35 Burst results for "hundred years"

Family demands release of evidence in Breonna Taylor's case

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 1 d ago

Family demands release of evidence in Breonna Taylor's case

"Her family is demanding the release of transcripts from the grand jury hearings that led to no charges against police officers in Louisville Kentucky involved in the depths of Brianna Taylor lawyers for the family including Juanita Baker say they have seen the evidence they have questions for the Kentucky Attorney General Daniel Cameron the grand jury on the grand jury if your office make that decision yeah and where does the right to know what is it that we need to say I got it wrong when it was read by Brianna Taylor's mother saying Cameron had the power to do the right thing he had the power to help me in over four hundred years of oppression what he helped me realize is that it will always be us against them governor Andy Beshear is also calling for the Attorney General to release what evidence in the Taylor case he can I'm at Donahue

Louisville Kentucky Juanita Baker Daniel Cameron Brianna Taylor Andy Beshear Donahue Kentucky Attorney
RIP Business Suit?

The Indicator from Planet Money

05:10 min | 2 d ago

RIP Business Suit?

"Tina Ob is a professor of management at Babson College and she says, a lot of students will come to her. You know before they're interviewed for the first internships or first jobs and they will ask like Bush should I wear this job. So she thinks about the question of like how professional and professional norms a lot when I asked most people what is the most big symbol of the business world and visit professionalism almost everyone says the business eventually and Tina started thinking about why in about where these norms come from also she herself had a special relationship with the business suit because before she was in academia Tina worked in banking and I absolutely were businesses because We think about the prototype of a banker is that you have a tailored suits white man play golf. I'm a black woman doesn't play golf. So I had to get the soup right and they was. I mean I had the best. They were beautiful suits and they were tailored. It was by putting on a crown almost I felt special I. Felt you don't have on my uniform. This is my beautifully tailored uniform and people perceive me differently. So now Tina works in academia and she loves researching things and so all of this got her thinking like wait why is the business suit? The thing that we all wear to work like what about kilts or row observe why not something else so she started tracing the business suit back through time all the way back to its origins in the sixteen hundreds it turns out we have Charles the second to thank for the suit he was the. King, of England four hundred years ago. Yes and at the time when he became king, the fashion in the royal courts was like very very over the top men were these huge poofy wigs and they had these big sleeves on their clothes and crazy colors because di was very expensive. So it was a sign you were wealthy men wore high heeled shoes but all of his over the top nece in the royal courts it was it was starting to cause some problems for Charles getting all this criticism from religious and economic leaders who were saying that the royal family there were morally Herat's overly decorated, and so he was looking for a way to try to. Present himself and As more restraints, the sewage back then were made from wool instead of silk, and even though the colors were still kind of like Easter and colors just all over the place. This was still super restrained at the time and it starts getting even more strain. So details on the codes when Charles the second I started wearing, them were quite long but they got shorter and shorter and shorter and eventually the. Colors that people in suits became more muted product. We see today or at least what we used to see I, mean I actually can't remember the last time I saw someone in a suit, and you know says, she can't remember the last time. She wore one I have on a workout Sir Yoga pants but you know what typically going to work I wouldn't have the song. Oh, it's the same for me talk. It's so nice, oh. Yeah. I can actually there's been a lot of talk on social media and in all of these articles think pieces about how much people have been loving dressing down Lali living that yoga pants life right and it's not like working from home is going away. I. Mean millions of offices are closed through the rest of the year and beyond and. Even for people who do go back to the office, the setups probably going to be pretty different probably fewer people some partitions, maybe less reason to suit up there. Also Tina says that now the people have tasted this yoga pants life going back is going to be hard. There's something to say about the sigh of relief the collective sigh of relief I think the world. That tells you that there was labor associated with getting dressed in a professional way. Tina says for now she is advising her students to still put in that Labor for job interviews in banking and consulting jobs, or at least take care of the top part that people are GonNa zoom suit jacket suit jacket. Exactly and you know the suit has survived four hundred years of change electricity, the combustion engine, the Internet two world wars the suit has survived. All of that is working from home really going to be the thing that takes it down death by Yoga. Pants, seriously towards yoga pants that killed the I'm on. I like the idea of the suit as King Kong. But you know I don't know Cardiff because the business has been around as you say for a very long time for four hundred years I mean. Things change and maybe this is the business suits swansong like maybe it's time for us to start wearing other kinds of close. WE'RE NOT GONNA be wearing suits forever right drew I put this all to Tina and she said, you know if you want to know the fate of the suit right now, you've got to talk to people who work in fashion right look at fashion person at twin watcher about what we're seeing from shoppers and what designers are

Tina Ob Charles Golf Tina King Babson College Bush King Kong Professor Of Management Cardiff DI England Herat Lali
The earliest human footprints in Arabia

Science Magazine Podcast

07:54 min | 3 d ago

The earliest human footprints in Arabia

"Now, we have contributing correspondent and gibbons. She wrote this week about the likely earliest human footprints on the Arabian Peninsula high an hi Sarah how old or how early are these footprints but that's a good question. They threw a whole package of dating methods at them and came up with in the Ballpark of twenty, one, thousand, two, hundred, and ten, thousand years old. Now the dates are not absolute. There's some questions about them, but that's a pretty good ballpark. How does this age compare to previous hints or clues that humans modern humans early modern humans were on the Arabian Peninsula. Here's the. We know that early hominids members of human family have been migrating out of Africa for two million years because we find fossils of our ancestors in the public of Georgia we find them in. Asia. We find them in Eurasia place, but we don't know how they got out and the most logical route is they had to walk through Rabia because they couldn't fly. They couldn't paddleboats a at that point the one landmass in the way between Africa where humans arose originally, our ancestors arose and Eurasia is through Arabia. So we know they had to go through there, but there's a huge gap there are. No tools older than three hundred to five, hundred, thousand years, and what is there is not definitive. The only fossil have a member of the human family from Arabia is a finger bone that is about eighty eight, thousand years old. So the mystery is, where's the evidence of members of the human family marching through Arabia, and then the second part of that is modern humans specifically, our ancestors Homo sapiens arose probably in Africa, because we see fossils in the ballpark of one, hundred, eight, thousand, three, hundred, thousand years of Proto early Homo, sapiens arising and Africa, and then we find more of these sort. Of Early Homo Sapiens in Greece dating possibly back to as early as two hundred and ten thousand. So we know that they got out right now we're just trying to find evidence. Is there something that going on in the Arabian Peninsula that either people didn't want to hang out there for very long or that erased a lot of evidence. Reagan. Peninsula, has covered with desert's it's very dry today the food desert where they found these fossils is parched arid but there were periods in the past where the planet was cooler and wetter, and during those times hundred, twenty, five, thousand years ago it was. One of them, it was green radio was covered with tens of thousands of lakes. They were grasslands between them. If you think about these early human ancestors, it's not a separate continent or a separate place for them to go to its Afro Arabia, right? Yeah. So it's an extension of Africa if the client is good and they're following large game, how were they able to find these footprints? This is a very large area and it's a few remnants of human passing through. Yes. So this team will have by Michael, Leah and it's an international team of Saudi Arabians in a number of people on. Has Been doing a search of scouring the deserts of. Arabia. For the last decade, they start with satellite imagery which helps them see parched ancient lake beds which have sort of characteristic white halio souls often these ancient sediments that stand out in the satellites and then go down to ground truth what they see on the satellites, an airplane shots they go in on foot in jeeps, and in this case they saw this ancient. Lake better rolling out as white sediment. It had just been recently exposed by Rosen and they found the footprints of the animals which was amazing and as I looked closer to one hundreds of footprints, it was four hundred mostly animals but they did identify a small number. It was seven that seemed to be human footprints. So they knew right away they were very excited about that that this was something that was important how Can you tell that they're human footprints and not some other upright walking relative? There's not a whole science of studying human footprints ever since the first ones are found in la totally in Tanzania and Kenya there've been a number of footprints that have been studied people use three D morphometric dimensional analysis with computational imaging or can really look at the depth and they could model how much weight would have been needed to make. That footprint, the length of the foot, the stride between the steps, and then they've done studies living people in their footprints in Africa to sort of test out those ideas and Lo, and behold when they do that to these footprints, they seem to come up with somebody kind of humor that was taller and maybe a little lighter weight more like a modern human of Homo sapiens and say an Andrew Tall so based on that. They say, Oh, these probably were made by Homo sapiens although we cannot rule out that nanotubes might have been there to is there anything else can tell about these people by looking at these marks I think if they get more, they can start to tell about their social structure footprint studies in Africa. I've got quite complicated where you could see the direction that they're going in the payson different members of social groups you can. To see what they are the packs of humans look like you know, what size are they how many are in these groups? What are they doing a lot of the way in this case, they're not spending a lotta time. They're just sort of walking through. This is a bantering group. What is really really cool. Though is that footprint site these are a snapshot of a single moment in time a single day most of the. Time when you have an archaeological site in a layer soil that you get the fossils of the tools and the dates, all that took place. This fan is usually hundreds of thousands, tens of thousands of years. So if you find an animal bone near a prominent human early Human Boehner tool, you don't necessarily know fear there at the same time as parch with footprints like these these were lay down in the same day maybe. A couple of days and they dried out and then got caught up in preserved. So we know they were all there at the same time. So you get this really cool day in the life look at the and of the animals they were with, which is really cool in this case and lots of animals. Yes. Almost four hundred footprints of animals including very interesting. A wild asses which I don't think we're carrying burdens but. That's kind of neat and they were elephants and the thing that's interesting about the elephants as their popular disappeared for the Middle East, just in Africa. Thanks for three hundred years ago and here they are in hundred twenty, thousand in Arabia and the camps they also Campbell's it's kind of interesting that such large animals with Aaron. It begs the question were these humans following them where they attracted them. Going back to the, we talked about it being about one, hundred, twenty, thousand years old. There's some question about the date but if that were cracked, is there anything particularly Gordon about this time human history about what we know about migrations that we could link these prince two? Yes. So what is really interesting is that genetic evidence says that everybody outside of Africa. Came from migrations that happened in the last fifty to eighty thousand years. So this state predates that we happen to know that early Homo Sapiens were in the Middle East pretty quickly after this or at the same time they're fossils in caves. At school and cough so that our early sort of product Homo sapiens. So we know humans are at sorta suggests that because we don't have DNA that dates back this early these were failed migrations. These were members of the human family that went out they weren't shelled migrations for them they lived, but they did not contribute to the gene pool of letting people today that's one hypothesis but it also shows that there's more complex story of groups of humans migrating out of Africa constantly whenever the weather excitement is right that it's three to nothing that they can get water follow animals to meet and trek. Africa. They can cross the desert. It looks like humans were doing that whenever they could and so how do they contribute tour ancestry today a really interesting question and how many different kinds of hominids out there. Thank you so much an thank you. Sir,

Africa Arabian Peninsula Arabia Middle East Afro Arabia Gibbons Asia Cough Rabia Sarah Eurasia Saudi Arabians Reagan Georgia Tanzania
How Have Hispanic Americans Helped Shape the U.S.?

BrainStuff

04:57 min | 3 d ago

How Have Hispanic Americans Helped Shape the U.S.?

"Brain Steph Lauryn Boban here. Here in the United States, it's Hispanic heritage month, which officially began as Hispanic Heritage Week in nineteen, sixty eight. Unlike many other campaigns that observe and honor the contributions of a particular group of Americans Hispanic heritage bump run throughout. September. But rather starts on September fifteenth and continues through mid. October. So, why does it start in the middle of the month? Well, a Costa Rica El Salvador Guatemala Honduras. Nicaragua. All celebrate their Independence Day on September fifteenth. Mexico's is on September Sixteenth Chili's is September eighteenth and believes independence. Day Is September twenty first. By, stretching into October, the holiday also includes de la Raza on October twelve, which is a kind of rejection of Columbus Day because of Christopher, Columbus's many crimes against humanity and see our episode on Columbus Day for more about that. De la Rosa instead celebrates the melding of Hispanic races or Raza, and cultures. In honor of Hispanic Heritage Month, let's talk about three times at Hispanic Americans have changed the course of history. Some three hundred years after Spanish, conquerors became the first non native Americans to view the Mississippi River and later the Grand Canyon one host. Jeff Marianne Hernandez helps smooth transfer of the territory of Florida into US rule Florida was still part of Spain when Hernandez was born in Saint Augustine in seventeen eighty four. But that changed when he was selected to serve in the House of Representatives and was sworn into duty in eighteen, twenty three as the first Hispanic person to serve in. Congress. In historical context Hernandez being a slave owner is a controversial figure. Still. He remains the first one, hundred twenty eight Hispanic people to serve in the. US Congress. Maybe of more relevance today is the first Hispanic senator elected to a full term in Congress. New Mexico's Dennis Shabas in nineteen thirty five. We spoke with Paul Orbits Historian at the University of Florida. He said in addition to being the first American born Hispanic senator. He's critical for the time we live in because he fought on behalf of all working class. Equally, he fought for higher wages legislation he fought for people to have the right to organize a union he fought for more progress and you as foreign policy for Latin America he organized N. Double ACP leaders against Jim Crow Segregation. Then, a Chevette as one of those people we can use Hispanic heritage month to talk about our connection other people's democratic struggles. Today's Congress. The one hundred sixteenth has forty seven members of Hispanic heritage. Hispanic Americans also helped turn the tide of the civil war. Some twenty thousand were involved in the conflict. While some in the southeast sided with the confederacy especially those who came from wealthy families with plantations or other businesses in Louisiana Alabama more supported the union. or it said a lot of Mexican American soldiers fought on the side of the Union army in the southwest and actually helped defeat the confederacy in the southwest. Hispanic people in the West back the Mexican government to and celebrated the country's defeat of the French at the battle of Puebla on May fifth of sixty two single Demayo in a victory that may have helped prevent the French from siding with the confederacy and thus ultimately helping the Union win. A bit more modern only about eight years before the US Supreme Court ruled in Brown versus the Board of Education, that segregation in public schools is unconstitutional as Spanish schoolgirl showed the way. Sylvia Mendez a Puerto Rican and Mexican heritage was just eight years old when she and her brothers were denied enrollment into the white only Westminster School district in Orange County in nineteen, forty three. At the time about eighty percent of California, school districts were segregated. Her Parents Gonzalo. Felicitas Mendez enlisted other parents to fight the decision and they took the school board to court. After appeals that were abandoned short of the US Supreme Court Mendez Versus Westminster became the first successful federal school desegregation case in the nation that was in nineteen, forty seven. The case was important arguing that segregation itself even if schools were separate but equal was harmful unconstitutional under the fourteenth amendment specifically, the clause, the calls for protection of the laws for all citizens. In appeals Sylvia's case was argued by Thurgood Marshall who went on to argue for the

