35 Burst results for "hundred year"

Mayflower AI Sea Drone Readies Maiden Transatlantic Voyage

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | 2 d ago

Mayflower AI Sea Drone Readies Maiden Transatlantic Voyage

"The Mayflower has left Plymouth England again this is not the same ship that arrived in Massachusetts in sixteen twenty this may flowers much more moderate and marine biology professor Richard Thompson says it's searching for signs of plastic pollution in the water to sample write down some of the smallest pieces in the ocean some of the microplastics lessen the diameter of a human head Andy Stanford Clark with IBM says this may flowers robotic no passengers on board I don't know what situation is going to come across so that itself will be a journey which discovery the old Mayflower mated to Plymouth Massachusetts in sixteen twenty red fan F. with the Mayflower autonomous ship projects says who knows what happens this time most similar thing between this project on the four hundred and the regional four hundred years ago was that neither of us are sure we were going to make it but our risk is much smaller than their risk the journey to Massachusetts should take about two weeks I met Donahue

Andy Stanford Clark Plymouth Massachusetts Richard Thompson England IBM Donahue
Finding the Last Ship Known to Have Brought Enslaved Africans to America

60 Minutes

02:02 min | 3 d ago

Finding the Last Ship Known to Have Brought Enslaved Africans to America

"Three years ago sunken ship was found. In the bottom of an alabama river turned out to be the long lost wreck. The clue tilda the last ship known to abroad. Captured africans to america in eighteen sixty. At least twelve million africans were shipped to the americas in the more than three hundred and fifty years the transatlantic slave trade but as we first reported in november the journey of the hundred ten captive men women and children brought to alabama on. The clotilde is one of the best documented slave voyages in history. The names of those enslaved africans and their story has been passed down through the generations by their descendants. Some of whom still live just a few miles from where the ship was found in a community called africa town for one hundred sixty years. This muddy stretch. The mobile river has covered up crime in july eighteen sixty. The clotilde was towed here on of darkness imprisoned in. Its cramped cargo. Hold one hundred and ten enslaved africans as it's amazing myself ban on his show to the ways and award is just not knowing where you were going joycelyn davis lorna gale woods and thomas griffin are direct descendants of this african man. Lua enslaved in alabama. His owner changed his name to charlie lewis. This image is from around nineteen hundred poli allen. Who's african name was ca- poli seen in this hundred year. Old sketch was the ancestor of jeremy. Ellis and darren patterson no close eating where they differentiated only allowed avocado whole for one day a week for two months. How many people do do we know. Now that could've survived something like that without losing their mind there or no photographs of pat. Frazier's great-great-grandmother laudi denison but capriccio wallis in her mother. Cassandra have a surprising number of pictures of their ancestor zula. Whose owner called him cut. Joe louis

Alabama River Mobile River Tilda Alabama Joycelyn Davis Lorna Gale Wood Thomas Griffin Americas Charlie Lewis Poli Allen America Darren Patterson Africa Poli Ellis Jeremy Laudi Denison Capriccio Wallis Frazier PAT Cassandra
Buddhism and Atheism With Ajahn Brahmavamso

Buddhist Society of Western Australia

02:02 min | 4 d ago

Buddhism and Atheism With Ajahn Brahmavamso

"But this evening's talk. I'm going to be talking about a subject. i hope i never thought about before. That's unlikely sings. I've been speaking here for over twenty years and it's come up in the newspapers recently and Few people have been discussing this on the email because apparently just before easter time there was an atheist conference over in sydney and that really upsets some people in the churches in sydney and because they were talking about eighty s and it affects them. Bickers is put this an atheist religion. Does it believe in god. If it doesn't why does support his position about this and so the first part of this talk no maybe just a bit of information about the stand on a garden some interesting things which many of you may not know for the most important part of this talk is That actually as far as buddhism is concerned is better reform does not believe in a supernatural being because there some very very grave consequences such a belief in your ordinary lives. I'm going to put this view and pointed point out that actually that you can become a wiser more compassionate person without such beliefs which sometimes obstruct no one's feeling of what's right and what's compassionate. Bullets go from the very beginning. Sometimes people ask is put some an atheist religion. What is a buddhist. Take on a guard but i vote is to go to the ancient scriptures twenty five hundred years ago when the border was around and of course you mentioned just the idea of god was very common at that time as far as the buddha was concerned. It wasn't just a theory but because of these great house which you can get through meditation you understand how the universe works.

Bickers Sydney
The Tulsa Race Massacre: Where Are the Reparations?

In The Thick

01:56 min | Last week

The Tulsa Race Massacre: Where Are the Reparations?

"Week was one hundred years right. Since the tulsa race massacre occurred this is when a mob of white people with support from local politicians and the police killed an estimated. Three hundred black americans burned down over one thousand two and fifty homes destroyed businesses. And all of this in the greenwood district of tulsa oklahoma. Which by the way was known as black wall street because it was so thriving so dynamic so filled with life and economic potential. Well okay no surprise. None of the white attackers were ever convicted for this crime which happened after a false report of a black teenager attacking a white girl. The girl later dropped the charges but white local media ran a racist article with an inflammatory headline which essentially incited the mob attack. So okay the role of media and journalism historically in this country. Let's take a look at that. Also white media. There helped cover up what happened in this. Like incredible part of the united states in the greenwood district barely any mentioned in the newspapers in textbooks government officials locals so finally one hundred years later. There is a reckoning happening in mainstream establishments. I have a question whether or not if george floyd had not been murdered. You know how extensive with these commemorations be but president biden visited tulsa this week. It's the first time a. Us president has done so to acknowledge what happened in greenwood. He did meet with survivors. I posted this jamila from nicole. Hannah jones who by the way shoutout were watching out for you and unc is are on that what nicole hannah jones said was the only thing i'm interested in right. Now is the reparations

Tulsa Greenwood Oklahoma George Floyd President Biden United States Hannah Jones Jamila Nicole Hannah Jones Nicole UNC
Biden Marks Tulsa Race Massacre in Emotional, Graphic Speech

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 2 weeks ago

Biden Marks Tulsa Race Massacre in Emotional, Graphic Speech

"Hi Mike Crossey a reporting president Biden marks the Tulsa race massacre in an emotional graphics speech this is not a right this is a massacre one hundred years later an American president finally spoke to the horror of the Tulsa massacre that saw the thriving Greenwood district also known as the black Wall Street destroyed terrorized Greenwood torches guns shooting a world on may thirty first and June first nineteen twenty one a white mob swarmed looted and burned at Tulsa's Greenwood district as many as three hundred black Tolson's were killed afterwards thousands of survivors were four time forced into internment camps in his remarks Biden said the nation must come to grips with the following season of denial for a long time schools and also didn't even teach it let alone schools elsewhere hi Mike Rossio

Mike Crossey Tulsa Biden Greenwood Tolson Mike Rossio
Biden To Visit Tulsa To Mark the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

NPR News Now

01:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Biden To Visit Tulsa To Mark the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre

"Live from npr news. I'm giles snyder on day. Mark one hundred years. Since the beginning of the nineteen twenty one tulsa race massacre. The attack by white mobs on the black neighborhood of greenwood known as black wall street span. Two days left as many as three hundred people. Debt of course polanski of member station k. wgn s. reports from an interfaith prayer service marking the centennial. The attack vernon ame church is one of the only structures to partially survived. The events of one hundred years ago clergy from many fates gathered there monday morning to dedicate a prayer while the reverend jesse jackson senior group in prayer for an end to racist violence and a reaper. The black wall street back then. President biden is scheduled to arrive in tulsa on tuesday in a proclamation recognizing the centennial of the massacre. He says he is committed to rooting out. Systemic racism in america for npr news. I'm chris polanski. In tulsa

Npr News Giles Snyder Vernon Ame Church Tulsa WGN Greenwood Polanski Mark President Biden Jesse Jackson Chris Polanski America
Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Events Proceed Amid Hiccups

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 2 weeks ago

Tulsa Race Massacre Centennial Events Proceed Amid Hiccups

"Tulsa marks one hundred years since one of the deadliest acts of racial violence in American history it was a two day event that started on may thirty first nineteen twenty one in what came to be known as the Tulsa race massacre thousands of black Tolson's flood a white mob that destroyed several churches while burning and leveling up thirty five square black neighborhood estimates of the death toll range from dozens to three hundred billion Parker owns the black Wall Street market in Tulsa and said she was told to never discuss the massacre we had the host up and we never talked about several events are planned for this week including a visit by president Biden who is expected to join local leaders and marking the occasion on Tuesday and other events will feature the last three known living massacre survivors who are all between one hundred and one hundred seven years old I'm Mike help in

Tulsa Tolson President Biden Parker Mike
The Wild Woman of Brooklyn, and the Peabody Bones

Science Friction

01:57 min | 2 weeks ago

The Wild Woman of Brooklyn, and the Peabody Bones

"Starts with a container of bones. I actually didn't know about them before. This project started there in the collection. Of the peyote museum of anthropology and death. -nology anthropology as we know it really in the united states began at just a few institutions in harvard. Being one of them and the peabody museum has really been the center of anthropology at harvard. For over one hundred years and it's collection ease huge in the collections of the museum. There are about one and a quarter million objects works archaeological artifacts cultural objects. It's quite large. I my name's lowering. I am an osteology at the peabody museum of archaeology and ethnology with is also lots of bones right. that's what osteology. It's like lowering investigate in the collections of human and other primate remains and bones. Also what this evolutionary anthropologist wanted to get access to the collection. My name is ian wallace. I'm an assistant professor in the department of anthropology at the university of new mexico. United states and works alongside modern hunter gatherer communities like the tarahumara indigenous to mexico to study. How the way we used our bodies today is at all with how bodies evolved to move. I mean you've just got to look at how much time we spend sitting on our bums in front of screens. Yeah that's that's definitely part of it. As well as the beds that we sleep in and even the ways that we are physically inactive are sort of fascinating because other hunter-gatherers and our ancestors also occasionally physically inactive but they did it in different ways by squatting and not necessarily sitting in these a super comfy chairs that shut off our muscles and that has all sorts of

