6 Burst results for "honeysuckle creek"

"honeysuckle creek" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

08:17 min | 5 months ago

"honeysuckle creek" Discussed on SpaceTime with Stuart Gary

"In the global dust. Storms this dynamic. Well but we not so much better now because of all of the different missions that have gone there to the decades and the fracking missions. And now all of is on the surface and other opening spice process. We really consider them. Is the traffic jam at the solar system right now. We like missions currently Active there three ball on the way right now and Supposed to be handled all of the The apollo missions the mission to the moon in handle miss thousands and thousands of missions demise to the giant stuff whole system to ask royds and calmer and of course the start yup the fiery with i m. I still have full of tokens by of nassar's biased. I'm distant robotic ambassadors out news. You've also got some remnants from another nasa station that honeysuckle creek. Yes originally there were seven by striking titans in australia. There were two in wetland fire on south style when explains land and free since here in cameron. They saw session bila station for rural valley. Panthers stationed honeysuckle creek which was especially setup to support the apollo missions and had a wing so that so that we could also provide backup support and supports communication with astronauts and swim spice crops but back in the nineteen seventies and eighties consolidation of the tracking stations. Meant as far as down around the country just affects them but we didn't get rid of the dish from hunting craig. It was dates the received and broadcast the world's very first action. I'm from getting on the surface of the moon Great terms the legacy was eventually honeysuckle. Once dish was dismantled moose villa reconstructed and continued. Great work for me cunningness price. Every died until farner back in two thousand ten. And of course you've got a visitor. Centers will visit today about seventy thousand people a year. Come along to see what we do is tracking station. The bright use of the complex in what we do lots of displays mayes missions and omissions the planets and he doesn't both because a lot of cases spicy story for poli. I'm a prized. Possession is an actual pace of monroe flexible on the poll of missing breakpoint. I building is paul's part of the lunar surface of a backup so understanding more about the thoroughly. Multan is spring down me. And i were out there and i love the pace. Picked up the servicemen by puzzle aldrin. And givens what does a thank you gift important. What prior has done spice exploration portion either. The lot block fifty. I take it. No one's ever allowed to touch it. So this particular moon rock is kept in a medically sealed tight there basically protect it from moisture atmosphere and their concert. So so that doesn't degrade it's tempting us special security type of get really up close to it. You literally disseminated y from it but we want to make sure that we can keep that pristine so that each generation can enjoy and Visit look like it's about the size of a duck game the about one hundred and forty seven brand i. It's the dock. Brian appearances has looked a little small holes in little vesicles western from bubbles of gas that was tucked inside the raw during mountain site. And then stuff that. What was the fight. Tiny hers been all over the rock in it is in fact. Panic rock lots of crystallization. Who pardon when building music are primarily the look in content. We're kind of reminds us that it sort of black and orange in fact but the the bright little signing aladdin pave silvery crystals on the that really is a beautiful pace of linderoth vets. Glenn nagel from this camera deep space communications complex and this is space time. I'm stewart gary still the come. Astronomers discover a rare active center in the dock expanse of the outer solar system. And we look at the meaning of the term blue moon. All that and more stood accom on space time your prostate waking you up more often than your alarm clock. The fact is the older. You get the more likely you'll have prostate problems which can affect your everyday. Life that's where prostate complete by real health comes in prostate complete the result of twenty years of experience as a leader in men's health the powerful formula in prostate complete supports natural prostate function and reduced urinary urges for a better quality of life available at walmart visit prostateoneperday dot com for special offers. These statements have not been evaluated. By the fda this product is not intended to diagnose treat cure or prevent any disease. Astronomers have discovered a rare center in the dock expanse of the outer solar system. The discovery reported in the astrophysical journal letters may hope uncover one of the secrets explaining how they can be active so far from the sun where water is frozen solid as the hottest is cintos a tiny frozen bodies wandering through the vast empty spaces between the outer planets jupiter saturn uranus and neptune. They believed to originate. Even further out in the copa built a ring of frozen roads icy debris in comets circling the sun out beyond the orbit of neptune centers occasionally show signs of activity developing comment like features such as a comber entails. Comments develop these features when water is and other volatile. They contain begin to hate up and supplement from frozen solid into gases as they get closer to the sun but cintos obina region of space. Where it's far too cold for water to release sublimate. Only eighteen active sent have been discovered since nineteen twenty seven and much about them remains. Poli understood discovering activity on santo is also challenging because they faint telescope time intensive and because they very rare the authors developed a database search algorithm to locate archival images of centers then undertake follow up observational campaigns will study archive images of essential cataloged. Two thousand fourteen. Og three ninety two which was first discovered in two thousand fourteen. The author isn't that as the coma emanating from the nucleus of the center stretching out some four hundred thousand kilometres one of the study's authors colin chandler from northern arizona university says the technique used observational measurements for things like collar and dust mask combined with modeling efforts to estimate the characteristics of the objects volatile sublimated and dynamics chandler and colleagues in combined this date with new observations acquired using the dark energy camera at the inter-american observatory in chile. The obeyed telescope at the campus observatory. Also in chile and the large monolithic. Imager at the lowell observatory's discovery channel telescope in arizona. The authors analyzed the santo supplementation processes and dynamics lifetime leading them to conclude that the activity was likely being caused by the gassing of carbon dioxide and or mugniyah as a result of the team's discovery center has now been reclassified as a comet and wolf from that one be known as c. Two thousand fourteen three ninety-two pan. Starrs this space. Time still come. We look at the meaning of a blue moon and later in the science report the twenty now on track to become one of the warmest years on record all that and more still to come.