Hispanic Heritage Month Jeff Marianne Hernandez Congress Senator Us Supreme Court Mendez Us Supreme Court Felicitas Mendez United States Steph Lauryn Boban Costa Rica El Salvador Guatema Nicaragua Mexico Columbus Raza De La Rosa Dennis Shabas Union Florida
Activists, Betita Martinez

Encyclopedia Womannica

05:14 min | 4 d ago

Activists, Betita Martinez

"Elizabeth Sutherland Martinez was born on December Twelfth Nineteen twenty. Five in Washington DC. Her father immigrated to the United. States for Mexico in one thousand, nine, hundred, seventeen in some ways historic exemplified the American dream. Here. Arrived with little to his name and ended up becoming a professor of Spanish literature at Georgetown University? In other ways his story serve as a cautionary tale he face racism and prejudice and top Petita to think critically about US policies and structures. The Titas American born mother whose family had come from Scotland and Ireland also helped to shape titas perspective. She was a teacher and activist. Batista. Grew up in Chevy. Chase Maryland a suburb of DC or she later wrote she felt like an outsider and what felt like an all white community after high school she left the D. C. Area to attend swarthmore college and graduated with a degree in history and literature in nineteen forty six. After graduation but thiede decided to go by Liz Sutherland in an attempt to better fit in with elites in the arts and Publishing World of New York City? She worked as a translator at the United Nations before moving into research and administration. PETITA studied European and US colonies in Africa and the Pacific Ocean working to shed light on conditions in places that didn't have self sovereignty. She, then worked at the Museum of modern. Art before becoming an editor at Simon and Schuster. In nineteen sixty four Batista became the books and Arts editor at The Nation magazine. PETITA had successfully broken into the New York, city. Cultural, elite. It was no easy feat. PETITA later said that she was a woman in a world dominated by men. Even. So she was adept at moving between worlds. TITA was equally at ease socializing on Fifth Avenue as at the Johns frequented by beat poets of the day. She was a very busy lady. In addition to her day job, the TITA found time to research and write pieces that landed in publications including the national. Guardian Horizon and the New York. Times. She also volunteered for political causes she believed in. petito wanted more than a successful business career she was driven to seek and push for change in the world. In nineteen, sixty, five petito left the nation to work in the civil. Rights movement. She then became the director of the New York Office of the student nonviolent coordinating. Committee or. And Major Civil Rights Organization. She was one of only two Latino women who worked as a paid employee at snack in her role Tita raised money organized events did research on the racial climate the American south. She wrote a book called Letters. Mississippi. About her experience working in the movement not state. Also continued to write for major national publications in nineteen sixty seven but he left snack and turned her focus to feminism before being drawn to the fledgling Chicano movement. Chicano Connex refers to people of Mexican descent born in the United States. Nineteen Sixty Eight petito left New York City for New Mexico. She went back to going by PETITA Martinez rather than the more Anglican sounding Elizabeth Sutherland. In New Mexico petita joined propelled forward what became a movement to promote the rights and celebrate the culture of connects people in the United States. She continued to maximize the power of her pen. She cofounded Allegri. Toe Del Norte a Chicano movement monthly newspaper in Nineteen seventy-three petita back the Chicano Communication Center and Albuquerque and served as its director until nineteen seventy six. The center used arts and media to educate visitors about the culture and struggles at the Chicano community. During her tenure there Petita also wrote another book. This one called five hundred years of Chicano history. From New Mexico petita moved to San Francisco where she continued to fight for a better future she served as the program director at global options an organization working on issues relating to labour conditions and social justice in. Nineteen. EIGHTY-THREE PETITA ran for governor of California as a peace and Freedom, party candy. In nineteen ninety-seven PETITA founded yet another organization the Institute for Multi Racial Justice the Institute served as the embodiment of her life's work to break down barriers between people fighting for justice especially different peoples of color. Following year in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eight, petito book called Deca Loris means all of us. But. Thiede has written and taught throughout her long and impressive career and activism. She's lectured at odds three hundred higher educational institutions. She's received many many honors accolades including as a nominee for the Nobel peace prize in two, thousand and five. Batista is a living example of what it looks like to keep fighting the fight against injustice in our own communities across the country and around the world.

Director Batista Petita New York City Elizabeth Sutherland Martinez New Mexico United States New York Elizabeth Sutherland Thiede DC Chicano Connex Chicano Communication Center Mexico Liz Sutherland Chevy Georgetown University Chicano Community Institute For Multi Racial Jus
It's the Little Things

Your Brain on Facts

06:39 min | 5 d ago

It's the Little Things

"For want of a nail, the shoe was lost for want of a shoe. The horse was lost for want of a horse. The rider was lost for want of a writer the message was lost for want of the message the battle was lost for want of a battle, the kingdom was lost. Small things can have reverberating effects on history both good and bad. In fourteen fifty three, the great walled city of Constantinople fell it had withstood sieges for eleven hundred years. It had held off fire from the then state of the art cannons for weeks. The Byzantine said even Ford soldiers trying to tunnel under the wall autumn Turks were finally able to overrun the great city because someone left the door open. One of the many gates in the fourteen miles of wall had been left open during the night and the Ottomans flooded in. Killing Constantine the eleventh in the battle and bringing an end to the eastern Roman Empire. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. It was a freezing Christmas night in Trenton. New Jersey during the revolutionary war. The English Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall. Commander. Of a mercenary infantry regiment of fourteen hundred has seen soldiers from Germany sat down to a good supper and an evening of entertainment. He and his men were celebrating their recent victories over George Washington's volunteer army, and of course, the Christmas holiday. Safe from the bitter cold and the pelting sleet inside a wealthy merchants home that they had commandeered. They relaxed safe in the assumption that no one in their right mind would possibly try to cross the Delaware River at night in a blinding winter storm. Someone challenged role to a game of chess, and before long he was deep in tactics and strategy. There was a knock at the door. And exhausted young. Messenger boy came in bearing a note from loyalist farmer. It's important to remember that about a third of colonists still consider themselves to be British and didn't want the revolution. Raw paid the boy little notice took the note and put it in his coat pocket without opening it. That pocketed piece of paper would cost him and the war effort nearly. Two hours earlier and ten miles away. Washington's men had begun being ferried across the icy Delaware. River. It took over ten hours to get all twenty four hundred men over to the New Jersey side. The conditions were so adverse five men froze to death. Then began the arduous march to Trenton in the dark. The plan had been to attack the town from all sides before dawn, but the troops didn't arrive until eight am. During the attack which lasted only an hour forty of the German. Henson's were killed and the remaining thousand surrendered. Colonel was mortally wounded. When his body was found the unopened note warning of Washington's crossing was still in his pocket. If role had read it, he would surely have had his gross of professional soldiers prepared. He allowed his pride and the weather to lull him into thinking his enemy was not a threat. Had he won the battle he may well have killed George Washington James Madison James Monroe John Marshall Aaron Burr and Andrew. Hamilton The. Second, most common premise in alternate history circles behind what if Germany won World War Two is what if the south one the American civil war? Two pieces of paper dropped in a farmer's field almost brought that about. Confederate General Robert E. Lee. Whose statue in the middle of my hometown of Richmond, Virginia has recently been given the historical context. It's so sorely needed. In the form of tons of. Graffiti. Issued Special Order one ninety one during the Maryland campaign before the Battle of Antietam. In the order lead divided his army, delineating the routes and roads to be taken and the timing for the units to reconvene. Adjutant Robert H Chilton penned copies of the letter endorsed them in Lee's name. Staff. Officers distributed the copies to various confederate generals. General Thomas Stonewall Jackson in turn copied the document for one of his subordinates, major general, D H Hill who was to exercise independent command as the rearguard. A Union soldier Corporal Barton W Mitchell of the twenty seven. Th Indiana volunteers found two pieces of paper bundled with three cigars as he marched across a farm in Maryland an area recently vacated by Hill and his men after they had camped there. The order provided the Union army with valuable information, concerning the army of Northern Virginia's movements and campaign plans. Upon receiving lease lost order. Major General George McClellan leading the Union army of the Potomac proclaimed. Here is a piece of paper with which if I cannot whip Bob Ely, I will be willing to go home. He immediately moved his army in hopes of foiling lease battle plans. When Lee heard a copy of special order one, ninety, one was missing he. He knew his scattered army was vulnerable and rushed to reunite his units Antietam Creek near Sharp's Berg. Lee's troops arrived tired hungry and many were sick. The Battle of Antietam, would go down as the bloodiest battle of the American civil war with casualties recorded as twenty, three, thousand dead wounded, which was usually as good as dead or unaccounted for over the course of the half day battle. That's nearly two thousand soldiers in our one every two seconds. When night fell both sides ceased fire together, their dead and wounded. The next day Lee began the painstaking job of moving his ravage troops back Virginia. Here, some scholars argue another solitary decision had far reaching consequences. Despite having the advantage. McClellan. Allowed Lee to retreat without resistance. From his point of view, he'd accomplished his mission by forcing Lee's troops from Maryland and preventing confederate win on union soil. President, Lincoln however thought McClellan missed a great opportunity to potentially end the war three years earlier than it ultimately would.

Robert E. Lee Army Major General George Mcclellan Maryland Union Army New Jersey Trenton Virginia Antietam Constantinople Colonel Johann Gottlieb Rall George Washington Ford Delaware River Writer Antietam Creek General Thomas Stonewall Jacks Washington
The Axeman of New Orleans

Far Side Chats

06:05 min | 6 d ago

The Axeman of New Orleans

"All right folks settle in because today we're in. New Orleans. So, nineteen eighteen to nineteen nineteen I'll carry we've got some pretty big stuff going on here. There's a lot of names. And quite frankly there's just a lot of information so I'm really just going to go. Bare. Bones. Here's the information kinda thing. Okay. That makes sense. Perfect. So. New Orleans. We're in nineteen eighteen. For, those of you who don't know our New Orleans is it's in Louisiana. Continuing may twenty third of nineteen eighteen? So it is sticky hot in Louisiana New Orleans. For, those of you who don't come from the south of the United States, it gets a really stupid humid and really stupid around this. Time of year okay. Like, miserable miserable like it's weather you wear as what we say it's growth. -actly. But. Honestly I don't know if it was any different back then you know climate change and all that. Probably not. Anyway so During this time. The town of New Orleans was. Just. Terrified for their lives and I'm going to get into exactly why here in a moment but Let's talk about. The first victim occur. Protect Victims I. Guess. So we've got Joseph and Katherine go on May Twenty Third Nineteen eighteen like I said. They owned a grocery store and they lived in a little apartment like above the. Grocery. Store. They were both Italian Americans hard working they. Were pretty much part of the community I mean they own a grocery store so You know people know him some people like them. It was also a weird time. and. that. It was a time that was. Racially. Distraught almost people didn't necessarily Really. Get along with other races. Sure, so you know. We can relate. Yeah. It doesn't feel that different from now. Yeah. Yeah. So it's nice to know that one hundred years ago. People were still stupid yet. So. They own this grocery store they lived above it and the night of May twenty third they. Were attacked in their, apartment? He had his skull fractured by his own acts and his throat was slit with razor. And she. Her throat had also been cut. And she actually died choking on her own blood. Oh my gosh. How terrifying? Yeah. That was the first of the whole thing and it was absolutely terrible. So you'll hear a lot of me saying that the victim owned their axe on the acts that. was used against them or that there was a panel chiseled out of. One of the doors to get into the house. Okay. Okay. Intriguing. Yeah. So just keep ears out for that. Okay, they're ready they're ready and prepared. Okay. So. The MAGGIO's died. I two victims right there came. Okay both Italian. Americans. Now. We've got to other people. On June twenty seventh Lewis, Bessemer and his mistress Harriet low. were. Sleeping. In. Bed. As. One does. and. late in the night they you know got their heads bashed in by Bessemer. Zone acts. He actually was very fortunate and that he live unfortunately Harry it did in fact die. Oh my goodness. That makes three actual victims. One is living. I wonder how all Lewis survived that. Girl. I don't know but I think people back in the day had very hard heads because there's a few more that. Show my goodness. Okay boiler but. I'm like, how on Earth do you live through? An axe bashing your head in. Yeah. No kidding. That's insane. So. Just tally up the count again, we've got four victims. Re Dead. came. So he's got a pretty good running. Statistic. Yep. Next we have Anna Schneider. On August fifth. Anna was. Asleep. She was also eight months pregnant. She was no. Yeah. She was twenty eight years old and she lived on L. Myra, street which I only put in because I used to live on an. L., Myra straight. That's crazy. What a weird coincidence I know. Anyway so Anish neider was home alone. Her husband was off working late and so she. Has I'm assuming eight months pregnant ladies are got tired and so she