Peyote Museum Of Anthropology Center Of Anthropology Harvard Peabody Museum Of Archaeology Peabody Museum United States Ian Wallace Department Of Anthropology University Of New Mexico Mexico
Why I Love Rome

Travel with Rick Steves

02:17 min | 2 weeks ago

Why I Love Rome

"Let's start the hour with three guides from rome. Who tell us what they love. Most about their city rome. It's the eternal city to one of the most romantic and popular destinations in the whole world but many visitors met with a harsh reality when they wander rooms. Ancient streets overcrowded sites chaotic. Urban seems unpredictable transit strikes. If you're not prepared. Rome can be a challenge. But many will agree with me that it's all worth it. Bernardo francesca russo and susanna perugini specialize in guiding american tourists around italy and. They've all made rome their home because they love their city. They join us now on travel. With rick steves to share their love of rome and share with us some tips on how we might enjoy it too you know. Francesca susannah bondar. Generate one so rome. I love history. And there's history every where you look. Francesca you're born and raised in rome. What's it like just to go to work. Surrounded by all that history. Sometimes i think about it that i can wait for the bus right by where julius caesar was stabbed to death. So i'm thinking that rome is a place where history goes from printed words on the page of a book to something. That's alive every minute of every day so you can feel it. Something had happened. Two thousand years ago happened right now. And there's layer after layer after layer. I mean there's like an archaeological dig isn't it but it's right before your very eyes. He has over two thousand years of history. Front is every single moment. Wherever you turn all at once pub is living in rome shape your outlook. I would say that most romans take it for granted. I think they gain a sense of how special the city is when they go elsewhere and they always find everything else so new so you become you become aware of how what it means to live with two thousand years of history once you leave it i think if you grow in it and you see coliseum every day when you drive to work in the sense you don't even see it any more than you might make a case that if you live in a land with very little with the shallow history. You don't appreciate history quite as much. i mean. The oldest building in my town is one hundred years old building a new town twenty times that could maybe if you live with things that are two thousand years old and every day i think you forget it and it just becomes something many conversations with my roman friends who say they've never been inside the coliseum where he could for take it for granted. Yeah but once you open their eyes to one thing then they understand and appreciate as well

Rome Bernardo Francesca Russo Susanna Perugini Francesca Susannah Bondar Rick Steves Francesca Julius Caesar Italy
A highlight from S14E12  Clinics Lifesaver Yanked

Ubuntu Podcast

04:59 min | 3 weeks ago

A highlight from S14E12 Clinics Lifesaver Yanked

"Do as amir review of that device but also talk about some of the decisions that we make when we buying things for kids and how they might differ from when we buy things ourselves given the when i was a kid was four years ago. Yes they're going. Different necessarily when revolting charles selves as kids when we making women making technology purchasing decisions. Here we say right. So what did you buy. I something called a yoto player. Which is an audio player for. Kids designed to be used by kids. So what is little cube which connects to your wi fi and has a couple of speakers. A nice of soft diffused led matrix display on the front. It's like sixteen by sixteen or something is not very high resolution displays. Yes oh it's like it doesn't. It doesn't display video displays like icon right or something like that To show what's playing and the way the the way that you get stuff onto it is you have a little. Nfc cards which you put in a slot and then that tells you what to play an leader if it's a radio station or it can stream it or if it's an audio book it can download it to the device and play off line and then the way that the way that you tell you what to play. Once he's downloaded. is you. Swap the cards in and out. I thought this was a really nice idea. Because when when my brother and i were kids we had little cassette players. And we'd have cassettes with stories and nursery rhymes and music. And we'd record our own you have these physical things which you swap in and out but all of my media. These days is all my server. And i've got various ways of playing it but there's no physical connection to the that media and i thought this is a really nice way of giving my little girl a way of having a physical connection to the media. She's listening to hear it's interesting you talk about like exchangeable like cartridges effective. You look like gameboy gaming is not media. Consumption by gameboy countries is like child hans size the exchange and it's very it's very tactile. You put it out and you when you put a different winning. Go different picture on different and very much. Like the switch difficulty. I think the switch cards about small as you can go really with small children not eating them but these are like credit card sized things that basically a standard nfc card. So if you've got like a badge for work or something which used to open the door is basically one of those right. And i was actually really impressed with how intuitive they are because we had one playing and we gave my logo another one and she's eighteen months old and she walked up to it. She pulled out the call that was in there. She stuck in the other one hundred years as happy as anything about it. So it's really really simple but a really intuitive system are like that i think that's really elegant. Yeah i mean it's also quite clever because the nfc card sort of gates access to the content as well right. Yeah exactly so. I mean you can buy ones which you can write yourself or you can buy them from the store with stuff preloaded on i have been doing a bit of investigation to work out a gig of how it works like the cards themselves. Just have a you alrea on which read stuff from the oto points to the oto website and you can scan it with your phone and just go to the website and play the media in your browser. Even i've got to writing my own card and seeing how much mess with it. So could you anticipating maybe you could leverage the media sogno media server and put fowzia compatible with this device on on our savvy you host so that you can then program at the euro. Put them in and it plays what you want. That's why i'm wondering. I mean you can like you can make your own playlist with your own media and uploads it to their service and then you put the collagen and ill download to your device. There's already a means of putting your in media on the device but and this is part of the discussion. I was hoping to lead into was f- the company goes away forever even if they go bankrupt if they get bought out by someone by competitor or by someone who doesn't want to keep this particular service going they might have a competing service then. There's a risk that it goes away and these these media doesn't work anymore so it got me thinking you won't be a how could i ensure long longevity for this device and would i if i was buying something like this for myself would i have chosen this one or do i have strict rules for myself on what i'm willing to. I'm willing to

NFC Charles
America's Best-Selling Truck Goes Electric

The Indicator from Planet Money

01:56 min | 3 weeks ago

America's Best-Selling Truck Goes Electric

"Oh my gosh. that's me. Revenue engine was fine. I actually move just sitting there in the boxing. Love to find out how ford was going to sell. Its beloved ford. F one fifty as a silent version. Sam's rev dairy new spoke with a four an engineer. The chief engineer for the f. One fifty linda zang and ford has tinkered experimentally with battery powered cars and actually over one hundred years ago but in two thousand and eighteen when linda zang join the f one fifty crew and helped build an electric prototype for the best selling model. She new ford was getting serious. What does it actually look like. I'm just imagining. You might have got a recent model ford f one fifty and just got the combustion engine and put some batteries somewhere in it or or am i completely off base with that. No that's pretty accurate like the way you explained. It is actually about right. Okay we'll be all apply for a job in the engineering department of then. Linda was trying to figure out how many batteries to put in the truck how to stop things like overheating. Lot of concrete engineering challenges. But of course there was another problem. I want to play so they for you. Yeah yeah so. That was the cranking an engine right if i heard that properly. That's a ford f. One fifty combustion engine. So what does the ford f one fifty electric's like it doesn't sound like anything. It doesn't sound like anything. And that's great because silence is golden. It gives them that piece that they may want Additionally we do have propulsion sounds for those customers. That do want it

Linda Zang Ford Boxing SAM Linda
The Civilian Climate Corps Is a Big-Government Plan

Short Wave

02:17 min | Last month

The Civilian Climate Corps Is a Big-Government Plan

"Nearly one hundred years since the creation of the civilian conservation corps. Much of its legacy is still being put to use of everything needed here. This tunnels the most impressive piece of work tom. Ford would is assistant manager of lewis and clark caverns state park in west central montana. Thirty feet long lasting from the outside in the tunnel is big. You could walk down at comfortable until the passage opens into a massive dark cave where the air is heavy with a chilly humidity. This came forward. Says was discovered by a member of the conservation corps who decided to do a little non-sanctioned exploring like i said slid through all that and came out into just this hits the lights so it's by far the largest room we know of in the cave system it has the biggest formations hole cave that we know of as well ribbed columns of rock stretch from ceiling to floor looking like glistening coral reefs perfect. Somebody's formations are still a million years old at they're going in every year. Seventy to eighty thousand people get to enjoy them. That's not to mention the millions more who used trails campgrounds and bridges the dams and other work. That was done by the civilian conservation corps. That's one of the things. I hear the most bizarre. They talk about the history. All they lament the loss of that type of an organization the here in washington it makes sense. President biden is so drawn to the idea of re-booting one of the most popular enduring programs from the new deal biden has draped himself in fdr symbolism and like roosevelt. He's made big government spending and programs a key part of his agenda once in a generation investment in america yourself. This is the largest jobs plan since world war. Two in fact biden has positioned himself as the first president in generations to like fdr unapologetically pitched the federal government and government spending as the solution to big problems. These are investments. We made together as one country investments that the government was in a position to make time and again propel us into the

Lewis And Clark Caverns State Civilian Conservation Corps West Central Conservation Corps Montana President Biden Ford TOM Biden Roosevelt Washington FDR America Federal Government Government
111-Year-Old Australian Recommends Eating Chicken Brains

AP News Radio

00:54 sec | Last month

111-Year-Old Australian Recommends Eating Chicken Brains

"Australia's oldest ever man shares some secrets prolong life dexter Kruger is a retired cattle rancher and lives in the Pinnaroo aged care centre in Queensland he's probably one of the sharpest residents here his memory is amazing for a hundred and eleven year olds Melanie Calvert works at the center dexter Kruger told Australian broadcasting a weekly poultry delicacy has contributed to his longevity chicken Brian's yeah they are chickens have ahead and in there there's a variety as I have delicious little things as anyone ever bought Kruger is writing his autobiography have written three hundred stories and they're all packed in my mind gather gathered over a hundred years the oldest ever woman in Australia lived until she was one hundred fourteen I'm at Donahue

Dexter Kruger Pinnaroo Aged Care Centre Melanie Calvert Queensland Australia Brian Kruger
Eliminating Single-Use Plastic One Household Bottle at a Time

A Positive Climate

02:05 min | Last month

Eliminating Single-Use Plastic One Household Bottle at a Time

"Episode is all about plastic. And did you know that every minute an entire garbage truck of plastic is dumped into our ocean. Today's episode is specifically about the plastic. We can team in a number of our household products such as looney liquid body. Wash and hanso now. Plastic is a product that is a lot of convenience to allies and it can be incredibly durable but so gerbil that unfortunately it can take over four hundred years for your hands at container to decompose. That's ri- n- alex. I'm just going to surprise you. Here with him have an impromptu. A positive kilometer trivia saw. How much plastic do you as an average australian new you above average the per year in plastic. Okay i'm gonna say fifty kilos fifty killed. Well why are you making a big number. But now it's actually one hundred and thirty kilograms per person per year. Do you know how much that is. It's it's about the white of the rockets every year. Consuming dwayne the rock johnson steaks. And then we're throwing him out in plastic correct. But it's worth being serious about this because you have to think of plastic this endless cycle of damage. And it's worth just rolling this off one by one. So firstly almost all plastic is actually derived from the materials ethylene propylene and from fossil fuels oil and gas so apparently about four percents of global petroleum production gets diverted to create plastic secondly to refund. It's usually energy intensive so let's add another full percent of petroleum gets used to refine it. Thirdly it's rarely recycled on the eleven percent is actually recycle. This means that the rest ends up in landfills or in poorly regulated nations at just gets incinerated beside the hate will get to this plastic landfills and that causes the emission of greenhouse gases. Then finally fought isn't recycled in landfill or incinerated. As alex said it's in our oceans so assistant into in disaster.

