to work every day to feed their family. . You can't be you know a day laborer and do. . It via zoom, , you actually need to show up in in any time. . There is that expectation. . There's not going to be a lot of social distancing at the workplace in. . So we think that lower socioeconomic in general would be forced to continue their work in their jobs. . In spite of the fact that the risks remain the same and the statistic is not percentages of people who get the virus it is a death toll of people who have the virus. . So, , is it biological that affects them differently or lifestyle or food or? ? Those are all definitely hypotheses that still frankly require investigation and I think that there may even be a multifactorial. . For it. . That is along the lines of what Stephen was mentioning is a difference in access to healthcare for these affected populations as well. . It certainly is possible that there may be a biological explanation, , our hospital in coalition with. . The other hospitals are studying the genetics of children who are impacted by either severe ovid infection or by MISC but there isn't anything clearly being born out yet in terms of solid genetic reasons that make me immune response to these affected populations different. . Necessarily, , there's still some work to be done there. . But as you suggested to bill the underlying potential complicating factors that might be called co morbidity in some are also higher in these populations and make them at higher risk in more susceptible to more severe sequentially of this infection. .

Boston Children Boston Brigham and Women's Hospital Dr Kristen Mufid professor of Pediatrics Bill associate physician Pediatric Infectious Disease D California China Steve ICU Christie Doctor Moffett Stephen Harvard Medical Rome Cova
"infectious disease" Discussed on Strange News Daily

Strange News Daily

04:24 min | 8 months ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on Strange News Daily

"That also will stop your sweat from evaporating kind of like the reason, it feels so hot in humid environments. is because the humidity interferes with that sweat cooling process that we have. So when we look at the impact of climate, change we, we see some problems on the horizon because. When temperatures rise, that's the thing we all focus on right. The rise and just absolute temperature we also have to focus on the intense is in humidity. It's not just GONNA get hotter. It's also going to be that. That different kind of humid heat, meaning that people who are already working in maybe factories with high temperatures, maybe out in agricultural industries they're going to be at an even higher risk of extreme heat and a high humidity. There was a study published in Twenty Twenty Said Heat stress might affect one point two billion people by twenty one hundred. That's four times the amount of people being affected now, but there there's light at the end of this hellishly hot tunnel right? Okay. Global solutions are tough. What Dylan what can we as individuals due to to maybe cool down a little well, I think the most important thing is to stay hydrated drink plenty of fluids before you work into take regular breaks. The says that Dr. these hospital has started putting out semi frozen drinks to help the staff. Cool down, but that avoiding heat stress isn't as easy as it sounds. You know when you're just talking about it. Because, you continually have to change out your personal protective equipment. Get a new set of equipment. And also he says that people don't want to drink a lot of fluids, because then they end up having to go to the bathroom a lot. And then on top of that, there's People's desire to keep working through difficulties to not let patients down, you know during a covert type crisis during hinting that you are highly motivated to take care of those in your care, and so actually puts you at a higher risk of injury, because you're not focusing as much on yourself so I think it's It's just remembering to take care of yourself and the global heat health information network as drawn up. Guidelines actually helped medics cope covid nineteen. Yeah, yet in this. This is important stuff because you know I I think many of us listening today have been in a situation where. You maybe you have a costume. Maybe a person wears A. What are they called? I'm not cool enough to know the rampers. Right like you know the things I'm saying people who aren't doctors also wear things that make it pretty tough. Go to the bathroom at times. Yeah Time Square Almost Times Square. elmo's yeah, demographic. That needs more attention and support I. This is important for medical professionals combating covert right now, but they're also functioning kind of his canaries in the mine because Dr Lee says that. The some of the issues that the medical professionals are facing maybe early indicators of some of the issues that human beings in general will be facing in the coming years. What other kinds of Downer solution? Exercise is really good for you. If you keep yourself aerobically fit, you're increasing your heat. Tolerance I know. No one wants to hear that, but it's true so. So what we'd say is take way here is that this situation is probably going to continue? If you are fortunate enough to have a cool working AC system, give it some love you know what I mean. Give it a name. Walk by give it a compliment, and then make sure you keep an eye on. It I think we, as a species are going to spend the next few decades collectively trying to beat the heat..

Twenty Twenty Dylan Dr Lee elmo
"infectious disease" Discussed on Nerdette

Nerdette

07:21 min | 8 months ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on Nerdette

"From. WBZ Chicago this is nerd. I'm Greg. Johnson and it is Tuesday June thirtieth, which means gall. We are halfway through twenty twenty. And I know twenty twenty seems like it has lasted approximately seventeen million years, but I mean. It's also kind of flown by right so I. Don't know I just think we should take them in like. Take a deep breath. Pat Yourself on the back by yourself. Some flowers do whatever you need to do to congratulate yourself because we're getting through a were getting through it, and of course I am getting through it while on the floor of my bedroom closet, which means this is another edition of the introverts guide to the good life. So you know very well that the coronavirus pandemic is not over but stay at home. Orders are actually starting to loosen up across the country including here in Illinois, where people can actually do crazy things like go to restaurants and get haircuts. Meanwhile you've probably seen news stories that some states are seeing more cases than ever before which means all of this is extremely confusing, and that's actually what happened. He used a number of times in the upcoming interview. You're about to hear our guest for this episode is going to help us all make sense of what's next. Her name is Dr Emily Landon and she's an epidemiologist and infectious disease specialist at the University of Chicago. Now some of you may not know emily by name, but I am willing to bet. If you live in the Chicago area and you listened to or watch the press conference in mid March where the mayor and the governor announced. Stay at home orders. You remember emily because she made this amazing impassioned speech. I've spoken with many of my colleagues across the city and the state. And we all acknowledge that this is the only way forward. This virus is unforgiving. It spreads before you even know you've caught it. And it tricks you into believing that it's nothing more than a little influenza. For many of us, it may not be much more than the flu, and so it can be very confusing to why schools are closed restaurants or shuddered, and now the virus is taking. What's left of our precious liberty? But the real problem is not the eighty percent who will get over this in a week. It's the twenty percent of patients, the older those that are immuno-compromised those that have other medical problems who are going to need a bit more support some oxygen or maybe ventilator. Life support. I can remember exactly where I was sitting as I listened to that speech and I'm really excited to have emily on today, because if you like, she does such a good job of bringing the humanity to what often just seems like a bunch of really confusing an intense weird numbers right? So what's actually about to happen? Today is more or less a therapy session with an infectious disease specialist. Because you probably have a lot of questions like. Is it okay to drink? Marks on the porch with a friend is eating at a restaurant worth the risk. Can I finally hug someone? When can I get out of this in closet? Okay, that one probably is just my question, but you get what I mean right so Dr. Landon is going to answer all of those questions. She's GonNa talk to us about managing risk and making good decisions and figuring out how we can coexist with this virus Dr. Landon welcomed. Internet hey thank you for taking the time I imagine you have been extremely busy over the last couple of months. Yeah, it's been a pretty much nonstop since the little after Christmas. Is this like a moment in your career that you ever anticipated actually happening well now in a rare life, foreshadowing moment during a bola frequently was heard to have said Oh come on this will be okay. At least it's not a respiratory virus pandemic. Oh Wow. How do you feel about that one now? Yeah, people bring it up now and they say you were right. And I think I wanted to quit before this happened. What a terrible thing to be right about I'm very sorry about that. Yeah I was hoping it would not happen. Yeah, well, yeah. I think I mean I. Don't know it's interesting to talk to someone like you because you. At least probably had an ability to picture what was going to happen. Where like I think a lot of us? You know like I. We started working from home on March thirteenth and I think even then it was sort of like well. Who knows like? Maybe it'll just be this month. Especially early on it was just all so unknown and foreign and strange to us, you know yeah, I mean I've been at a lot of you. Know the we do these table. Top drill these exercises where we go through different threats and like biological threats that may happen, and you have to learn how to be prepared for them, and and I remember sitting around tables, and saying things like, and this is where we would cancel all elective for years, and you know, and here's where we really recommend strong social distancing in canceling all large gatherings. And you. You say them so easily. It needs tabletop exercises, but then It was pretty surreal to be saying them in real life, and to see the real to to really seeing things have to happen that way and it was a free train that we could see coming I. mean many people in my kind of work could see it coming from January and sure. Yeah, yeah, yeah, it's still a freight train I. I don't know I. Mean I think there are a lot of different factors to what we're looking at right now as places like Chicago or starting to slowly open up. And in a lot of ways for me, it seemed like it was much easier when it was just like. Nope, stay at home. Don't do anything. Don't see anybody. Know, no gatherings like the rules were very clearly defined, and as they loosen up more and more I'm just kind of at and the more tired I. Am you know the more I could really use a hug? It's just really confusing. Yeah, I am equally perplexing. Confuse the this the whole process of shutting down. It was a lot more complicated than I anticipated that it was going to be from my table. Top experience, which is not terribly surprising. How would say But there is really some. There's a little bit of solace. Solace like sort of a a breath. Sigh of relief when you just decide to that, it's going to be time. I stay at home. We're GONNA. Shut everything down that just that you're right. It sort of feels like you know okay. We're GONNA. Take a pause now and figure out what to do, and now figuring out how to get back into the world I think a lot of people felt like well. We're not going to go back to things until the virus has gone but rate. That's never been the plan you know. Everyone well, not everyone but. Many people could predict that there was going to be still a lot of cases of this virus, and going forward and that we really need that time for the stay at home to get things under control, so was more manageable and. Build our knowledge, understanding our personal protective equipment, our capacity and in healthcare we needed to.