The apollo missions chile nassar honeysuckle creek colin chandler Multan lowell observatory nasa australia astrophysical journal campus observatory arizona moose villa cameron walmart Glenn nagel monroe northern arizona university
"honeysuckle creek" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

03:14 min | 5 months ago

"honeysuckle creek" Discussed on Space Nuts | Astronomy, Space and Science News

"And. Finally announced in that is that they might be more water on the moon than we first thought, and while we're on the moon, we gotta talk about that collaboration between NASA Inaki to put a four g network, a mobile phone network on the Moon the deadly serious about it but that radio astronomy thrilled and we guide to revisit as promised the Asya required mission, which successfully bounced off asteroid been kicked up the dust collected. Some samples and looks like Motoo much because get the lead on so We'll see what's happening. And a couple of really interesting questions one about the use of the Sun as a gravitational lens and another as to why after the summer solstice in the southern. The sun still continues to sit lighter, which is a little bit of a confusing. Normally we'll explain all of that and much much more today on spice nuts now fred you on a bit of a road trip. Last while you not indeed yes. It was down in the south of the state we visit the. Decisive Cambra. The astronomical sites have camera which included monstrum low observe a tree had a look at some of the the. Remains of telescopes after the fire that went through there in two thousand and three But also spoke to our group about what's going on now, which is great stuff Then we went to Tidbinbilla to the tracking station which is spice network along with Goldstone Madrid. To Been Bella provides the. Coverage for deep spice vehicles a towel along a Tude and. They've got some very impressive dishes including three new ones which working a slightly different way from the old ones. But one thing that was a highlight of visit an might give a shoutout to Glenn Nagel who's a good friend and Somebody who is actually head of communications at communications and outreach He gave up his Sunday for us week ago last Sunday to to give a certain fool Toa, which was brilliant the the highlight of the tool for so many people was the old honeysuckle creek dish which was moved to Tidbinbilla. Right doesn't operate anymore but that was the one that got first signals from Apollo. When the astronauts walked on the moon. Despite what the movie says it was only Creek I. then. That's right. Yeah people in the know know that but. They certainly tried it as as the pox radio telescope and it was instrumental in getting signals ATAS wells are. play very big part in the Apollo, eleven landings and. Fantastic. Love. Frayed the Australian names Tidbinbilla. And some some of the aboriginal names to get attached to things where I live in Dabo the would. Is supposed to be and the I think they've always had trouble confirming this, but it's supposed to main writer in the wind you are allowing windy..

Tidbinbilla Apollo NASA Goldstone Madrid Motoo Dabo Glenn Nagel head of communications writer Toa
"honeysuckle creek" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"honeysuckle creek" Discussed on The Science Show