New Orleans Anna Schneider Louisiana New Orleans Bessemer Lewis Joseph Louisiana United States Anish Neider L. Myra Harry Anna Harriet Low. Katherine
The Positives and Negatives of Investing Your Money in gold

Optimal Finance Daily

04:50 min | Last week

The Positives and Negatives of Investing Your Money in gold

"The positives and negatives of investing your money in gold by Robert Farrington of the college investor Dot Com. Do you remember all the hype around gold in the not. So distant past from two thousand, seven to two thousand eleven. The value of an ounce of gold went from about five hundred dollars to eighteen hundred dollars. If you would have purchased gold in two, thousand seven, you would have nearly quadrupled your investment in just five years. Now, that is one heck of an investment. Around this time I also pronounced that you shouldn't buy gold and it received a lot of criticism in more recent years. Gold has settled back down to around thirteen hundred dollars and sometimes slightly less than that. So hopefully, you took my advice, but the question still remains in the back of people's minds. Would it be wise to invest in gold right now? At, its current price gold is worth five hundred dollars less than its previous high. So one would think that an increase in value could be on the horizon. Here's what you really need to know about the pros and cons of investing in gold. Pros of investing in gold. In my opinion, there are three major pros when it comes to gold investment one, it's equality hedge against a down market to it will still have value of paper currency inflates and three. There is an apparent upside to its value versus years. One Gold is a quality hedge against a down market. As we all saw in two thousand seven when the stock market took a dive everyone began putting their faith in gold instead with the higher demand in gold and with a limited supply. The price of gold went up massively within the next couple of years we may witness another steep downmarket, which may again increase the value of gold. Two Gold we'll still have. Value Paper currency inflates. Local currencies constantly fluctuate against foreign currencies. It's the way of the world policies are in place to hold currency steady, but they're not always foolproof once a currency begins to make a downward spiral it can be very difficult to stop severe inflation, which of course, decreases our purchasing power. Is often the more solid option for currency since there's a finite amount of this precious metal if you have gold, then you're likely to hold on to more of your overall worth than someone that is put all of their faith in the banks and paper currency. Three, there is an apparent upside to the value of gold. As I stated before gold was once at eighteen hundred dollars but now rests at value of less than thirteen hundred. If there's a slight blip in our economy that sends fear through the nation, then gold could easily spike back to eighteen hundred mark. It no longer seems far fetched because after all the value has already been there before. Cons of investing in gold. I used to be a huge advocate of gold and silver investing but my opinions on this investment technique have changed largely because of these cons. One Gold has a terrible historical return. If you went back two hundred years and put ten thousand dollars in gold ten, thousand in bonds and ten thousand stocks, which of these investments would come out on top. Well, if you're smart, you would probably not choose gold to be the top investment but the astonishing part about this is how poorly it actually performed versus the stocks and bonds. Here are the values of your investments after two hundred. Years. Old Twenty six thousand dollars bonds eight million dollars stocks five point six, billion dollars. Based on the historical returns gold is a lousy investment. To Gold is worthless if things get really bad. As a pro, we stated that gold is a great hedge against the dollar inflating, which causes us to lose our purchasing power. This is true. But what if the currency becomes absolutely worthless and we all have to resort to trading goods to survive what value is gold at that point? Well, let's see me certainly can't eat gold. So it is of little value for that purpose and you really can't make anything easily out of gold either. So there really isn't any value they're pretty much at this point your gold nuggets in bars are only as valuable as Iraq because he might be able to throw it at something and kill it. Three gold only earns you money when you sell it. The biggest con of investing in gold in my opinion. Oh and Warren Buffett's is that it produces you absolutely nothing when you own it. If you want to grow truly wealthy than you want to buy an asset that produces a passive income while you own it so that you can then by other assets that make you even more wealthy. Warren started doing this as a boy. When he bought a hunk of land, he knew the land would increase in value but the truly great part is investment was that he could earn an income each year from the local farmer that wanted to rent his land after a few years of Rental Income Warren Kundun reinvest his money into even more land and do this over and over again, this method allowed him to buy assets that gained in value, but also gave him income while he owned them.

Warren Buffett Robert Farrington Iraq
What are the origins of English

Tai Asks Why

02:40 min | Last week

What are the origins of English

"Think if it is a bunch of. It is probably a bunch of women, MOMS and aunts on the island of England. That's probably the people who invented the English language and they were called angles. So they didn't even call English. They called it anguish. My Name's Tom Howell and I used to write the Oxford Dictionary encounter and I wrote a book called the Rude Story of English and it is a history of some dudes and some woman thousand five hundred years ago trying to invent the language. So in a sense when you learned English. From the older people in your family. They are inventing English in a way because that is going to be a bit different. From the English that their grandparents spoke and then their great grandparents spoke and so on and so on and so on. Until when you go back far enough, it would be very difficult for us now to understand like great. Great. Great. Great. Great. Great great grandparents, saints which other think of how friend and neighbor are spell differently neighbors eat before I, friend is I before e friend came from one place where they said free owned once upon a time and neighbor came from another place where they were saying. It was actually called a near Ghabbour. You know has GM neighbor Mrs Weird thing we don't pronounce it now. It's just people stop pronouncing it properly but. Once upon a time, they would've been like, no, it's wrong to say neighbor without Jeanette they would have been like the correct way to say that is Nia Gabor because it was a boor who lived near you. So generations go by people make mistakes people say things a bit differently. People put on funny voices. Things Change. Now we say neighbor instead of new? Kabar I guess it is. The English is so complicated because it comes from all around the world. Yeah. What recalled English today like if you look up a word on the Internet to find out where it came from could come from anywhere. Like bungalow comes from India but you know even if you went back all the way to what the angles were saying, their language also came from all around the world like their language came from. Iraq and India and Russia and all kinds of weird places like people have been talking to each other for at least one, hundred, thousand years. So all of us, any point in history might say who invented our language and the odds would almost be some not dudes some arts and mother's thousand, five, hundred years ago. kind of doesn't matter where you are. That's always kind of be the answer.

England Tom Howell Mrs Weird Nia Gabor Oxford Dictionary GM India Jeanette Ghabbour Iraq Russia
Perfectly preserved prehistoric cave bear discovered on Russian Arctic island

Kottke Ride Home

01:30 min | Last week

Perfectly preserved prehistoric cave bear discovered on Russian Arctic island

"Have just discovered a completely preserved extinct cave bear the ice age cave bear species, Ursus SPILEA S-, which went extinct about fifteen thousand years ago is itself between twenty, two, thousand to thirty, nine, thousand, five, hundred years old and was discovered in the melting permafrost of the of Ski Islands the Southernmost Group of the new Siberian islands. The bear originally found by reindeer herders still has its nose teeth and internal organs intact. It is the first wholly intact cave bear specimen scientists having previously only found skeletons. Quoting Science Alert Cave bears roamed while most of Europe and Asia. Were covered in glaciers sharing the landscape with mammoths, sabertooth cats, and giant ground sloths. The creatures were massive males could weigh up to one ton, which is about five hundred pounds heavier than the largest bears alive today and quote this particular species is believed to be an ancient relative of the Modern Day Brown bear and this specimens precise age will be confirmed wants radiocarbon analysis is done by the team at Eastern Federal University and you could. As the planet warms and more discoveries are being made in the permafrost other fines in recent years include a cave bear cub of forty thousand year old Wolf's head two lion cubs in eighteen, thousand year old puppy, and of course, the remains of woolly mammoths.

Ski Islands Eastern Federal University Wolf Europe Asia
Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

The Science Show

11:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Humans Have Caused the Most Dramatic Climate Change in 3 Million Years

"Recently Assad with some research colleagues at the Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, a look at a brand new science article in which are climate model for the first time had recreated the climate on earth over the last three million years, which covers the entire geological pleistocene epoch. The Pleistocene is so important as it constitutes a point of reference for life on. Earth. Because although sure our planet has existed for four point, five, billion years it's only in the last million years. That earth has looked at least roughly in the way as we know it, the continents were roughly where they are today. The North and South Poles were covered with ice. The atmosphere had a similar chemical composition to what we have today. Planet, Earth. Our earth has only existed for three million years. All, comparisons further back in time are quite meaningless. And the manuscript I hold in my hand is not just reaching. My brain is also striking straight into my heart. A deep humility settles in when look at the graph showing the variations in mean global temperature on earth over the past three, million years it shows that we have never throughout the whole plasticine exceeded two degrees global warming compared to our pre industrial average temperature of approximately fourteen degrees. Never. This means that Earth despite all the stresses and natural shocks from fluctuations and Solar Radiation Volcanic eruptions, asteroid impacts and earthquakes has regulated itself within an incredibly narrow range minus four degrees. Celsius were in deep ice age plus two degree Celsius. We're in a warm interglacial period lasting three million years. It's absolutely incredible. Especially since we know why. It's earth's ability to self regulate the ability of the oceans to absorb and store heat the ability of the ice sheets to reflect solar radiation the ability of the forests to absorb carbon dioxide and the ability to be a safe and store greenhouse gases. The planet is a biophysical self playing piano whose music sheet stays. Within the minus four plus to scale. If that is not caused for humidity than I do not know what humidity is. And a deep concern in hundred and fifty years. In the geological blink of an eye, we risk now tearing this Planetary Symphony to shreds. Let that sink in. The global average temperature is now changing hundred and seventy times faster than over the last seven thousand years and it's doing. So in the wrong direction upwards when the current orbital forcing meaning are distance to the sun and the current low level of solar activity means that the temperature should in fact, be slowing down. You don't have to be a physicist to understand that we have a problem. Climate skeptics like to argue that historically the climate has fluctuated so much. So why shouldn't it be fluctuating now? Obviously. It fluctuates. But we are now racing towards plus three to plus four degrees warming. Sceptics like to bring up the little ice age the time when Swedish King Call The tenth Gustav Marched His army across the deep frozen great belt and the little belt in sixteen fifty eight to beat the Danes or that the vikings grew grapes in Greenland during the medieval warm period. Yes. Of course, this is true but it all occurred within the natural boundaries of minus four and plus two degrees. And it's here within this sweet spot that we must remain for our own sakes and our future? In August two, thousand, eighteen at the peak of that year's drought and fires in Sweden and Europe. We published a scientific paper where we tried to establish whether we are at risk of pushing the entire planet away from its current state of equilibrium, the Holocene epoch where we have been since the last ice age. This is fundamental. Our Planet Earth can be in three different states. It can be in a deep ice age as it was twenty thousand years ago with large is. Extending over the northern and Southern Hemisphere with over two kilometers of ice above our heads here in Sweden an ice extending as far south as Berlin. This is an equilibrium state as it is not only lower solar radiation that keeps earth in an ice age. It is also the feedbacks caused by ice. As the ice sheets grow earth gets whiter, which means that more more incoming heat from the sun is reflected back to space more ice means it gets colder which means even more is and suddenly you have a self reinforcing mechanism. This is what makes an ice age and equilibrium earth remains. They're not only because of the external forces from the sun but also thanks to these inbuilt biophysical processes in this case, the color of ice. Earth can also be in an interglacial an intermediate state, which is what we have today where was still have permanent is sites at the polls and we have glaciers on land and the biosphere with forests, grasslands, and lakes roughly as Earth as we know it. It is these two equilibrium states and only these two states that the planet has been over the last three million years that is during the entire Pleistocene. But then there is a third state when earth tips over from self cooling feedback loops to self heating feedback loops, which leads to an inevitable journey to becoming a hot tropical planet that is four, five, six, potentially seven, eight degrees warmer than today where in principle, all the ice has gone and the surface of the ocean is more than fifty meters higher than it is today and where the conditions for live is fundamentally different all over the entire planet. This is what we call hothouse earth. Or Highs Zaid hot time in German where the article when we published it drew so much attention doing this burning heat wave in the summer of twenty eighteen that highs Zaid was chosen as the word of the year in Germany. In this research, we tried for the first time to identify the global mean temperature at which we are in danger of tipping over from our current state, the Holocene interglacial, and embarking on a journey that would inevitably take us to highlight our conclusion is that we cannot exclude that the planetary threshold. The tipping point where we kickoff unstoppable processes of self amplified warming is at two degrees. Bear in mind we are today at one point one very mind were moving fast along a path that reaches one point five in potentially only twenty, thirty years and two degrees in forty fifty years. This is one I would argue of the biggest. Challenges of all to test whether we are right. Can the planet cope with or Canet not cope with higher temperatures than two degrees? But. My conclusion based on the knowledge we have today is that the planetary threshold to avoid triggering high Zaid is most likely at two degrees. Of course, it's not so that Earth will fall off a cliff at two degrees. The risk is rather that we would then pass a threshold where the shift towards hindsight would become unstoppable. In other words, we face an urgency at the timeframe whether we pushed the on button on not triggering stoppable warming is within the next few decades meaning essentially. Now, if we pressed the UNBUTTON and kick off the great planetary machinery with feedback loops causing self warming, then the full impacts may play out over three four, five, hundred years before we reach a new equilibrium state hothouse. A planet with over ten meters, sea level rise temperatures, and extreme droughts, floods, and heatwaves making large parts of earth uninhabitable a planet we do not want a planet that cannot support US humans. This requires from us that we understand two different time horizons. The short term time of commitment. When do we push the unbutton but then also the long term time horizon when we have the full impact hitting on people these are different but ethically, I would argue only the trigger moment counts, we cannot leave a damaged planet beyond repair to future generations. So to summarize the decisive moment when we press don't press the button lies within the next ten to twenty years. With consequences for all future generations a moral, bum. Are High site article concluded that degree Celsius is our ultimate planetary threshold that we need to stay away from. This article actually came out six months before our climate modeling showed that we've never exceeded two degrees throughout the whole pleistocene, the last three million years. In Two thousand nine, our planetary boundaries size showed that one point five degrees is a boundary we should not transgress because then we enter a danger zone of uncertainty. So perhaps you do understand my feeling a deep concern of humility in the face of our latest scientific findings, which really only says, one thing tipping points are real and if they're crossed, they lead to unstoppable changes, which requires a new relationship between us and our planet, and that we realize that we are facing a new ethics. What we do today will determine the future on earth for all our children and their children.