Alex Dwayne
Shaping the Future of Health Fueled by Nurses with Mary Lou Ackerman

Outcomes Rocket

02:37 min | Last month

Shaping the Future of Health Fueled by Nurses with Mary Lou Ackerman

"Mary lou. Thank you so much for joining us. Today i'll thank you for for having always excited to share nursing stories and talk about innovation in healthcare. Thank you yeah. And so before we dive into the work that you're doing and your view on nurse. Leadership tucked us a little bit about what inspires your work in healthcare. There's so many so many reasons you know. Of course helping people to live their lives. Underpins the inspiration or energy. I get from working in healthcare that with the numerous opportunities that a career in healthcare offers as a nurse. I've enjoyed every opportunity from my early days as a front line nurse working with individuals and their families into leadership positions working with staff ensuring that they have what they need to provide. The best care possible went into Focus on health. Informatics know understanding what we need to do and the impact it has on patient experiences and now using all of those experiences and knowledge in my current role in innovation design testing solutions at service models to really help reshape the future of health. It's really hard not to be inspired as a nurse. Not only with all those opportunities but the impact that you can make on how people live their best lives through any one of those opportunities at. It's really meaningful work mary lou. And you've done so many things from bedside to executive it's fantastic to see that you've done what you've done and so as you focus on the work that s he health is doing the work that you're doing there. How would you say the organization is adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Se health is well known. In canada's a leader in home and community also bringing excellence and innovation to seniors lifestyle family caregiving. Our mission is simply to bring hope and happiness and delivered to deliver holistic life care individuals for over a hundred years. We've been providing care in the place. People call their home you know. This could be their own hallmark senior living facilities in clinics in schools or even on the streets last year we impacted the lives of more than one hundred fifty thousand people who approximately seven million visits. This is a whole lot of opportunity to bring hope and happiness by inspiring these carry exchanges with individuals that are really meaningful and impactful in my raw had the privilege to work with nurses health system partners and technology companies who are looking for solutions to modernize the delivery of healthcare now it's with these partnerships that were able to design his service models enabled by the technology to augment clinical care and enhance those care experiences and ultimately changed the way individuals experience health.

Mary Lou Canada
The case for co-ops, the invisible giant of the economy | Anu Puusa [TEST]

TED Talks Daily

07:31 min | Last month

The case for co-ops, the invisible giant of the economy | Anu Puusa [TEST]

"Wow i get to do that a lot around here. It's finally someone else's turn. So yes i happen to marital wonderful man named ted which is pretty rare in finland where i'm from. It's not a typical finnish name at. Aw trust me i myself. I'm a business professor. And i love teaching but you know what my students are fed up. They have really fed up. With the way the business is growing the environment and making wealth inequality was and putting money and profits above all else. And what really makes them mad is when i tell them about the cooperative movement the angry because once they understand how cooperatives they feel like a secret solution has been kept hayden before i tell you more about why cooperative sauce so great. I want to explain what they are. A corporate. dave is an organization that is owned by its members who are also its customer and decision maker and unlike most businesses where certain owners can buy more power and influence in a corporate day of every member has one vote which was the revolutionary idea back when the model was first introduced a regular mind not dimension a woman with no significant means or prestigious position in the society as an owner and partner in business on heard of perhaps it's still a bit revolutionary. Copa dave's exist in a sweet spot between the for profit and nonprofit worlds. They uniqueness is based on the idea of duality. They have two distinct but complementary roles on one hand they act like any other business and try to make money but on the other hand cooperatives are and do so much more they are scented enterprises run by and for then members and they tried to achieve economical but also social and cultural goes to benefit those members who are just regular people like you and me and what has happened for. Almost two hundred years is that cooperatives have proven to make decisions with a view across generations instead of quarter to quarter to benefit more people and wells in communities that might not otherwise attract investment while. Still being competitive and innovative. Sounds pretty good right. I guess that's why. At the end of a clause the other day student all red and chest up basically shouted at me of always been a straight a student. Done all the work read. All the books are now you telling me that all my life. I've missed hearing about a movement with this magnitude. I get this a lot. The organized corporate they've movement started in eighteen forty four with the russia's society of equitable pioneers. This was a group of weavers and artisans who are of desperation. Opened a store together to sell things that they could neither get nor afford alone. The cooperative movements from there and became a global phenomenon. Many of the modern day credit unions and farm credit systems. You see in. North america are descendants of the famous cooperative reiffeisen system in germany and here in finland. A man named hanis gephardt is considered to be the father of the finnish cooperative movement in the nineteenth century. He introduced cooperatives to help. People tackle debt poverty and unemployment. It turns out. This is the foundation opo country known for its democratic values high quality education and the happiness of its citizens and this line of impact of cooperative movement can be found in other places in the world to. I'm proud to say that invalided terms. Finland is one of the most cooperative countries in the world. We have about five point. Five million people who have over seven million memberships in cooperatives. That's run everything from groceries to banks each time. I stop at grocery cooperative. When i feel in my guest tank edo jointly owned restaurant. Stay at a hotel or buy clothes. Ohad west of i could bonuses. That can be up to five percent. And when i pay with bank card get an additional half percent off and i know that win. The copa davis doing well. It's not funding a single person's luxury vacation in the bahamas every year. A governance body comprised of elected representatives decides. How any operating surplus will be used. Some of the money will go back to the members. For example this year all consume the corporate dave boyer's caroline also or beco- or as we call it it's part of the group is the biggest corporate of croup in finland. They had a so close of two percent or members purchases and twelve percent return on money invested. When you add up the savings and the return my family received more than two thousand years back which is more than we spend on groceries in one month not to mention that across race above seven percent cheaper than its main competitor. i'm a member owner intrigue cooperatives and my husband has four memberships consumer a bank an insurance and water cooperative. We have two beautiful girls who are ten and twelve years old. And they're also member owners of the s group then. Memberships caused us one hundred euros. Each we want to pass on the legacy and teach them about the benefits of corporate gives early on and of course they're very happy about the yearly interest on cooperative capital. But it's just about us getting money back. It's about the greater good for our community. I'm not only talking about taxes and employment. Our consumer cooperative is the biggest employer in the area. I'm talking about support for young people. Sports arts university and cultural events for example as a member of the board of beco- or a few years ago we agreed to build a sports hall fully exa which is a nearby city here in the eastern part of finland belonging to our cooperatives operational area after we built it. The city signed a very long term rental agreement with us so financially investment made sense and of course it was a major gesture to the local people who not have proper facilities to do all kinds of sports in another case. We ended up rejecting the investment proposal regarding building a senior house downtown. The idea was very good one but we declined because it was the big hosting complex requiring a lot of capital with low expected investment return that would only serve a small part of the membership less than one percent of our over one hundred thousand members and therefore we decided against it

Finland Copa Dave Society Of Equitable Pioneers Hanis Gephardt Hayden TED Dave Boyer Dave Russia North America Germany Bahamas Sports Arts University Caroline Board Of Beco
James Twyman | The Most Powerful Manifesting Tool

You Can Heal Your Life

02:15 min | Last month

James Twyman | The Most Powerful Manifesting Tool

"Why. Don't you tell everyone kind of how you came up. And discovered the moses code like how did you come up with this. How did you discover it. And what is the moses. Go okay. I it's a funny story That has a very funny ending I remember a year or so before that There was a movie that came out I don't think very many people saw it was a movie called the secret and of course almost everyone has seen it and this was right at the beginning and i remember watching thinking two things number one. This is a very good movie and a lot of people are going to see it. And i really felt like the movie stopped short and fac in from my perspective. It chronicled what. I call the egos law of attraction which is based on. How do i use spiritual law to get what i don't have in somehow field feel fulfilled and i knew that what was really needed was to take it one more step. It was a wonderful first step but the next step was. How do we manifest from the level of soul not from the level of ego which is based not on what i can get but what i can give is not so much focused on riches but richness and less upon goods and more upon goodness because of course when we have richness in our lives and goodness in our lives will then everything else follows and we find ourselves fulfilled on levels. That we can't even imagine. I know i live in mexico in a small town called heat mexico and i'm surrounded by some of the richest people ever known even though they have next to nothing. These beautiful mexican families that surround us. And i know many people who have extreme abundance and they're poor and so the moses code is meant to take us to the level of soul so that we can become the source of that goodness and it goes back historically thirty five hundred years and what i always like to say is that this was a code. That was lost thirty five hundred years ago and it is the most powerful manifestation tool in the history of the

