23 Burst results for "hundred thousand kilometers"

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe Is Unlocking the Sun’s Mysteries

Quirks and Quarks

07:37 min | 1 year ago

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe Is Unlocking the Sun’s Mysteries

"Just over a year ago NASA launched the parkers solar probe towards the Sun. It's an ambitious mission is going to get closer to our star than any spacecraft has ever done and to do so it has to withstand the Sun's intense heat and radiation in fact the probe job is literally going to touch the sun and take measurements inside the corona the Sun's outer atmosphere to help us better understand our star and the space weather it creates before it gets there though the probe has been slowly testing the waters with ever-closer approaches gathering. Data's does so and this week scientist a just released. The first batch of research from those fly buys one of the scientists getting their hands on this hot data. Was Dr Justin Casper. He's a professor of space. Sciences is an engineering at the University of Michigan Dodger. Casper welcome to quirks and quarks. It's great to be here. Thank you now before we get into your new findings Give us a quick overview of the mission in What are its goals and where we're at right now? Short so parker solar probe is the the largest helium physics mission. NASA has ever undertaken And it has a few main objectives one is to figure out why the Sun's Corona is about a thousand times hotter than the surface of the sun. So something really interesting is is happening that can take the six thousand degree visible yellow surface of the sun and produce a million degree corona glowing x rays ultraviolet light The second the thing is we want to figure out how the existence of that hot corona produces a really fast solar wind a stream of particles ions and electrons Iran's that travel out in the space away from the Sun at Millions of kilometers an hour now and to do this. You're actually going to the Senate's how how close are you going to get the way I like to think about. It is in units of the radius of our Sun so earth is about two hundred and fifteen solar radii away from the sun and to date the closest the spacecraft has ever gotten to the sun was seventy solar radii away from it What Parker solar probe does as it has Multiple orbits around on the Sun. where it plunges close to the sun and then pops back out again and then repeats Every few months and so far we've been closing within thirty five solar RADII but but over the next five years we're GONNA fly by the surface of Venus six times then each time we do that. Venus Bend our orbit closer and closer to the sun at the end of the mission will be about ten solar radii from the Sun. Wow well how is your probe able to survive getting that close to our star. This is very very difficult so at closest approach the spacecraft has a heat shield That reflects her absorbs about five megawatts of sunlight It's front gets up to about fifteen hundred degrees Celsius but it's back is only about three hundred degrees c wow that's astounding. Well tell me about the the latest data Ada even getting from the probe as it's on its way there. Yeah sure so. One has to do with how the silicone is being heated. Now when we've put spacecraft aft- into the solar wind in the past in her planetary space they see this constant stream of a special type of magnetic wave moving away from the sun. We call call those Alpha waves Think of it like Plucking Guitar string but the guitar string is a magnetic field line the magnetic field wiggles and the particles wiggle wiggle with them And those Al Fain waves carry a lot of energy So we were wondering when we got closer to the sunlight would just see more of these random Alvin fain waves may be there. There are a little larger amplitude. Could that possibly be the source of heating the Corona And what we found to our surprise is these he's Instead of just a random ocean of waves. That's maybe a little more intense. There were these huge rogue waves traveling by very coherent well-defined. Uh Spikes and the velocity in the changes in the magnetic field so just to describe the spacecraft would be coasting along through the solar wind And then suddenly within in seconds the speed of the flow jumped by about five hundred thousand kilometers an hour And we'd be sitting there in this weird jet of of flow flow And then just as suddenly a few seconds or hundreds of seconds later we pop out The other side. And we've left it. And when we analyze the data ada looks like these things are kind of s shaped kinks in the magnetic field. It's a it's a wave that so violent it's actually twisting the sun's magnetic field field around on itself so they're carrying an incredible amount of energy and this is really exciting because it could potentially explain the energy source that heats the corona. It does the data you have so far. Tell us anything about space weather. Since we're affected directly by that here on Earth. Yes absolutely so so. When it comes to heating the corona I'll give you a very specific example of this Coronal mass ejections are like violent eruptions of material from the Sun's Corona Rona. A A large mass ejection might involve an amount of mass Roughly equivalent to the water in Lake Michigan Going from rest to moving moving at a few million kilometers per second in just minutes That's incredible amount of energy expelled out in space. And if those hit earth they can you know disrupt Communications radar navigation electrical power. So he really wanted to be able to forecast whether or not a cme criminal mass ejection is GonNa hit Earth. The same way we're able to. With some reliability forecast weather hurricanes going to make landfall given place the speed of a wave in the sun's atmosphere as a function of the temperature of the atmosphere. So if we don't know how how things are you know. We're missing out on very fundamental things. Like just how faster waves going to to travel around Are we going to good job. Forecasting the path of interruption. If we if we don't even know how fast the waves are moving so this information is directly. Are you going to improve our our models in our simulations that we use to forecast based weather. Where's the pro right now? So the program now is actually pretty far away from the sun but it is headed towards Venus and on December. Twenty six. That's GONNA pass Just two thousand kilometers above the surface so Venus And that's going to deflect its orbit's so in January we can have our next perihelion down twenty eight solar radii instead of thirty five. What are you looking forward to most in this mission? There's a point that I really WanNa Cross with the spacecraft so these Al Fain waves that travel travel away from the Sun. There the fastest wave that moves through the sun's atmosphere And as you go away from the sun the solar wind speeds up and the speed eight of the Alpha waves drops down and at some point. The wind is escaping faster than an Alpha brain wave could travel back to the sun. The material truly disconnects from the sun on and becomes the solar wind. We call that point the AL fame point and if we get the spacecraft below the AL fame point will truly be in the extended atmosphere era of our sun. will be basically touching star for the first time I like to think about it And so I'm I'm very hopeful that between now and our final final orbits ten solar Radii we're going to cross elfin point And touch a star for the first time after Casper. Thank you very much for your time. My Pleasure

Corona Al Fain Nasa Scientist Corona Rona Dr Justin Casper Professor University Of Michigan Dodger Alvin Fain Lake Michigan Senate AL Wanna Cross Iran Casper Five Hundred Thousand Kilomete
When Precision Counts

Innovation Now

01:30 min | 1 year ago

When Precision Counts

"I'm navigator. I compute trajectories a spacecraft figuring out where they're at and we're GONNA go. This is innovation now. Bringing bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future precise radio navigation using radio frequencies to determine position is vital to the success awesome deep space exploration missions. Here's Todd Haley Project Manager for NASA's deep space atomic clock to explain why precision should matters those signals traveled speed of light. That's three hundred thousand kilometers per second. So if you're off by a millisecond you'd be off by three hundred kilometers and measuring the distance so that spacecraft so it's really important that you have extremely precise timing on your signals de sac deep space time clock. I takes the UH technology we have in our ground atomic clocks packages it up into smalls based craft ready size device the mercury ions in the clock make it the most stable atomic clock ever flown and this kind of precision will ultimately help space navigators like todd pinpoint spacecraft's crafts position anywhere in space for innovation now. I'm Jennifer pulling innovation now is produced by the National Institute of Aerospace Through Collaboration Aberration with NASA and is distributed by w H._R. V. Visit US Online at innovation now dot U._S.