Zaid Sweden Potsdam Institute For Climate Assad Physicist Holocene Europe Gustav Vikings United States Canet Southern Hemisphere Germany Berlin
Surprise! Nintendo just announced a The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild prequel for Switch

What's Good Games

01:36 min | 2 weeks ago

Surprise! Nintendo just announced a The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild prequel for Switch

"Nintendo just announced a legend of Zelda breath of the wild prequel for the switch. This comes to us via the Euro Gamer so. TIROL WARRIOR IS AGE OF CALAMITY A prequel to the legend of Zelda breath of the wild. It's throughout the twentieth of November this year on intendo switch is set one hundred years before the birth of the wild. Witness the events of the great calamity firsthand and tried to save hi rule from destruction reads the official blurb who got got me going. All right. Let, the developer is Coy tecmo maker of twenty, fourteen hack and slash. Rule warriors producer you'll suitca high she said that while age of calamity retains the Gameplay style of the warriors series with quote exciting one versus thousand battles and a wide variety of playable characters. This will be only game that lets who experienced the world one hundred years prior to the events breath of the wild. Cell Development? Chief. An own. Numa. Say. that. Ao Numa. Am I've always I've always said that his name despite studying Japanese I always that's why I was asking you. Stephanie's. Describing described age of Colombia's as a combination of the well detailed world of breath of the wild with warriors game play. Therefore, he added, I, believe this game will offer the experience of the gravity battles that weren't fully shown in the original game of course antenna. Breath at the wild to in the video below Enuma said that fans will have to wait a little bit longer before we can provide more updates. So don't told you breath just yet.

Nintendo Developer Tirol Enuma Producer Colombia Stephanie Official
Why 2020 hasnt taken Rev. angel by surprise

On Being with Krista Tippett

05:04 min | 2 weeks ago

Why 2020 hasnt taken Rev. angel by surprise

"At such a pace what we're experiencing now in our society were just cycling through it were digesting the material of the misalignment were digesting the material of how intolerable it is to be intolerant. We're digesting the material if four, hundred, five, Hundred Years of historical context that we have decided to leave behind. Our heads and we are choosing to turn over our shoulders and say I must face this because it is intolerable to live in any other way than away that allows me. To be in contact with my full loving human self. I feel like you. Name something here. That this evolution, we were in a moment we're using this language of the moment. and. We we were already in the moment in a way we were building to this in all its complexity. Yes which not all pretty and not all hopeful, but it's all of a piece. You know I wonder yeah. Were You Almost WANNA ask you you know I want to ask you how I WanNa ask you this personally as well as in terms of drawing out your wisdom, your spiritual wisdom I wonder if the price you. Know. That at all. I think we are This body. This body that we call a nation is ready for this. And Anybody that has had a great amount of. Toxicity as part of the IT system has to heave out that toxicity. And we've had a lot of ways to suppress it and a lot of ways to get it a lot of ways to. Purchase things and distract ourselves and Watch net flicks. All sorts of other things that we can do. But. We have had a long history in this country. It's sort of baked into the structure of. The design I talk a lot about the design of this country to have so many people disembodied. And I think that we had an amazing extraordinary painful. And yet collective experience of a sufficient quieting. Allowed us to feel this collective body that we are as a nation. New and there's a whole bunch of. Individual bodies in there that said enough. I can't I can't tolerate this. What is here? Because I can feel it now I can see it and The uprisings and the particular. The potency of. George. Not only his death, the means of his death and the. The expression of his death and I mean. Literally, right the expression. The physical embodiment, the expression on the officer's face. The expression of his death through the media, the expression of his death. Was Too much for this body to continue to bear. Yeah. I. Also think about how? Soft we were. Elected body and our individual bodies. We had each and every one of us whatever their circumstances of our lives kind of felt for the ground beneath our feet. And our defenses down. There the pandemic created A. Four strict treat. Wounds we unforced retreat. and. I've done retreat many years. And there's always this point in during retreat where you feel you're not knowing come into. Into into your view. There's there's one thing to move around the world and say, Oh, I don't know we have not. No. It's another thing to just feel it to to come into confrontation. With your knowing and it is tender as you said, like it is a tender. Place to be in confrontation with that and and it's different. I think entirely. To have been not just individual, but to also feel the reverberations of. The collective not knowing. And as a as a country, we've

Officer George
Hyrule Warriors: Age Of Calamity - Everything We Know

Dude Soup

03:54 min | 2 weeks ago

Hyrule Warriors: Age Of Calamity - Everything We Know

"Woke up this morning. It was very pleasantly surprised for say open by idea was open my eyes and I, looked at my phone and I saw a news notification for Hira Warriors Age of calamity and I was like Ooh, what is this and it's kind of the kind of thing like you have a whirlwind of emotions because you're like. Zelda and then you go higher warriors in your you know. Not to diminish warriors because I think the first game was like it was solid it wasn't like the game mainlines all the game. I think we're all excited for this one. I'm I'm actually more into by the looks of it. I had that same ranger emotions rose like, oh, man Zola Taira Warriors, and then I stopped and like you spent two thousand hours playing that game shut up. Shut up nerd a nerd. I have a question. John. Hira Warriors. What kind of game is it because I thought being compared to dynasty words I only played dynasty warriors four when I was in seventh grade. So. Is that comparable? Like what are you doing it? It's It's just like, sorry it's just like combat and like some environmental puzzle stuff but Matt. This this one's a little different because it's basically is dynasty warriors but instead of like Only, that there's also some Zelda elements built in where it's like, yeah, I gotta go solve this puzzle using the bombs or something like that. And then you might an army of people by yourself. Yeah, other other people from Celta are there to their plays IMP army, but they're not nearly as good as you. In the regular one yes. I would assume because this takes place one hundred years before breath of the wild. Yeah. It's it promises a robust story that's going to kind of give us some insight into what happened during that era of calamity as they call it where the great calamity, of calamity, Dan, how many times can intend to say calamity. Did I kinda love it but yeah send for one hundred years before the events of breath of the wild and it seems like we're going to either see or get to play as some of the characters that appear in breath of the wild to. Direct prequel to breath of the wild I. Guess So. That was the most intriguing part to me is that it seems like it's cannon prequel like they're using the same aesthetic and everything even like it was the kind of self rated breath the wild which I think it's just all the stuff that we heard about throughout the game about what happened one hundred years ago we're actually going to explore it like clone wars. which that's awesome for me because I'm someone who I I like this all the time line just because I enjoy trying to piece together and figure out where it's supposed to go and having a hundred years of history basically thrown at me Awesome. I. Also like it because I like. I like when a prequel. Predate something where you know that Shit's hit the fan and go. Wrong. So I it's what I really liked about dark crystal age of resistance is like. This going it's like A. Charlie, wiping out of of a creature but I kinda liked that we're gonNA see just is GonNa have I imagine a kind of bleak story end to set us up more wild. Following the. Good. You're. Going to say if it's following the history of the characters that we meet in Ghost form and breath of the wild. Sort of a giveaway.

Hira Warriors Zola Taira Warriors Zelda Imp Army Matt Shit John DAN A. Charlie
Heaven's Police Arrest God For Leaving Kids In Overheating Planet

The Topical

01:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Heaven's Police Arrest God For Leaving Kids In Overheating Planet

"Lord God the Father Almighty Creator of Heaven and Earth sits in custody awaiting trial today. After it was discovered, he had left all of his seven and a half billion children unattended in an overheating planet authorities said that our Lord and Savior's precious children were trapped on the planet for possibly up to one hundred years as Earth's temperature rose to catastrophic levels OPR's thaddeus loss joins. US from the Celestial Realm of Heaven. Just outside the courthouse gates were God is being held low Thaddeus. Thanks for having me Leslie. Then he is how did authorities find out about this negligence from the Almighty according to an official report? A and authorities were alerted after hearing horrifying screams and piercing sounds of thousands of natural disasters Aminata from the planet at a deafening pitch early. This morning while just how bad was the temperature inside planet or or reportedly all of God's children were left alone long enough for the temperature of the Earth to rise from negative zero point two degrees Celsius to a dangerous one degree Celsius authorities say if they were left alone long enough for the temperature to increase in additional degree or to all of the Almighty's precious. Children. Would have drowned or starved to death in likely food and Water War by twenty one, twenty disaster averted. There

United States Leslie Official
Vanessa Branson on her latest book, One Hundred Summers

Monocle 24: Meet the Writers

05:11 min | 3 weeks ago

Vanessa Branson on her latest book, One Hundred Summers

"Vanessa France, and welcome to the writers. Thank you. Thank you. Now of course, you'll family name is well-known because of the entrepreneurial success of your older brother recovered, and in this book you give us a wonderful portrait of the whole family going right back a couple of generations. Search should we start with your grandparents? Golly well, Kim I just state why I wrote the book in the first place because I think it's context utilizes why I wanted to go back and look at my family. I actually started writing it on the twentieth of January two, thousand seventeen. It was the morning of Donald Trump's inauguration and I was so thrown by. I was quite frightened actually, or we were all very fearful about what was going to happen and everything all my values and everything I felt I stood for being threatened by this man to power. And I wanted to I couldn't articulate why I felt so nervous. And I wanted to really ground all where all those values came. and. So by looking back, I wasn't gonNA rush by myself a tool I just wanted to ground where it came from. So I started back with the birth of my father he was born nineteen eighteen. And roll the sort of serendipitous. It was exactly one hundred years before I started writing the book, and there were these mighty seismic changes back in one, thousand, nine, thousand, nine, hundred. I wanted to serve slot the family into a historical context as well. Because the both sets of grandparents came from different worlds didn't they? Yes. Nothing. That was one of the things that I was excited to investigate. My father's family was really quite educated and very good fun actually and very playful. They weren't in the grammar school boys and they all went to Cambridge. And they were ventures and travelers and extraordinary. My my mother's family was more of middle class but I was very interested about the class in England as well and how we've always felt as a family now, quite sort of class less than I wanted to find out where that came from because I think they were quite horrible to your mother, I yes. Well, she was sort of show. Girl you can imagine I mean they were they were slightly snobbish. My grandfather was a high court judge in he wasn't landed. He didn't have a stately home, but he rented one and they had lots of staff and long drive and they did shifting with the right people and let's say and then my mom turned up and she was on the stage and I think they would rather said. That they're blue eyed boy they're DEB's delight as they called him at fallen for this rather so crazy. Well. described it herself as a flippity Japan but. Anyhow it was a very enduring marriage and Utah wonderful stories of the courtship and all the rest of it. It's very beautifully done, and clearly they had a huge amount of affection for each other. And for their children, how would you characterize your childhood? Well, it was sort of heaven really the with very little cash. My father wasn't very successful barrister in he was slightly forced into it by his father and. One of the defining characteristics of all of us which is really was really interesting to sort of nail is that we're all dyslexic and both my parents are dyslexic. They just found schoolwork in academia very difficult and my poor father was sort of shoehorned into being a barrister and he shouldn't have been. So he was there was never much cash around but. They were just sort good fund, my parents and. They both been through the war and I, think life was just to you know they'd seen such terrible things experience really quite a lot of hardship and they just wanted to live for the joy of life again and they gave us that in bucket foles and just embraced all K- also adventure and people and everyone was welcome and we had very very happy childhood action. It sounds like this wonderful big messy household with just lots of lots and lots of animals the countryside I mean does sound so much fun. Tell me about your siblings then well, my brother was born in nineteen fifty and I wasn't born until nineteen, fifty nine, and then we have assisted in the middle. and. We've sort of space do and Richard Got Adhd and he was very very energetic and rather than sort of repressed him I think my parents soon realized that I mean in Heaven Forbid Kids nowadays would be on Ritalin or something and they set him challenges and so my earliest memories were keeping Richard Busy sending him off on on really long bike rides and really difficult things to keep him occupied for the day and lots of mealtimes. My sister just lovely to me and. I wanted to be held on Halloween because of the things. We teased relentlessly and there were lots of sort of games but. Missed quite interesting. Now in my mom's still alive, she's ninety six and I'm sure a lot of people listening to this all recognize this but we all still fall into type as if we're still ten years old. And we'll. We'll want Mommy's attention you know, and we'll still play all roles and it's it's possible.