Mexico
A highlight from Under My Skin

Life in the Son

05:03 min | Last month

A highlight from Under My Skin

"Hey, how're you doing this morning. Good to have you back. And I hope you're ready for today. It's going to be an interesting day. Today is going to be the day that I do something that most people don't expect or don't like prisons to do because it seems so out of character for Christian but bear in mind now. There is such thing as righteous indignation but see. That doesn't come from the Christian. That actually comes from one. That Christian spends most of his time with being christ and quite frankly no Christian can really ever admit to having anything rightist in and of itself because it doesn't exist so when we do talk about things or Point things out. That isn't right away. Like I'm going to do today is basically going to run . But here's the thing is about things that are as anti-god as you can get and don't get me wrong. There's nothing in me. That is absolutely rises. Accept cries to his Emmy and who by the way is quite righteous enough to point out sayings that I'm going to talk about today and the thing is it's not about being a hypocrite. Because i will be the first one to tell you that. I have a hard time sometimes walking Christian wall because god does set the bar pretty high however he does make it possible to reach that ball whether we reach that bar at any particular time is entirely up to us and because of this war with the place that kind of complicates things a little bit but it does get better with time so I guess what I'm trying to say is once a person an one who is lost approaches the cross in total repentance and accept Jesus as the savior that does not mean that person just became one hundred percent perfect. If that person lived as chris for the next two hundred years he would be nowhere near perfection. so I'm just saying that is the beginning of moran. I'll go into it later. But the idea is to remember first of all one who is saved still has to war with the old self because you know his mind and his flesh is still pretty. Well existent okay. And as far as perfection goes no human being on the face of the planet war ever be perfect in this place in this world. So you know. I think. I'm saying that more because more than anything. Because I'm getting tired of being called a hypocrite because are not made. But I'm speaking of the Christian body of people calling Christians hypocrites because we still deal with the human element and the people that do this. Talk about our hypocrisy. I mean I'm assuming this because you know what God expects of us. And I'm just to say you now. If you know what God expects of you, then you can't take the spec out of anybody else's I when you got a beaming your wrong. So let's try to put a lid on that. But i'll be back in just a few minutes and i'm going to discuss a few things and i hate to even admit it but i saw i've been seeing things on Facebook and I say things you know walking down the street or in the grocery store i hear things all the time on. It really gave me Fired up I'm not gonna lie. Gets me fired up. But i will say this before. I decided to do anything with this show today. Operate about it so you're going to get inside of me today. I hope. But I'm still going to discuss a few of these things because I think we really need to pay attention to these things and yes I'm gonna run about it but don't worry it won't be so bad if already prayed about it. I've calmed down a little bit right now. I am going to take a brief break. Lou recess at you will. I'll be right back. They'll go away. I

Emmy Moran Chris Facebook LOU
"hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

03:28 min | 6 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"Paul rogers who co-authored my book with me Lucky me the three of us. Go out to dinner with our wives about once a month and paulin. I've been trying to get bothered to do a book. He and i would do it together. But he's not he's reluctant to do it just doesn't seem to want to so you can't get out of a tournament and he didn't wanna you well. I'm glad that you're preserving of these stories. And i'm curious because it seems like you have been very open minded and adaptable throughout your career. When it comes to trying new things and now you know at ninety nine years old starting a podcast seems like you're very open to new thing. Well you know. Podcast is interesting. Because i am unique and i go back that far and unless i tell it was gonna tell it. I don't know if there any other players living at played with point four it. I guess there are but Mickey mantle greenberg. joe gordon. I look booed ro. I'm and i'm happy to share my experiences with those guys. Warren spahn and johnny sain. Just so many joe dimaggio and i'm happy doing then. I like doing it so why not do it. In last time we talked to you. We asked you bet. Jackie robinson but this time i wanted to ask you about larry doby who i imagine you just talked about in your nine thousand four hundred. Yeah i'd talk a lot about. Larry doby because i don't think he's received anywhere near the credit right that he should receive. He was first black in american league. He went through the same indignities that robinson did. I don't wanna take anything away from jack. Up played against jack in nineteen forty six when he was he was in montreal and i was in baltimore and the international cannot and i had occasion to watch him and and play against him all that year and i admired him. I thought he was a very good player. And a good guy on the proved to be just that he was very deserving lehrer dovy very very deserve. What was it like when when he came up in forty seven well he was accepted. It was the same thing he had to sleep in different hotels. He couldn't eat in a restaurant and he did all the things. that jacket. larry was a very nice guy. Good teammate and a damn good hitter and with power power hitter. One thing that i was struck by as i was reading through some of the coverage of your birthday and i wonder if this might be a topic of the future podcast episode was a really lovely answer that you gave to. Mlb dot michael clare about the role that your wife played in your career and the support that she gave you. And i wondered if you could talk a little bit about what life is like for the wife of a major leaguer and a farm director in baseball executive. Because i imagine that she has a fair number of stories that she tell the podcast to come onto. You wanna talk to her. Sure she put her on. yeah. I'll.

Larry doby Mickey mantle greenberg joe gordon Paul rogers Warren spahn johnny sain paulin joe dimaggio Jackie robinson jack american league robinson montreal baltimore michael clare larry Mlb
"hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

07:46 min | 6 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"And i think that jj kind of illuminated for me that there are a lot of open questions still when it comes to what the long term effect is going to be player development going forward and quality of play that some folks are gonna see and who gets a chance to play affiliated ball and who doesn't and the economic future of both the affiliated miners and the baseball that used to be played in the affiliated. Minors and those franchises still kind of uncertain. But we're trying to do was answer. The question like who is going to be there in person access to baseball disappear and who is going to see the character of that access change so it's one thing to have you know a minor league team within driving distance of your house. It's another thing if the only baseball team you have access to say the major league team because that's going to be a more expensive proposition. Maybe the pro partner leagues the summer. Wood bat leagues. Don't have the same emotional resonance for you. That affiliated ball does even if the odds of everyone you see on the field making it to the majors or sort of slim so we wanted to now that we know what teams are in which teams are out sort of culture that analysis again and i think that the top line results is that over five million people at least as it stands now and i will say that there are nineteen teams whose futures are uncertain. So it could be that these five million people have access to a new pro partner league team in the coming years. It could be that they have existing summer. What about leagues. That are near at hand. They might be within driving distance of a good college program. So you know there's there's still some options here but basically over five million people across the country are set to lose access to close in person baseball and that's a real shame. Meanwhile nearly twenty three million people who had minorly access are now going to have to go elsewhere whether that's to the pro partner leagues to the major leagues to the summer. Wood bat leagues. We do want to point out that over. Ten million people who only had major league access are now going to gain minor league access because of the way some of these affiliations have changed so folks in minneapolis. Who were like. I can't afford to go watch. The twins can now go. See the saint paul seitz which are going to be the aaa affiliate of Of the twins now so. I think that our conclusion is that they're going to be people who either have as much access as they had before or going to have to pay more for that access or see it shift and while we might end up with a more efficient system than we had before and there certainly some some benefits to this plan which we talked about on that episode with. Jj you know. More than forty million people went to a minor league game in two thousand nineteen and that sleep more than half the number people who went to a major league game so there is an audience for minor league baseball. And i think people enjoy that. It is inexpensive generally and that it can be kind of funny and it can be light hearted and it can be a nice night at the ballpark for self family. And for many of those people going to the park just got harder. And that's a real shame. Yeah a link to that research and we talked about the merits of this change on the podcast but one thing that we maybe touched on but didn't well on his just. Some of the minor league team owners are so up in arms about the sort of strong arming that. Mlb is doing here and we mentioned how they've extended the quote unquote invitations to join affiliated. Paul in sort of mock that a bit. I was just reading an article. In athletic. By evan drellich where he was talking about. How even to like see the terms of the agreement the professional development license this ten year contract that the teams are going to sign if they want to be affiliated ball in order to review that contract they basically have to sign an nda the teams and also an indemnification of mlb. So even if they want to see the terms they have to agree to not talk about the terms and basically like not to sue. Nlp or hold him responsible for anything before they even see the terms of the contracts the tactics that mlb is usually here like they have all the leverage. I guess and then just figure well they need us more than we need them and if they pass then we'll just move to the next team on our list that we did not extend quote unquote invitation to and So they don't like it then they can lump it but imagine like here's the ten year contract that is going to govern your business for the next decade. You can actually see it in less. You agree not to tell anyone what's in it or speak publicly about it or sue us or anything you have to sign away all your rights before you even take a look at it so i think that's a big part of what has rep people. The wrong way is just like the way. Mlb when about this even apart from the merits of the agreement in the new structure itself. It's like teams finding out on twitter. That they are inner out. Were being in limbo for months on. Just not the best way to implement this. I think they want what they want and they can get it now. So they're gonna all right so we are finished with followups one more thing that we want to touch on before we bring eddie on here. There was news this week and it's long awaited news. And it's that the cleveland baseball franchise is changing. Its name not immediately which we can talk about. But they have Finally agreed to go along with the public pressure that has been building for quite some time now. Decades really going back to in stanford changed its name but with greater urgency of late and of course the washington football team. Belatedly begrudgingly agreed to change. Its name earlier this year and now cleveland has finally retook along with this and they are not doing it immediately. They are taking their time to implement this change so for at least twenty twenty one the franchise will have the same name which is really going to be sort of a strange situation. I think because once you agree that you have to change the same and that the current name is unacceptable. Than how'd you even like. Go about your business for another year without chasing him. Like what do the broadcasters say. What do the pa people say. What will the program say. But i guess we can sort of celebrate that it happens while also noting how long it took the happen and how oddly it's happening it's like very much like the qiming discussion that we had. It's like this is great. This is long overdue. Glad tapping but boy. did it. take a really really long time to happen. Boy did they stumble at the finish line. Yeah so. I think the way that we can be happy here is to applaud the activists and community members and fans who have been working for such a long time to exert pressure on the franchise to change. Its name Which has been so obviously bad especially in conjunction with while who for such a long time. But yeah i understand that while i don't care about this. I understand that the brand concerns are important in this conversation. At least from cleveland's perspective. We don't have to care about that stuff. But i understand they do. And they are trying to maintain the value of their franchise. And so changing. The name is a big deal. It's thing that happens in sports. But you know..