Dr Emily Landon Chicago twenty twenty Pat Yourself University of Chicago Illinois flu Johnson
"infectious disease" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

15:02 min | 10 months ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on Work in Progress with Sophia Bush

"Center Doctor. Hoffman's research focuses around optimizing care for HIV infected women both in the US and abroad. Today we're going to talk about what it's like to be a doctor right now. Her work with HIV patients her concerns about Kovic Nineteen from the perspective of infectious disease. And how the Cova crisis is bringing the medical community together today in ways. We've never seen she's can offer us some hope and does have reality and I think you'll really enjoy it Reza. Thank you so much for taking the time to speak today. I do have to expresses supreme amount of gratitude for everyone listening at home. Obviously these episodes on Tuesdays. But you've given me time on on Sunday morning When you are in the midst of practicing medicine and treating patients and you know looking at the landscape of a pandemic and I just really want to thank you and thank you on behalf of everyone. Who's going to get to hear this conversation? Thank you so much and Really you know happy to be here and share my thoughts and I wanna say it's a huge team of of healthcare workers out there all around the world and that it's really incredible to be part of of this healthcare worker community during this time So I wanna get into everything going on right now and hear how healthcare workers are doing. And what you're seeing but I would love just briefly to hear how you ended up becoming an infectious disease specialist I. I generally go through so much of people's sort of origin stories but I also know that given the time we have today we should focus on the science. I'm just curious as you entered into a field of medicine and research. How DID YOU PICK INFECTIOUS DISEASE? it's a good question it's I think that for me. I was growing up in in school during the beginning of the HIV epidemic. And I think about that a lot because I wonder about kids. Who are you know? Maybe junior high age during high school or even younger who are going to this coveted experience and how that might shape their future. If they're inspired the way I was sort of inspired is the wrong word. I think I was seeing hearing on the news about this new infection. That no one ever heard of it was affecting haemophiliacs so there were kids my age that were the Ryan White face of HIV. And nobody knew how it was transmitted and so I sort of that. That have a big influence on on me. Just how scary it was. But also as I watched it evolve over you know years when I was in high school and then in college and I went to Stanford University and I had a really inspiring professor who taught a class called the impact of AIDS. And this was probably maybe like early. Nineteen nineties tonight. Now you can calculate my age And this was really before the advent of effective HIV therapy so people were mostly dying and there was a lot of stigma and he approached the HIV epidemic. From a really multidisciplinary Lens and talked about the importance of all the different fields. Not just science. Basic Science in research clinical medicine but The social science is behavior ear. You know legal legal protections and I was very interested in this idea of of fields and careers. That were really required. Multidisciplinary way of thinking about a problem. And I think. Hiv is such an interesting problem in that way because it requires really thinking about a disease and considering everything from the legal ramifications to behavior change to you know obviously the clinical part so really that was probably the the reason I decided to go into infectious diseases because mostly At the time I was training the pathway to become an HIV physician and researcher was through infectious diseases. I did also have A fascination with with what we call bugs drug so the bacteria antibiotics and viruses and I always had a sort of yearning to travel and see the world and think about inequity is not just here in the US. But inequity around the world you know. As I was progressing my.

infectious disease HIV US Cova Hoffman Ryan White Stanford University researcher professor
"infectious disease" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

12:02 min | 11 months ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on Short Wave

"Stay with me here the next time you go to take a trip to the loo look around because Elizabeth. Yuko bioethicist journalist. Wants you to know that. A lot of the things in our bathrooms are designed the way they are in part because of infectious disease the sink the toilet the bathtub. The toothbrush holder didn't expect that one towel racks the floor. I have white tile floor and White House in the wall so pretty much. You're telling me like almost all of the above. Yes Elizabeth wrote about this story for city lap to Bricusse cholera. The flu as our understanding of these diseases evolved how they spread the role hygiene plays and preventing them. So did the American bathroom and when we realized that built architecture and design could have some sort of influence on our health that became something that people wanted to adopt within their own homes today on the show. We present a brief toilet timeline and talk about how the current pandemic could bring about a new wave of bathroom. Related Innovation Now I think I'm going to be thinking about the bathrooms a lot more than usual. You're welcome we're talking with Elizabeth. Yuko about how infectious disease influenced the American bathroom. So let's start in the mid to late. Eighteen hundreds when Elizabeth says we started seeing the first sanitation and sewer networks in urban centers around the country. This made indoor plumbing possible so if you were wealthy there might be a small sink in the corner of your bedroom but it did take folks awhile to come around to the indoor toilet the toilets at this point. We're still outdoors even though while your families could put them in the house. There was this idea that sewer gases asthma's were coming up through the toilet and could make you sick so they were still using chamber pots in the House. And then having an outhouse to go outside so These chamber pots. If a you know wanting to spruce place up a bit had a wooden box that went over it and they were pretty looking sometimes. Intricately carved wooden boxes to stop. Hide the fact that it's a pot that you go to the bathroom and in your home. I wasn't sure you were going to send a theater so I'm going out together. It was a journey. So yes once that became a fixture then when bathrooms themselves sorted springing up and bathtubs became the norm and indoor plumbing became more prominent the fixtures. The bathroom work typically covered in would not the insides but the exterior parts of the toilet. The bathtub sink anything to make them look like real furniture and not part of a bathroom. Because at this point we still don't want we don't think about what we do in the bathroom and you know anything could make it look than that was was seen as a good idea in that changed right like in the Early Twentieth Century Nineteen early nineteen hundreds Kinda shifted away from would. Why was that so would was dark and porous and at this point we realized that germ theory was a thing and do that. These little crevices could house dirt and germs and dust and so the idea was to make everything as clean as possible and as easy to clean as possible so would really was not a great option. Especially this like intricately carved Victorian patterned would that they had all over their bathrooms and then also Taurean bathrooms. You had heavy drapery around the windows wallpaper. Sometimes rugs carpeting so it was a very kind of ornate plush kind of fuzzy set up in these Victorian bathrooms and that will change. Thank God essentially medical folks were able to convince people that indoor toilets connected to a public sewer system were better at stopping the spread of infectious disease. Also around this time. Elizabeth says there was a quote sanitation craze. Which meant goodbye. Would Hello Enamel. So a lot of brands would use sanitation as kind of marketing technique. Like we're the most sanitary restaurant or something like that. So this was something that was catching on and colour pre you probably know from toilets and bathtubs they pay your type of enamel that went over cast iron for bathtubs which then became our became used in the rest of the bathroom as well and that was marketed. As being sanitary hygienic right in in like someone around that time there was like a huge amount of curriculum in these communities and tuberculosis actually played a role in our bathroom design. Right yes because in the time before antibiotics rest sunlight and fresh air were the best known cures treatments for circular and when people got sick they if they had the opportunity went to a to Burkina Sanatorium to cure and these were purpose built. Buildings really had a big windows. Make sure there's enough and elation and sunlight air everything inside was white and easily cleaned and this idea of having the sterile white healing environment caught on for sin hospitals but then also when people's homes. Yeah so what about influenza? How did that shape things in in bathrooms back then so after the in one thousand nine hundred eighteen flu epidemic which also coincided with high levels of October Kilo says? There is an idea of having a second bathroom on the ground floor of your home. And this is in wealthier homes where you had an indoor bathroom little onto and yet here was that because we're getting daily deliveries things like ice and coal. You had this delivery person who was traipsing around your neighborhood. Going into all of your neighbor's homes picking up. Who knows what type of diseases and then coming into your home. So this person to wash their hands or use the restroom. While they're in your home they could do so right on the ground floor without having to go up the stairs and use the family's personal bathroom and spread germs up there which is so brilliant. I mean it's like it makes so much intuitive sense to me and I guess I never really thought about like the powder room being a bathroom for the stranger. I thought about it in like weird. I don't know what kind of Weird Puritan things are going on my mind but it was like away so you don't have use my bathroom in. I don't have to be embarrassed but it makes way more sense that it's like a bathroom that keeps people from coming all the way into your house. Yeah Brilliant Brilliant. Bathroom stuff okay. So can I just ask about one? Specific thing short is going on with like the fuzzy rugs and like the Fuzzy toilet seat covers. Why Elizabeth tell me why those exist. I wish I had better answers but once we got to a point where we understood germ theory. We had antibiotics. We're pretty confident. In our ability to cure ourselves of a lot of these illnesses. We got a little lazy when it came to decoration. Although lazy is not really the word. It's less focused on sanitation and hygiene and we had a vacuum cleaner and a washing machine. Just tossed that thing in the Washer and everything would be fine so we stopped thinking as much about how easy things to wipe or clean. And that's when stuff like. That came into bathrooms. So how do you think you know? It's it's it's hard to talk about this without thinking about the fact obviously that we are in the middle of a pandemic that might shape. You know or probably will shape us in a lot of different ways. Do you think bathrooms are going to change now after this virus outbreak? I don't know if they're gonNA change but one thing that I did write about was Lloyd alter one of the people interviewed from the Ryerson School of Interior Design He predicted that. We'll see a rise of vestibules and sink specifically end vestibules. So since they will you encounter as soon as you walk into. Someone's home so you could wash your hands right away And I think that absolutely makes sense. Yeah I I've started coming in my house through the back door because my kitchen sink is right there just to like wash my hands immediately when I come in the house if I leave. Yes we think that will be moving forward. That will be a focus and think any design is really going to be made with. What if we have to self isolate for months at a time again? We might have a day for example. Because you know that's not something that is common in America as it is in other parts of the world but now as people running at toilet paper. They're seeing that. It's actually a pretty great invention you know. I know that as journalists were not supposed to be political. But I'll just say I'm prob- A day and I just keep thinking about how much toilet paper I wouldn't need right now if I had one. Yeah I I'm pro day as well and And a user as well so it's yes I'm a fan and I'm glad that I mean I wish it didn't go pandemic for us to realize this is a useful thing but I'm I'm glad we're there. Yeah so you wrote about how overtime humans kind of went back and forth between responding to you know like trauma that comes along with massive infectious disease by trying to make ourselves feel a little bit more comfortable or by implementing design features that make our homes and bodies easier to clean. And I just think it's going to be kind of interesting. You know what combination of those things happen with corona virus. Have you thought about that? Yes I think? A lot of people probably have even if they haven't realized it because the past few weeks we've been spending almost all of time in our own homes staring at the walls of our house or apartment in ways that we probably never had before. And so whether we're in the bathroom washing our hands for twenty second intervals or for sitting in the kitchen or living room looking at how we've decorated moving forward. Republicans take this pandemic and this time you've spent at home into consideration when making design choices right and I think there's going to be like kind of a renewed focus about even just like thinking of those spaces because you know I didn't think about the fact that I needed to come in and wash my hands as soon as I came from the outside until this and so now I know this seems silly but like I enter my house differently now. It's not silly. It's I mean. We have to adapt changes because of public health situations all the time and this is just another example of that okay. Elizabeth honestly thank you so much for this piece so so interesting. Thank you so much. Glad someone else's enthusiastic about bathrooms. Also I mean yes I mean seriously though. I will not think of a bathroom the same way when I enter it now. And that's on you. I'm touched if you want to check out Elizabeth's piece in city lab. You can find a link in the episode notes. This episode was produced by Brit. Hanson and edited by. Emily Bond. Check the facts. I meant by. Thanks for listening to shortwave from.