Todd Haley Nasa National Institute Of Aerospac Project Manager Jennifer Three Hundred Thousand Kilomet Three Hundred Kilometers
Why is space so dark if its full of stars?

Tai Asks Why

05:50 min | 1 year ago

Why is space so dark if its full of stars?

"Quite space. That's a deep question spaces dark because the universe is expanding. That's why spaces dark it's expanding and it's finite right because if the sight line through space ends on a star then that intensity of starlight would be the brightness rightness of that spot but most places you look do not land on a star so the expansion dilute starlight and not only that we don't live infinite universe because it for infinite eventually your sight line would land on a star if it did that the whole night sky would be ablaze with starlight. Oy Not Gaza. I'm GONNA play cool but you know stock to. Neil degrasse has Tyson's so it's a bag dale reason we see darkness instead of all starlet everywhere because the universe is expanding. The starlight is moving away from us and also because the universe is finite. If we look in a certain direction there might not be a star there but that's some big confusing really works your mind answer so i. I have a lot of fog questions. I have to get more answers. Neal was busy doing amazing astrophysics stuff so I went to visit my author author personal astrophysicist Heidi White the University of Toronto to help me see what's going on with all this light and the COSMO's all right now. Let's turn this on war on the roof of the astronomy building downtown Toronto in a warm pretty clear really windy night look. It looks like you're back to like fire laser. We're just firing up the telescope to check out some bright space objects that are close to US tidy that way. Let's move it a little bit and you see this. Let me move it up so you can pay it no friend he then that's Jupiter C. thanks yeah those are moons. We've it go. Heidi tells them not alone wondering white everything around my new. Pal Jupiter is so dark three hundred hundred years ago apparently there was this dude named wilhelm older who asked the same question you know the observing that we're doing right now is very similar to to the night sky observing that overdid over was doctor during the day and at night he turned like the roof of his house into an observatory and God at night just like we are and study what he you could see in the solar system so because older wondered why the sky was so dark. Apparently they named the question. After after calling it paradox basically the paradox that if the universe infinitely big infinitely old infinite general as they believed seventeen hundred then the whole sky should appear to be super bright all the time but it isn't and we know now oh boy Neil said the universe is an infinitely big. Neither is infinitely old. So why does that change the brightness of the Scott. What do you know about our universe and how long it's been around thirteen point five billion years like thirteen eighteen point six now close about thirteen point eight yeah so we know that our universe had a beginning and you know what that beginning was. Big Bang Bang release more just a very wet inflation just went really big. There was no big explosion or anything this kind of inflated like a balloon very quickly yeah. That's a really good analogy actually to to visualize the expansion space time one really good thing you can do is take a balloon and put a bunch of dots on it and then blow up the balloon start to cities. You put more air into it. Got Sort of what's happening is based on things are moving further and further away from one another but this is important in the context of understanding the answer to overs paradox because is what this means is that things haven't always been the way they look right now. The speed of light is fixed and what that means. Is that if we look look far enough away. What we're effectively doing is looking back in time in that way? Telescopes can actually be time machines because the most distant stars light in the universe hasn't had time to actually travel through space because it's been expanding to actually reach us the speed of light is three hundred thousand kilometers a second so the light from Jupiter takes thirty minutes to reach us here on earth so when we see it we're seeing Jupiter as thirty minutes ago and then there's Leiden University that is thirteen point eight billion light years away. This is the stuff made in the Big Bang guys so we can't see yet because we're not not that old yet. Maybe by the time high school be seeing light from a random star that I can't see today because it'll finally beginning to my eyes this but also maybe not 'cause well as the space time continue balloon just inflates inflates further. It'll just take even even longer for that light to reach your eyes.

Neil Degrasse Heidi White Gaza Time High School Toronto University Of Toronto Leiden University Cosmo Neal Wilhelm Scott Tyson Thirty Minutes Three Hundred Thousand Kilomet Three Hundred Hundred Years Eight Billion Light Years Five Billion Years
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on 31 Thoughts: The Podcast

31 Thoughts: The Podcast

02:38 min | 1 year ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on 31 Thoughts: The Podcast

"Ready has been traded to the Vegas Golden Knights. First off, how did we get here? And why did this trade eventually happen? I don't know who you believe in the situation. But one way or the other, what was clear that the Canadians were ready to move on from max fatty. And he was probably after all this trait talk, ready to on from them, too, much a special place in, I'll always make sure I make time to go back and hopefully. Everyone feels the same way I feel like I built a lot of friends and, and relationships in the city that I'll cherish forever. However, I'm very excited to be a new chapter in my life. You have to embrace predictions in the spirit. They're meant to be made in. It is good fun against the conversation, Rowland. And what are we here for, if not to get the hockey conversation role in the regular season is upon us? So I counted nine I would say I think right now I can pick to win the Stanley Cup. I have an eight b and that's vigorous. I think they get shafted a bit because nobody believes that last year was for real. But I think they're better than most people doing credit for Winnipeg natural with Toronto, getting closer still not there Tampa. Yes, Boston, Pittsburgh, Washington Washington, I think San Jose could win the co. Travis german. It's got to Skinner states. Zone that if I Bennett into the inboards we've got it ahead for Louis Eric's heresy to center. Pettersen his first NHL goal is the first goal of the season. Wicked. One berry bulliest Pettersen. He's done it again goals in four NHL games. When drafted Pederson, I was screaming, my lungs, guide, Sola Rogers hometown hockey. It's fifth season. Stop number one hundred is tomorrow. Obviously the show has a lot of hometowns hundred thousand kilometers behind us. But it kind of feels like we're going home to the show number one location, London..