Mlb paul seitz evan drellich Wood jj minneapolis nda cleveland Paul eddie stanford twitter football washington
"hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

08:07 min | 6 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Effectively Wild: A FanGraphs Baseball Podcast

"And i think all of that is good to think about. But i also just find it really hard to believe that. If you're the mets and you have all this steve cohen money and you got all these cohen bucks and you want to shower someone with them that you can't go to real muto and be like how 'bout this wild number that he wouldn't go y- okay. I mean maybe he doesn't wanna play in new york. Maybe he doesn't wanna play in queens. Maybe he doesn't want to be the face of this new era of the mets. Like i don't know. I don't know remove show. I don't know what his hierarchy of needs are when it comes to the next contract that he sides but it does strike me as sort of an odd excuse. Because it's like if you're willing to spend the most money then it seems like it's a non issue and you know there is reference made to a bidding war. And what have you. But it's like you're never. It seems hard to believe that you're going to get more efficient sort of bang for your buck in this market than signing realmuto. He's the best. And it's a position of need on your roster like what are we doing here right sandy. Alderson seemed to suggest that it was a matter of timing that they didn't want to weed round for him. But maybe you'd better off. Her would have made up his mind. You know i was reading another report. There was a report that digitally mayhew and the yankees were like. Twenty five million dollars apart but it was like well lemay mayhew wants for years and one hundred and the yankees want to give him four years and seventy five or something and like even four seventy five. I think that is above what most people projected for will mayhew in this market. Which was expected to be so depressed and so if that is the real difference between them and there were some subsequent reports that suggested maybe the difference between them is actually bigger than that. But if that's the low number and maybe they end up meeting somewhere in the middle. Then that's another data point. That sorta says well. Maybe this market won't be quite so disastrous. At least not for everyone and in a piece i was reading about that at j. dot com. It was mentioned quote. It's believed the. Mlb players association has strongly suggested to free agents not to accept deals just yet unless their exact prices met technically. It's still early in the offseason with spring training not scheduled to start until mid-february there's a sense in the industry that spring training and opening day could be pushed back as the owners and players worked to navigate another year in the time of the coronavirus and vaccine news. Get your price or wait. It out is essentially what free agents are being advised. The person said so. If that's the case then yeah maybe the people who are signing got their price but the fact that some players are getting their prices may be better than people expected coming into this. Yeah i think that it's i mean. It's never a bad thing. If what you want is your expectation and hope for the market is that players will be paid commensurate with their talent when you see players meeting or exceeding your understanding of where that lies from a dollar perspective. That's not a bad thing like it's such a bad thing. I do think that like the back end of this deal. Might end up looking of gnarly for the mets because even as craig edwards pointed out when he wrote the suppress at van graphs. Like even if you assume that what he showed last year and in two thousand eighteen is his new baseline he's still a catcher advancing into his thirty so he's gonna have age related decline regardless of what his new sort of defensive and hitting is. But also your steve cohen and you have billions of dollars. So maybe don't care about the back end of the deal lake riding on our. It's funny how cohen has become such a celebrity. Really since he bought the mets. It one needs to chill out. Yes i know that. His twitter presence is abusing right now. Almost endearing in a way in like cow a oddly punctuated. It is times like it. It seems like he is writing these tweets as opposed to getting someone else to write them for him. Yes i mean he is maybe not quite as cuddly his tweets but it is just sort of striking like how you already are. Multi-billionaire like steve cohen. And a big person in the business world but like most people didn't know who steve cohen was. Your average new yorker didn't really know who he was and yet may be. Bobby axelrod was based on him but he wasn't like a household name or anything. And yet you buy a sports franchise and suddenly everyone knows who you are. And millions of people in your city love you and follow you and hang on your every word and peace seems to be really enjoying this personal tweeting. That he's doing and just kind of goes to show you like. Buying sports team is a money making venture or is treated as such by many people who purchase sports teams. But it's also just really about echo in about getting recognized in a way that you weren't in kind of like being the big man in town you know by the sports team like get recognized. People know who you are people care what you say. Outside of the boardrooms you know people are talking about you. And so that's i think a big part of the reason why a lot of people wanna by sports teams. I mean if. You're steve cohen yet maybe you think it is a valuable asset to add to your portfolio. But i'm sure he could invest that money in some other way. That would make him just as much so really. You probably do it because you wanna be famous and you want to be liked in a way that you can't be just for being rich really so i guess that's a big part of why you would want to buy a sports team. I can hear our listener saying that. You always say that. You want more steve bombers in baseball which i think is the the sort of basketball equivalent to two cohen right. We're here flamboyant and clearly super invested almost to the point of mania. And i think that yeah like if we're picking a mold of billionaire to engage with the sport. I'd rather one whose i'd like to win. A world series and the way that i'm deriving my sense of personal ego and satisfaction is by mets twitter liking me which like as an aside seems like a thing that should be examined with the help of a professional but we all like what we like and some of the stuff we like is really weird. So that's that's steve. Cohen's thing then go with god and a good wind but i do. I do want to do want to caution. people should just okay just. It's okay to enjoy it clearly. I'm not going to tell people to not enjoy something and twenty twenty. I'm not a monster. Just remember like you don't have to just don't give yourself away cheaply as all i'm asking for just saying you don't have to be impressed. You don't have to be impressed. You're not obligated. He should a good team on the field. That's what he should be obligated to do as an owner. You are not obligated to find him charming he want to. That's cool but you don't have to s- okay. I get it. If i were mets fan. I'm sure i'd be seduced by now. I mean i don't know if you can even say like eh. He'll get milkshake duct at some point. Because like you know. He's already like ben dineh his company. You know plead guilty insider trading so like that happened already cast. But you know it's like if you've been living under the wilpon regime for perhaps your whole life or or decades and then suddenly a competent person appears and Speaks to you in a way that you would want your owner to speak and you know easier said than done but hey he signed a couple free agents and that's encouraging the so i get it. I understand the cult of cohen. I just thinking about it from his perspective. Like you're worth fourteen billion or whatever like what more do you want or need like what do you lack. And i guess the only thing money can buy really at that. Point is the kind of fame that he has now in like people carrying about him in a way that they would not have cared about him before or even heard of him. So it's just overnight. You know you're a big figure in the business world. Most people don't know who you are. Then you buy a baseball team and suddenly you're famous and everyone's talking about you and liking you. He had very very few twitter followers..

steve cohen mets mayhew lemay mayhew cohen Mlb players association yankees craig edwards Alderson Bobby axelrod queens steve bombers new york twitter ben dineh baseball basketball Cohen steve
"hundred year" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

Welcome to Night Vale

05:04 min | 10 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

"Carlos and I are at the theatre. The audiences of buzz with excitement. Yes. But also many of them are the insects that infest this theater. Bugs became entranced by the story over the years passing down through brief generation. After brief generation history of all that happened before the story of the play became something of a religion to this creepy crawly civilization, and so now the bugs are jittery on the walls thrilled to beat the generation that gets to see the end of this great tale. The curtain rises on a scene. I recognize well. It is a simple set of studio apartment. A kitchen caught a window overlooking a brick wall. A man sits in the corner deep in thought Doorbell rings come in it's open, the man calls. A woman enters she is very old tottering unsteadily on legs that have carried our for many many years. Please take my seat. The man says with genuine concern. Thank you. She says collapsing with relief onto the cushions then looking out. As for the first time noticing the audience. I know this woman I I saw her as a baby later as a twenty year old, it seems she has lived her whole life on the stage taking part in this play. The woman says his Hanoch her spin. I was born in this theater clutching scripted my off. That was bigger than I was my twin in a way. I started acting in that script of mind before I was even aware of the world. I grew up in that script lived my entire life in the play I had written from infancy to now. And she rises and the man reaches out to help but she waves him away she speaks her. Voice is strong ringing out through the theater. The play ends with my death. Because the play is my life. It is bounded by the same hours and minutes that I am. Audiences wrapped many have tears in their eyes even the INCEX. Weep. Thank you for these Hundred Years Hannah Hirshman says. This script is complete. She walks to the window. It might look like raid she says. Who knows? Lights. Thunderous. Applause cries of a claim and Hannah Hirschman dies to the best possible sound person can hear concrete evidence of the good they have done in the lives of other humans. Stay tuned next for the second ever Night Vale players playhouse production now that they finally finished this one. They're going to do. God's spell. And from the script of a life I have not yet finished performing. Good night night fail. Good night. Welcome to Night Vale is a production. Of Nightingale, presents it is written by Joseph, Fink, and Jeffrey Craner and produced by disparition. The Voice of Night Vale is see slow Baldwin original music by disparition all of it can be found at disparition dot band camp, Dot Com. This episodes weather was shallow is by Brad bence. Go find out more at Brad, Ben, school, music, Dot Com comments, questions, canal us at Info at. Welcome to Night Vale Dot Com or follow us on twitter at night Ville radio or wait for us to run out of television. WE'RE GONNA run out of television soon right check out. Welcome to Night Vale Dot. com for Info about our upcoming livestream production of our classic episode the sandstorm with a number of brand new guest appearances live theater but you don't have to wear real clothes to watch it today's proverb. Many are called but few are chosen and fewer still pick up. Because most calls are spammy stays. High it's Joseph Inc my friend Jeffrey I created welcome tonight fail back in two thousand twelve normally worthy the ones turning our ideas into writing. But for our brand new show start with this, it's you who will do the creating on each episode. We'll talk about a topic of the creative process. Then we will give you too short assignments something to consume and something to create. You can share your work on our membership forum to see what other people are up to. We want you to start creating one simple assignment at a time because the best way to start writing is to start writing and find it wherever you get your podcasts..

Night Vale Night Vale Dot Com Night Vale Dot. Hannah Hirshman Dot Com Brad bence Carlos Hannah Hirschman Joseph Inc Jeffrey I twitter Joseph Baldwin Jeffrey Craner Ben Fink
"hundred year" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

Welcome to Night Vale

03:29 min | 10 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

"Believe. Cab. But you throw it all away. They have. Off. The three. Spin. System. A. Wow..