"Glen. I flied in sixty two and he i said that he'd seen the lots of earth as he flew over. My wink dead him years. That's right now. I'm going to ask kerry impossible question. It's about somebody john bolton. I don't mean the john bolton in the white house planning the third world war with donald trump. He's got two little white. Mice andrews knows starch and i'm talking about our john bolton here. Imagine you've vaguely heard beach. When you go out from beach you go into dover heights and there was an old shed their where they used to try to track an aircraft and when various engineers who knew very little really about astronomy came in in a whole bunch they got together under the leadership of john bolton to look at these cosmic rays things coming from the sky somewhere and in that process yes they helped invent a new field of science called extra galactic radio astronomy celtic which is an amazing place absolutely fantastic in pasadena selena heard of this and they ask for john bolton he went over there and he helped them build dishes and they were so pleased. They gave him a professorship officership with tenure. Which of course is something you can't walk away from but he did and they came back to australia to paddock in new south wales and help bill impossible question as that dish was involved with tidbinbilla in tracking and showing the world walk on the moon who played john bolton in the movie movie. Sam neill so for those of you. That's who he's actually meant to be legendary. His voice not legendary enough is it a some of the people but bolton in fact was a very good designer all radio telescopes he designed his robin has already mentioned the pox radio telescope but it turned out that it was just the right kind of telescope also the tracking spice craft at distances far away from the earth so nassar adopted the design one of the parkes radio telescope to actually create the big dishes at the tidbinbilla tracking station dan in canberra. If you go there now you can actually see the seventy made a dish which was based on the original design of parks that nasa modified for their purposes mostly observatory do now that telescope tidbinbilla parks were well both chuckled creek yeah well. Tidbinbilla was one of nasa's deep space tracking stations. They've got three around the world so that one's always always pointing in the direction of deep space where they spacecraft and traveling out to the planet so it'd been bill has been involved since nineteen sixty four in tracking spacecraft grabbed at to the planet and in fact pox hoped that to a lot of people don't know pucks actually help with some of the very early tracking the missions to venus and tomorrow's but of course there's another tracking station. We need to talk about and that is honeysuckle. Creek nasa began with the manned spacecraft network with shane in western australia but for their moon missions they needed an extra tracking station so they built one outside of canberra needed been biller called honeysuckle creek and the two of these he's works together and then in conjunction with the parkes radio telescope to of course bring the world. The pictures of apollo eleven landing on the moon in nineteen sixty-nine bought what i'm sure most of you have seen the dish just remember it's only a movie the actual moments of armstrong armstrong stepping out onto the lunar surface came through honeysuckle creek because the moon hadn't risen high enough pox to receive the signal so did have visual road this afternoon got high enough because parks was a much bigger dish. It was actually better able to pick up the very weak signals from the lunar surface so oh nasa then switched over to parks and most of what she's all from the moon came from parks that we like to give honeysuckle. It's credit now. When it comes to launching settle art march. I have the vague idea that we was something like fourth fifth or sixth. Somehow it kind of depends how you want to categorize it. We were certainly up there air in the group of very early nations that were able to.

john bolton nasa donald trump honeysuckle creek Tidbinbilla canberra australia Glen. Sam neill Creek nasa parkes radio kerry armstrong armstrong andrews dover heights white house south wales shane pasadena
"honeysuckle creek" Discussed on Instant Message