Elizabeth Yuko bioethicist influenza White House Early Twentieth Century Ninete tuberculosis Burkina Sanatorium Emily Bond Hanson America Ryerson School of Interior Des Lloyd
"infectious disease" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

The Stephen A. Smith Show

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

"Espn sports betting analyst hosted daily wager. Doug Kazarian joins US Doug. This was the last thing and reach. I had to ask you. What effect does all of this have on Vegas in the sports books? Yeah thanks for having me on. Obviously it is All this takes a back seat to the to the medical situation but sports books are going to take a hit All of them that I've talked to have just obviously voiced that they understand the decisions. But this people understand next Friday so this Friday and the opening round of the NCAA. Tournament is the second biggest sporting day into sports betting day according to one book. And there's a bunch operations behind only the super bowl so there's tons of revenue for the Las Vegas Visitors Authority and just sports books across. Stay 'cause we now have sixteen states now to more joining the party this week. So this weekend's significant the entire tournament and we'll see what happens moving forward but this is obviously a setback. They've changed schedules that they had were planning extra staffing for this weekend. And the coming weekend but again it's all sort of understood but it's definitely there's a domino effect for this business as well. Well absolutely and I agree. It's understood we all know it's important but I'll go to south by South West which cancelled and then had to fire. Fifty had to lay off fifty eight employees because they couldn't get the doors open as they're a worry or concern about long-term effect to Vegas overall from something like this no like. I said they're going to tweak the schedules but the thing is let's say the NBA Nhl. Just delay things or resume this summer. Then the budget and the staffing will kind of be just delay and the L. so normally a quiet period the summer maybe a boom so in July which is supposedly really slow especially around the major league baseball. All-star break maybe it's the NBA finals. Right we just don't know but it's certainly interesting to see how it could all be handled but for now no no layoffs or anything like that. It's a wait and see approach. Remember the tournament has not been postponed or cancelled yet. It's only the short-term we at Spring Training Games today. There's even some women's basketball going on right now and and their tournaments some conferences. So it's just say wait and see approach right now but everything's just gonna be different and that's okay because the entire world is adjusting. Follow him on twitter at Doug. Espn Doug we really appreciate you jumping on giving us the insight. Check out the daily wager as always doug. Thanks for coming on my friend. What we've tried to do over. The course of the last two hours is give you information and this is what I can't stress enough. I'm not a doctor. I'm not GONNA sit here. I'm not a conspiracy theories none of that interests me. My interest is this. This is the reality were now in the reality. Were now in that seeing movies being canceled seeing entire tours and music being cancelled and seeing the sports leagues that you love at least postponing for right now so in the words of talk of a lower so what now. How do we take this? How do we move forward? And what's the next step? That's the most difficult part of all of this is trying to figure out how we got to where we are and what it means for the sports that we love moving forward. Because here's a reality. A reality not a lot of people wanna hear about but the reality is there. We may not have games to talk about. Not just for days not just for months there is a legitimate concern that we won't have games to talk about for months. I mean you're talking substantial lengths of time where the very thing that you go to escape from everything. The very thing that gives you your opportunity to forget about the world sports entertainment. The thing that gives you your release is gone through all of it. I won't stop trying to at least give the information we need and I'll stress to you find people you trust. Read what they say and try and form educated opinions on what's going on. It'll help you deal with everything that we're looking at in the meantime we'll canes GONNA come up next if I know anything. He's going to keep the coverage coming and it will be great. He'll cover more of the corona virus in the effect on the sports world. Thanks for hanging out with us before to be sure to check out the first. Take your take podcast also..