Vegas Golden Knights hockey NHL Washington Rowland Travis german Sola Rogers Skinner Pederson Winnipeg San Jose Tampa Louis Eric Bennett London Boston Toronto Pittsburgh hundred thousand kilometers
The Supermoon explained

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

06:10 min | 2 years ago

The Supermoon explained

"As well as offering a change of seasons the much acre Knox's also brought with a circle superman that happened just four hours after the moment of equinox. The closest since March and the two thousand and it will be another eleven years twenty thirty before the two events will gain be less than a day apart. Well, just think of that we now closer to twenty thirty what want to the thousand a by the way, this was also the third and final superman for twenty nine chain. The term ship moon was invented back in nineteen seventy nine by an astrology not on astronomy for those unfamiliar with the difference between the two and astronomers a person to study space in the cosmos, using the scientific method to learn about the universe and astrologer is a person uses inaccurate positions. Constellations planets and other celestial bodies at different times in order to tell people about the character would have predict the future has never ever ever ever ever ever. Been any scientific evidence. Supporting any of the claims made by strategy and its success depends exclusively on the Gulf ability of people now back to the science on average the moon orbits about three hundred eighty four thousand four hundred kilometers from earth. But the moon's orbit around the earth isn't a perfect circle. It's slightly elliptical. Meaning one part of the orbit will be closer to the earth. Bet. Three hundred fifty seven thousand kilometers is parody. And the other part of the oil, but will be further away around four hundred and six thousand kilometres apogee, the differences about five percent closer or further away on average the exact distances of perishing apogee, also very other factors such as whether the lunar orbits long axes pointed towards the sun. Also, the moon's Ogle extremes a greatest between November and February when the earth, oh, but places the planet and its moon close into the sun, you say earth orbit itself is also elliptical by that two percent. And they will the sun's gravitational influence is greatest during these months, technically. These would be Jane full moons but trend to its east terms like what use the description of super moon to describe any Newell full moon with a ninety degrees of parody syncing opportunity. Nassar's now adopted this term as a means of educating the public about astronomy twenty nineteen will be an excellent year to look to the sky and enjoy the spectacular view of earth's nearest neighbor. The moon fifty years ago, we witnessed one of humankind's most, remarkable achievements. When we first step foot on the dusty surface of the moon. All for man. By ugly. As NASA continue celebrating the fiftieth anniversary of the Apollo program. The year is opening with a number of opportunities to marvel at earth's original satellite, three super moons, and a total lunar eclipse in the span of three months. So what is it that makes a super moon super start with size? The moon orbits around the earth in a slightly oval shape at its furthest point away from us known as the apogee it's about two hundred fifty thousand miles or four hundred thousand kilometers from earth when it's closest to us. It's parody. The moon is about two hundred twenty thousand miles or three hundred fifty thousand kilometers away when the moon is full at or near its parody. It is considered a super moon and can appear up to fourteen percent larger and thirty percent brighter than it apogee. Those distances however are changing as the moon is slowly. Shifting away from earth how slowly approximately two inches or five centimeters annually a billion years from now the moon will take about thirty one and a half days to orbit the earth. Instead of today's twenty seven point three days. In the meantime, this year's first superman of the year occurred on January twenty first and also featured a total eclipse, the second occurred on February nineteenth and sky watchers. Another chance on March twenty first well, super moons. Total lunar eclipses are marvels to behold. A question rises fifty years after humankind's first steps on the moon. Does it hold anymore secrets for NASA? Scientists Noah petro project, scientists for the lunar reconnaissance orbiter or El aro at nestles Goddard Space Flight center says there are many unanswered questions about the moon. For example, we are still attempting to understand how the moon evolved to its current state. The moon has occupied space near earth for its entire four and a half billion year history. Keeping record of the impacts that have scarred on its surface over time. This record of anxious impacts is largely erased from the earth due to win water in plate tectonics analysis of Apollo samples shows that there was a period of intense impact cratering on the moon early in the history of the solar system and therefore on the earlier as well observations from L our show now in its ninth year of orbiting the moon or helping us piece together this history people say shoulda moons, especially big in brunt compare to regular full moons, but will a can be around fourteen percent lodge and thirty percent broader, you really wouldn't notice the difference unless someone told you and even then any size difference perceptions. You do have will be more likely GTO imagination in reality, you'd really need proper non-legal equipment to Mitch the difference. And remember the full moon always looks lodge and Bryant when it's near the horizon and a fake none as men allusion. The other important point member is. That Superman's not all that uncommon. They usually current groups of three roughly about every thirteen months in eighteen days. In other words, roughly every fourteenth full moon will be superman now one consequence of superman that should be noticeable involves ocean tides many factors influence title heights at a given location that they usually highest something that a spring tides during full moons or new moons when the earth sun and moon are all aligned so a parody moon being big plus than average should result in a slightly higher high tide.

Nasa Superman Goddard Space Flight Center Fifty Years Three Hundred Eighty Four Thou Three Hundred Fifty Seven Thou Three Hundred Fifty Thousand K Four Hundred Thousand Kilomete Six Thousand Kilometres Twenty Nine Chain Supermoon
What Is Light?

BrainStuff

04:35 min | 2 years ago

What Is Light?

"Light. In addition to being a bright, Patrick, sunshine on your window. Sill is a metaphor for enlightenment and exploration, which is a bit paradoxical for phenomenon that even after thousands of years of inquiries and endless experiments. Scientists still can't quite explain is it a particle or wave or both or neither do we need a new word for it. Your eyes tell you a lot about the way light behaves. It travels so fast that seems instantaneous about one hundred eighty six thousand miles or three thousand kilometers per second. It blazes through air and space and laser like straight lines. But it also bounces reflects and refraction, and when it interacts with the right medium like a camera lens, it make her we know that it's made up of tiny units that we call photons, and we know that the term waves can describe its movements. But neither of these words really encompass lights auditees in ancient times. The Greeks used philosophy to attempt to address lights wide range. Of behaviors perhaps they thought light is actually composed of little bits of stuff that bounce to and fro the idea never really caught on then in the sixteen hundreds French philosopher Rene Descartes became convinced that light was essentially a wave one that moved through a mysterious substance that he called platinum Isaac Newton thought that light was a particle, but he was at a loss for a way to explain many of its properties. Like the way it refracted and could be split by prison from a single beam of white light into a rainbow of many colors of light. This was largely before the rise of empirical studies in science wherein, we attempt to answer questions about the world around us by designing experiments that demonstrate well how stuff works back in the day. Science was a matter of philosophy people coming up with about how stuff works and basically arguing about the ideas merit to be fair. Our modern microscopes computers and other equipment help just for example, lights behavior becomes more evident, depending on where you're observing it in the vacuum of space. Ace light zips along at the aforementioned one hundred eighty six thousand miles or three hundred thousand kilometers per second. But point a beam of light at a very dense bit a matter say a diamond, and it can slow to only around seventy seven thousand miles or one hundred twenty four thousand kilometers per second much easier to observe relatively to try to explain in. These are modern times. What light is let's I remember some science basics waves are not a thing or substance. They're a property of thing. A wave is a compressing and stretching of a particular medium, a like an ocean wave that drives toward the shore or the ripple spreads out across the surface of a pond when you toss in Iraq, you can see the waves with your eyes feel them with your body. And sometimes when a sound wave happens in the air, you can hear them with your ears particles on the other hand are not quite so easy to define particle can be a tiny bit of matter. A matter broken down into its smallest and most basic units water, for example, is made up of countless party. Guls particles that are affected by waves. What's really happening when you watch a wave in the ocean or ripple in a pond is that each particle or molecule in this case of water is being moved and thus the medium of the ocean or pond is being compressed and stretched in sequence and we see waves, but light as experiments have proven also consists of particles that we call photons the behave like waves. Let's unpack that there was a famous nineteenth century double slit experiment in which researchers beamed light through two slits and observed the way the light struck a screen behind the slits what they saw was that the streams of light affected each other like two hands splashing water in the same sink as if they were waves interfering with one another. But then in the twentieth century scientists began their pioneering explorations into subatomic particles. Like neutrons electrons, Albert Einstein wondered what would happen? If you emitted light one photon at a time in the double slit experiment. What scientists saw dumb found? Did them the single photons went individually through the slits, but the way that they struck the screen over time showed the same interference pattern that occurred with full-scale beams of light streaming through both slits this behavior can't be explained by the physics. We use to describe particles and waves in the macro world around us, it's in the realm of quantum mechanics. The physics theories that describe what goes on at the very smallest subatomic levels, and which we humans still don't really understand. So ultimately, if you want to answer the question, what is light you could call it both a particle and wave and you'd be correct. But as for fully explaining why and how it works. We're still working on

