35 Burst results for "henrietta"

Over 168 million children miss nearly a year of schooling, UNICEF says

UN News

01:19 min | 1 d ago

Over 168 million children miss nearly a year of schooling, UNICEF says

"At least one hundred and sixty eight million children. Labor missed out on classroom learning in the last year. Owing to corona virus related lockdowns the un children's fund unicef said on wednesday schools in some fourteen countries remained largely shut for almost twelve months as authorities attempted to hold back ovid nineteen infections. The un agency said in a new report in response to the findings sector jemele antonio guiterrez warned of global education crisis. Now efforts should be sped to safely. Bring every child back into the classroom. He tweeted here. He is speaking outside. Un headquarters in new york one of the most dramatic consequences of congress as being terrible suffering children and families because of the two of them. That defense school mandy. Fortunately at the chest with with the virtual means that's a or the forest populations without internet connection. We have millions of people of the school and that is a tragedy as the one year anniversary of the covid nineteen pandemic approaches on the eleventh of march unicef chief. Henrietta four underlined the catastrophic education. Emergency that worldwide lockdowns have created with every day that goes by children who are unable to access in person schooling full further and further behind and the most marginalized paying the heaviest price. Miss four added

Un Children's Fund Unicef Antonio Guiterrez UN Congress New York Henrietta Unicef
UNICEF Gears Up for Global Coronavirus Vaccine Rollout

UN News

01:10 min | 2 weeks ago

UNICEF Gears Up for Global Coronavirus Vaccine Rollout

"The head of unicef the children's fund urged the security council on wednesday to support the agency's call for all countries to roll out inclusive national vaccination plans to end the covid nineteen pandemic this means regardless of their legal status or if they live in areas controlled by non-state entities. Henrietta four told the meeting on ensuring equitable access to new coronavirus vaccines in places affected by conflict and insecurity. Her comments come as the agency steps up plans for the global distribution of covid nineteen vaccines unicef aims to procure two billion doses of covid nineteen vaccines by the end of the year. In addition to the two billion doses of other vaccines that obtains annually on behalf of one hundred countries miss for highlighted the difficulty of reaching an estimated sixty million people living in conflict areas under the control of non-state armed groups as well as refugees and migrants who are routinely excluded from national immunization drives after repeating the un secretary. General's call for a global ceasefire. Which would help aid vaccine delivery. The unicef chief urged the security council to restart Immunization campaigns we cannot allow the fight against one deadly disease to cause us to lose ground in the fight against others. She said

Unicef Security Council Henrietta UN
UNICEF chief’s appeal for access to children caught up in Ethiopia’s Tigray

UN News

00:57 sec | Last month

UNICEF chief’s appeal for access to children caught up in Ethiopia’s Tigray

"Three months since fighting began in ethiopia northern state of tigray great concern for the plight of youngsters there. The un children's fund unicef has warned in an alert on wednesday the agency's executive director henrietta. Four said that the very little was known about the impact of the conflict was deeply troubling because of difficulties getting humanitarian access. The warning comes almost two weeks since unicef and partners dispatched twenty nine trucks filled with emergency nutrition health and protection supplies entity gray where central government soldiers have confronted tigray people's liberation front forces. That convoy was a step in the right direction but nowhere near the level of access and scale of support. That is actually needed. Miss four said unicef cited reports of three hundred unaccompanied or separated children among the more than fifty seven thousand people who fled to neighboring sudan the are potentially many more among the approximately two hundred eighty thousand internally displaced in tigray and neighboring regions the un agency said

Un Children's Fund Unicef Tigray Unicef Ethiopia Henrietta Sudan UN
Fauci: Up to 90% of population needs vaccine for herd immunity