Doug Kazarian Vegas Espn NBA Las Vegas Visitors Authority analyst NCAA baseball twitter
"infectious disease" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

The Stephen A. Smith Show

10:40 min | 1 year ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

"Its season as reported by emily. Kaplan we know that Major League baseball is expected to spend all operations as soon as today. We know the Duke in Kansas have just announced they're suspending shutting down all sports so even if there's an NCAA tournament they will not be part of it. We know NASCAR will hold their next two races without any fans in attendance today. Of course we've seen thirteen different college. Basketball tournaments cancelled because of the spread of Corona virus. I've said it repeatedly I'll say it again. I'm not a doctor. I'm not here to be a doctor. I'm here to make sure that you know how this all impacts your life as a sports fan. That's the best thing I can do. Right now. Is Let you know what the lasting impact is and what it means again. I'll go back to things that I learned in hosting the daily over the last twenty four hours. And I'll tell you that things you need to know. Is You here at risk at risk means at risk for mortality which when you hear is typically people that are older that are at risk for people with immune issues that are at risk that means at risk for mortality? Not just at risk to catch it. Anybody CAN HAVE CORONA VIRUSES. An important distinction. Also you should know that because of the way the body the disease works in your body. I've learned that you can actually test negative for you. Don't have it when you do have it because it takes time to build up into the system to the point that you would have a positive test. That's why importantly they can't just quarantine all the NBA Blair's testimony and say let's go. It's not that simple because they could test negative and still be positive so this takes time and it also takes information. I will stress to you. Whatever you WANNA learn about corona virus go out and learn it read it find it. Find it from sources you trust. Find the information you need to know and I will again remind everybody. A common misconception is that this is not new remember a novel Corona viruses in New Corona virus that has not been previously identified this is from the CDC directly the virus causing Corona Virus Disease Twenty Nineteen Cove. Nineteen is not the same as the corona viruses that commonly circulate amongst humans and caused mild illness. Like the common cold. Things like SARS that you've heard of in the past. Those are also corona viruses. Corona virus is a general term. Kobe nineteen is a specific term. Part of the reason the elderly are struggling with. This is because it is new and the body doesn't know how to break it down so it takes time to figure out how to do that. And that's part of the reasons affecting affecting it. I've learned a lot of this from hosting ESPN daily. Last night. I was able to talk to Tissue Thompson. Espn investigative reporter. I stress go check out the daily. It's about twenty minutes. It will give you a lot of information and it will end a lot of the yeah buts that you've been asking yourself. Yeah but this. Yeah but that. Why don't we talk about this? And why don't we talk about that so now? I'm not a doctor. So we figured the best thing we can do is try and get one to come in and help us. Especially a brilliant one doctor Selene Ghandour Internist infectious disease specialist in epidemiologist host of the podcast epidemic and American diagnosis joins us now on the shell. Pennzoil performance on Dr countered. Thanks for your time. Why is this so severe? So you know? There's been a lot of debate about whether to call from Novartis an epidemic or a pandemic and I think finally people have come around to saying the pandemic. So what is the pandemic? It's novel virus to which people have not previously been exposed to which they have no immunity. It is spreading rapidly across continents and in communities. And the reason. We're really concerned. There are certain populations that are at higher risk for severe disease and death that includes the elderly. We start to see an increase in risk after the age of fifty but especially after the age of seventy and also people with chronic medical illnesses. So we're not talking about high blood pressure high cholesterol here. We're talking about Oregon disease like lung disease. Heart Disease Kidney Disease Liver disease. We're talking about people who have cancer or being being treated for cancer. people with autoimmune conditions at everything from Lupus to Crohn's disease And and other immunosuppressive illnesses. So those are the people who are at high risk highest risk for severe disease and there's actually one other and this is a big part of what we're so worried about his that. Healthcare workers are very much at risk here. And what we're going to hear this expression flattening the curve. If you haven't already with that means is that we're trying to reduce the number of patients who come into healthcare facilities speaking healthcare services We WanNA stretch that out over time so even if eventually I dunno anywhere from forty to seventy percent of the population they eventually be infected. But if you can make sure that happens over a longer period of time that will reduce the risk and help us manage the demand for help so think about it this way. If you have one hundred people you come into the ER and one hour. That's very different from one hundred people coming into the ER in one day or one week and having too many people coming into health facilities needing help that leads to a few problems one. It's crowded which means that you're more likely to have infection spread within those facilities and to it means waiting times we'll go up and so it's not just patients with corona virus. Who are going to suffer if you have a heart attack or a stroke and you come in. We say time is muscle or time is brain. Which means that. If you're attended to you know it's more slowly that could have real consequences for your health. So these are the these are the reasons. We're quite concerned about this. And this is to be clear. This is not the flu. This is a probably in the range of five to ten times as bad as the flu in terms of numbers of deaths And so you know a typical flu season in the United States. We have about fifty to sixty thousand people die per year. This would be five to ten times that much. So you're talking about you. Know Two hundred fifty to five hundred thousand people dying. That's not a small number of people so one of the big things it that sort of caught the Internet on fire last night for sports fans because it Rudy Gobert contacts that he's now tested positive for corona virus. Surprise a lot people because they just didn't think he was at risk. I WanNa make sure that they were very clear here. Everybody's at risk to actually catch it at some point correct. That is correct. And you know it's funny because if you think about who got this disease earliest it was businessmen traveling to China four People taking luxury crease cruise lines so this is not. This is not about your social class your race or anything like that. Anybody can get it now. My concern also though is as this evolves Will POOR PEOPLE Who have more difficulty accessing health services? Who may not be able to take time off? Work may not have insurance etcetera. Will they suffer more as a result of this? I I'm sure that will be the case But everybody is equally susceptible for sure. Well one of the viral moments. It's taken the world by storm is Rudy Gobert wiping. His hands on reporters microphones when he was asked about it. It was sort of flippant funny moment to him in that moment now. He has corona virus. So I'll have to ask you two questions here. One is that a way he could have contacted it in two. Could he have spread it through that path? Yes certainly if you think about it. When somebody's speaking microphone? It's getting close to their mouth This is a droplet spread. Not Airborne droplet spread disease so it's the droplets that come out of your mouth and your nose when you talk when you sneeze when you cough. Khou I'm sure those microphones you know if it's that has been put in someone's face or been handled someone who has a virus that microphone contaminated So you know this is why we keep saying. Wash your hands because that's it's on surfaces of things it's on people's hands that's where this virus likes to hang out and that's what we need to control. Dr John or now that we know that That he has it and also the Donovan. Mitchell has it. What's the sort of recovery process where How long did it take for him before? He's free and clear to be back amongst people in normal activities. Well this is going to be monitoring symptoms. Make sure you know he's getting better We have been at least in some countries doing Repeat Testing At the end of the illness to make sure people are are negative. The problem with the tests that we use is it's really designed to pick up Arna which sort of like DNA of the virus. And just like you know if you're trying to investigate a crime scene you can find somebody's DNA even if they're not there anymore. It's the same thing with the virus so they could potentially test positive after they've recovered even though there's no more infectious virus around so we're unfortunately the tests are not very good for telling US okay. This person is now safe to go back out into the community to be around others and so I think it really needs to be a combination of you know maybe that fourteen day time range They've gotten better in terms of symptoms fever and respiratory symptoms. And then maybe it's still using those test but we just don't have a great answer. Still Dr grounded quickly before we let you go Everybody right now is looking the sports landscape and they're trying to figure out how long this all goes on. If you're in your expert opinion where are we in the process of of this entire outbreak? And how it's affecting America specifically. Well you know I think it depends on how rigorously we're able to shut things down las things down So the more able to do so. Now the less time potentially we have to to to prolong this If we're really really rigorous about it you know maybe you know eight weeks But you know this is such a new. It's a new virus that were we. Don't know a lot about still and so we're we're kind of going by the seat of our pants and learning on the fly here. I keep telling you guys. I'm not a doctor. That's why we have Iran follow on twitter Acelino founder. Also you can check out. The podcast is epidemic an American diagnosis. Both of those podcasts as an internist infectious disease specialist. We really appreciate your expertise on this. Thank you so much for taking the time to join. Us absolutely take care. This is the sort of information keep stressing we just we need Info right. That's what I'm here to do is give you all info on how this is going to impact your life in sports and the sports that you watch the entertainment. You Watch what it means. Moving forward we're going to keep breaking all of that down as you need to know what it means next going for for you guys. Plus we'll get an inside a little bit on what it could mean moving forward for Vegas. We're going to do all of that next but we start with some straight talk you know what a full court press and basketball is right. It's full defensive coverage.

basketball Rudy Gobert United States Liver disease NASCAR Major League NCAA emily Kaplan Pennzoil Duke NBA Vegas Novartis flu ESPN Kansas Nineteen Cove Dr John
"infectious disease" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