Sill Rene Descartes Isaac Newton Patrick Albert Einstein Iraq One Hundred Twenty Four Thousa Three Hundred Thousand Kilomet Three Thousand Kilometers One Photon Two Hands
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Eighty to ninety. For the weather. We have up here. Right. And. He said, it'd be better for the my my issue. The people that are complaining about emissions and all that stuff for environment battery packs hybrids in the cars, not subvert. I'd environmentally friendly with them. I think it's gonna be a worse than usual. Easel? Now. Oh, you mean the fact of what what the emissions that are produced in manufacturing the batteries. Not only just manufacturing them like. That was a hybrid. And and I don't know whether it'd be in vinyl they said after hundred thousand kilometers you'd have to replace the battery. So what happens with those batteries when they got replaced it to, you know, a regular landfill under the sit there because I think that's worse than recycling oil or anything like that. Right. So my issue is what's going to happen rental trucks? Are you're only doing or five hundred kilometers Turner, fifty three hundred mile on a battery charge. You know, what they're done. And what's going to happen? Right. So good idea. But I think we should. Little only twenty nine. In the morning to you. Electric though in the morning. Right. What's your take on that? That's been the key on most of these electric truck. The the idea of how far they can go on a charge. And that's that's the key. And how long's it gonna take to recharge? Right Tesla's, the one that was making claims about how far they would be able to go, and they were pretty pretty significant numbers. I think your buddy who said that they're going to be more useful for maybe like port operations are our local. Yeah. In town delivery, kind of thing short deliveries. But yeah, I'd I haven't seen the numbers on how far this. It's a Freightliner Cascadia. Debut in there at the Consumer Electronics Show. Okay. Back in two here on America's trucking network road.

America Tesla hundred thousand kilometers five hundred kilometers
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:14 min | 2 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Eighty to ninety. The weather. We have up here. Right. And he said, it'd be better for the my my issue. People are complaining about emissions and all that stuff, or you know, environment. But those battery packs hybrids in the cars. You know, I didn't environment. Holy Family with them. I think it's going to be worse than the diesel. Right now. You mean the fact of what the emissions that are produced in manufacturing the batteries. Not only just manufacturing them like. That was a hybrid. And and I don't know whether be vinyls, but in Columbia, they said after a hundred thousand kilometers you'd have to replace the battery what happens but those batteries when they get replaced. You know, a regular landfill under the just sit there because I think that's worse than recycling oil or anything like that. Right. So my issue is what's going to happen? Aren't those big trucks? Are you're only doing or five hundred kilometers Turner, fifty three hundred mile on a battery charge. You know, what they're done. And what's going to happen? Right. So good idea. But I think we should meet. Little only twenty nine, but you know, they won't be sound. Good morning to you. Cut though in the morning. You know, what's your take on that? That's been the key on most of these electric truck. The idea of how far they can go on a charge. And that's that's the key in. How long's it gonna take to recharge? Right Tesla's, the one that was making claims about how far they would be able to go, and they were pretty pretty significant numbers. Like, I think your buddy who said that they're going to be more useful for maybe like port operations are our local. In town delivery, kind of thing short deliveries, but. Yeah. I'd I haven't seen the numbers on how far this. It's a Freightliner Cascadia. At their debut in there at the Consumer Electronics Show. Okay. Back in two here on America's trucking network.

Columbia America Tesla hundred thousand kilometers five hundred kilometers
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

Quirks and Quarks

04:07 min | 2 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on Quirks and Quarks

"We'll take an enormous amount of stuff that will have to send four hundred thousand kilometers from the earth at fantastic expense unless we figure out how to make stuff on the moon. That's the problem. Researchers at the European Space Agency had been wrestling with and their new solution is a clever idea for making all sorts of things from a resort. That's plentiful on the moon lunar dirt. Dr advent Mataya an advanced manufacturing engineer at the European Space Agency and his team have demonstrated that they can fabricate small parts from screws to gears using simulated regular or moon dust, and some modern technology to Mikhail welcome to cork in Cork's. Thank you very much for having me. What is the technology? That you're using to make small parts out of moon dust so to make this mode baths. We are actually mixing the moon the moon dust with the binder kind of glue which react to light. So when it's exposed to light it hardens. We can harden the binder glue the grains of frigging layer by layer to three D print the objects that we that we are manufacturing three D printing. Tell me about that. So three D printing is just the principle of building a three dimensional object layer by layer. And at the end of the process, you get your three d object. Now, you're doing this using moon dust what exactly is moon dust? So Moon-dust is not very different from the sun that you have on earth silicone oxide the defending side beat the fire on site and so on which are mixed. And of course, it's very difficult to get the real stuff from. The moon. We only have some from the Apollo missions. So what we do is that we create simulants. So we signed that we find him most of the time volcanic send. And then we make sure that we have seen. La gimme Cal compositions similar grant size distribution as as what we would find on the on the moon. And that's what we used to do our three D printing exudes now when you talk about using glue, and the you're not actually melting this are you just gluing it together, literally. That's that's correct. So this most crews, and guess it's based on using a binder. So you keep the grains of of the as they are. And you just applying glue. So you you're not melting the the sun the dust, which would require high amount of energy. Now, we have looked into other techniques where we actually use heat to fuse to partially fused the grants together using Casandra. Centrating Salah light or some of the people are using microwave. So that's another. They can use a binder or glue. All you use a bit of heat to fuse the grants together. How precise is the process very precise? And to our knowledge is the most precise you we have a chief so far. So we can reach details, which are all the other of fifty microns which is one twentieth of a millimeter so about half of your hair. And that's the curious that we can reach right now. So the product that you end up with if I was to hold say, I don't know screw that you made in Mahan. How how tough would it be would it would it be have kind of a rough service to it? It's very smooth face because of the accuracy that we get we can build very fine and very smooth surfaces in terms of toughness. It's pretty much like Jeremy objects. He would find that to make on earth with regular regular processes. So that's how it would feel like it would be something like a copy Cup. Yes. I was expecting it to feel something like sandstone that you might be able to grind it down. Just with your fingers, you're saying, it's pretty tough pretty tough..