Instant Message

12:38 min | 1 year ago

"honeysuckle creek" Discussed on Instant Message

"Balloon. It wants to go in a circle so no matter how sleek you make it to the body is soon as you press your is it immediately. It's going to be larger than the body. You're you're you're working inside of a balloon so to speak so the sleek suits are great and the reason for the pressure is so the oxygen in your bloodstream doesn't doesn't boil off immediately. You need to have a pressure to keep the gases inside your bloodstream which would be oxygen suggest inside the bloodstream where they belong so you don't get the Benz like with nitrogen leaving. The bloodstream coming up you know from an ocean is now. The other thing you could do is use physical pressure but there's certain parts of the body that just don't adapt very very woman physical pressure. If you know what I mean in other words so we so we use we use gas pressure and because of the gas pressure that goes circular in won't be slick so as long as we're colonizing Mars and going out in space ace. We're always going to have these big bulky suits. He think unfortunately yeah unless we can come up with another way to keep the oxygen in the bloodstream and particular in those very sensitive areas of the body where you can't use the mechanical pressure necessary necessary to do so so the gas pressure is more friendly and the only problem is you have an inflated suit and what's happening now the space for Apollo Sky Lever custom-made so they weren't so bad for shuttle because their size of all all different sizes of suits for the different people they're not custom and there's more hardware in the suits basically the suit as drifted farther and farther from a sleek design as the year's gone on but at least the the moon boots seem to be getting better which is a solid step in the right direction so to speak. I'm not sure about that one now. You have to take a look. I'll say this for the slit you have so many complex curves that when you pressurize it doesn't look that bad you know relative to the foot and we here on earth are getting all kinds of things that look like moon boots and kind of work like moods. It seems like thanks to what you're talking about. I feel like all this stuff is getting spicier and more impressively manufactured in the athletic shoe business that I'm involved in. Yes everything we're trying to do is lighter weight more functional National Etcetera and <hes>. I've worked on many many many things in that area. That's what I did for a living all right. Well thank you so much. I really appreciate you taking all the time. This is really great very good. Thank you okay coming up in just a second. We're GONNA talk about cameras and how to make ATV show from the frigging moon capital one knows life doesn't alert you about your credit card. That's why they've created needed iino the capital one assistant that catches things that might look wrong with your credit card info catches over tipping duplicate charges or potential fraud and then sends an alert sheer phone and helps you fix it. It's another way capital one is watching after. Your money when you're not capital what what's in your Wallet See Capital One dot Com for details okay next up when you think of Apollo Eleven and the moon landing there are probably certain images that come to mind Neil Armstrong wrong stepping down off the ladder muttering something about steps and mankind and Aldridge and planting the flag and fun fact by the way a recently learned that the flag on the moon actually got knocked over by the rocket blast as Apollo Eleven left the moon's surface and everyone's pretty sure it disintegrated anyway which was kind of crushing to learn but that's beside the point all these images these iconic moments in American human history were captured by some of the most remarkable cameras anyone had ever built. I mean we live streamed from the moon in nineteen sixty fifty nine. You can't do that on twitch even now and as with everything we've been talking about today. The innovation required to make those cameras work is still noticeable in the cameras that we use today so to find out more we have Jennifer Lavazza space history curator at the Smithsonian air and Space Museum Jennifer. You're in a Dunkin donuts in a Walmart and you're talking to us and I am appreciative that you were here. This is true. The job does not stop just because I've gone on vacation at least not this week. You can imagine it's a dangerous time to take vacation on. The fiftieth. Anniversary of the Moon. Landing is so okay so I want to start with the TV broadcasts because I feel like I had never really considered how incredible and achievement it was to broadcast live television from the frigging freaking moon in nineteen sixty nine. <hes> was this as big a deal at the time. It seems like I realized now like was it as wild to everyone then that we could do this. Absolutely I mean I think it's wilder than you really realize because at the time television television cameras that were used in T._v.. Studios were four hundred pounds and they had to shrink that down into something that could be picked up by a human being on the moon and so you basically had to make it about seven pounds and do that in a span of just a few years was an incredible accomplishment by Westinghouse who provided that particular camera for that mission and it also had to travel two hundred forty thousand miles back to Earth so this is no small feat. This is really it is a big leap. It is a massive leap and I think the fact that we were able to people were able to watch it live. I have on their screens at home all around the world. It's just fantastic and really doesn't even seem like it really could've happened in that particular time but if you can go to the moon you can broadcast from there too. That's fair so actually I mean the the broadcast piece of it is one thing that it's really interesting and researching all of this there was so much to worry about in going to the moon and just getting there and making sure everything worked it. There was maybe more thought than I would have expected given to the cameras and the broadcasting and that kind of like why was it important and worth all the resources of making sure that we could get great images and video in Livestream T._v. and stuff like why was that such a key part of the plan when we had so many other things to deal with just to get people to the moon well this is a years long long process and it was something that was at the request of a president who had been assassinated and by the end of the nineteen sixties with this deadline looming over their head. You know it wasn't something that was going to happen in isolation `isolation without anybody watching because that would have sort of you know not really proven the point that the United States had put massive amount of money and effort into something and made it happen and really accomplished this seemingly impossible thing and to do that have