The Stephen A. Smith Show

07:47 min | 1 year ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

"Of contracts and press conferences and teams facilities being shut. It just doesn't go together and so we're waiting to hear something from the NFL which has been quiet up until now about how it's going to handle everything in regards to the league year that starts next week and the owners meetings that are coming up in a couple of weeks. Adam schefter appreciates you math. Forgive me for going in this direction. But I'm just curious about us so I must ask you There's a collective bargaining negotiation. That's going on as we speak and we know the friction that has existed. I'm talking about internally with the Players Association. Got A lot of got a lot of guys out there. That don't agree with the proposal. They don't agree with executive director of the Maura. Smith's position players at meetings from what I told Monday went in on the executive director. Really really trying to neutralize what he was trying to bring to their attention. There's a lot of dissension within the ranks of the NFL PA. What kind of effect do you believe this virus can potentially have on these negotiations? Well I would say this Stephanie. Who believes or who feels more comfortable economically today than they did one or two weeks ago. There's nobody that could feel that way. That means the owners that means the players that means owners feel probably shaky about the deal that means players probably have to look at this and say are we going to get as good a deal when the market right now is tanking and it's hemorrhaging money at this point in time so a lot of the votes have already been cast. So that's also interesting. I don't know how many ballots are still out. There that have not been filled out but they're still been encouragement for all players to get out and vote with your or against the CBI but it's hard to think we are living in a different era. Now we have not seen anything like this in our lifetimes. So I don't know everybody's fully grasping the full scope of this as they factor that into the vote on the collective bargaining agreement is insignificant as something like that now seems atom. I can't help but to think the NFL lucked out here in a way from reputable sources that I've read predictions and these are just predictions because a lot is unknown about the corona virus. Are It will get much worse before it gets better. And people are saying. Two to three months seems to be the horizon that they're looking the. Nfl season doesn't start until September. I mean they have time to get it together. What in terms of the timetable does actually affect if we're sitting down for regular season Games and here's opening or kick off right well. Maximum is one key my support to this morning right that was in touch with medical staff and going over the various scenarios. The doctor and let me be very clear again. The doctors know a lot more than we do. I'm just passing on what was told in that team's training facility and this doctor said that if kings evacuate and everybody goes home. And everybody's quarantined and everybody's on their own for a couple of weeks and we can figure out how to get the testing done and we can figure out who has the virus and who doesn't have the virus and what measures. We shouldn't be taking. This belief of this particular team. Doctor was that we could help. Control it as best as we can but if the proper steps aren't taken in the coming days that this could obviously be a disaster and we're already beginning to see hints of that right now and who knows if we're already too late. None of us know these answers. I'm just passing on. What one doctor said? They believe that if again the proper steps are taken out it will go a long way towards helping the situation and not having it be as significant later on so as that relates to the NFL season. You're right if our country can get a hold of this marine it in and keep it manageable thing. Yes you would think the. Nfl season is down the lines that seems insignificant as that seems might be. Okay I take your take on. Espn radio and the NFL season might be okay book. Many other seasons breaking news as it comes down the pipeline today of different leagues that are affected and will. Now get some straight talk. Brought to you by straight talk wireless by going over to the show penzo performance line were ESPN NHL reporter. Emily Kaplan joins us the NHL has suspended. Its season as reported by emily. Emily thanks for some time on some short notice. How did they come to this decision? Well the writing was clearly on the wall especially last night after the NBA announced that they were going to their season. There's a lot of overlap between the NHL and NBA especially in the buildings that they play in We got some hints of it this morning when the NHL teams to cancel their skates. Cancel their practices Cancel any team meetings that they had and the NHL ahead a phone call with their board of Governors essentially their owners today at one PM Eastern. Gary Bettman the Commissioner essentially recommended. This is the path that they should take and I was told there was not much resistance on that call emily you mentioned that the NBA obviously marinas and made their decision last night before the NBA had made that decision was the NHL already leaning this way. I'm not so sure you know what's crazy is how quickly this is all transpired. I was at the NHL GM meetings March second through fourth in Boca Raton. And I was asking I tell officials you know what they're gonNA do and they're like we're looking into contingency plan like you know for example playing an empty arenas or postponing the seasons. But I don't think we'd have to do anything about it and well clearly. They have to do something. That dramatic Things really did escalate though with the situation with the NBA With TWO PLAYERS ON THE UTAH. Jazz testing positive. The jazz since March fourth have played in three different buildings Madison Square Garden. Td Garden and little. Caesars arena that all also host. Nhl Teams as well so as we know how communicable easily transferable this diseases That obviously raised concern. We're talking to ESPN NHL reporter. Emily Kaplan on the Shell Pennzoil performance on on the heels of the news that the NHL has suspended their season. Obviously I understand. They're Canadian teams in the NBA. Also Toronto I'm not taking anything away from them but let's acknowledge the fact that Canada plays a big part in the NHL. So how much was international sort of need and necessity part of the decision? Here I certainly think it was you know the NHL stances been working over live and local health officials and the to help authorities BBC in public health. Canada You know there are outbreaks in Canada's. Well I think there's probably some concern about going across the borders even though NHL him do travel privately But really what we were getting down to the. Nfl is preparing for situations already. Where there's GonNa be no fans and their Rena Columbus Ohio band large gatherings so did Santa Clara County with the San Jose Sharks Games and that was going to start to be the new president so I think that was also an issue just what the local communities were recommending for their specific teams. Keep up with every single piece of the news on by following on twitter at. Emily Kaplan Emily. We appreciate your time. Thanks so much. Thinks that that's a straight talk straight. Talk wireless everything for less only at Walmart again. Major League Baseball has suspended operations. And that's expected to go into place as soon as today. That's according to pass any broke that earlier on sportscenter. Emily Camp Kaplan letting you know our ESPN NHL reported that the NHL is suspending. Their season. Fifteen sorry thirteen different college. Basketball Conferences have canceled their conference tournaments but most importantly the breaking news. We've had in the last few minutes. My remember have joined us a minute ago to help us break this down. Also Duke and Kansas have both suspended all athletics meaning even if there is an NC double A. Tournament Duke and Kansas will not take part in it so we'll see what that means for the decision that we would expect to come sooner than later as we figure out what's next coming up next more updates on corona virus plus we're GONNA talk to an infectious disease specialists. That can help us figure out how this is impacting the sports world. And what it means next. We'll do all of that but first we do have to look forward to summer..

NHL NFL Emily Kaplan Emily NBA Espn Emily Camp Kaplan executive director Players Association Emily Kaplan Adam schefter reporter Canada Td Garden Madison Square Garden Basketball Gary Bettman CBI Stephanie Smith Walmart
"infectious disease" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