Mikhail European Space Agency Cork manufacturing engineer Centrating Salah Apollo missions Jeremy four hundred thousand kilomete fifty microns
Kenya launches first coastguard

Monocle 24: The Globalist

03:42 min | 2 years ago

Kenya launches first coastguard

"Coastline is one thousand kilometers long. And yet until recently it didn't have a coastguard maritime security has been the job of the navy. But now the president of hurricane iota has launched the first coastguard service this one big problem though, it only has one boat. Here's the tell us Moore's Robert folks defensive tour of the London Evening Standard wrote. There are many problems possessing that part of the coast from piracy and people in jugs trafficking to illegal fishing, and I wondered if you could just give us a bit more detail on on the piracy aspect. It doesn't seem as bad now as it was in its peak in two thousand eleven Parisy has been confronted. I've heard say that surly dealt with by about national force by led largely by the EU. But it's actually burden-sharing between the EU beta and on. The whole it's been pretty successful. Because one of the things that became apparent after this dreadful business. Extended. It'd be guide for several years is that the the brevity of the life of the parrots that they they they were very very short lived. Indeed, the Mr. bags always the so-called logical, Mr. beg, but they were making the money and back and forth from east Africa to west Africa and also to south East Asia, but I can straight that sort of airy Parisy hasn't gone away. But it is interesting in the way that you have flagged up this new force. The new coast guard for spring stood up by president Kennedy at its prime role, actually isn't counter piracy, it is counter narcotics. But above all counter illegal fishing, and the president said in the inaugural speech for their full said that really, you know, we're letting too much getaway one hundred billion dollars. It's a very modest beginning. But the two very definitely related because legal fishing. Of course, has meant that loss of livelihood for many of those people living along the coast, and some of those people that are going into piracy. Yes, I think it's very interesting that almost this is philosophical gesture of the part of the canyons very, very bodice beginnings. It's interesting if the declaration I've been trolling through the notes and the president's page, I'm not quite sure of the specific numbers that very very small numbers for very difficult in job at the navy's only about two thousand below in personnel for coast as you say one hundred thousand kilometers, very difficult and very important one. And as far as I can make out most of the coast guard personnel again to be joined drawn from the paramilitary police that forty is seen as the new ship. The new vessel the door at is that surveillance facile. It is actually gathering intellige-. Silence about the kind of very kind very matter you've been toying piracy illegal operations, penetration. And so on it is obviously a big and important move in a new direction at I think we're going to be hearing in terms of geopolitics in the way that you deal with globalized organized crime. I hate them expression the oxymoron contradiction term, but criminal activity, we've terrorist activity eve is is on the rise. And they to a lot of countries, including the u k again to need a lot more coast guard.

President Kennedy Navy Parisy EU President Trump Hurricane Iota London Evening Standard East Africa East Asia Moore West Africa One Hundred Thousand Kilometer One Hundred Billion Dollars One Thousand Kilometers
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on Conversations

Conversations

02:33 min | 2 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on Conversations

"Three planets in the habitable zone could potentially host liquid water could potentially have life on the right now. What if with that's it for us? What if what if we're the only mind conscious minds in the whole of the universe that sad. I mean, we quite feeble. Humans a quite feeble. And we're very prone to arguments. And I think you know, that that's going to be a constraint for us with the intelligence and Eva lesion creates less augmented creatures and more cooperative creatures in the future. I live in hope really the whole thesis of your book is that one day the Andromeda galaxy will crush to our Milky Way galaxy when I crash I mean, what I suppose the gravity that will draw them together in a kind of dance. Then though what sheer into one another. And if you could somehow be alive five billion years or three and three point three one billion USD the future win this process was start to happen. What would it look like from the surface of the? Well, that's right. It's it's absolutely beautiful. We see in space. What happens when galaxies? Collide, so often we actually see galaxies merging and passing free one. Another like to ghosts. Yes. Absolutely. It happens all the time because gravity is the most dominant force in the university pulls together is pulling our galaxy tools Andromeda galaxy which is unable four hundred thousand kilometers per hour. When when they do collide in three point eight billion years, or so we'll have this incredible cacophony of light and color in the sky the spiral of both galaxies will be ripped apart. And then wrap back around the sky this incredible. I say it's like the embrace of cosmic octopus because these spiral arms, which is wrap around us sky. There will be thousands of new stars brighter than the current stars created in sky, and they'll be just light and color everywhere. The won't be darkness and a few stars. They'll be just dominant the host will be dominated by light. So it'd be like a negative image of the current. That's right. It'll be more. What than black? That's right say it's like to the headlights of a car coming towards us the whole sky in the night. Nighttime. We'll be we'll be light. And and that's a real shame because we won't be able to see the distance. We won't be able to see anything beyond galaxy. It's it's a sad time for strontium is actually kind of one blowing to talk about this stuff. Look, look, really cool. Nice to imagine. Stop repairing. Now, people can never be too early about such things five three point five billion years who's counting.