This Week with George Stephanopoulos

03:20 min | 2 months ago

Fauci: Up to 90% of population needs vaccine for herd immunity

"The cdc is now requiring a negative test for any travelers coming from the uk but officials had been downplaying the threat of these of these new strains that we are seeing these variations in the uk. I think you had said earlier this week. That a mutation doesn't mean the virus more dangerous or more deadly. Dr fauci said that these these these variations may already be here in the united states. So why why this new step. Why this new restriction important for people to know that we're layering protection on top of protection on top of protection. No individual protection is going to be one hundred percent. A lot of americans don't know that back in march through the presidential To twelve f authority we restricted. The ability of people to come to the united states from the uk and travel is down ninety percent even pre knowledge about this new variant from the uk. So we've already had severe travel restrictions from the uk. testing within seventy. Two hours isn't one hundred percent. It's not perfect but it does. Further decreased the number of people who will come in and then what we recommend to people according to the. Cdc is that once you get here you still isolate for seven days if you've had a negative test or for further longer than that if you don't get a test on this end ten to fourteen days so those things layer together. We'll significantly decrease chance of exposure to a new variant. But here's what the american people most need to know. Mitigation works the shows that it works. So if you're worried about a new potentially more contagious variant. It that much more important that we follow the four ws. Where a mask wash your hands. Watch your distanced and the fourth one is weight on gatherings especially with one last holiday coming up new year's we need to be very careful. You said that you understand the skepticism. From many african americans about the vaccine obviously given the history of medical racism in this country and you of course got vaccinated on camera to to to to send a message. What else needs to be done to convince people including some of those most vulnerable that this vaccine is not only safe but it's effective and necessary. Well we need to continue to acknowledge what's happened in the past. And i've talked about ski. Talked about henrietta lacks but they were real issues going on today right now in this country when you look at seven hundred women dying pregnancy related complications. Most of them black and brown in the united states. When you look at not just cova hypertension and cancer disparities. We need to acknowledge these things. And we need to show people meaningfully in a real sense what we're doing to improve on these measures and that's why a surgeon general before covid health equity was a critical part of everything that i did. And then we need to engage with trusted influencers. We need to make sure our pastors in e moms in rabbis. All of whom. I'm working with. Have the facts so that they can spread it to to their congregants and we need to walk the talk and that's why i got vaccinated on live tv. I want people to know that as a scientist at the doctor. I've looked at the data. I know the protections that are in place. I know an african american female helped. Develop this vaccine and tony foul. She and i made sure that the trials were were enrolled with diverse participants. And i got vaccinated because i trusted and how we end this pandemic

UK Dr Fauci United States CDC Henrietta Hypertension Cancer Tony
"henrietta" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:32 min | 2 months ago

"henrietta" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"He stressed the need for education about the vaccine in communities of color, specifically black communities. And it's worth adding that we have people of color represented among the researchers who developed the vaccine, the scientists and doctors who reviewed it. In the tens of thousands of study participants who bravely volunteered so they could prove this vaccine safety and its efficacy. But and this is an important but Having a vaccine is only the first step. We must now move from vaccines to vaccinations, and it would be a great tragedy if disparities actually worsened. Because the people who could most benefit from this vaccine take it. We know that lack of trust is a major cause for reluctance, especially in communities of color, and that lack of trust Is not without good reason at the Tuskegee Studies occurred within many of our own lifetimes to truly combat vaccine hesitancy and encourage diverse enrollment in clinical trials. We must first acknowledge this real history of mistreatment and exploitation of minorities by the medical community and the government thing we need to explain and demonstrate. All that had been done to address these rooms to make sure tragedies like the tough Gigi syphilis study, or the exploitation of Henrietta lacks never happen again. The black man who participated in that study, given free medical exams in payment, but never offered treatment for the disease, even after penicillin became the main form of treatment. Four. Syphilis..

Syphilis Tuskegee Studies penicillin Henrietta
Kitsap school districts, NW of Seattle, eye reopening schools in January

News and Perspective with Tom Hutyler

00:57 sec | 3 months ago

Kitsap school districts, NW of Seattle, eye reopening schools in January

"District leaders across kits at county still hoping to reopen schools for in person learning after the first of the year. That update from comas Connie Johnson kids have school District announced Friday. They're still aiming for a phase return to in person classes beginning January. 11th North Kids have school district has also sketched out a tentative return to school buildings. January 11th. Starting with the youngest grades. First UNICEF, The International Child Welfare Agency, last week issued a dire warning of a generation lost to the long term effects on Children of remote learning. As the pandemic drags on. Henrietta Fore is UNICEF's executive director. Those schools not only threatened their education Being out of school can lead to poor health, Mental and physical it covert case rates remain as high as they are today, though going back to classrooms likely would not happen. Kids that counties 14 day rate for new cases per 100,000. Is that 169 more than twice what? The rate was just 2.5 weeks ago.