The Stephen A. Smith Show

10:47 min | 1 year ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

"And we have a bunch of people joining us over the course of these this show on the Shell Pennzoil performance on. You can tweet me at Jason Fitz but what we're trying to give you the best and latest information on how Corona virus specifically impact sports where you consume those sports and what the lasting effect could be all of this comes because today was another layer right last night we saw the. Nba postponed their season in what felt like an eerie shocking moment. Right we all felt that and said man feels like the sports world is different. In this moment we had that. We're we're you win moment last night in the NBA. Well today. Thirteen different conferences across the landscape of College Basketball have canceled their tournaments for their conference tournament in basketball. So this is ABC. Commissioner John's wofford announcing the cancellation of the basketball tournament. After a recent discussion of about fifteen minutes ago with our presidents and athletic directors again. The League is made a decision to end. This year's Atlantic Coast Conference Men's basketball tournament as of today. I cannot be more clear for anyone that decides they want to tweet me. I'm not here to have a conversation about whether this is a big deal whether it's not a deal not here to have that conversation with you at all. I'm frankly above and beyond that the conversation that we need to have as no matter what you think about that issue sports you watch are being consumed differently today because of the corona virus. That's what we're here to talk about. Also along the way I'm going to at least get you the information I'm being given by people smarter than me on how we can look for this. What's happening and what it means. Speaking of people smarter than me. Espn College Basketball Reporter. My Ra- metcalf joins us now on the Shell Pennzoil performance line myron. I love talking to you. I wish we were talking a lot happier things. But what's your reaction? Today to thirteen conferences canceling their conference tournament. It's the domino effect that's GONNA lead to the cancellation of the tournament. And I'm actually not surprised. It felt like we were headed in this direction. You mentioned that do suspended all athletic competition. That's very important. Jason Because Kevin White is the chair of the men's basketball selection committee. So the chair of the selection. Committee's school will not be participating if there's an incident delayed tournament. I think that means we're not going to have a tournament canvas also just announced they suspended all athletic competition. No travel for athletic competition. Kansas would have been the number one overall seed they're not participating it feels like it's just a matter of time maybe even minutes before the double announces that this is over the same reaction of everyone else's had This is wild is amazing. It's GonNa take us a while to process everything but certain looks like we won't have any well first for seniors and I'm GonNa go back as somebody who's watched a lot of college basketball this year. I keep thinking of caches Winston for Michigan State. Who's absolutely a heartbreaking air? With the suicide of his brother. He goes through all of this perseveres. He's in his his senior year. His moment with Michigan State for somebody like that does the NCWA now have to consider some sort of a waiver that will allow them to come back and play. Should they choose to a valid question? I think it's one of those questions. That incidentally will have to answer. At some point now the question will be is it cancelled or postponed The good thing about the incident of Lacey's in is you still have a couple more months in the school year. If you wanted to postpone but I think waivers eligibility all of that stuff is GonNa be very important but I do feel like not just the NBA canceling. But the fact. That Rudy Gobert now Donovan. Mitchell contracted Toronto virus. I think that made us very real and tangible for athletes across all sports so I think I things will get cancelled. And then we'll figure out the fallout from there into that point. Myron you make a great point in close. Proximity IS PART OF THE WAY. This is spread. And you're talking about a bunch of guys on the basketball court that don't know each other. They don't know how who Everybody's been in contact with me. This is sort of if you're a college basketball player. Even if they try to have the tournament why would you? WanNa put yourself at risk. Well yesterday a bunch of coach that talk to you said let's go bill. Self I said. Have you ever seen anything like this bill? It tells you Kansas City. Yeah no I've never seen this but let's roll with it. We got to keep going you know so. I think that was the attitude of a lot of coaches. When they thought the tournament would be played without fans in the stands. But I do feel like Jason. This is involving thing and twenty four hours ago feels like a year ago this thing keeps changing and now it seems like they're all realizing that best if everybody stays home so what should be approached at this point for the NC Double A. B. I mean what what's their first step. In cancelling the tournament They've gotTa make that declaration soon And then from there I think it becomes a matter of is everything cancelled for good. Are you going to reevaluate here? In a couple of weeks and postpone maybe for April or May so that becomes the question And I'm not sure how they can even know that considering how this thing is growing and evolving but I think the first immediate step is listen. We may have made a mistake when we said we were just going to host the tournament without fancy. We should have gone a step further. We're going to do that today and cancel. The incident delayed turn it. Is there any logic for the late to wait until local governments? Make a decision on how they want gathering Sandal. If they WANNA look foolish. Sure Yeah I mean if you WanNa be the last group to do it you can do it but you only pay more criticism for me. It feels like if the NBA is saying no go. Everybody should follow that this is the NBA. If they're canceling things. Everybody else should cancel things as well. So I don't think there's any logic in anything that isn't cancellation or at a minimum postpone. Yeah I mean and Myron. That's a great point when you think about what happens the minute the NBA cancel. It creates I hate to use the word liability in a litigious society but now every other league has to look at it and say do we want to be the one sport that continues to play because God forbid something happens? Now you know anybody that's affected would have you could be looking class action lawsuits for putting people in danger so did the NBA by simply canceling or postponing. I should say their season actually create a domino effect. No matter what I think they absolutely did. And here's the advantage that the NBA has those players have a union that represents them college basketball players. Don't have any of that. So so how do you sift through all the potential liability legal issues? I don't think you can if you're the double A. And if some kid goes to a game and drum tracks this what does that mean for the NC Double A.'s. So it just doesn't seem like it was ever worth the risk Catholic. Now figure out the other stuff you can follow him on twitter at Medcalf by. Espn Myron you know. I love your work. Nobody Comes College College basketball. Better Force Really. Appreciate your time and your insight. Thanks for coming on. Thank you brother. I mean you start to talk about what this means and the domino effect. It's real here. I don't want to sit here and pretend that we you know everything's about lawsuits. But there is some sort of limited liability. Let me be a cynic for a minute and say. I think this would be a lot easier for tournaments to just be cancelled if people weren't worried about the money right like the money has to the conversation so if we're going to acknowledge that the money plays into the conversation in keeping things going then we also have to acknowledge at some point. The money plays into the conversation from the other side of it. Do you want to be the one league that let people in and by being the one league that led people in you? Open yourself up to class action. That's the real possibility here. I'm GonNa tell you again tune into the ESPN daily podcast. This is what we tell you. Every day we bring a deep dive into a single-story from one of ESPN's hundreds of report reporters. I hosted it all right. I hosted it in the wee hours of the morning. I hosted it with somebody that is substantially more intelligent than I am with all of this Tissue Thompson. Espn investigator reporter by the way the daily presented by Adt. You talk about somebody that can give you the breakdown. There important nuggets. I need you to know all right. A lot of people think corona viruses existed for a long time. Corona virus is a general term. So I WANNA make sure people understand that we're using a general term for a specific illness cove in nineteen as says on the CDC website a novel Corona viruses a new corona virus that has not been previously identified the virus causing Corona Virus Disease Twenty Nineteen Kobe. Nineteen is not the same as the corona viruses that commonly circulate among humans and cause mild illnesses like the common cold. So you've heard of things like SARS before SARS was also a Corona Virus. So we're using a general term for a specific thing. That's important here because what we also know is anybody can catch it all right just because you here at risk doesn't mean anybody can't catch it so at risk is talking about at risk. For mortality rate. It's important distinctions. That you need to know in the meantime we haven't had lot of conversation about the NFL yet because they're not playing right now but Adam schefter did point out that corona virus is specifically affecting the NFL when he joined maximum. Stephen on I take I would imagine we're GonNa hear the NFL address. Its upcoming annual owners meetings in Florida and a couple of weeks. It's hard to imagine that they're gonNA allow older people in a group setting to travel to Florida here in a couple of weeks. There's been no now because really. There's no urgency as there is in the NBA right now but the NBA was out front. This obviously made a huge statement. It looks great and doing that and the NFL. So far has been very quiet. But let me tell you what's going on behind the scenes. I think there are teams right now discussing whether or not to shut their training facilities. The Washington redskins moments ago announced that their coaches and scouts no longer will be allowed to travel to pro days of college prospects. So that's now out the window for the Washington Redskins and you could be sure that there'll be other teams that follow along again. We're waiting to hear from the NFL on the owners meetings were waiting to hear from the NFL on the NFL draft which discussed various options at this point in time. But you can't imagine being in Las Vegas in front of crowds of people. Hundreds of thousands of people as the League has done in previous years with the draft. That's illogical to think about. We are entering a new era here now the other business at hand is the NFL newly gear that is scheduled to begin next week on Wednesday at four eastern when teams are allowed to make moves now again. This is not confirmed but speculative I'm hearing there is some discussion about potentially moving back the start of the league year now. The League has been very firm this week up until now that the league year will start. Wednesday four o'clock but as we see all this news trickle and as we see the NBA moved to the forefront at the head of leading the charge here and showing real leadership it's hard to imagine that the NFL allow business to go on as usual next week with player signing millions of dollars worth.

Nba Basketball NFL Jason Fitz Corona Myron ESPN Shell Pennzoil Washington Redskins ABC Michigan State Reporter Commissioner John Rudy Gobert twitter Kansas metcalf Toronto Lacey Winston
"infectious disease" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

The Stephen A. Smith Show

01:31 min | 1 year ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on The Stephen A. Smith Show

"I said on the show several times today to check out today's episode of Espn Daily. Why because I think there was actual real learning opportunities? There are real things that we need to know. They're important things about how corona viruses moving forward how it spread and ultimately what it means to your future. There are debates to be had for a certain people that love it about whether or not this is real or whether were over. Hyping it whether it's all conspiracy theory. Those debates are for another place another person and another time my job right now right through this moment it's try and figure out how will help us all navigate incredibly difficult waters waters that may not include sports may not include songs may not include movies may not include any of the entertainment. You've learned to love not just for days. Not just for weeks possibly for months. This is a real moment for sports fans and we've got to find some way to come together even though everybody wants to stick to sports world. We've got to find a way to come together now that this is impacting the sports that you love so much we've gotta find a way to come together and get real information. I will stress it until I'm blue in the face. Don't take anybody's word for anything. Go out and read read for yourself form your own opinions based on many educated articles as you can read and has many educated people as you can hear from hopefully today through the course of this show this. Show this podcast. You'll learn a little something because I know I have and I know that knowledge helps me understand exactly what we're dealing with.