five billion years four hundred thousand kilomete eight billion years one day
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"The new will pass seven hundred fifty thousand kilometers about the earth on the twenty third shift Tim at twenty sixty and that close approach is crucial because it will affect the next close encounter on September, the twenty fifth twenty one thirty five that's expected to be at around three hundred thousand kilometers while the could be as close as. Hundred thousand now there's no chance of impact in twenty one seventy five, but depending on how the asteroids affected by that close encounter with earth, featuring cat as without planet. Start to get really interesting. That's because the asteroid could pass through this fifty five kilometer wide. Well, it's a sort of gravitational KO, and that could create an impact scenario in a future encounter on the twenty fifth September twenty one seventy five a one eight twenty four thousand chance of an impact with earth, but the normal twenty one seventy five approach will be February at a distance of roughly fifty million kilometres the most threatening chats impact will be on the twenty four September twenty one ninety six when there's a one any live in thousand chance of Banou slamming into the earth only in all that adds up to a cumulative one in two thousand seven hundred chance of an earth impact between twenty one seventy five and twenty one ninety nine Louis from the cat can ever if station in Florida aboard an atlas five rocket on September the twenty sixteen. The two thousand one hundred ten kilogram Cyrus wreck spacecraft spending threes orbiting the asteroid. The new mapping the space rock surface jollity studying it's volition composition chemistry in mineralogy. One of the missions cave. Jacobs will involve understanding non gravitational influences on the asteroid such as the coffee fit and with sunlight hates up the surface of an asteroid, and that Haiti's then radiate it back spaces the asteroid rotates in the process, providing a small amount of thrust. So knowing the news physical properties will be crucial for scientists trying to determine the likelihood of this mountain sized asteroid slamming into the earth in July twenty twenty Cyrus Rix will fly down on how the just about business surface extending our body to collect up to two kilograms of pristine asteroid regulus. Sample return to worth the space craft decided to.

Cyrus Rix Tim Haiti Banou Jacobs Florida Louis twenty fifth seven hundred fifty thousand k two thousand one hundred ten k three hundred thousand kilomet fifty million kilometres fifty five kilometer two kilograms
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on TechStuff

"But that's that's doable. We we did do it. So clearly it's do. Lable. Location giving someone to Mars getting anything to Mars takes a lot more time. Now, part of that is because the distance between earth and Mars is not constant. And the reason for that is that you know both planets are going around the sun, right? But they're going at different speeds and their orbits are different sizes. So there are times when earth and Mars are aligned and they are about close as they possibly can be. And there are other times where earth is on one side of the sun and Mars is on the other side of the sun, and they're about as far apart as they possibly can be. So the distance varies dramatically at the closest earth and Mars are about thirty three million nine hundred thousand miles apart or fifty four million six hundred thousand kilometers. So to compare again to the moon, the moon was two hundred thirty eight thousand nine hundred. Miles away Mars thirty three million nine hundred thousand miles away. So that's not a day trip way further and that that its closest at its furthest away Mars is about two hundred forty. Nine million one hundred sixty thousand miles away or four hundred one million kilometers away. So if you're gonna make a mission to Mars of any kind. Then you need to do a lot of thinking about it and planning beforehand because you need to decide, okay, what what are we going to send their? We're going to send a Rover men. How how much is that gonna way? Well, it's going to about this much how much you know rocket to do. We need to throw at it. Right. Okay. So you got your, got your rocketed, and you're. Just basically think like some sort of nineteen eighties side. Scrolling video game rocketed. I'm going to write that. Okay. And you're over, you know what? You know what you wanted to. Do you know how to get there? You start having to think about all sorts of other stuff. Okay. Well, so how much gravity does Mars have? How much difference in the wait is they're going to be once this this Rover gets there. How are you know how much atmospheric interference it's going to be there. Okay. So you're going to have to plan how long it's gonna take for you to shoot this thing in its base and get to Mars and how it's gonna stop when it gets there. Oh, and then you have to take into account if you know roughly how long it's gonna take. Where are the two planets going to be? Yeah, you have to figure out. Backwards from there and get they're going to be at their closest here..

fifty four million six hundred four hundred one million kilom
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

02:54 min | 2 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

"It's closest it'll be six million kilometers or three point seven million miles from the sun surface and this is really great and i'm really recommending you do this you gotta look this up let me tell you what it is and then go look this it's gonna use venus's gravity to change its orbit around the sun so you just have to go see the video of how as it's going through it's twenty four orbits cycle it has the planets are going around the sun you could see how the people that plan this out they threaded this needle this mathematical juggernaut to get this orbit perfect so what happens is the or the orbit decays as it goes around the sun than it comes out to pass the orbit venus and it comes back in and you could see how the venus changed its orbiting make it a little bit closer a little bit closer and a little bit closer to the final point with the last three orbits of the pro fly as close as three point eight million miles of closest to the sun surplus that seven times closer than any other ship which this is all just amazing that we can do this now another cool thing three months after the probe launches it'll be traveling through the corona at about seven hundred thousand kilometers per hour that's four hundred thirty five thousand miles per hour that's that's gonna spacecraft in our solar system we wonder if it'll it'll go through timewarp like they didn't star trek for you know we're just breaking all tons of records here but that's not why we're doing this even though it's fun it's going to be able to observe the corona and solar wind up close so we can understand the sun's atmosphere called solar weather with more precision so nasr's going to track how the energy and heat traverse through the solar corona and they'll also try to find answers to why the solar wind exceleron as it moves farther away from the sun and a lot of other things that they're going to be looking at now you know with this observation this could improve our ability to forecast solar wind its effect on our space craft and ground technology right you know like i was saying it's it's actually called space weather by the way that solar weather coronal mass ejections yeah that that could destroy your cell phone and the power grid in horrible things like that so we wanna know we'd like to know why there's a huge temperature difference between the surface of the sun and the corona for example we actually don't know why we don't we can't see those details from the mystery the probes date is going to be the only way that we can answer these significant outstanding questions as some of these questions have been lingering for decades scientists they wanted to send a mission to the sun since nineteen fifty eight which also happens to be the year that nasa was created so this has been on their minds from the very beginning and it's been the advances in recent technology now guess they've been tracking can we do it can we do it in order to get close we have to have certain types of get can think again material but the materials you know like it goes back to like the space shuttle even before that with their developing ceramics materials to figure out how to you know how to disperse heat and things like.

seven hundred thousand kilomet six million kilometers three months
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:41 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Greek mathematician euclid in three hundred bc believed our is fire infinitely fast particles light up everything in their path and that is how many c have you changed thanks in part to a muslim scholar known as al has an born in basilan in one thousand sixty five hours and boasted that he could tame the river nile by building a dam to stop it flooding when the egyptian keleaf heard about his claims he invited him to stay but when al has an witnessed the enormity of the challenge he got cold feet the cliff was furious and through amazon into jail it was during these dark days and he made a dazzling discovery inside the blackness of his cell a shot of lights spilt through a tiny pinhole projecting an image of the outside world onto the wall opposite he designed experiments which proved that light travels in straight lines and creates pictures when it hits our is translated into latin this experiment became known as the camera obscure meaning dark chamber well that's all very interesting but what about the speed our listeners are asked whether anything can travel faster than light right then i'm going to call in the big guns here i call it phys supremo presents of the life scientific jim kelly there's a speed in a universe that is the maximum speed possible for anything happens to have a certain value which is three hundred thousand kilometers per second nothing go farther than that because that's the speed that's built into the fabric of space and time itself is so happens that light is able to travel at this maximum speed so it's not sort of like that specialists the.