"hundred year" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

Welcome to Night Vale

07:22 min | 10 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Welcome to Night Vale

"Listeners some exciting news from the world of theatre. The hundred year play is about to reach its final scene. Yes. This is the play that has been running continuously since nineteen twenty. Written by brilliant playwright, Hannah Hirschman designed to take exactly one hundred years to four. And the tireless volunteers of the Night Vale players playhouse have been going through those scenes one after another for decade upon decade. There is little time to rehearse for each hour brings new scenes and. Will only performed once the play moves on in order to keep up with tight scheduled needed to. The entire script before a century elapse it's It is a monumental work of theater, but like all work, it must someday cease. Today specifically. I will be in attendance at that historic moment when the final scene is performed and the curtain closes on the hundred year play. More soon but I, the news. We bring you the latest on the lawsuit, the estate of Franklin Chen versus the city of Night Vale. As you know this case has grown so large and complicated that I've not had the time to discuss it in my usual community radio broadcasts. But instead have started a true crime podcast called bloody laws bloody claws, the murder of Frank Chan. Which I strive to get to the truth just what happened on that fateful night when five headed Dragon Hiram. mcdaniels met Frank Chin and then later Francesa body was found covered in burns and claw marks. It's a confounding mystery. The sheriff's secret police announced that it seems really complicated and they're not even GonNa try to solve that sucker. Oh what a secret police spokesman muttered at an earthworm found in his garden, you want us to fail. You want to see US fail. That's why you want us to investigate this case to see a let it. The family of Frank Chen say they merely want the appropriate parties in this case, the city of night fail Hiram mcdaniels and an initiative conception of God to take responsibility for their part in this tragedy. The trial is now in its tenth month and has included spirited reenactments of the supposed- murder by hopeful players playhouse performers in between their work on the hundred year play. Three changes of judge and venue due to quote some dragon attacks and constant interruptions from a local audio journalists who hosts a widely respected true crime podcast. Still with all this we near A. Judge Chaplain has indicated she will issue a ruling soon like in the next year or so she said certainly within five years listen I don't owe you a verdict just because you're paying me to do a job, you can't rush me to do it. The verdict will be done when it's done. Chaplain then huffed out of the courtroom followed by journalists, shouting recommendations for episodes of their podcast to listen to. I was present. On opening night of the hundred year play. How. The theater buzzed of course, this was partly the audience thrilled to be at the start of such an unprecedented work but mostly. It was the insects. The night failed players. playhouse had quite a pest problem at the time and still does. It's difficult to do pest control when there is a hundred year long play being performed on stage at every hour of every day. The curtain opened those many years ago on a simple set of a studio apartment, a kitchen, a hot a window overlooking a brick wall. A man sits in the corner deep in thought. A doorbell rings come here. It's open. The man says, a woman enters flustered. She is holding a newborn. This been a murder. She says, the victim was alone in a room and all the doors and windows were locked. My God, the man says springs up who could have done this and how. The woman tells him. IT TURNS OUT TO BE THE GARDENER MR sprinkle. He served with the victim and the war and never could forgive him for what happened there. He threw a venomous snake through and event. The man sits back down nodding So the mystery is solved. As a playwright, Hannah Hirschman did not believe in stringing up mysteries a second longer than was necessary. The baby in the woman's arm stirs Shish Little One. The woman says, the man looks out the window where he cannot see sky. It might look like rain he says. knows. Thus began a journey of one hundred years. And now a word from our sponsors. Today's episode is sponsored by the Knightdale Medical Board which would like to remind you that it is important to drink enough water throughout the day. Drink more water. Your body can't function without water without water. You're just dust made intimate water forms the squelching mud of sentence. Try to have at least ten big glasses of water not over the entire day right now see if you can get all ten of them down, explore the capacity of your stomach. See if you can make burst, you will either feel so much better or an organ will explode and you will die. An. Either one is more interesting than the mundane now. You should drink even more water than that. Wander out of your door searched the earth for liquids, find a lake and drain the entire thing until the bottom feeders flop helplessly on the flatlands laugh slushing Lee as you look upon the destruction, you have wrought the power that you possess. Now that you are well hydrated move on from the lake and come to the shore of an ocean. All Oceans are one ocean that we have arbitrarily categorized by language. The scene knows no separation and neither will you will lay belly down. On the sand, put your lips against the waves and guzzle the ocean. The ocean is salty it will not be very hydrating. So you'll need to drink a lot of it. Keep going until the tower tops of Atlantis See sky again for the first time in centuries until the strange glowing creatures of the deep deep are exposed splayed out from their bodies now that they no longer have the immense pressure of the ocean depths to keep their structure intact, and once you have drunk the oceans, turn your eyes to the stars. For their is water out there to at, you must suck dry the universe. This has been a message.

murder Hannah Hirschman Hiram. mcdaniels Night Vale A. Judge Chaplain US Frank Chen Franklin Chen Frank Chan Knightdale Medical Board Frank Chin slushing Lee Francesa
"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

02:47 min | 11 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

"But that said those of us who were photographers who are champions for photography and love photography and really believe as I do that photography is a very, very high level medium deserving of its. Own Accolades independent of all other form of media photography that is to say is not junior sculpture or junior ballet or junior music or junior painting. That photography is a medium that deserves respect in and of itself. I think that historians will look back at our time and realized that this was the time in which photography really started to establish itself as an independent medium. Partly because of what's happening in the overwhelming distribution of photographic imagery through books and through digital media. To some degree this is an academic discussion because, of course, one hundred years now you and I won't be around. So we won't know and why should we even care? I think it's important for us to recognize however. That in order for an individual photograph to survive and to be of interest to anybody in future generations, it will be because it connects with them on an emotional psychological, artistic and aesthetic level. Not Because of its Extraordinary use of the technology of the day we can look back at Prince from a hundred years ago and say they're extraordinary examples of the technology of the day. But. That doesn't make them interesting in and of themselves. The reason some photographs have survived is because they speak so deeply to the human heart and I think that's the universal thing that happens with all art in all. Times Photography. So our. Times. In the history of photography will be known. As a blip. In the technological. Of. Photography. But a continuation of the aesthetic movement of the communication from our generation of our observations of the human heart and the human condition. And in that regard. We are just like all the photographers from one hundred years ago and all of the photographers from a hundred years from now. While, we are simultaneously unique in our own generation..

"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

03:38 min | 11 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

"For the last fifty years anyway, a lot of photography has been presented in very high quality offset lithographic reproductions, duo tones, try tones, etc.. And we don't need to see those photographs on the wall a frame in order to appreciate them. It's a different experience of course when you see original print. And there may be something that you can get from an original print that you can't get from a book reproduction but the thing about a book reproduction is it can go almost everywhere and lots and lots of photographers know lots and lots of great photographs. Because of books. And that is a marvellous an interesting thing. That is beginning a little bit of separation between Photography and painting. And I think that is even extended further when we consider the effects of digital distribution. So much of photography is now being digitally distributed. The obvious ones are think of instagram etcetera, which will be long forgotten technologies a hundred years from now, but the method of distributing images without requiring physical paper that I suspect. We'll still remain a hundred years from now. And so I think one of the interesting things about the times in which you and I are living in our cutting edge and our contemporary times. Is simply that. Historians will look back at this time and see that this was when photography came into its own when it established itself as a medium that wasn't reproducing some other mediums form of presentation it's not junior painting any longer. But. Photography is establishing its own universe. Its own sort of language as Partially, anyway independent of physical. Media. Of course will always exist as physical media I. Don't I don't WanNa. Go down a rabbit hole that makes it sound like. I'm saying that there will be the end of prince there won't there will always be prints. But there will also be non physical distribution of images that we're seeing now for the first time, and that technology is likely to continue and the more it does. The more I think historians will look back at our time as the time when photography really came into its own. I would like to think that photography came into its own in the age of Stieglitz. But it didn't. STIEGLITZ was still trying to establish photography as a serious art medium enhance his. Exhibition of photographs right next to paintings he was trying to. Elevate photography by Association and in two ninety one he exhibited as much painting as he did photography. So, there was still a connection between. Those two media that was undeniable and photography was considered the sort of the secondary medium as much as stieglitz tried to make it not. It's still was it still is to this day and anybody who doesn't admit that is not really being realistic..

Stieglitz instagram WanNa
"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

02:37 min | 11 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

"That don't have anything to do with the technology of when they were photographed or when they were published but have to do with something else by the same token poets can have their work appreciated one hundred years after they've written their poem and gone into that Great Poetry Library in the sky, the same thing can happen with photography. It points out that. Every artist I think is living at the cutting edge of whatever their technology is. If if you were a novelist one, hundred years ago, the cutting edge might have been the typewriter I don't know when the typewriter was invented but let's say it was a hundred years ago and before that it was the cutting edge was the quill and ink, and maybe the cutting edge fifty years ago was the typewriter. Every artist lives at the cutting edge in history of whatever technology is used in their particular art medium. But If we're careful if we're sensitive if we pay attention as artists, what we also realize. Is that in. To being at the cutting edge of whatever our medium is we are also simultaneously. coterminous with all artists throughout all history be they photographers or painters or sculptors, or poets, or novelist, or dancers, or singers, or whatever. And this brings me to one of the reasons why I think we're not only connected to all of history. But we do live in a time that's going to be very interesting in photography's history for reasons that don't have anything to do with the technology of making photographs and it's this. Up until now primarily because of stieglitz I've mentioned this and other contexts but primarily, because of stieglitz fine art photography has been presented to the world more or less. The same way that painting has been presented to the world. In a frame on the wall in a gallery. But we're in the midst of time when that is radically changing. When a lot of photography is starting to be seen off the wall out of the frame..

stieglitz Great Poetry Library
"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