evidence of it in the night late nineteen sixties of course you had to have television television was part of ninety five percent of the homes in America at that point and so to have especially a television signal to send back was crucial to improving it and making it seem as though it had really been worth the investment worth the effort worth taxpayer dollars for that matter and so- NASA really had to do it and it wasn't really something that anybody wanted to do. It's an extra layer of work. The astronauts need to get out there and get home safely but to be able to share it with something I think even Neil Armstrong appreciated he. I think had an appreciation for the fact that he wasn't doing this in isolation even if he was up there just one other person okay. Give me a sense of kind of what the what the gear setup looked like I mean there's there's this T._v.. Camera that you're talking about from Westinghouse but as best I understand I mean there were they brought cameras with them. There were cameras on the ship itself like what was kind of the gear load out. They had going on well. It was as minimal as possible because because every day you put into space you have to spend a certain amount of fuel to get it there and so they really needed cameras in particular but a lot of other equipment for perform multiple tasks and so there was only one television camera for the lunar module they had a small camera that was in command module but for the lunar module itself there was a camera that was stowed inside equipment door basically behind a door once Armstrong got down to the bottom of the ladder. He pulled a cord. How very analogue I love him? He didn't push a button he had to pull a cord that would release that door and that Cameron there was the same camera that they then went and moved to a stand for the rest of their V._A.. Worked for the rest of the moon walk and so it was a one one one camera one multiple-purpose situation and that was true for any of the cameras they had they weren't just for science or engineering. They were everything everything had to perform double and triple duty basically and I'm guessing at the same time had to also be as simple. Simple as possible to set up and use because there's probably not a lot of extra time for like reading manuals for cameras on the moon there was lots of training ahead of time and had to be very simple and straightforward as much that could be planned ahead of time was done ahead of time and so oh the astronauts worked incredibly hard to understand everything that they needed to do. The cameras had to be easily manipulated with spacesuit gloves. When you're on the moon you don't WanNa have to have tiny little switches or buttons to press and so everything the connection points joints everything had to be very simple very easy and and bulky it had to have some kind of <hes> heft to it had to have something added and most cameras are made with very small dials on the lenses and things like that so they had to kind of make some kind of retroactively make some encysted these things so the astronaut spacesuit gloves made it possible for them to actually operate the cameras and I'm thinking now about how hard it is to use technology when I'm wearing like winter gloves and you can't touch anything anymore I can't even imagine wearing gigantic pantic spacesuit gloves and trying to press buttons or do anything yeah? It's one of the things that we challenge our visitors to do at the national aren't Space Museum. Is We have some places where you can put on a glove and actually try to do something like pick up a penny or manipulate something. That's very small. It is far more challenging than you might realize so. Did all of this just work. I mean we we obviously we got the T._v.. Broadcast we've seen the photos and the videos and stuff but we're there issues that they had in the process or did all of it just kind of magically go best case scenario yeah well. It would be great if it did but as NASA is very likely to do in every scenario possible they will have a backup to a backup to a backup and so there were multiple plans in multiple ways to make sure that it went right everything did go right on the moon side of things it was back on earth where things were a little tricky. They were receiving a signal from two hundred forty thousand miles away the earth had to be facing a certain way so you had to make sure you had tracking stations and receiving stations basically in certain in quotes that could then relay that signal and so this massive network was being developed and was really an it's new stages in the nineteen sixties this deep space network and so it's a series of receiving stations tracking stations radio telescopes around the world that can work together to send these signals around and so if you ever see a diagram of how this all works it's incredible aside of the Earth that was facing the moon at the time was basically the Pacific Ocean and so there were receiving stations in Australia and in California and really the real challenge and difficulty came in finding out which signal was the best signal they kept switching even during the moments there are flickers in the in the live broadcast where they're actually those are moments where NASA is changing over which signal it is using and so they used one from California they used one from one of the stations in Australia called honeysuckle creek and then for the most part of the actual broadcast. The bulk of the broadcast comes from a tracking station nation called the Parkes Observatory which is also in Australia. Wow Okay so you're not kidding. When you talk about backups tobacco tobacco they were going to make this work no matter what the end to do absolutely and then they had to send its wasn't as the signal just traveled straight from Australia to somebody's comedies television that had to go up to satellites to get back down to Houston to then travel through cables and all kinds of other stuff and so when you see a really fuzzy image of Neil Armstrong stepping on the moon don't be surprised I mean the signal degraded considerably and there are lots the hiccups along the way and things that had to be adjusted dealt with that made it incredibly complicated in the fact that it happened at all is incredible? I mean it seems like from the research I've done that it was there was a lot of work done kind of in the run-up to these missions that led to a lot of the the camera innovation in terms of everything from the size to what you could capture in the quality and things like that like this turn out to be kind of a watershed moment for camera technology both in the space program and just kind of in general. I think you know there's is this the one thousand nine hundred zero time when you're moving generally towards innovations like that that makes things more portable more and more people are using thirty five millimeter cameras. They're using small portable cameras especially in terms of photo journalism..