Espn Daily
"infectious disease" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

06:45 min | 1 year ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Support for NPR and the following message come from the Financial Times with with over six hundred correspondents. In more than fifty countries. The Financial Times offers a unique independent and truly global guide to the world's new agenda visit the Financial Financial Times at F. T. dot com support. Also comes from you. River cruises want to travel to popular spots in Europe without all the hassle. Immerse yourself herself in local culture take part in active excursions. Now you can with you. River cruises learn more at you by YUNA WORLD DOT COM. So emily you just got back from a reporting trip to an area near the quarantine zone and traveling is on a lot of people's minds right now. So what was that like. What was it like going through the airport? It it was. It wasn't as tense as you would imagine it to be but going through the airport meant going through many many security checks so when you're driving up to the airport you've you've got to go through. What used to toll booth is now a temperature checking station and then you walk into the airport itself? Yours objected to an explosives test but also another temperature temperature check in which they point this gun like thermometer at your forehead and it takes an immediate reading. Then when you get your ticket and you're about to get on the plane again. They do a third temperature. knbr track and then when you actually laugh at your destination and you get off. They have these temperature sensor setup that are getting everyone. And if your temperature's too high someone will come over and flagging they've got plenty of security milling around do just that and so when you were reporting about how close to the epicenter of things we actually able to get. So I went to the city called jo-john I could see across the river into the teen zone. That's why I picked the city. It's separated by this really narrow waterway. Technically it's a tributary of the young river. But UH on one side is the city I was in on the other side was done which is under really strict quarantine. What were things like? They're sort of what was. What were you seeing? I didn't see much. It was a ghost. Town Jo Jong is a city of four point. Seven million people. I walked around drove around on for the better part of a day. We saw maybe sixty to seventy people walking on the streets. There were basically cars. Every store was closed except for pharmacies. In grocery stores local governments have forced grocery stores to remain open and for them to not raise food prices. So at least people are not going to starve. But everyone's just kind of huddled in their houses including myself when I'm not on reporting trips and they're just hoping to wait out the worst of this outbreak. And do you have any sense of of what impact this might have sort of on the economy of China in the world economy. It'll have a huge economic effect. It every shopping mall has closed closed stores which normally would see some pretty high holiday. Sales aren't going to see that. This year most restaurants are closed. Basically there are no factories open right now except for people who are making medicines making has met suits and making face masks. The government has extended the loonier holiday. They've shut down. Public events is associated with the Lunar New Year that might have generated revenues cinemas aren't open schools aren't opening people are not going back to work and generating revenue and being productive. So yeah there's going to be a huge economic costs down the line. I mean it just seems like you know things in in China on a slightly larger scale scale. I mean we talk about like a city of eleven million people are four million people being a smaller city. I mean it just seems crazy to me that they would be able to mobilize oval is so much and sort of deal with this on such a scale. It cuts both ways right. They're able to mobilize they can call in all the big pharmaceutical companies and grocery chains. And say listen you guys have to get your act together. You cannot close you cannot raise prices. You have to work overtime to make sure that Oliver Oliver Supply needs are met and also impose a huge quarantine zone for fifty million plus people. Everyone has to use their national. ID to buy a plane ticket. Ed or a train ticket so and national. Id by the way has a number that reflects your ideas registered whether you're Julia province or one so it At a certain point became very easy to track They sent the soldiers in two car train stations and airports. That people couldn't leave so once. Those were on lockdown down then it became quite easy to control where people went but at the same time public disclosure and information transparency has been real real issue. I mean doctors have been describing an on the record interviews. How started seeing a spike in cases of this corona virus? Starting January sixth. We're talking right now. January very twenty eighth. The government didn't start putting quarantine measures in place migration controls in place To contain this virus until about last Monday so there there's a really long period of time in which there was no information about whether there were new cases and whether this was a true public health concern when it actually was so yes. They're taking extreme stream. Unprecedented measures curtail the outbreak. Now but a lot of people in China think it should have been. It should have been done much earlier. And how are things in Beijing are. Are you feeling it. They're not really Beijing has had its first death from the corona virus. That was a little worrying but Beijing is A. It's a city of migrants which means that over the Lunar New Year. Everyone goes home the week before the holiday the city vacates. It feels completely empty even if there were an epidemic Emmett going on so you don't feel the anxiety as palpably as you would in a smaller place where people are going home and worried about getting the virus there but one day I talked to you said he was so nervous about not so much getting sick himself. A passing it onto loved ones that he was now sleeping separately from his wife and a separate bedroom because he was afraid that he'd come back after a day of running errands. I have the virus on him and give it to his wife and child. Is there anything on. You really want folks you know. Listen to the podcast to know about what's is going on there. Anything I feel like. I didn't ask about her missed or anything like that. I think one of the mist elements of this whole outbreak is of course the the horrible public house site site if things but the psychological toll its head on people like it's really emotionally It's really emotionally heavy to think that anyone around you might be incubating the virus could give it to you without showing symptoms themselves so there is an atmosphere of panic in the country. That was Emily Fang. NPR's Beijing correspondent this episode so D- of the indicator was produced by Rafi on and me. Lena Sun Scary. It was fact. Checked by Britney Cronin our editor is Paddy Hirsch and the indicator is a production at NPR.

Beijing China NPR Financial Times Europe Oliver Oliver Supply Emily Fang Jo Jong Paddy Hirsch loonier Britney Cronin Julia Ed Emmett
"infectious disease" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Breath Haberman Dariz. Rafi on an. I'm Lena since Gary and we are the producers here on the indicator from planet money today. We're bringing you a story that that at first glance may not seem like it's about economics. We're talking about the corona virus so a little background earlier this month officials in China identified fight a new strain of Corona virus that had begun infecting humans causing an outbreak of respiratory illness. In Wuhan a city of about eleven million people and a major manufacturing hub. The virus has since claimed the lives of at least one hundred and thirty two people and infected more than six thousand people at least eighteen countries. The Chinese government women officially extended Lunar New Year holiday keeping schools and most businesses closed. Millions of people are now under strict. Quarantine will travel in and out of affected affected areas tightly. Controlled huge chunks of Chinese society have essentially ground to a halt and that's beginning to have some major economic impacts as the world's second largest economy a hugely important market for many global company is China is a major engine of growth for the world and now large parts of that engine are sitting idle. Global stock markets have been rocked in recent days with hotels and tour operators expected to be hit. Hard restaurant chains like starbucks McDonald's Donald and KFC have closed thousands of locations across China. United Airlines British Airways and air. Canada have canceled. Flights into the region apple adjusted its latest earnings forecasts forecast anticipating supply disruptions and automakers like General Motors Honda and Toyota have all shuttered plants in Wuhan but beyond all that beyond the impact on the bottom line and supply chain disruptions. This is also a moment of extreme fear and anxiety for the millions of people currently living under lockdown and at the end of the day emotion is just as powerful an economic force has anything else and so we wanted to know what are things actually like on the ground in China. What does it look like when an infectious disease? Outbreak shuts down one of the world's largest economies so we decided to reach out to NPR's Beijing correspondent. Emily Fang caught up with her as she was returning to Beijing. From Jiu Zhang a city of about four and a half million people just across the river from the quarantine zone. You'll hear that conversation.

China Wuhan Haberman Dariz Beijing Rafi Outbreak Jiu Zhang Gary United Airlines British Airway Emily Fang starbucks McDonald NPR Canada apple KFC General Motors Honda
"infectious disease" Discussed on Something You Should Know

Something You Should Know

06:11 min | 1 year ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on Something You Should Know