05:01 min | 11 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

"At the cutting edge of technology, the cutting edge of the thought process of what were engaged with with photographic art. It's attribute he thought he was at the cutting edge. In fact, he was at the cutting edge of technology with his photograph Viewer Magazine Camera Work and with his creative thinking about what photography could be in terms of an art medium. He could have no more imagined the future of. Football Books and dual tone printing and galleries all across America and huge events like photo plus Houston photo festival that would have been. Literally inconceivable to him. But yet, it all came to pass. I would propose that it is equally difficult for us to imagine. What photography will be a hundred years from now in twenty one twenty what the technology will be in twenty one twenty, what the means of distribution will be in twenty one twenty. But isn't it interesting that when we look at Alfred? stieglitz photographs. We can still relate to them. The technology has changed the Zeitgeist has changed. The method of presentation has changed everything about photography has changed except. The content. Content is the one thing that hasn't changed. It's evolved sure and there are things being photographed today that Stieglitz can only imagine photographing. But when you look at Stieglitz work in general. And the other photographers of his generation. We can see the content threads that are still alive today. There are photographers today who doing. Essentially. The same kind of thing or an outgrowth of the kind of thing that Stieglitz did. I would propose the same thing will happen one hundred years from now our technology will seem so primitive our methods of distribution will seem so quaint. All of the things that we're worrying about now in terms of gear and process and methods of distribution will seem. The product of our times. But in fact, the content that we produce. Will. Possibly maybe. We hope. Still be of interest. Because whatever we do in terms of. Addressing, the issues of being human being the nature of being alive the nature of observing. What, goes on around us and capturing something in our artwork will be just as valid. It'll be hundred years old, but it'll be just as valid then. As it is today. By the same token, we read novels that are a hundred years old and we can relate to that they may be the language may be a little different than what we use today and all of that but. But. Nonetheless when they touch the human heart and they address the content of what it is to be alive. They still carry forward and they're still valuable even. Novelists who aren't famous and well remembered. There's something to be gained by reading their books. There will be something to be gained by looking at our photographs. One Hundred Years from now just light. There is something to be gained by looking at photographs from a hundred years ago. Now I mentioned Stieglitz Stieglitz is famous and he's still. Appreciated, today. But if you have the opportunity, go back and look at other publications from. Well, it's hard to find them from one hundred years ago 'cause Stieglitz was sort of unique but you can get a hold of a book that has all of the camera work photographs in it. That's well worth getting not too. Surprisingly the book is called camera work the complete photographs it's published by. It's really interesting little book kind of small but very thick and supposedly contains every photograph that was published in camera work and a lot of them seem. Somewhat dated but still interesting. But..

Stieglitz Stieglitz Viewer Magazine Football Houston America Alfred
"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

LensWork

03:57 min | 11 months ago

"hundred year" Discussed on LensWork

"Here's the editor of Lens. Work Publishing. Bruce. Jensen I had a truly weird and strange experience this morning that I wanNA share with you I had to dry for about an hour this morning down to Anna Cordis and as I almost always do when I have that kind of drive I use that time to do some dictation to make nodes to. Possibly, put together ideas for an editor's comment for Lens Work and sometimes actually do the dictation and I happen to be doing a dictation about Alfred. stieglitz. And this particular dictation was sort of a bit of a test if you will because I had purchased a new Bluetooth headphone and I wanted to test how the quality of the audience would be while I was dictating in the car with the car noise driving down the freeway at seventy miles an hour. That's oftentimes a problem when it comes to try to transcribe those dictation because the car noise is so loud that it sometimes gets difficult to. Understand the words and for the dictation software to translate correctly. So I was really hoping that this new Bluetooth headphone would work. Fine. So there, I am I'm driving down the freeway I'm dictating an article about Alfred Stieglitz, and it dawns on me that Alfred Stieglitz was doing his thing. Almost, exactly a hundred years ago. and think about what Alfred Stieglitz was doing a hundred years ago. He was trying to make a place for photography in the art world he'd. Published Camera Work for a number of years, and then there was a to ninety one, the gallery in New York and he was essentially promoting photography as an art medium. When up to this point, it hadn't been promoted much as an art medium. And let's look ahead of Stieglitz for a few years. What was yet to come well yet to come in. Roughly Nineteen nineteen or nineteen twenty were gelatin silver paper and certainly things like enlargements were yet in the future and most photographers in his day were probably printing on. Platinum palladium prints or something like that. So Pretty primitive in terms of the technology that we think about today I forward today here. I am in the car driving seventy miles an hour down the freeway using my Bluetooth headphone to dictate an article about his time in photography onto my smartphone, which I'll have transcribed by the computer later so that it can appear in the digital version and print version of Lens work so that all of you can see it. That's what happened in a hundred years of technological advancement. Can you imagine what Alfred Stieglitz would say if he had been sitting next to me in the car listening to me describe in my thoughts what I think his point of view about photography was and where his place in photographic history was it it would be beyond his comprehension. To think about what I was doing. In the period of a short one, hundred years after he was. Publishing Camera Work and doing to ninety one. Now, obviously, the point of this is to project forward. Can we possibly imagine where photography is going to be a hundred years from now we like to think that we're.

Alfred. stieglitz Jensen editor Bruce Anna Cordis New York
"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Years trying to get a hope. The real hotel tell room is very hard. I spoke to someone. I met at the event who goes every year in state at the holiday inn. He had to agree to a minimum of five days and paid about route three hundred and fifty dollars per night yikes <hes> he's been going for years and he kinda renews each year but there's other options <hes> this year he says i stayed at the university of wisconsin oshkosh. I pass along a brochure <hes>. It's a dorm rooms. You know what dorm rooms are like their there are no. They're simple <hes> the bathrooms down the hall maybe but the price is good lo- <hes> low prices around seventy five dollars a night and he's got some other tips on that he says is that the <hes> the university of wisconsin nash kosh is easy to get to a busta leaves. He's the dorms for ya every <hes> <hes> every. I'm not sure what it is maybe every half hour. It's it's very frequently and it costs. I five dollars a ride or thirty dollars rides so <hes> that's another option that i will be looking at. I don't know about you max but i've done camping. I've done the university and i've done believe it or not a family farm house down the road from the airport yeah so there's a lot of options besides the hotel the hotels and i don't my my remembrance. The first time i went with with the museum my remembrance of the dorm room was it was a dorm room and if you don't mind going down and showering down down the hall and know how to deal with it. It's a comfortable bed and it does have a little bit of a._c. So it's nice to come back and get a shower a._c. Not nine climbing to attend but that's just my own personal personal opinion sorry guys who can't bake and i like that idea yeah. The camping is fun <hes> you you know hotels are nice. The only concern i have is what if you're on one of those upper floors of the dormitory and you don't have air conditioning. That's gotta be pretty hot. I would imagine yeah yeah. I think there's a recommendation to bring a fan if you don't have an air conditioner in the room but <hes> hey as as for community showers i mean hey. I'm a product of the sixties. M used to beat in there with a bunch of people that who knows where they came from all taking showers. It's not a big deal but <hes> <hes> showers are nice. Patrick wiggins wrote us. He said i saw this while taxiing to my hanger salt lake international. Maybe something for the show notes oops. I send us a photo says i've seen be seventeen before an f. eighteens before but never together this <hes> photo makes for a great old meets new picture and there's just you know which be seventeen. This is david di recognize. This must be the collins foundation as i didn't i. I didn't look that closely at it. I saw be seventeen and went yup. It's be seventeen. Sorry okay. I don't know how many flying b seventeen are is there more than just one of the collings foundation. There's there's at least ten. <hes> oh yeah yes yes certainly there is i'm thinking this was parked over by the the military section you know when you come into salt lake international national general aviation military is on the other side of the field from the the terminal so i'm thinking this may be parked over there. I will put that that picture in the show notes. Somebody can identify this. <hes> this play maybe even where the eighteen comes from based on the markings which are the the markings on the f. eighteen have actually i don't really see very many markings on that if eighteen but i'm looking at a small version of the picture <hes> but patrick also says are he mentioned about how david made a comment comment about people being cargo patrick's is according to far ninety one point one quote. No person may operate in the aircraft aft carrying passengers for hire in formation flight and yet. It's not at all uncommon for this to happen in skydiving. Were jumpers paid a jump from the planes that are flying in formation. So how can it be legal for. The purpose of jumping parachute is not considered passengers..

Patrick wiggins busta david di university of wisconsin oshkos salt lake university of wisconsin collings foundation collins foundation seventy five dollars thirty dollars fifty dollars five dollars five days
"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Well. It's like there's all these unique advances and technology but we're just not a neighbor with like we were in the past because they're not speed records. <hes> that's interesting rick kennedy. Wanna thank you for joining joining us for <hes> a great conversation. <hes> i'd really encourage people to take a look at this book one hundred years of reimagining flight and and even if you're not just purely an engine nut like some of us. Maybe i think you'll find it really really fascinating because i mean you can't talk about the the engines you can't describe the history you can't talk about the people involved and the decisions that were made in not talk about the airplanes as well obviously <hes> one is no good without the other so <hes> if you're interested in aviation in general in the in the history of both commercial and military <hes> we we haven't really talked much of the military aspects of this but there's a lot of that in the book as well so check it out really encourage it encourage. You take a look at it then rick thanks again. Well dave maximum max. I appreciate the chance to talk with you guys about. I mean just we're. We're all very blessed to be engaged in. A fascinating inch in this industry is so fantastic and it's booming. It's just booming. I mean it really is. It's just a continuous. It really is booming so thank first time. I really appreciate this. Are you a bit of a musician yeah as a music major in college. I played jazz. I've written a couple of books on early jazz music so yeah ah i thought i saw something about that. What what do you play yeah. I play piano <hes> which basically consist of walking the base an four four line the base. I play a lot of like monk and you know nineteen fifties and sixties jazz but my <hes> my study of it in terms of book riding is nineteen twenties and thirties jazz labels <hes> living in cincinnati. I live an hour away from richmond. Indiana where the first great jazz record label able was. I mean the twenty so i like interest on that stuff so yeah that was a journalist and i covered entertainment music and so i had a chance to hang out with all the great jazz players great <hes>. That's amazing but i i wanted. I just went in with one thing just to say and i think you'll see that in the book i i liked. I made a very big point to the site accomplishments from rolls royce and pratt and the book because yes the three of us just absolutely hate each other but respect respect each other because the big three are killing each other and just have done some great things in the aviation world so we all have the grizzly like each on a little a little bit well and i'm guessing you wouldn't have as many accomplishments if there weren't one or two competitors right i mean hasn't that really driven the the industry too far greater accomplishments schwantz than you could have if there were just you know one company out there doing this and that's why worry about consolidation sometimes because when it there i mean i really do. I mean you you know. Roles came along with a wide chord fan where he once. We got to do that and we came composite. Not roles is working on a composite and we're don't seem sees prescott this weird good system and so we're always trying to leapfrog each other and i think has made a huge difference in the quality aviation for travelers and in the military world have three guys just cotton each other up and i hope that always remains that way because the consolidation at least makes me nervous especially because they can play you guys off against each other. Oh if you look at u._t. C. a. g. guy look at u._t..