Neil Armstrong NASA Australia Westinghouse California Walmart Apollo Eleven Parkes Observatory fraud Space Museum Jennifer Pacific Ocean Jennifer Lavazza Space Museum president United States Houston Cameron Aldridge
"honeysuckle creek" Discussed on Space Nuts

Space Nuts

12:21 min | 1 year ago

"honeysuckle creek" Discussed on Space Nuts

"What about that technology now I heard identified this is true or not but I heard a little piece of information some years ago that suggested we would not have the microwave oven without Apollo? I'm not sure that's true for term an urban myth but could be it'd be well yeah the so it is true that one of the things Apollo pushed Bush was the miniaturization of technology. I mean it's a bit <hes> it seems a bit curious that the biggest rocket launched dive yeah assassin five should should actually you know should should spur miniaturization but they did they how to make everything smaller and he met well the the wanted to call the the things that generate the microwave forgotten the night. That's ridiculous. No the the device that does it probably listeners does that yelling out the name loudly the moment but I forgot what he's called. It's that device which will come to me shortly. I'm sure <hes> was almost certainly miniature. They started the life actually in radar wartime right all of these these Mrs of microwaves however the probably the the most notable path of militarization that we think about with Apollo as with computers because at that time during the sixties computers was starting to become <hes> you know readily available there will be built commercially I._B._M.. And I see Allen companies like that were building. These machines means when I went to union nine hundred sixty three but did a course in computer science and we had an I._B._M.. Machine in the computer land which I think wade several tonnes. <hes> it had <hes> you know how electrcity bowed to to to break the circuits circuit breaker Baltic probably consumed several kilowatts have power that was the best we had that so that was the beginning of the sixties out probably from about nineteen sixty by nineteen seventy-nine. You've got the Apollo guidance computers which were very much the things that will be used aboard the space craft through two of them while in the Komo nor do <unk> a difficult <unk> lunar orbit and one in the Balloon Orlando Elian the lunar excursion mobile so by then these things had come down to a very lightweight thirty two kilograms. What's that says seventy pounds or something like that to to live? I can never remember that conversion two point two pounds per kilogram yep about seventy pounds and they also consumed about seventy walks which is the powered technique by fairly bright light bulb of the old incandescent to tell us that was state of the art that was you know the the just what you needed for computing tpc the orbital parameters <unk> it was it was still pretty. I've done stuff they yet back then but of course it was all a <unk> gobbledygook terminology out to typing <unk> Orden <unk>. There was nothing like a like a attractive Pandora or a mouse or anything like that it was all about just typing numbers in getting numbers out as a space the equivalent to dos system yeah what's his accrued than dogs well demonstrated in the movie Apollo Thirteen. We're trying to record night the position and shaved some sort of gardens and that would doing all of mathematics pencil and paper <hes> and then <hes> hand program the computers too because it was yeah. That's what it came down to the you thinking of a <hes> a cavity magnetron. Yes thank you just popped into. My head ended in Tehran but I could remember what it was. It's about going well well the P._T._O.. <hes> so that they would probably try as well to the extent that he can but you know that so that spurred on and the Fest Generation of absorb a small computers waste use those in the Schmidt Telescope <unk> computers which were selling portable but they were smaller than those big mainframe machines that we had back you nearly sixties and then the move to personal computers and of course now to this amalgam of telephone telephone technology in computing which will carry in pockets the estimates that your average mobile phone in terms of the number of instructions per second that it can carry out is under twenty million times faster than the apollo computers ages staggering. It's staggering in it and it's happened in fifty years less than fifty will probably thought he is in real terms but yeah the thought that we carrying around in pockets devices that that much more superior to something that helped people get to the moon is mind boggling it really is and you know it a testament to what was achieved as far as the Apollo missions nations were concerned because this was the catalyst for change. This was one of the things that led humanity down that technological path that we all take for granted now in many many countries. I think that's true. I think that's a fair comment and of course there are other failed as well <hes> without going into too much detail for example high fuel cells web perfected for policies things that tag hydrogen oxygen in combined electrolytic to produce power water facts act. I think it was if I remember it was an explosion in a fuel cell that led to the publicity mission ables. I think that's what caused it. I can't remember I never saw the movie by the way I should watch it sometime. I think get enjoy it. You'd probably have a bit of cringe because it's such a complicated story. They had to take a lot of shortcuts. A few things are probably not as well detailed or creative law since went into just so we'll just do that. Just get that thing done. I thought if I recall what they said in the movie it was rotating the oxygen tanks that Monaco's the explain. Maybe I can't remember I don't know don't know but the fuel cells now at their much higher levels sophistication than they were backing the days of Apollo and and they've got a bright future. Certainly I'll chief scientists strategy scientists diamond fecal whose offices just along the carpet for me. When I'm sitting camera <hes> he is a great champion hydrogen fuel for Cars and the way you turn up fuelling to energy is not burning but by putting it through a fuel Sam <hes> so that you you get power motor out the other end hydrogen oxygen so he sees a bright future for hydrogen power and is a very strong advocate for that as I saw I go to survey the other day from car company? I bought a car from them. Three years ago four years ago and I sold it not long after it'd be honest but they still serve me about how the cars going on it but one of the questions in the survey was in future. Perhaps when you buy you next car. Will you buy a fuel a diesel a full electric a hybrid or hydrogen powered vehicle. You go yeah how far that's the correct answer but yes available so there's a lot to sort of look at technologically speaking yes in terms of what indeed that's right Apollo and just you know looking at the big picture stuff the the the rocket scientist selfish changed since Apollo Minnesota said Apollo is was the the southern five was the biggest vehicle have produced used the left the earth hundred ten maters toll with <unk> for Apollo on job but we're well on the way to <hes> spacecraft to launch vehicles of comparable tile but which will be much cheaper deeper and you've got to give people like he must credit to that for his his reusable boosters. That's what his lyrical cutlass several times <hes> the IT brings down the cops by probably factor ten <hes> so you know eventually what now costs to that twenty thousand kilograms to put to to to go into a little bit will come down to two thousand kilograms publish something to I two thousand dollars per kilogram currently twenty thousand dollars per kilogram but will come down factor an in general. I suppose <hes> the amount of Houston's it's now made of space compared with what it was like the Apollo era there were a lot of scientific satellites were a lot of military satellites. The were a few communication satellites in the Apollo era but <hes> look at why we all now there something like five thousand satellites in orbits around the planet about three thousand of them defense to something like two thousand operational ones statistic statistic that I noted recently. How realize was that last year to Chinese eighteen on average was one satellite launch per day three hundred ninety something for the year so it was about one day but of course there's all the debris as well <hes> something like half a billion bits of space junk up there at a larger than Aucoin most of that's tracked the so that you know to move the International Space Station out the way when one of these is GonNa Wiz by? I think you know maybe think about this suspect. That's one of the less welcome legacies of Apollo what we've done to our environment in space we really did up and the space network work yeah the deep space network that's right. It was going to highlight not too because we you know that's something we take for granted in terms of the way the data come back from the robotic space probes. The State Spice Network of <hes> of dishes are the three main concerts at Goldstone a the U._S._A.. <hes> it's in California. The European ones near Madrid. That's well established station goes back the Apollo era when of course what is now bill was honeysuckle creek where the first images of the of the of Neil Armstrong's mood will came through talks which took over soon after that Tim Billet Now Korea has the function <unk> just outside camera of being nice as Deep Space Network Station in Australia although I think talks gets rotated still from time to tell him so much that came out of the Apollo missions scientifically so if you're listening to us fi you're smart device you know that's that's one of the legacies of polite and something we will love so much these days and cannot live with that. You're listening to space nuts with Andrew Dunkley and fred. What's in a special edition looking back at Apollo eleven fifty years on.