DEB Richard Donald Trump Vanessa France Cambridge Japan Golly Mommy Utah Adhd England KIM
1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

06:20 min | 3 weeks ago

1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

"So my episode today. is about the nineteen eighty Mount Saint Helens eruption. So now, we weren't alive then even though we were not alive, then it was you know years until Jillian. Many years. Until we were born. We are in our. Mid Twenty. S. So we're very youthful. Yeah. We say what's a CD or whatever I don't know anything I couldn't even pretend to be a teenager because I have no idea went technology. Don T TIKTOK ON THE TIKTOK You know on the TIKTOK so. Nineteen Eighty Mount Saint Helens eruption has a lot of parallels to what's going on in the world today, but it's an interesting story. So to to start with for our non US friends and Non West Coast friends, I didn't know the details about this when I started researching it but Mount Saint Helen's which is known as a lot lot to the indigenous lets people and Lou wit. Luella cloud to the click a tat is an active stretch of Okano located in. Skamania. County. Washington in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States I. Apologize to the Washingtonians. If I pronounced Skamania county your Skamania county incorrectly. I'm sure I will get an email about this. Fifty miles eighty kilometers northeast of Portland Oregon Ninety, six miles or one hundred and fifty four kilometers south of Seattle Washington. So to get a sense of where Mount Saint Helen's is. If you're thinking of both Washington state and Oregon is roughly like. Square ish rectangular ish in shape with Washington, in the north and Oregon just below. Mount Saint Helen's is in the lower left quadrant of Washington state near the border of Oregon. and. She's roughly halfway between Portland, and the Portland Oregon and Olympia Washington, which is the Washington state capital. Okay. also relevant northeast of Mount. Saint Helen's is what's called Spirit Lake. And there's a bunch of little rivers and creeks in that area just due to like the geology of the area but almost directly north of the mountain is the north fork toodle river. River toodle or Poudel T. O. U. T.. L. E. Title River. So. Also? Mount Saint. Helen's takes its English name from the British diplomats. Lowered Saint Helen's is a friend of explorer George Vancouver who made a survey of the area in the late eighteenth century The volcano is located in the cascade range is part of the cascade volcanic arc, which is a segment of the Pacific Ring of fire that includes over one hundred and sixty active volcanoes and for the record before the explosion mount. Saint, Helen's stood at nine, thousand, six, hundred and eighty feet high. So. They knew it was part of the ring of the ring of Fire Okay Yeah Yeah So. They knew as part of the ring of fire. It had experienced some activity throughout recorded history but it. It remained dormant basically from its last period of activity in the eighteen, Forty S and eighteen fifties. So by one thousand, nine hundred had been more than one hundred years before there was any like really significant activity that includes ash like little burps and like any kind of flow or anything like that. So. At this point people were pretty complacent thinking nothing's going to happen anytime soon it's fine like it's a dormant volcano for all intents and purposes until we get to the spring of nineteen eighty. Okay. So, there were several small earthquakes beginning on March fifteenth of that year indicating that magma may have begun moving below the volcano also just as an f. y. we talked about natural disasters on episode sixty one which was called here I am rock. You like a hurricane I talked a little bit about that about volcanoes in that episode. So if you want to refresh your memory about the basics of what's in a volcano check that out episode sixty one, it's very good. Thank you. So on March Twentieth Three Forty Five PM Pacific Standard Time, which everything will be NPS T. Shallow magnitude four point two earthquake centered below the volcano's north flank signal the volcanoes return from one hundred, twenty three years of hibernation. A gradually building earthquake swarm saturated area seismographs, and started to climax at about noon on March twenty fifth reaching peak levels in the next two days including an earthquake registering five point one on the Richter scale. A total of one hundred and seventy four shocks of magnitude. Two point six greater were recorded during those two days. That's a lot. Yeah. So geologists in that area are like look is no not a great sign. Initially. There was no direct sign of eruption but small earthquake induced avalanches of snow and ice were reported from aerial observations. So this mountain is shaking and you know stuff is falling off. It's not it's not nothing. At twelve thirty, six PM on March twenty seventh phreatic eruptions which are explosions of steam caused by magma suddenly heating groundwater. So that's like a quick like spur. Of, like Ash and Steam K ejected and smashed rock from within the old summit crater. Excavating a new crater, two, hundred and fifty feet wide. And sending an ass column about seven thousand feet into the air. So you yeah, knock. Great. So by this date along, east trending fracture system had also developed across the summit area. So there's cracks forming in the summit. This was followed by more earthquake swarms in a series of explosions that said ash even higher above there. And most of this ash fell between three and twelve miles from its fendt. But some was carried hundred fifty miles south to bend Oregon or two hundred and eighty five miles east to spokane Washington. So the ash went pretty far and those who were like what the What is happening here? So? then. A second new crater and a blue flame were observed on March twenty ninth.

Mount Saint Helen Mount Saint Helens Eruption Saint Helen Washington Oregon Portland ASH Mount Saint United States Skamania County Mount North Fork Toodle River Jillian Pacific Northwest Don T Poudel T. O. U. T Tiktok Luella Cloud Olympia Washington
"hundred years" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

Welcome to Night Vale

05:04 min | 3 weeks ago

"hundred years" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

"Carlos and I are at the theatre. The audiences of buzz with excitement. Yes. But also many of them are the insects that infest this theater. Bugs became entranced by the story over the years passing down through brief generation. After brief generation history of all that happened before the story of the play became something of a religion to this creepy crawly civilization, and so now the bugs are jittery on the walls thrilled to beat the generation that gets to see the end of this great tale. The curtain rises on a scene. I recognize well. It is a simple set of studio apartment. A kitchen caught a window overlooking a brick wall. A man sits in the corner deep in thought Doorbell rings come in it's open, the man calls. A woman enters she is very old tottering unsteadily on legs that have carried our for many many years. Please take my seat. The man says with genuine concern. Thank you. She says collapsing with relief onto the cushions then looking out. As for the first time noticing the audience. I know this woman I I saw her as a baby later as a twenty year old, it seems she has lived her whole life on the stage taking part in this play. The woman says his Hanoch her spin. I was born in this theater clutching scripted my off. That was bigger than I was my twin in a way. I started acting in that script of mind before I was even aware of the world. I grew up in that script lived my entire life in the play I had written from infancy to now. And she rises and the man reaches out to help but she waves him away she speaks her. Voice is strong ringing out through the theater. The play ends with my death. Because the play is my life. It is bounded by the same hours and minutes that I am. Audiences wrapped many have tears in their eyes even the INCEX. Weep. Thank you for these Hundred Years Hannah Hirshman says. This script is complete. She walks to the window. It might look like raid she says. Who knows? Lights. Thunderous. Applause cries of a claim and Hannah Hirschman dies to the best possible sound person can hear concrete evidence of the good they have done in the lives of other humans. Stay tuned next for the second ever Night Vale players playhouse production now that they finally finished this one. They're going to do. God's spell. And from the script of a life I have not yet finished performing. Good night night fail. Good night. Welcome to Night Vale is a production. Of Nightingale, presents it is written by Joseph, Fink, and Jeffrey Craner and produced by disparition. The Voice of Night Vale is see slow Baldwin original music by disparition all of it can be found at disparition dot band camp, Dot Com. This episodes weather was shallow is by Brad bence. Go find out more at Brad, Ben, school, music, Dot Com comments, questions, canal us at Info at. Welcome to Night Vale Dot Com or follow us on twitter at night Ville radio or wait for us to run out of television. WE'RE GONNA run out of television soon right check out. Welcome to Night Vale Dot. com for Info about our upcoming livestream production of our classic episode the sandstorm with a number of brand new guest appearances live theater but you don't have to wear real clothes to watch it today's proverb. Many are called but few are chosen and fewer still pick up. Because most calls are spammy stays. High it's Joseph Inc my friend Jeffrey I created welcome tonight fail back in two thousand twelve normally worthy the ones turning our ideas into writing. But for our brand new show start with this, it's you who will do the creating on each episode. We'll talk about a topic of the creative process. Then we will give you too short assignments something to consume and something to create. You can share your work on our membership forum to see what other people are up to. We want you to start creating one simple assignment at a time because the best way to start writing is to start writing and find it wherever you get your podcasts..

Night Vale Night Vale Dot Com Night Vale Dot. Hannah Hirshman Dot Com Brad bence Carlos Hannah Hirschman Joseph Inc Jeffrey I twitter Joseph Baldwin Jeffrey Craner Ben Fink
"hundred years" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

Welcome to Night Vale

03:29 min | 3 weeks ago

"hundred years" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

"Believe. Cab. But you throw it all away. They have. Off. The three. Spin. System. A. Wow..

"hundred years" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

Welcome to Night Vale

06:27 min | 3 weeks ago

"hundred years" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

"From the Night Vale Medical Board. Twenty years passed without me thinking about the hundred year play. You know how it is one day you're an intern at the local radio station doing all the normal Erin's like getting coffee and painting pinnacles upon station management doors as part of the ritual of the slumbering ancients. Then twenty years passes and everything is different for you. Your boss is gone. Now you are the host of the community radio station and there are so many new responsibilities and worries and lucid nightmares in which you explore a broken landscape of colossal ruins so With all of that I, just kind of forgot the hundred year play was happening. But they were toiling away in they're doing scenes around the. Building and tearing down set set a frantic pace trying to keep up with the script that relentlessly went on page after page and sometimes one of the people working on the plate would wonder how does this all end? But before they could flip ahead and look, there would be another seem that had to be performed. They wouldn't have a chance. So no one knew how it ended. No one except Hannah Hirschman, the mysterious author of this centennial. Play. Soon after becoming radio host during the reading of a community calendar I was reminded that the play was still going on and so decided to check in I put on my best Tux. Yeah. It's the one with the Scales Confetti Canon and then took myself to a night at the theatre. I can't say what happened in the plot since that first scene but certainly much had transpired. We were now in a space colony thousands of years from now, and the set was simple just some sleek chairs and a black backdrop dotted with white stars of paint. A woman was giving a monologue about the distance she felt between the planet she was born on which I believe was supposed to be earth and the planet she now stood on. I understood from what she was saying that the trip she had taken to this planet. One Way. And that she would never return to the place she was born. We are all of us move. By Da. She whispered in a cracked force voice. Not, what of US dies in the world we were born into. Sitting in my seat in that darkened theater, I knew to facts with certainty. The first was that this woman had been giving a monologue for several days. Now, she wavered on her feet speaking the entire four hours that I was there. And I don't know how much longer she spoke after I left, but it could have been weeks. She was Pale and her voice was barely audible, but there was something. Transfixed sing about it and the audience sat in perfect silence leaning forward to hear her words. The other fact I understood was that this woman was the newborn from the very first scene. Not, just the same character, but the same actor twenty years later, she was still on that stage still portraying the life of the child we had been introduced to in the opening lines. She was an extraordinary performer. Presumably having had a literal lifetime of practice. And that was the last time I saw the play. Until tonight when I will go to watch. The final scene. But first. Let's have a look at that community calendar. Tonight, the school board is meeting to discuss the issues of school lunches. It seems that some empower argued that it isn't enough that for some reason, we charge the kids actual money for these lunches. They argue that the students should also be required to give devotion and worship to a great glowing cloud who's benevolent power will fill their lives with purpose. Due to new privacy rules, we cannot say which member of the school board made the suggestion. The board will be taking public comment in a small flimsy wooden booth out by the highway just entered the damp dark interior and whispered your comment and it will be heard. Perhaps, not by the school board, but certainly by something. Tuesday morning Lee Marvin will be offering free acting classes. At the REC center the classes entitled acting is just lying. We'll teach you how acting is just saying things that aren't true. With, emotions you don't feel so that you may fool those watching with these miss truths. Fortunately. Marvin commented. Most people don't want to be told the truth and prefer the quiet comfort of ally. well-told classes are pay what you want starting at ten thousand dollars. Thursday Josh Creighton will be taking the form of a waterfall in Grove Park so that neighborhood kids may swim in him. There is not a lot of swimming opportunities in town is dry as night vale, and so this is a generous move on Josh's part. He has promised that he has been working on the form and has added a water slide and sunbathing deck. He asked that everyone swim safely and please not leave any trash on. Friday the cornfields will appear in the middle of Town Right Br does each September as the air turns cooler and the sky and the west takes on a certain shade of green. The cornfield emanates a power electric an awful. please. Do not go into the Cornfield as we don't know what lives in there or what it wants. The city council would like to remind you that the Cornfield is perfectly safe. It is perfect and it is safe. Finally, Saturday never happened. Night if you know what's good for you got it. This has been the community calendar. Oh look at the time you're I am blathering on the play is about to end. Okay. Let Me Grab my new many recorder that Carlos got me for my birthday. It's only thirty five pounds and the antenna is a highly reasonable seven feet and I'll see you all there. What's the weather like for my commute?.