rick kennedy Indiana richmond dave prescott cincinnati pratt one hundred years
"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

03:46 min | 1 year ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"From inside the engine to cool parts parts so you lose about thirty percent of the air that comes to that from san the cool parts and the rest goes to the engine well with ceramic matrix composites. Is you have to do that so when we opened that plant in alabama a year ago the agreement was with the government they gave us a nice grant for that thing and they you said you will make that raw material available to defense company and the united states but guess what you press gonna be buying that stuff. They're not stupid you know they're they're good company. There are on c._m._c.'s already and so i think at some point she will probably be a provider of the material to pratt and other aerospace companies in the united states. Pratt has its own operation was c._m._c.'s g has its own r._n._d. Research in gear turbofans by the way the gear your turbofan is a company owned by g._e. In italy yeah i know i was when i i know i know i know my. Oh my goodness 'cause i remember i remember before i it was called fiatavio but maybe it's just obvio- now. I'm not sure yeah i i used to <hes> visit naples <hes> several times a year to see them and then when when i remember when g. e. bought them and i'm on thinking oh no oh my goodness so it's really interesting. Is i look in the future. I think you're the question you're exactly right. I think if you're gonna see a marrying of geared systems you're marrying a obviously ceramic matrix composites on the geared system. It really comes down to the thrust class and works the best there <hes> that can becoming yeah so. I think that's gonna come. I said the beginning to show the real challenges for all of us is going to be any new technology introduction financially. You have to be able to meet the same reliability of the predecessor engine and that is not easy easy to do at all tough. I mean look at pratt right now. I mean you know they are paying some serious money right now to get this engine gone and it's gonna work. I mean i'm a g._i. I'm just telling you and within the halls of general electric they know the press. They're good and they're gonna make that thing work. It's going to be painful foolish l. but they're gonna make it work because that's the world we live in today. These engines have to be so reliable and that's a financial arrangement when you sell them. Yes absolutely you have you have guarantees and you have remedies. It's crazy yeah yeah. Thank god for the spare parts yeah. That's a a a model. I know <hes> because i was involved. I'm that pratt and whitney struggled with as the the o._j._t. A dis the seventy seven and others was starting to wind down in that spare parts sales stream was starting to starting to dry up. That's when pregnant. He decided to engage a lot more in the side of the business. <hes> gee did as well but but i think gee strategy now is is somewhat different and in that <hes> g._e. I guess is not owning <hes> maintenance shops overhaul shops part repair businesses <hes> but <hes> i guess licensing <hes> to others to third parties that kind of the strategy for tomorrow for g._e. Aviation he's now. That's exactly right. There was twenty years of stumbling. Oh boy in trouble for saying that but really the night in the nineteen nineties the theory was was a general electric corporation was just this just.

pratt united states Pratt alabama c._m._c. naples italy g. e. whitney thirty percent twenty years
"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

02:27 min | 1 year ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Is really the most successful jet engine manufacturer curious syria and so yes. I talked to my friends from pratt and whitney. They always say it. Wasn't i still owe you either right there right there absolutely absolutely right now that that was the one thing you know working for g for thirty years. I always thought of c._f._m. International joint-venture the bills the engine for the seven three seven the three twenty. I always thought as joint venture of two companies as they did the research it was so obvious it's a relationship between g._e. And the french government it's a government relations should be so. It's like second joint venture between g._e. And france that's simple it gonna go if it wasn't for pompidou chiampou president pompidou's france the jet the joint venture never would have been binging been created so so you go from you know the tia thirty nine with a high bypass engines lisa see six commercial engines and then that leads were relationship with a friend and then she creates the effeminate national and the rush system and the m fifty six engine. They're great engines there. They're really really good engines pratt. I don't you know i'm i'm a little out out of touch but <hes> at least for a while there pratt had a engine overhaul shop that did c._f._m. Fifty-six engines and i it was kind of a joy to to tour for that years ago in this i it's a it's a great engine. There's no doubt about that. Well the first generation to see if the secret was as is we use the the <hes> the hot section of the b one bomber engine that was called the f. one. No one had single stage turbine. I'll get too technical technical with your audience but now you can get technical. Go ahead now. I can't and that was the secret yup. Oh that was the secret i was. The absolute secret is that had a single stage turbine and so the strategy and philosophy was we may never win on fuel burn. We may never went on admissions. We may never win on knows that damn thing will be reliable as hell and kill everybody on maintenance costs and so that was the philosophy. You're going to see a families to keep that engine really simple now when you get to the next generation which is when pratt's dorms and with the geared system. You're turbofan. Dan then again see offense. Let's keep it simple.

pratt pompidou chiampou president po france syria french government whitney Dan thirty years
"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

Airplane Geeks Podcast

04:20 min | 1 year ago

"hundred year" Discussed on Airplane Geeks Podcast

"Powering aircrafts in war too so we were the logical choice to do the jet engine so people are always confused by g._e. Did engines. It's like well oh yeah because we had to create power for those electrical products and that power system lead right to turbo superchargers and then from there to jet jet engines and i think it's interesting how the the government of integral to not as g._e. Aviation but aviation companies in in general in terms of pushing and in many cases funding the development of technologies well. That's exactly right. I mean gee would never i mean in the early days. A turbo superchargers was the direct result of a work with the government to try to figure out how they get piston piston planes to fly higher as we all know. Is you get hired. There's less oxygen and the piston playing can't inserts losing power so that was a major government government initiative and war one they got involved and then of course by the mid nineteen thirties with the advent of a b seventeen turbo superchargers made that very lethal weapon and so from there you go into all the fighter jets of the forties and fifties. She's i mean. She didn't really have a viable commercial business until the nineteen th avenue right. I think people may not may not realize that during the war effort the second world war of course pratt and whitney and right were focused on producing as many radio engines his could in g._e. Was supporting the effort the war effort with these <hes> turbo superchargers that's right yeah right in fact the and they selected g._e. To do the first the u._s. jet engine because they didn't want wright aeronautical and pratt and whitney to be distracted because they needed them to produce those piston piston engines and the jet engines very different so they took the frank whittle design from england and it was a it was a competition between westinghouse and g._e. But she was perfectly perfect should have to do that but you're right. I mean and then of course pratt them credit. Manny didn't take them long once. The jet engine was a viable product by the early fifties they they were all over it. They were all yes. <hes> tried to to play catch up and of course it was some early successes. Does that really kind of lodged them in. I would say carried the company in many ways for for many many years but but we'll we'll get up to that time period one of the fun things that <hes> some people may not realize is there was actually it at one point an effort to develop the atomic engine and both g._e. He and pratt where it's separately on that. That was the one of the things that in doing this book. I worked at g._e. For thirty years it's funny when you write a book you have a chance to step it back and see these broad themes and she was always attracted by exotica. You know we love the atomic engine. The supersonic engine that that was canceled the j. ninety three engine power the x._p. Seventy and while we're doing all this league tzadek stuff perhaps like okay. We'll just do a this figure bigger away to do a google spool compressor on our military engine and they just cleaned our clock on those first jetliners of first generation but you're right right. There was an effort to do an atomic engine. It went for purity years. It was finally killed by john kennedy's administration but the idea was that the atomic reactor was where the combustion was so great thing about jet engine we always joke suck squeeze bang and blow so the air comes through you compress the air and then you bring that compressed air into atomic reactor and that i pointed blows out the outside the determine so the idea was that the aircraft would just you know basically circle the world nonstop for months on end yeah but <hes> that's kind of g. was very involved in all this kind of exotic concepts. <hes> were pratt was doing that but but they were also thinking. We're going to get involved in this jetliner. Business g was a little slow to get through the game. They really are different companies..

g._e pratt whitney wright aeronautical john kennedy Manny england westinghouse thirty years
"hundred year" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

04:42 min | 2 years ago

"hundred year" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"And that history connected to Einstein's theory of relativity is also very closely connected to the first World War. There wasn't astronomer in putt, stem. His name is Evan Finley, frankly, and he was obsessed about trying to prove Einstein's theory of relativity. He was working very closely with an Stein and already in nineteen fourteen. He set out to go to observe an eclipse in the Crimea, but that was at the evening of the first World War, and so he was immediately captured and locked away and was not able to do the observation. And in, in the sense this was a blessing in disguise because at that time, incensio referral tippety was not yet completely the parade, and he still was missing a factor of two so his predictions where effector of two off from the real result. Two years later nine hundred sixteen college fat chilled was actually, the first one to solve Einstein's equations. Very simply, and he did this on the front in the Russian Freund, while he was a soldier in the first World War, and then later. Basically presented his results in Berlin, and said he would never have thought that his equations would have such a simple solution. Now, unfortunately culture died a year later from a disease that he has actually caught at the front. And so we were missing a big genius in the strana me for the rest of the time. But his equations are still what Beijing are current understanding of calls on, and then sir ASA Addington at that time, he was not yet, sir. He was working at Cambridge. He was a professor at Cambridge at that time. And during the first World War, there was almost no communication between Germany Stein and Cambridge, but I think had the private version of the incense theory of relativity, and he used that theory in order to evade becoming a soldier in the first World War, because he convinced the London. Military that he doesn't have to go to war, but he's preparing solar eclipse, and so, adding right after the first World War, then set out to west Africa, and there was another expedition to Brazil, where they observed the light bending and the exactly measured or roughly measured. What had predicted and I think the most important effect of this measurement was that all of a sudden became famous like a rockstar, and from then, on everybody knew the theory of relativity. And a lot of people were trying to measure it to prove it. And in the years after there were many, many different and more and more accurate measurements that prove the theory of general, relativity hundred years later, gravitational waves read discovered, which was a major prediction of the Serey, and then also just last year, the gravitational Redshift from the black hole neglected center was detected with telescopes at ease. And so I think this round up the hundred year history of the general theory of relativity, when you think about similar events that could happen now or the future. I cannot help but think about the mess, which we are in our ignorance about dark matter dark energy, black holes. We don't have a clue yet about what dark matter is what dark energy is. We know.

Einstein ASA Addington Freund Cambridge Germany Stein Evan Finley Berlin Crimea Beijing Brazil London west Africa hundred years hundred year Two years