basilan al amazon jim kelly three hundred thousand kilomet one thousand sixty five hours
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

BBC Radio 4

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on BBC Radio 4

"Time is not twenty eight minutes nine it is several months since the cities of mosul in iraq and russia in syria were taken back from the socalled islamic state group britain has been involved in the effort against it the coalition that includes the united states in the kurdish aligns known as the syrian democratic forces today it said that today it says that ninety eight percent of the territory held by is in syria and iraq has been recaptured major general felix kidneys the deputy commander of that coalition operation against is and the most senior british officer involved he's with us in the studio good morning general kidney good morning what does the remainder of the fight whether in iraq or in syria involve well as you say we've made we made great progress in the fight against deja isis if you think back to two thousand fourteen when large tracts of land were controlled by success across northern syria and iraq as you say ninety eight percent of that land is now been retaken from isis seven point seven million people have been liberated from isis control an over one hundred thousand kilometers squared landry taken from them as we speak where in the last operations to clear turt tree from isis control in not syria on the border with iraq that's going to be difficult fight we've called a round up we expect that to last a short while it is not just going to be about the retaking of territory is it because these fighters can and probably will go somewhere else so how will you know when the fight is over when when the job is done now europe see right so the liberation of surgery is just the first stage in this campaign to defeat isis once we've liberated we need to ensure that those liberated areas remain secure and that's largely done by local forces.

russia syria britain united states commander officer iraq mosul europe ninety eight percent one hundred thousand kilometer twenty eight minutes
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

The Smoking Tire

01:39 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on The Smoking Tire

"Yeah and yet the basically ship your car from panama to colombia because you have the darien crossing which is like fifty kilometers of the most dangerous territory in the entire world and so you have to basically get a tanker and ship it out that's so interesting we had this dude on the podcast who wanted to drive from sierra del fuego to alaska and he wanted to do it in a fucking vw cumby like brazil spec water cooled volkswagen microbus okay and he had gotten as far as l a and he came on our show and he'd been on through on his tenth engine rebuild or something comu life yeah yeah i love that guy yeah film with them and use in vancouver yes yes and he i changed his life by giving him an old iphone and introducing him to tender you never had sleep in that van again but yeah yeah so what does your friend drive to will what did you guys drive to westphalia but he ended up selling that because the exhaust fumes were coming through the vents so you get like dizzy after going up a hill but he ended up getting a knock ninety two toyota pickup and camper on it and had a rebuilt engine like almost four hundred thousand kilometers or few americans kind of like three thousand three hundred thousand miles i guess four hundred thousand k is sixty one hundred twenty two hundred and forty thousand miles yeah so basically he made it from vancouver all the way to ecuador and the only thing that went wrong is he had a flat tire it's fucking on this was like he should have bought a privy if he would have done the whole.

panama colombia sierra del fuego vancouver westphalia ecuador darien crossing alaska brazil toyota four hundred thousand kilomete four hundred thousand k fifty kilometers
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"End it went away very quickly once the price tag hit yes but you realize that prices have dropped like a rock you know that the movie the martian with matt damon that cost over one hundred million dollars that's more than the cost of an actual space probe launched by the indians that reached mars in 2014 so you realize that hollywood movies now cost more then an actual flight to moe harkless prices have dropped so the 400 billion dollar figure that was done in the first era of space exploration when things were really expensive but now people like ilan must when a drop the causes space travel by a factor of ten by having reusable rockets in the same way that the used car industry revolutionize and drought the prices of new cars used car use rockets are going to be the main bulwark of the space program of the future prices have dropped and that's the key we can think of what the way it was back in the 1960s will me at the cold war and anything to them are knows that the russians those days are gone now we're talking about people who are looking at the dollars and cents realizing that we can drop the cost of space travel by factor of 10 and that's what's driving all this enthusiasm this partnership between nasr between nasa and silicon valley billionaires we asked the pause in just a moment i want to squeeze in one quick comment before we go don't fear the repair tweeted mars is such a red herring if we're serious about getting our butts into space a permanent moon basis the most logical step we have virgin ground just a mere one hundred thousand kilometers away before we paused you talk in the book also about a moon base as kind of a step towards mars may be a necessary step for supply line supply chain reasons yes and as i mentioned the richest men in the world jeff bezos has spent his own money he's opened his own checkbook to create a rocket base in texas forget cape canaveral he has his own rocket base in texas and he wants to create an amazon delivery system to the moon his goal is to create the earth as a park the earth becomes a garden heavy industry goes into outer space and pollutes outer space the earth becomes a garden we do have a number of comments.

matt damon ilan nasr nasa jeff bezos cape canaveral texas hollywood amazon one hundred thousand kilometer one hundred million dollars 400 billion dollar
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on 1A

1A

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on 1A

"Not talking about a science project we're talking about a publicity stunt call maher's one now we're talking about the real thing nasa has stated that yes according to the president's presidential directive the moon mars and be on that is the new mantra within nasa although it an interesting i'm sorry for us it's interesting that you mention uh the us government and and paying forward i am reminded of the last time that we talked about how much a mission to mars would cost you mentioned in your book it was upwards of four hundred billion dollars and then people were leg oh maybe we don't want to end it went away very quickly once the price tag hit yes but you realize that prices have dropped like a rock now people like elon musk when a drop the causes space travel by a factor of ten by having reusable rockets in the same way that the used car industry revolutionize and dropped the prices of new cars used car use rockets are going to be the main bulwark of the space program i'm of the future prices have dropped and that's the key we can think of what the way it was back in the 1960s while me at the cold war and anything to thumb are knows at the russians those days are gone now we're talking about people who are looking at the dollars and cents realizing that we can drop the costs of space travel by factor of ken and that's what's driving all this enthusiasm this partnership between nasr between nasa and silicon valley billionaires don't fear the repair tweeted mars is such a red herring if we're serious about getting our butts into space a permanent moon basis the most logical step we have virgin ground just a mere one hundred thousand kilometers away you talk in the book also about a moon base as kind of a step towards mars maybe a necessary step for supply lines supply chain reasons yes and as i mentioned the richest men in the world jeff bezos has spent his own money he's opened his own checkbook to create a rocket base in texas forget.

maher nasa president ken nasr jeff bezos us texas one hundred thousand kilometer four hundred billion dollars
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on KTRH