"Names that we can cover the multiple strains different strains if he bowl vaccine there's Marburg virus is similar virus that can also be very real challenge for us. Imagine having a vaccine that had a cocktail these different strains and could provide protection for ten twenty or maybe thirty years. That's the kind of research we need. That's the kind of thing we have to pay for if we don't we'll continue responding to these crisis after they happen which I can tell you it was gonna be much much more costly than investing upfront and trying to prevent these things from ever happening. Is this a a problem for government and business in public health people like you or is this something that everybody plays a role in. Everybody plays a role because it's only through the public's demand for this kind of support an action as things going to happen. That's that's exactly. Why the center that I lead at the University of Minnesota the Center for Infectious Disease Research and policy or Syrups C. I. D. R. A. P.? This was really really born out of the challenges that we saw where we have lots of good science coming forward in the public health world but none of it was getting translated into policy. So you don't you might have a bunch Gotcha public health scientists talking to each other but did it make any difference. He ended the same time we see. A lot of policy gets developed both in the public and private sector that has a relative absence of good science to it and that can actually be actually damaging as opposed to helpful and so we need to do is marry the two kind of like chocolate and peanut butter run into each other in the hallway. what we need basically is to blend and that's what our center does and so what we try to do is take the best science the current information information that we know and anticipate the future and we try to say okay. What kind of policies do we need to make this problem? Go Away or never happened. And how can we do that. Cost effectively. How can we do that? So we bring the best technology to bear. That's what we talk about deadliest enemies we actually lay out in layman's terms. Just what needs to be done. It should be common sense but we're not doing. That's where the general public news to demand of their elected officials. What are we going to do about this? Why are we going to not deal with this? Imagine you know if we had no response to hurricane in this country that hit landfall and made did major damage. Well you know. First of all the key thing his highly prepared for it to begin with so it minimize the damage and then after it occurs. How do you respond well? We saw that with Katrina. We know how the public responded. These are the same things that go on with infectious disease outbreaks in Infectious Disease Challenges. So that's our goal is to take these off the table by using the best science and policy combination but it would seem that if somebody would invest in a vaccine that wipes out several strains of flu for decades or a decade that that would be a real profit center. So why aren't we doing this. Why why is there? This is big resistance to what seems the way you describe it so obvious well first of all because there's been a lack of creative imagination in government for many years we unfortunately portrayed. The flu vaccine is working a lot better than it is and we made people think that was just making more of it. I remember this is a vaccine that largest made in chicken eggs it takes almost six months to make so it's really not an emergency response Kinda vaccine when a pandemic arises as we've seen in everyone we've had in the modern era of the virus white through much of the population before the vaccine ever was available because it took that long to make it and unlike you know something thing where you can just make more of it by doing it faster. There's no way that makes us faster than it is. That's why we need a new vaccine. The public hasn't cried for out for a a new vaccine because they didn't understand what the challenges were to begin with and the industry. Surely that makes flu vaccine now. Why would they want to disrupt their annual sales you know? Why would we invest a billion dollars hours to find a new vaccine and also by the same time cannibalize our annual sales? Were now currently realizing the current vaccine. So somebody else has to step in. We need a Manhattan Project on flu vaccine that I believe in others around me who are experts and flew agree. We could likely do so. This is where we have to break the logjam of what we've been doing works when it doesn't and the creative imagination say so what can work and just if you do the return return on investment of that as usual so well said imagine what our world to be like if we could take pandemic flu off the table in. That's not an unrealistic goal. So that's what we need. The same thing with antibiotic resistance. We need to limit how we use antibiotics today. So that we don't lose all the ones we have and in speed speed on the mutation changes occur when these bacteria exposed to it in this case factory there shouldn't be exposed because we're just over using antibiotics. We need new vaccines to target. Some of the diseases uses that are caused by these antibiotic resistant infections. So rather than treat and prevent them and finally we just need new vet antibiotics. But imagine if you're in the firm school industry and we're saying we want you to create a new drug but we don't want anybody to use unless they absolutely have to and when they use we want them to use it as sparingly as possible. Now how are you gonNA cost that out. You know rather when you have a drug like a lifestyle drug where you're going to take it every day for the rest of your life and in that standpoint you know the profits are pretty well assured so we just need a new model for how do these things and how we invest in them from a government standpoint and and not just to do it because it's altruistic but because it's darn I'm good business to make sure that we'd protect people's lives and the economy from these kinds of problems happening well it's really fascinating subject in one. That really everyone needs to pay attention to Michael. AUSTER home has been my guest. He is the founding director of the Center for infectious disease. Research and policy at the University of Minnesota and author of the book deadliest enemy our war against killer germs. Thank you Michael Thank you you really ask great questions. I really appreciate it. Everyone.

flu vaccine University of Minnesota Infectious Disease Marburg Michael Center for Infectious Disease founding director AUSTER Katrina Manhattan
"infectious disease" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

POLITICO's Pulse Check

04:00 min | 2 years ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on POLITICO's Pulse Check

"In the HIV strategy, we discuss check out a podcast for a few weeks ago with Jen Cates. The Kaiser family foundation, we got more into detail about why the nation's HIV problem has persisted. And what the current strategy would do. With that. Let's get to Dr Tony thoug-, Dr Tony thoug-. Welcome to politico. Pulse. Check. Thank you. It's good to be with you. You've been at an ex for fifty years. Fifty one years a fifty years, right? You've run the National Institute of allergy and infectious disease for thirty four and a half years you've been doing this work longer than many listeners have have been alive. Why? Well, first of all, I think it's very it's an important issue. The issue of of health particularly in the arena of infectious diseases, I trained after I had a full training in internal medicine. I did a fellowship combined in infectious diseases and immunology and got fascinated by elements of the interaction of the interface between the body's ability to fight infection and the actual microbe itself. And what's happened over the years as it's evolved. The reason I still feel as refreshed than is excited about. What I do is that it's an ever changing challenge. I mean, the first really big challenge that I was confronted with as a science and science administrator was when I began became involved in HIV back in nineteen Eighty-one and HIV is is kind of the the the the Pitta me of an emerging infectious disease that can transform societies. And at the time known even knew it was well, no, I mean, it was an extraordinary period of my life. I had been working in the interface between immunology and infectious diseases following my medical training. I did that for about eight or nine years. And then when I I noticed the first cases of curiously gay men from L A who presented with the strange Numa Misys pneumonia that I was very well familiar with because I was an infectious disease expert as it were. But that only occurred in people had very compromise. Immune systems. I had no idea. What it was? That was an MSW war that appeared in June of nineteen Eighty-one MMWR morbidity and mortality weekly report, which is the CDC's kind of alert publication about what's new in infectious disease. What's going on? I didn't make much of it. I thought it was a fluke and then one month later in July of nineteen Eighty-one. There was a second report in that journal now of twenty six curiously all game in not only from way. But from San Francisco and New York who presented with these bizarre infections and captures Oklahoma. And that day that I read that I I would say without personally really changed my life, my professional career in my life because I decided that this was something brand new and it was scary. And it was going to be huge. So I changed the direction of my research from doing things in fundamental -nology and autoimmune diseases to decide that I was going to start bringing in. These young men who at the time role gay men and study them to see if we could figure out what it was. So that was in the summer of nineteen Eighty-one, and I have been doing my own research and HIV since then, but in one thousand nine hundred four when I was offered the job as the director of the infectious disease institute, I'd never wanted to get into science administration. I'd been fundamentally clinician and scientist, but I felt that that was something I needed to do to call attention, not only to HIV, which was phenomenal example of the incredible impact of infectious diseases, but all infectious diseases, and it's been a changing landscape over the years. It's just changed Ebola Zeka things like that. Well, since you bring up HIV, let's just park there for a second..

infectious disease HIV MMWR morbidity and mortality Dr Tony thoug Kaiser family foundation Jen Cates National Institute of allergy CDC Oklahoma administrator scientist San Francisco director New York fifty years Fifty one years nine years one month
"infectious disease" Discussed on Canada Foundation for Innovation

Canada Foundation for Innovation

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"infectious disease" Discussed on Canada Foundation for Innovation

"An apocalyptic scenario by a number of public health leaders around the world. It's taking us back to what it was like before. Nineteen forty when major reason people died was because of infection. Now your chances of dying of infection or about three percent whereas in say nineteen thirty it was almost sixty percent so the reason for that is antibiotics and vaccines and all the wonderful things that control infection and were at risk of losing that our lob we are investigating how to overcome antibiotic resistant so that includes finding out what the enemy is. Then see what we can. We can do. In terms of being able to discover new drugs or new approaches to killing resistant. bacteria resistance is spreading like wildfire across the The planet because of martin transportation because of all of these interventions that we're doing it hospitals and as a result we have a really significant problem to one of the biggest issues that we face is that we don't. We're not considering in terms of evolution. We think it's sort of a stuck ask event but this is entirely predictable process and it's been going on for millennia. So we really need to rethink how we look at a microbes and think about them in terms of their evolutionary history. And then we'll start to be able to rationalize wife antibiotic resistance is such a significant problem and maybe even get ahead of it instead of being turned react to it. We're very interested in in thinking about antibiotic resistance on a global level and not just in for resist in serie and pathogenic bacteria disease causing bacteria. But rather where do these resistance genes come from in the first place and what we found for example said environmental bacteria that don't cause disease are actually large reservoirs of resistance genes. Probably the origins of antibiotic resistance and so these genes move through bacterial populations horizontally so from one organism to another they share dna so bacteria notoriously promiscuous having sex with each other all the time and as a result. They share these these genes. And we're trying to understand these mechanisms in order to use that against these organisms to solve this problem who reported in nature in a molecule. The blocks one of the most important antibiotic resistance elements out there right now. That rescues antibiotic activity. That was a big day in a lot. We actually were able to give a mouse in infection with a lethal dose of of drug resistant. Organisms at the antibiotic and add this compound. And when the calm when this compounds inhibitor of resistance is added the mice live so that was the big eureka moment that we were really onto something hot and so we're actually in the early stages of sort of a real drug discovery process. Were doing things. That i never thought we would be able to do because We have this really this really the molecule. So that's that's incredibly exciting and time will tell whether or not will actually be a drug that we can use for people. But it's the closest. I've come in the last twenty five years of dreaming about something like this. It's a pretty exciting Feeling to go back and look at where we started and where we are now. It really shows that you can stay in canada and get things done..

martin canada