Lee Marvin Night Vale Medical Board Josh Creighton intern Hannah Hirschman US Erin Carlos Grove Park
"hundred years" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

Welcome to Night Vale

07:22 min | 3 weeks ago

"hundred years" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

"Listeners some exciting news from the world of theatre. The hundred year play is about to reach its final scene. Yes. This is the play that has been running continuously since nineteen twenty. Written by brilliant playwright, Hannah Hirschman designed to take exactly one hundred years to four. And the tireless volunteers of the Night Vale players playhouse have been going through those scenes one after another for decade upon decade. There is little time to rehearse for each hour brings new scenes and. Will only performed once the play moves on in order to keep up with tight scheduled needed to. The entire script before a century elapse it's It is a monumental work of theater, but like all work, it must someday cease. Today specifically. I will be in attendance at that historic moment when the final scene is performed and the curtain closes on the hundred year play. More soon but I, the news. We bring you the latest on the lawsuit, the estate of Franklin Chen versus the city of Night Vale. As you know this case has grown so large and complicated that I've not had the time to discuss it in my usual community radio broadcasts. But instead have started a true crime podcast called bloody laws bloody claws, the murder of Frank Chan. Which I strive to get to the truth just what happened on that fateful night when five headed Dragon Hiram. mcdaniels met Frank Chin and then later Francesa body was found covered in burns and claw marks. It's a confounding mystery. The sheriff's secret police announced that it seems really complicated and they're not even GonNa try to solve that sucker. Oh what a secret police spokesman muttered at an earthworm found in his garden, you want us to fail. You want to see US fail. That's why you want us to investigate this case to see a let it. The family of Frank Chen say they merely want the appropriate parties in this case, the city of night fail Hiram mcdaniels and an initiative conception of God to take responsibility for their part in this tragedy. The trial is now in its tenth month and has included spirited reenactments of the supposed- murder by hopeful players playhouse performers in between their work on the hundred year play. Three changes of judge and venue due to quote some dragon attacks and constant interruptions from a local audio journalists who hosts a widely respected true crime podcast. Still with all this we near A. Judge Chaplain has indicated she will issue a ruling soon like in the next year or so she said certainly within five years listen I don't owe you a verdict just because you're paying me to do a job, you can't rush me to do it. The verdict will be done when it's done. Chaplain then huffed out of the courtroom followed by journalists, shouting recommendations for episodes of their podcast to listen to. I was present. On opening night of the hundred year play. How. The theater buzzed of course, this was partly the audience thrilled to be at the start of such an unprecedented work but mostly. It was the insects. The night failed players. playhouse had quite a pest problem at the time and still does. It's difficult to do pest control when there is a hundred year long play being performed on stage at every hour of every day. The curtain opened those many years ago on a simple set of a studio apartment, a kitchen, a hot a window overlooking a brick wall. A man sits in the corner deep in thought. A doorbell rings come here. It's open. The man says, a woman enters flustered. She is holding a newborn. This been a murder. She says, the victim was alone in a room and all the doors and windows were locked. My God, the man says springs up who could have done this and how. The woman tells him. IT TURNS OUT TO BE THE GARDENER MR sprinkle. He served with the victim and the war and never could forgive him for what happened there. He threw a venomous snake through and event. The man sits back down nodding So the mystery is solved. As a playwright, Hannah Hirschman did not believe in stringing up mysteries a second longer than was necessary. The baby in the woman's arm stirs Shish Little One. The woman says, the man looks out the window where he cannot see sky. It might look like rain he says. knows. Thus began a journey of one hundred years. And now a word from our sponsors. Today's episode is sponsored by the Knightdale Medical Board which would like to remind you that it is important to drink enough water throughout the day. Drink more water. Your body can't function without water without water. You're just dust made intimate water forms the squelching mud of sentence. Try to have at least ten big glasses of water not over the entire day right now see if you can get all ten of them down, explore the capacity of your stomach. See if you can make burst, you will either feel so much better or an organ will explode and you will die. An. Either one is more interesting than the mundane now. You should drink even more water than that. Wander out of your door searched the earth for liquids, find a lake and drain the entire thing until the bottom feeders flop helplessly on the flatlands laugh slushing Lee as you look upon the destruction, you have wrought the power that you possess. Now that you are well hydrated move on from the lake and come to the shore of an ocean. All Oceans are one ocean that we have arbitrarily categorized by language. The scene knows no separation and neither will you will lay belly down. On the sand, put your lips against the waves and guzzle the ocean. The ocean is salty it will not be very hydrating. So you'll need to drink a lot of it. Keep going until the tower tops of Atlantis See sky again for the first time in centuries until the strange glowing creatures of the deep deep are exposed splayed out from their bodies now that they no longer have the immense pressure of the ocean depths to keep their structure intact, and once you have drunk the oceans, turn your eyes to the stars. For their is water out there to at, you must suck dry the universe. This has been a message.

murder Hannah Hirschman Hiram. mcdaniels Night Vale A. Judge Chaplain US Frank Chen Franklin Chen Frank Chan Knightdale Medical Board Frank Chin slushing Lee Francesa
Conversations with Samdhong Rinpoche and J. Krishnamurti

The Wisdom Podcast

05:33 min | Last month

Conversations with Samdhong Rinpoche and J. Krishnamurti

"And so in this country and I have a couple of characters coming in and true stars basically Chris. Moody and some don't remember Jay and Crystal Naughty has come up quite be in these podcast interviews I've been doing I think Barry, Magid mentioned him and a your a your friend Larry Rosenberg talked of Christianity quite a bit when we interviewed. So this'll be you know people who listen to this have been sort of encountering Shimon from different perspectives. So I was hoping you would tell us about the first time you met Krishnamurti was what was The first time I drove. By the stories rather charming, a friend of mine. I was living is a bachelor by the beach in a little apartment. In a bag of plastic, excuse me a paper sack ended up on my porch and in it where eight talks by Birdie, at the University of San Diego Nineteen Sixty eight. And a series of. Talks that the Ramdas just given in San Francisco a more or less than oral history of his journey to the east. And not having anything else to do I listen to these tapes over and over again for year, we just hang a little cassette on my bedroom door and listen so listen to. Alternately, between Rob Dawson. Story and then listen to Chris steaks and then I realized that found out that he was alive. And that he was living in, Ohio I for a good part of the year. I didn't even know that Ohio existed. It was two and a half hours north of Los Angeles Long Beach where I was living. So I, drove my though Orange Volkswagen up and sat in the audience and you know just that my first meeting was that was just just like everybody else sitting there going who is this guy? There's something riveting about what he has to say I don't get it. I don't understand in other something compelling. Often. Say IT'S A. Christie. gave me a headache. You know just because there was something oblique about what he was pointing to that I couldn't quite. Grass. So this happened for several years. I came up every year then when he gave his talks in Ohi- in the springtime. And then finally. When I showed up at the Grove where they he speaks or heads spoken throughout his life there in Ohio. Grove's trees there were video cameras read. Krishnamurti was quite shy about having his picture taken and didn't want to be the Sarah Attention. Etc.. For the same reason when I you know Buddha when for several hundred years after his passing, they didn't represent him as a person that represented him as the empty chair or footprints in the sand because for the same reason that didn't WanNa have pictures agents. Saint Saint so I'm a documentary filmmaker background in television. So I I asked the people that actually the woman that gave the announcements. If this was an house production just hired somebody they said, well, they hired somebody from from. Santa Barbara to record talks and I said well, I have some experience Navy I can help. And that led to a conversation. I've met with this woman her name is Evelyn Blau and have learn I became friends and so six months. Later we were playing going to Canada which was. A trip that Krishnamurti was going to visit one of the Sanders, their Canada. So that was my first real meeting one's. Going to his home in. Ohi- a times and then we actually started production of the first film that I did which was called A. Business the challenge of change. And it was the first biographical documentary that was on his life. Elections had just written the first of series of three different biographical books called the years of awakening which kind of exposed very early rather strange. USC early years how he was discovered. In quotes who is e? Etcetera Etcetera. Those books I read maybe twenty years ago those. Roads and. It was quite fascinating at a different time of meeting Krishnamurti than reading is his lectures very. Very different that again, that's the. I just finished writing and the Christian Rate Foundation is going to be publishing a book called. Unconditionally free and this is A. A sweeping history of Krishnamurti's talks from the very beginning, where did you come from? What is the mythology around the story? The all the kinds of things is the ASAKUSA society and then moving forward. What is the Mitra? Why was he had to be the new the next? The next? Buddha. ETC seper. So. Yeah. So that will be coming out in two months. So what was it about? So it seems like you had

Krishnamurti Chris Steaks Ohio A. Christie. University Of San Diego Grove Sanders Larry Rosenberg Shimon Canada San Francisco Magid Los Angeles Moody OHI Rob Dawson Evelyn Blau Santa Barbara JAY
"hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

02:47 min | Last month

"hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

"But that said those of us who were photographers who are champions for photography and love photography and really believe as I do that photography is a very, very high level medium deserving of its. Own Accolades independent of all other form of media photography that is to say is not junior sculpture or junior ballet or junior music or junior painting. That photography is a medium that deserves respect in and of itself. I think that historians will look back at our time and realized that this was the time in which photography really started to establish itself as an independent medium. Partly because of what's happening in the overwhelming distribution of photographic imagery through books and through digital media. To some degree this is an academic discussion because, of course, one hundred years now you and I won't be around. So we won't know and why should we even care? I think it's important for us to recognize however. That in order for an individual photograph to survive and to be of interest to anybody in future generations, it will be because it connects with them on an emotional psychological, artistic and aesthetic level. Not Because of its Extraordinary use of the technology of the day we can look back at Prince from a hundred years ago and say they're extraordinary examples of the technology of the day. But. That doesn't make them interesting in and of themselves. The reason some photographs have survived is because they speak so deeply to the human heart and I think that's the universal thing that happens with all art in all. Times Photography. So our. Times. In the history of photography will be known. As a blip. In the technological. Of. Photography. But a continuation of the aesthetic movement of the communication from our generation of our observations of the human heart and the human condition. And in that regard. We are just like all the photographers from one hundred years ago and all of the photographers from a hundred years from now. While, we are simultaneously unique in our own generation..

"hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

03:38 min | Last month

"hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

"For the last fifty years anyway, a lot of photography has been presented in very high quality offset lithographic reproductions, duo tones, try tones, etc.. And we don't need to see those photographs on the wall a frame in order to appreciate them. It's a different experience of course when you see original print. And there may be something that you can get from an original print that you can't get from a book reproduction but the thing about a book reproduction is it can go almost everywhere and lots and lots of photographers know lots and lots of great photographs. Because of books. And that is a marvellous an interesting thing. That is beginning a little bit of separation between Photography and painting. And I think that is even extended further when we consider the effects of digital distribution. So much of photography is now being digitally distributed. The obvious ones are think of instagram etcetera, which will be long forgotten technologies a hundred years from now, but the method of distributing images without requiring physical paper that I suspect. We'll still remain a hundred years from now. And so I think one of the interesting things about the times in which you and I are living in our cutting edge and our contemporary times. Is simply that. Historians will look back at this time and see that this was when photography came into its own when it established itself as a medium that wasn't reproducing some other mediums form of presentation it's not junior painting any longer. But. Photography is establishing its own universe. Its own sort of language as Partially, anyway independent of physical. Media. Of course will always exist as physical media I. Don't I don't WanNa. Go down a rabbit hole that makes it sound like. I'm saying that there will be the end of prince there won't there will always be prints. But there will also be non physical distribution of images that we're seeing now for the first time, and that technology is likely to continue and the more it does. The more I think historians will look back at our time as the time when photography really came into its own. I would like to think that photography came into its own in the age of Stieglitz. But it didn't. STIEGLITZ was still trying to establish photography as a serious art medium enhance his. Exhibition of photographs right next to paintings he was trying to. Elevate photography by Association and in two ninety one he exhibited as much painting as he did photography. So, there was still a connection between. Those two media that was undeniable and photography was considered the sort of the secondary medium as much as stieglitz tried to make it not. It's still was it still is to this day and anybody who doesn't admit that is not really being realistic..