"The hindu god vishnu well clark explains in the book vision the 'twentysecond century scientists have used the names of all greek and roman mithological figures to name astronomical buys in invest moved on to hindu mythology so now they made things after hindu gods romme's actually it asteroid called thirty one four three nine eight was detected by astronomers leader 21 thirty according to the story well while still it's outside orbit of jupiter the object speeds one hundred thousand kilometers in our and the angle trajectory clearly indicate that it's not an object on a long orbit around our son so they say well it it comes from interstellar space just like the announcement the other day oh actually last month when the thing blame the when a more more passed as well as you jack 3's cut a bizarre it income from our solar system and so we're going to watch it for a while astronomers interest peaked when they realized that this asteroid not only has the extremely rapid fourminute rotation period but it's quite large in size for an asteroid an unmanned space probe dubbed sita he's launch from the mars boone phobos and photographs taken during its rapid flyby revealed that rama is a mathematically perfect cylinder about twenty kilometers in diameter that but diameter and about fifty four kilometers long and it's made of a completely featureless material in other words this is humankind's first encounter with an alien spaceship it's just a cylinder it's like a tank going through a g like you know you see on on a train a tanker on a train kind of like that well we send messages to rama we want rama communicate with it doesn't wanna communicate with us so we send this solar survey vessel endeavor we go and study rama now in this case we're going to send something called lira this is already a project they're discussing lire and uh you know endeavor is the only ship close enough to get to this rama eta in a brief period of time so rama has a very limited time in our solar system endeavour manages to rendezvous with rama one month after the spaceship first cubs earth's attention and and that's about with the giant alien spacecraft all raised within venus's orbit so they put up a crew about twenty.

solar system clark rama one hundred thousand kilometer fifty four kilometers twenty kilometers twentysecond fourminute one month
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on KELO

"Reporting and would like to thank all the people who've been reporting on the jamming that we've been receiving and it's it's something that kind of disturbing uh you know what's really happening tonight and that what we are reporting today and in as i was saying it's alluding to aid kinda reminds me of a story by arthur c clarke called rendezvous with rama it was one of the story it was a book that i read when i was a kid and i thought it was interesting to i i wrote a lotta i read a lot of good science fiction book as a kid and rama uh arthur c clarke rogue this book i think he wrote the 1950s rugby was rama rao knows the name of the salient starship initially it was mistaken for an asteroid and it was funny because they namely asteroid rama though same thing happen here we saw funny asteroid we named it a more more which is a hawaiian name for a messenger ram of course is the avatar he of the hindu god vishnu well clark explains in the book beating the 'twentysecond century scientists abuse the names of all greek and roman with logical figures to name astronomical buys and invest moved on to hindu mythology so now they named things after hindu gods romme's actually it asteroid called thirty one four three nine eight was detected by astronomers in the you're twenty one thirty according to the story well while still it's outside orbit of jupiter the object speeds one hundred thousand kilometers an hour and the angle trajectory clearly indicate it's not an object on a along orbit around our sons so they say well it it comes you interstellar space just like the announcement the other day alexi last month when the thing but when imamura pasco as well as dejected cut a bizarre it income from our solar system and so we're going to watch it for a while astronomers interest peaked when they realized that this asteroid not only has the extremely rapid fourminute rotation period but it's quite large in size for an asteroid an unmanned space probe dubbed sita he's launch from the mars moon phobos and photographs taken during its rapid fly by revealed that.

arthur c clarke rama rao alexi solar system clark one hundred thousand kilometer twentysecond fourminute
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on WCHS

WCHS

02:17 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on WCHS

"A one another interesting case the year after that which we just just discovered recently in for the year two thousand fourteen and october is a comment it's gonna make an extremely close approach to the planet mars um within three hundred thousand kilometers which is close on a cosmic scale and possibly uh the highest probability is right now is about fifty thousand kilometer approach with some small potential impact in on mars ethan um and so all the nasa assets at uh in orbit around mars of course interested in observing this it's going to be passing very cool close to these these spacecraft if it doesn't it doesn't hit mars so that's a very interesting case um this comment is probably been falling towards the sun for a million years from the ort cloud um which is a cloud of icy planet his moles about uh fifty thousand astronomical units are about a quarter of the distance to the nearest stars just as cloud icy bodies at some point you know millions of years ago this object got perturbed enough so that it's it's gradually been falling towards the sun and accelerate in accelerating and now it's going to make it's a it's big entrance after all that preparation and uh sushi by the ah the planet mars uh and to give us hopefully lots of information because the material streaming off of it is is very ancient it hasn't been altered by heating and um it spends sort of pristine out in their power distance solar system and so we're going to be very interested to see what what information is going to be we can glean from this uh this pristine object as it uh makes its approach to mars and then a round the sun and then as disappear probably never to be seen again and up that particular object is called citing spraying the designation as c slashed 2013 a one and then the name of sightings spring has a uh to mention the uh the site that discovered it okay add comments uh unlike meteors tend to linger linger in this guy for days and weeks and we all remember haley's comet uh the comment of the century that was kind of a died back in 1980 sex but the hate is comment does come whipping and.

solar system haley nasa three hundred thousand kilomet fifty thousand astronomical fifty thousand kilometer million years
"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

KFQD News Talk

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"hundred thousand kilometers" Discussed on KFQD News Talk

"Of the year after that which we just just discovered recently in for the year two thousand fourteen and october is a comment it's going to make an extremely close approach to the planet mars um within three hundred thousand kilometers which is close on a cosmic scale and possibly uh the highest probability is right now is about fifty thousand kilometer approach with some small potential of impacting on mars ethan um and so all the nasa assets at uh in orbit around mars of course interested in observing this it's going to be passing very cool close to these these spacecraft if it doesn't if it doesn't hit mars so that's a very interesting case um this comment is probably been falling towards the sun for a million years from the ort cloud um which is a cloud of icy planets his moles about uh fifty thousand astronomical units are about a quarter of the distance to the nearest stars just as cloud of icy bodies at some point you know millions of years ago this object got perturbed enough so that it's it's grads living falling towards the sun and accelerate in accelerating and now it's going to make it's a it's big entrance after all that preparation and uh swoosh by the ah the planet mars uh and uh give us hopefully lots of information because the material streaming off of it is is very ancient it hasn't been altered by heating and um it's been sort of pristine out in the power distance solar system and so we're gonna be very interested to see what what information is going to be we can glean from this uh this pristine object as it uh makes its uh approach to mars and then caught round the sonnen and has disappeared probably never to be seen again then up that particular object is called citing spraying the designation is seas slash 2013 a one and then the name is citing spring has a uh to mention the uh the site that discovered it okay comments uh unlike meteors tend linger linger in this guy for days and weeks and we all remember haley's comet uh the comment of the century that was kind.

solar system sonnen haley nasa three hundred thousand kilomet fifty thousand astronomical fifty thousand kilometer million years