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"honeysuckle creek" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"honeysuckle creek" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"History being made almost twenty years ago almost fifty years ago on the twentieth of July but to day on this date on the sixteenth of July back in nineteen sixty nine Apollo eleven which is part of the Apollo program took off at eight thirty two AM so was already on its way this time fifty years ago I say call amazing and it's only one of those things you can't believe you hit that mark fifty years since then and I just wonder you know you think about the national unity around an event like that to to sort of watched with bated breath as Apollo eleven takes off and then to be gathered around your screens to see the moon landing and all of and to listen and to just to just to know that it's happening all of that can it cannot happen again what a Mars landing if you should ever be achieved the way that Donald Trump the president would like to see the chief and he's not alone this bunch of people of all different partisan interests political parties we would all love to see a Mars landing with that attract the same type of attention and get the same sort of national unity around such an incredible moment landing on Mars yeah no it and in our lifetime I guess we would be so the the I guess the excitement that surrounds it at the time in the the sixties is started with John F. Kennedy in sixty three he was sixty two maybe when he when he talked about you know going to the moon landing a man on the moon and ended all through the moon landing and into the seventies how it was all about the space race that's all about space space space space space which which just captivated the entire country for years and years and years I have probably a good a good decade joining us now an astronaut someone who did this is someone who knows what it's like to be in a tiny scrap little space Tom Jones is astronaut and he gets to do what is right now Tom thank you so much for joining us it's great to have you good morning this morning merry and what a great anniversary yes it is right now at eight thirty two was when they took off on eight thirty two AM fifty years ago today what wake can you explain to us how this I find so interesting the country was just obsessed with this and I just don't think we would have the same kind of obsession today I don't know if we can recapture that magic what was that like well I'm biased I was a space geek at age fourteen watching all this unfold and the whole country was caught up in it not everybody agreed with the goals of the space program in the amount of money that was being spent it's important to note that but I think everybody appreciated the drama and the fact that three astronauts were laying their lives on the line to achieve president Kennedy's goal sat eight years earlier and there was not it was not a sure thing there is no guarantee that Neil Armstrong and buzz Aldrin would make it down to the surface let alone back off and get back to earth safely so the drama of riding a giant fueled bomb off the launch pad in Florida and then trying to set down the lunar lander eagle which is something that everybody was captivated by so everybody drop what they were doing people work flocked around television sets or listening to the radio lot of this of course and for the without real time video so it was something that was a listening as well as watching experience yeah absolutely and and you bring up the point about these men were willing to lay down their lives in order to to try to make this happen and that's not lost on PS a lot of people because think about it as you said that you know this is this is a jet fuel the filled in part to touch a bomb that they're sitting on top of so we took incredible courage and an incredible I don't know bravery sense of of a sense of selflessness in order to do this of course of the country could achieve a sense of greatness and a sense of of pride and so much came out of the program as well when they went up there we didn't know if they were gonna compacted way thank you know several of the Apollo astronauts as mentioned in public that this was a Cold War competition with the Soviets and we sort of forgot about that now but this was a real low to compete with the Soviets without having to shoot at them and so winning was really important Frank Borman who went on the crew that first circle the moon Apollo eight that's why he went to because you want to be there the Soviets and of course to actually complete the goal of landing a human on the moon return after it was why buzz and Mike Collins and and Neil Armstrong went and Neil Armstrong said you know it's probably ninety percent chance we get back alive but only a fifty percent chance that we pull off the landing Tom use if you spend a lot of time and space I don't know if this is right to the internet tells me fifty three days in forty eight minutes and ends in so doing there's a big do astronauts view this as like other levels of jealousy like all man I'm really jealous of the guys you've got to walk on the moon all I got to do was orbit the earth like what's that what it what are your feelings about like the guys who actually did that my heroes when I was growing up and so they were role models for the career that I chose to go into yeah and so when I became an astronaut in the early nineteen nineties to meet these people at astronaut reunions would have Neil Armstrong come in and give you a professional lecture about what it was like to pilot the eagle to the lunar surface that's Dreamland for for not sure not to actually be able associate rub shoulders with these guys so to be able to in some way called on colleagues is a real privilege and you know they're great Americans and it's just great to be in their company yeah I I don't I don't know if you heard this I thought this is so interesting because he's all heard about how they lost NASA admitted that they lost the tapes of of the the for first generation tapes of the historic moon walk right they are being auctioned off Allen's at Sotheby's on Saturday which is the fiftieth anniversary of the moon landing and they were bought I don't I knew nothing about this I'm just hearing about this now but they were bought by it at the time and in turn a NASA intern at a government surplus auction in nineteen seventy six just two hundred and eighteen dollars at the time the less than a thousand dollars in today's money had no idea what was on these tapes it wasn't until six at NASA admitted that the tapes have been lost that he realized what he had these things are on edited they are I'm re touch a restored on enhanced and remastered these are the actual first generation of video I love the fact that these could wind up in private hands is it's kind of sad though so hot what video do we have them we see that moon landing now what video is that so when the signal came down from the moon merry they were displayed on a monitor in Australia where the ground station was at that particular time and then a video camera photographs that image and sends out video back to the United States and that's what we recorded metal we've had in our possession ever since the nascent two thousand nine cleaned up that old video and made it as good as can be but it's still a copy and so if this guy really has the tapes that were recorded on a in Australia the honeysuckle creek crack tracking station there might be better quality we can pull out of that original broadcast from that then that would be some historical on the feet I I just find it interesting that the clear other recordings were either taped over or raised in the early nineteen eighties at what we need is for adults bad scratcher somebody's weddings been recorded over right now yeah that's I think that's how we have a new data coming down from the Mars probe you know so that's right they need the room I Tom Jones astronaut thank you very much really appreciate your insight on this historic day we celebration thank you eight forty five no W. I. mail traffic.

fifty years forty eight minutes eighteen dollars fifty three days thousand dollars ninety percent fifty percent twenty years eight years