Stieglitz instagram WanNa
"hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

02:37 min | Last month

"hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

"That don't have anything to do with the technology of when they were photographed or when they were published but have to do with something else by the same token poets can have their work appreciated one hundred years after they've written their poem and gone into that Great Poetry Library in the sky, the same thing can happen with photography. It points out that. Every artist I think is living at the cutting edge of whatever their technology is. If if you were a novelist one, hundred years ago, the cutting edge might have been the typewriter I don't know when the typewriter was invented but let's say it was a hundred years ago and before that it was the cutting edge was the quill and ink, and maybe the cutting edge fifty years ago was the typewriter. Every artist lives at the cutting edge in history of whatever technology is used in their particular art medium. But If we're careful if we're sensitive if we pay attention as artists, what we also realize. Is that in. To being at the cutting edge of whatever our medium is we are also simultaneously. coterminous with all artists throughout all history be they photographers or painters or sculptors, or poets, or novelist, or dancers, or singers, or whatever. And this brings me to one of the reasons why I think we're not only connected to all of history. But we do live in a time that's going to be very interesting in photography's history for reasons that don't have anything to do with the technology of making photographs and it's this. Up until now primarily because of stieglitz I've mentioned this and other contexts but primarily, because of stieglitz fine art photography has been presented to the world more or less. The same way that painting has been presented to the world. In a frame on the wall in a gallery. But we're in the midst of time when that is radically changing. When a lot of photography is starting to be seen off the wall out of the frame..

stieglitz Great Poetry Library
"hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

05:01 min | Last month

"hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

"At the cutting edge of technology, the cutting edge of the thought process of what were engaged with with photographic art. It's attribute he thought he was at the cutting edge. In fact, he was at the cutting edge of technology with his photograph Viewer Magazine Camera Work and with his creative thinking about what photography could be in terms of an art medium. He could have no more imagined the future of. Football Books and dual tone printing and galleries all across America and huge events like photo plus Houston photo festival that would have been. Literally inconceivable to him. But yet, it all came to pass. I would propose that it is equally difficult for us to imagine. What photography will be a hundred years from now in twenty one twenty what the technology will be in twenty one twenty, what the means of distribution will be in twenty one twenty. But isn't it interesting that when we look at Alfred? stieglitz photographs. We can still relate to them. The technology has changed the Zeitgeist has changed. The method of presentation has changed everything about photography has changed except. The content. Content is the one thing that hasn't changed. It's evolved sure and there are things being photographed today that Stieglitz can only imagine photographing. But when you look at Stieglitz work in general. And the other photographers of his generation. We can see the content threads that are still alive today. There are photographers today who doing. Essentially. The same kind of thing or an outgrowth of the kind of thing that Stieglitz did. I would propose the same thing will happen one hundred years from now our technology will seem so primitive our methods of distribution will seem so quaint. All of the things that we're worrying about now in terms of gear and process and methods of distribution will seem. The product of our times. But in fact, the content that we produce. Will. Possibly maybe. We hope. Still be of interest. Because whatever we do in terms of. Addressing, the issues of being human being the nature of being alive the nature of observing. What, goes on around us and capturing something in our artwork will be just as valid. It'll be hundred years old, but it'll be just as valid then. As it is today. By the same token, we read novels that are a hundred years old and we can relate to that they may be the language may be a little different than what we use today and all of that but. But. Nonetheless when they touch the human heart and they address the content of what it is to be alive. They still carry forward and they're still valuable even. Novelists who aren't famous and well remembered. There's something to be gained by reading their books. There will be something to be gained by looking at our photographs. One Hundred Years from now just light. There is something to be gained by looking at photographs from a hundred years ago. Now I mentioned Stieglitz Stieglitz is famous and he's still. Appreciated, today. But if you have the opportunity, go back and look at other publications from. Well, it's hard to find them from one hundred years ago 'cause Stieglitz was sort of unique but you can get a hold of a book that has all of the camera work photographs in it. That's well worth getting not too. Surprisingly the book is called camera work the complete photographs it's published by. It's really interesting little book kind of small but very thick and supposedly contains every photograph that was published in camera work and a lot of them seem. Somewhat dated but still interesting. But..

Stieglitz Stieglitz Viewer Magazine Football Houston America Alfred
"hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

03:57 min | Last month

"hundred years" Discussed on LensWork

"Here's the editor of Lens. Work Publishing. Bruce. Jensen I had a truly weird and strange experience this morning that I wanNA share with you I had to dry for about an hour this morning down to Anna Cordis and as I almost always do when I have that kind of drive I use that time to do some dictation to make nodes to. Possibly, put together ideas for an editor's comment for Lens Work and sometimes actually do the dictation and I happen to be doing a dictation about Alfred. stieglitz. And this particular dictation was sort of a bit of a test if you will because I had purchased a new Bluetooth headphone and I wanted to test how the quality of the audience would be while I was dictating in the car with the car noise driving down the freeway at seventy miles an hour. That's oftentimes a problem when it comes to try to transcribe those dictation because the car noise is so loud that it sometimes gets difficult to. Understand the words and for the dictation software to translate correctly. So I was really hoping that this new Bluetooth headphone would work. Fine. So there, I am I'm driving down the freeway I'm dictating an article about Alfred Stieglitz, and it dawns on me that Alfred Stieglitz was doing his thing. Almost, exactly a hundred years ago. and think about what Alfred Stieglitz was doing a hundred years ago. He was trying to make a place for photography in the art world he'd. Published Camera Work for a number of years, and then there was a to ninety one, the gallery in New York and he was essentially promoting photography as an art medium. When up to this point, it hadn't been promoted much as an art medium. And let's look ahead of Stieglitz for a few years. What was yet to come well yet to come in. Roughly Nineteen nineteen or nineteen twenty were gelatin silver paper and certainly things like enlargements were yet in the future and most photographers in his day were probably printing on. Platinum palladium prints or something like that. So Pretty primitive in terms of the technology that we think about today I forward today here. I am in the car driving seventy miles an hour down the freeway using my Bluetooth headphone to dictate an article about his time in photography onto my smartphone, which I'll have transcribed by the computer later so that it can appear in the digital version and print version of Lens work so that all of you can see it. That's what happened in a hundred years of technological advancement. Can you imagine what Alfred Stieglitz would say if he had been sitting next to me in the car listening to me describe in my thoughts what I think his point of view about photography was and where his place in photographic history was it it would be beyond his comprehension. To think about what I was doing. In the period of a short one, hundred years after he was. Publishing Camera Work and doing to ninety one. Now, obviously, the point of this is to project forward. Can we possibly imagine where photography is going to be a hundred years from now we like to think that we're.

Alfred. stieglitz Jensen editor Bruce Anna Cordis New York
"hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Years trying to get a hope. The real hotel tell room is very hard. I spoke to someone. I met at the event who goes every year in state at the holiday inn. He had to agree to a minimum of five days and paid about route three hundred and fifty dollars per night yikes <hes> he's been going for years and he kinda renews each year but there's other options <hes> this year he says i stayed at the university of wisconsin oshkosh. I pass along a brochure <hes>. It's a dorm rooms. You know what dorm rooms are like their there are no. They're simple <hes> the bathrooms down the hall maybe but the price is good lo- <hes> low prices around seventy five dollars a night and he's got some other tips on that he says is that the <hes> the university of wisconsin nash kosh is easy to get to a busta leaves. He's the dorms for ya every <hes> <hes> every. I'm not sure what it is maybe every half hour. It's it's very frequently and it costs. I five dollars a ride or thirty dollars rides so <hes> that's another option that i will be looking at. I don't know about you max but i've done camping. I've done the university and i've done believe it or not a family farm house down the road from the airport yeah so there's a lot of options besides the hotel the hotels and i don't my my remembrance. The first time i went with with the museum my remembrance of the dorm room was it was a dorm room and if you don't mind going down and showering down down the hall and know how to deal with it. It's a comfortable bed and it does have a little bit of a._c. So it's nice to come back and get a shower a._c. Not nine climbing to attend but that's just my own personal personal opinion sorry guys who can't bake and i like that idea yeah. The camping is fun <hes> you you know hotels are nice. The only concern i have is what if you're on one of those upper floors of the dormitory and you don't have air conditioning. That's gotta be pretty hot. I would imagine yeah yeah. I think there's a recommendation to bring a fan if you don't have an air conditioner in the room but <hes> hey as as for community showers i mean hey. I'm a product of the sixties. M used to beat in there with a bunch of people that who knows where they came from all taking showers. It's not a big deal but <hes> <hes> showers are nice. Patrick wiggins wrote us. He said i saw this while taxiing to my hanger salt lake international. Maybe something for the show notes oops. I send us a photo says i've seen be seventeen before an f. eighteens before but never together this <hes> photo makes for a great old meets new picture and there's just you know which be seventeen. This is david di recognize. This must be the collins foundation as i didn't i. I didn't look that closely at it. I saw be seventeen and went yup. It's be seventeen. Sorry okay. I don't know how many flying b seventeen are is there more than just one of the collings foundation. There's there's at least ten. <hes> oh yeah yes yes certainly there is i'm thinking this was parked over by the the military section you know when you come into salt lake international national general aviation military is on the other side of the field from the the terminal so i'm thinking this may be parked over there. I will put that that picture in the show notes. Somebody can identify this. <hes> this play maybe even where the eighteen comes from based on the markings which are the the markings on the f. eighteen have actually i don't really see very many markings on that if eighteen but i'm looking at a small version of the picture <hes> but patrick also says are he mentioned about how david made a comment comment about people being cargo patrick's is according to far ninety one point one quote. No person may operate in the aircraft aft carrying passengers for hire in formation flight and yet. It's not at all uncommon for this to happen in skydiving. Were jumpers paid a jump from the planes that are flying in formation. So how can it be legal for. The purpose of jumping parachute is not considered passengers..

Patrick wiggins busta david di university of wisconsin oshkos salt lake university of wisconsin collings foundation collins foundation seventy five dollars thirty dollars fifty dollars five dollars five days
"hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Well. It's like there's all these unique advances and technology but we're just not a neighbor with like we were in the past because they're not speed records. <hes> that's interesting rick kennedy. Wanna thank you for joining joining us for <hes> a great conversation. <hes> i'd really encourage people to take a look at this book one hundred years of reimagining flight and and even if you're not just purely an engine nut like some of us. Maybe i think you'll find it really really fascinating because i mean you can't talk about the the engines you can't describe the history you can't talk about the people involved and the decisions that were made in not talk about the airplanes as well obviously <hes> one is no good without the other so <hes> if you're interested in aviation in general in the in the history of both commercial and military <hes> we we haven't really talked much of the military aspects of this but there's a lot of that in the book as well so check it out really encourage it encourage. You take a look at it then rick thanks again. Well dave maximum max. I appreciate the chance to talk with you guys about. I mean just we're. We're all very blessed to be engaged in. A fascinating inch in this industry is so fantastic and it's booming. It's just booming. I mean it really is. It's just a continuous. It really is booming so thank first time. I really appreciate this. Are you a bit of a musician yeah as a music major in college. I played jazz. I've written a couple of books on early jazz music so yeah ah i thought i saw something about that. What what do you play yeah. I play piano <hes> which basically consist of walking the base an four four line the base. I play a lot of like monk and you know nineteen fifties and sixties jazz but my <hes> my study of it in terms of book riding is nineteen twenties and thirties jazz labels <hes> living in cincinnati. I live an hour away from richmond. Indiana where the first great jazz record label able was. I mean the twenty so i like interest on that stuff so yeah that was a journalist and i covered entertainment music and so i had a chance to hang out with all the great jazz players great <hes>. That's amazing but i i wanted. I just went in with one thing just to say and i think you'll see that in the book i i liked. I made a very big point to the site accomplishments from rolls royce and pratt and the book because yes the three of us just absolutely hate each other but respect respect each other because the big three are killing each other and just have done some great things in the aviation world so we all have the grizzly like each on a little a little bit well and i'm guessing you wouldn't have as many accomplishments if there weren't one or two competitors right i mean hasn't that really driven the the industry too far greater accomplishments schwantz than you could have if there were just you know one company out there doing this and that's why worry about consolidation sometimes because when it there i mean i really do. I mean you you know. Roles came along with a wide chord fan where he once. We got to do that and we came composite. Not roles is working on a composite and we're don't seem sees prescott this weird good system and so we're always trying to leapfrog each other and i think has made a huge difference in the quality aviation for travelers and in the military world have three guys just cotton each other up and i hope that always remains that way because the consolidation at least makes me nervous especially because they can play you guys off against each other. Oh if you look at u._t. C. a. g. guy look at u._t..

rick kennedy Indiana richmond dave prescott cincinnati pratt one hundred years
"hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"From inside the engine to cool parts parts so you lose about thirty percent of the air that comes to that from san the cool parts and the rest goes to the engine well with ceramic matrix composites. Is you have to do that so when we opened that plant in alabama a year ago the agreement was with the government they gave us a nice grant for that thing and they you said you will make that raw material available to defense company and the united states but guess what you press gonna be buying that stuff. They're not stupid you know they're they're good company. There are on c._m._c.'s already and so i think at some point she will probably be a provider of the material to pratt and other aerospace companies in the united states. Pratt has its own operation was c._m._c.'s g has its own r._n._d. Research in gear turbofans by the way the gear your turbofan is a company owned by g._e. In italy yeah i know i was when i i know i know i know my. Oh my goodness 'cause i remember i remember before i it was called fiatavio but maybe it's just obvio- now. I'm not sure yeah i i used to <hes> visit naples <hes> several times a year to see them and then when when i remember when g. e. bought them and i'm on thinking oh no oh my goodness so it's really interesting. Is i look in the future. I think you're the question you're exactly right. I think if you're gonna see a marrying of geared systems you're marrying a obviously ceramic matrix composites on the geared system. It really comes down to the thrust class and works the best there <hes> that can becoming yeah so. I think that's gonna come. I said the beginning to show the real challenges for all of us is going to be any new technology introduction financially. You have to be able to meet the same reliability of the predecessor engine and that is not easy easy to do at all tough. I mean look at pratt right now. I mean you know they are paying some serious money right now to get this engine gone and it's gonna work. I mean i'm a g._i. I'm just telling you and within the halls of general electric they know the press. They're good and they're gonna make that thing work. It's going to be painful foolish l. but they're gonna make it work because that's the world we live in today. These engines have to be so reliable and that's a financial arrangement when you sell them. Yes absolutely you have you have guarantees and you have remedies. It's crazy yeah yeah. Thank god for the spare parts yeah. That's a a a model. I know <hes> because i was involved. I'm that pratt and whitney struggled with as the the o._j._t. A dis the seventy seven and others was starting to wind down in that spare parts sales stream was starting to starting to dry up. That's when pregnant. He decided to engage a lot more in the side of the business. <hes> gee did as well but but i think gee strategy now is is somewhat different and in that <hes> g._e. I guess is not owning <hes> maintenance shops overhaul shops part repair businesses <hes> but <hes> i guess licensing <hes> to others to third parties that kind of the strategy for tomorrow for g._e. Aviation he's now. That's exactly right. There was twenty years of stumbling. Oh boy in trouble for saying that but really the night in the nineteen nineties the theory was was a general electric corporation was just this just.

pratt united states Pratt alabama c._m._c. naples italy g. e. whitney thirty percent twenty years
"hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Is really the most successful jet engine manufacturer curious syria and so yes. I talked to my friends from pratt and whitney. They always say it. Wasn't i still owe you either right there right there absolutely absolutely right now that that was the one thing you know working for g for thirty years. I always thought of c._f._m. International joint-venture the bills the engine for the seven three seven the three twenty. I always thought as joint venture of two companies as they did the research it was so obvious it's a relationship between g._e. And the french government it's a government relations should be so. It's like second joint venture between g._e. And france that's simple it gonna go if it wasn't for pompidou chiampou president pompidou's france the jet the joint venture never would have been binging been created so so you go from you know the tia thirty nine with a high bypass engines lisa see six commercial engines and then that leads were relationship with a friend and then she creates the effeminate national and the rush system and the m fifty six engine. They're great engines there. They're really really good engines pratt. I don't you know i'm i'm a little out out of touch but <hes> at least for a while there pratt had a engine overhaul shop that did c._f._m. Fifty-six engines and i it was kind of a joy to to tour for that years ago in this i it's a it's a great engine. There's no doubt about that. Well the first generation to see if the secret was as is we use the the <hes> the hot section of the b one bomber engine that was called the f. one. No one had single stage turbine. I'll get too technical technical with your audience but now you can get technical. Go ahead now. I can't and that was the secret yup. Oh that was the secret i was. The absolute secret is that had a single stage turbine and so the strategy and philosophy was we may never win on fuel burn. We may never went on admissions. We may never win on knows that damn thing will be reliable as hell and kill everybody on maintenance costs and so that was the philosophy. You're going to see a families to keep that engine really simple now when you get to the next generation which is when pratt's dorms and with the geared system. You're turbofan. Dan then again see offense. Let's keep it simple.

pratt pompidou chiampou president po france syria french government whitney Dan thirty years
"hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Powering aircrafts in war too so we were the logical choice to do the jet engine so people are always confused by g._e. Did engines. It's like well oh yeah because we had to create power for those electrical products and that power system lead right to turbo superchargers and then from there to jet jet engines and i think it's interesting how the the government of integral to not as g._e. Aviation but aviation companies in in general in terms of pushing and in many cases funding the development of technologies well. That's exactly right. I mean gee would never i mean in the early days. A turbo superchargers was the direct result of a work with the government to try to figure out how they get piston piston planes to fly higher as we all know. Is you get hired. There's less oxygen and the piston playing can't inserts losing power so that was a major government government initiative and war one they got involved and then of course by the mid nineteen thirties with the advent of a b seventeen turbo superchargers made that very lethal weapon and so from there you go into all the fighter jets of the forties and fifties. She's i mean. She didn't really have a viable commercial business until the nineteen th avenue right. I think people may not may not realize that during the war effort the second world war of course pratt and whitney and right were focused on producing as many radio engines his could in g._e. Was supporting the effort the war effort with these <hes> turbo superchargers that's right yeah right in fact the and they selected g._e. To do the first the u._s. jet engine because they didn't want wright aeronautical and pratt and whitney to be distracted because they needed them to produce those piston piston engines and the jet engines very different so they took the frank whittle design from england and it was a it was a competition between westinghouse and g._e. But she was perfectly perfect should have to do that but you're right. I mean and then of course pratt them credit. Manny didn't take them long once. The jet engine was a viable product by the early fifties they they were all over it. They were all yes. <hes> tried to to play catch up and of course it was some early successes. Does that really kind of lodged them in. I would say carried the company in many ways for for many many years but but we'll we'll get up to that time period one of the fun things that <hes> some people may not realize is there was actually it at one point an effort to develop the atomic engine and both g._e. He and pratt where it's separately on that. That was the one of the things that in doing this book. I worked at g._e. For thirty years it's funny when you write a book you have a chance to step it back and see these broad themes and she was always attracted by exotica. You know we love the atomic engine. The supersonic engine that that was canceled the j. ninety three engine power the x._p. Seventy and while we're doing all this league tzadek stuff perhaps like okay. We'll just do a this figure bigger away to do a google spool compressor on our military engine and they just cleaned our clock on those first jetliners of first generation but you're right right. There was an effort to do an atomic engine. It went for purity years. It was finally killed by john kennedy's administration but the idea was that the atomic reactor was where the combustion was so great thing about jet engine we always joke suck squeeze bang and blow so the air comes through you compress the air and then you bring that compressed air into atomic reactor and that i pointed blows out the outside the determine so the idea was that the aircraft would just you know basically circle the world nonstop for months on end yeah but <hes> that's kind of g. was very involved in all this kind of exotic concepts. <hes> were pratt was doing that but but they were also thinking. We're going to get involved in this jetliner. Business g was a little slow to get through the game. They really are different companies..

g._e pratt whitney wright aeronautical john kennedy Manny england westinghouse thirty years
"hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

03:09 min | 1 year ago

"hundred years" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"We're speaking with rick kennedy trum g._e. Aviation and author of one hundred years of reimagining flight rick. I ordered the book some time ago but it arrived about a week ago <hes> finally so <hes>. Is it available now generally it's on amazon. It took a little while because because this is a book that was designed for customers and employees so let's make a commercial thing and so all the books sold you know to amazon on and through bookstores are all. They're all donated all the money the g. e. makes donations charity so it's out there it type into amazon dot com. It's out there. It feels great now to be able to push a book that i've been paid fine to do it and so all the rest of the revenues goes local charities in cincinnati so where it's out turns don't find great. Oh i didn't realize about the charity aspect of it. That's <hes> that that's really commendable. The company would crazy they just like they spent all this money on like high end paper her and whatever we wanted they said fine and so itself like twenty five bucks but the kind of book would cost like thirty five to forty to actually put circulating <hes> but anyways yeah so when when it's sold g doesn't make a penny i don't make we've all been paid. They pay the bills and so it all goes to charity which is like. I love that part of it. That's fantastic yeah. I it is a very high quality. I was kind of pleasantly surprised when i opened the box. <hes> <hes> felt the book in the pages and the quality of the printing and all three it's really nicely done but but the <hes> the history and the stories <hes> it's just fascinating isolating <hes> certainly i you know i know something about g._e. Aviation in the recent past and maybe i'll call that the last twenty a years but the the early history was something that was new to me and is very interesting when g._e. <hes> what we call now g._e. Aviation started a hundred years ago. <hes> this year it was a really a completely different kind of a of a company in organization than we see today <hes> and it it kind of revolved around. How do you get by planes to to fly. Faster are in higher exactly right. I mean most people don't understand how you go from light bulbs to jet engines g._e. And really it's pretty simple board because lightbulbs and electrical appliances require power generation and so g got very involved steam turbines to create grids across the united states and so that got them involved in high temperature alloys turbine wheels in pillars on compressors to compress air and so that was a natural thing. It was almost inevitable. The gbi involved jet engines because those general technologies they were doing that to turbo superchargers mr world war one and through the nineteen thirties and of course by world war two we had over a hundred over one hundred thousand turbo superchargers superchargers powering.

amazon rick kennedy cincinnati united states one hundred years hundred years
"hundred years" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

04:42 min | 1 year ago

"hundred years" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"And that history connected to Einstein's theory of relativity is also very closely connected to the first World War. There wasn't astronomer in putt, stem. His name is Evan Finley, frankly, and he was obsessed about trying to prove Einstein's theory of relativity. He was working very closely with an Stein and already in nineteen fourteen. He set out to go to observe an eclipse in the Crimea, but that was at the evening of the first World War, and so he was immediately captured and locked away and was not able to do the observation. And in, in the sense this was a blessing in disguise because at that time, incensio referral tippety was not yet completely the parade, and he still was missing a factor of two so his predictions where effector of two off from the real result. Two years later nine hundred sixteen college fat chilled was actually, the first one to solve Einstein's equations. Very simply, and he did this on the front in the Russian Freund, while he was a soldier in the first World War, and then later. Basically presented his results in Berlin, and said he would never have thought that his equations would have such a simple solution. Now, unfortunately culture died a year later from a disease that he has actually caught at the front. And so we were missing a big genius in the strana me for the rest of the time. But his equations are still what Beijing are current understanding of calls on, and then sir ASA Addington at that time, he was not yet, sir. He was working at Cambridge. He was a professor at Cambridge at that time. And during the first World War, there was almost no communication between Germany Stein and Cambridge, but I think had the private version of the incense theory of relativity, and he used that theory in order to evade becoming a soldier in the first World War, because he convinced the London. Military that he doesn't have to go to war, but he's preparing solar eclipse, and so, adding right after the first World War, then set out to west Africa, and there was another expedition to Brazil, where they observed the light bending and the exactly measured or roughly measured. What had predicted and I think the most important effect of this measurement was that all of a sudden became famous like a rockstar, and from then, on everybody knew the theory of relativity. And a lot of people were trying to measure it to prove it. And in the years after there were many, many different and more and more accurate measurements that prove the theory of general, relativity hundred years later, gravitational waves read discovered, which was a major prediction of the Serey, and then also just last year, the gravitational Redshift from the black hole neglected center was detected with telescopes at ease. And so I think this round up the hundred year history of the general theory of relativity, when you think about similar events that could happen now or the future. I cannot help but think about the mess, which we are in our ignorance about dark matter dark energy, black holes. We don't have a clue yet about what dark matter is what dark energy is. We know.

Einstein ASA Addington Freund Cambridge Germany Stein Evan Finley Berlin Crimea Beijing Brazil London west Africa hundred years hundred year Two years
"hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

The Tel Aviv Review

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"hundred years" Discussed on The Tel Aviv Review

"You go back in the book to the origins of the design assessment of palestine in the eight 1880s and of course sign isn't did not start in nineteen seventeen all the conflict didn't start in 1917 why did you choose 1917 as your starting point i mean at least in the title i mean covering one hundred years of conflict you do 1917 messes because in through synteen or the buffet declaration but we can talk about its significance but it is amazing on many of you will know this year i imagine you're interested in this subject to those you wouldn't be here so it is extraordinary how in the seventh year of every decade for the last one hundred twenty years something significant as happened in this story i could whiz through them you've got eighteen ninety seven the first sign is congress okay nineteen oh seven was the aftermath of the young turk revolution leave that to one side 1917 is the balfour declaration 1927 there was a very bad earthquake in palestine it was unusually it was a natural disaster rather a man made one 1937 was the report of the british peel commission which of course famously recommended that palestine be politician did to separate jewish and arab states nineteen forty seven we just had the seventy th anniversary of the un's politician decision and so it goes on nineteen 67 needs no introduction by king seventy seven sold the rise of likud to power in israel anwar sadat visiting jerusalem 1987 was the first palestinian intifada and it goes on and on two thousand and seven so the hot mess islamist movement over gaza i have said before that i think the thing we will people were member about twenty seven is she donald trump and whatever effect he turns out to have on the story in what's happening right now i want to go into the introduction you have indecision to all of this fascinating archival work in a lot of detail you have insights that sort of appear throughout the book and in the right in the introduction you write that one of the.

palestine un likud jerusalem donald trump israel one hundred twenty years one hundred years