Comas Connie Johnson International Child Welfare Ag Unicef Henrietta Fore
"henrietta" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:11 min | 3 months ago

"henrietta" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"I'm jenny kaplan and this is encyclopedia will manteca. Today's stem was a barrier breaking astronomer. Whose work on cepheid stars lead to a complete reevaluation of the size of the known universe. Her work was instrumental to the development of the fields of astronomy cosmology and astrophysics. Let's talk about the extraordinary henrietta. Levitt henrietta swan levitt was born on july fourth eighteen. Sixty eight in. Lancaster massachusetts to george and henrietta. She was the first of their seven children growing up. Henrietta 's family was fairly well off her father. George worked as a minister and the congregational church. The downside of georgia's job was at the family. Had to move whenever he changed congregations when henrietta was in her teens. The family moved to cleveland ohio. After graduating from high school in eighteen eighty five henrietta enrolled in a one year college. Preparatory course at oberlin college followed by two years as an undergraduate there at the time henrietta was studying music following her sophomore year at oberlin henrietta and her family moved back east to cambridge massachusetts home of harvard university. Henrietta was desperate to enroll at harvard but the university didn't accept women at the time instead she enrolled what was then known as the harvard annex an educational establishment for women. That would eventually change. Its name to radcliffe college for two years. Henrietta studied math and astronomy before graduating in eighteen. Ninety two after graduation. Henrietta took a job as a volunteer research assistant at the harvard. College observatory though. Her parents had to support her financially. During her time there she was able to build up credits towards an advanced degree in astronomy and she found great satisfaction in the work at the observatory. Henrietta was part of a large project attempting to catalog the brightness position and color of all observable stars in the universe which at the time was believed to just consist of the milky way. Henrietta was tasked with analyzing photographs in order to determine the necessary star data. She was asked pay particular attention to any star whose brightness varied over time and to record how long the cycle of bright to dim too bright again took otherwise known as the period of variation at the beginning of eighteen ninety. Six henrietta left harvard to spend some time in europe. She was having issues with both her sight and hearing and her doctors had suggested that a trip abroad might help upon her return to the united states. Two years later. Henrietta moved to wisconsin where her father had just taken a job at a new congregation. Henrietta i managed to find a job for herself as an assistant at the local college in nineteen nine two. After five years in wisconsin henrietta contacted edward pickering the director of the harvard college observatory with their request to have her old lab. Notebook sent to her in wisconsin. She wanted to complete the report on stars. Sheet started so many years before she also asked pickering if you knew of any observatory jobs located in warm weather since it was better for her health. Pickering was unaware of any job openings in the tropics but he was so impressed with henrietta 's previous work offered her a paid fulltime job at the harvard college observatory as a computer computers as they were called at the time or people who did all of the calculations and data analysis by hand this also gave henrietta the opportunity to finish up the work on the star catalogue in nineteen oh eight. Henrietta published her first academic papers summarizing her work on the star catalogue. The paper focused on the existence of an extraordinarily large number of stars with variable brightness located in the magic clothes. Most importantly she noted that the brighter stars have longer periods meaning. It takes longer for them to go from dim too bright to dim again for four years. Henrietta continued the time consuming work of analyzing variable stars. She discovered that there was one type of variable star called a cepheid star that seemed to pulse at a rate directly related to the stars actual brightness since there's a very clear and precise relationship between brightness and distance henrietta realized that one potentially use a cepheid stars variability to calculate the distance from that star to earth. This was a major revelation in nineteen twelve. henrietta published. A paper about her breakthrough. It was extraordinarily well received by the scientific community. And astronomers around the world began working to utilize henrietta discovery. Just a year. Later a european astronomer was able to determine the distance of a number of cepheid stars from earth which laid the groundwork for a method of determining the distance of any sethi these cepheids with known brightness distance ratios became known astronomy as standard candles utilizing henrietta 's work edwin hubble then calibrated how to measure the distance to steffi's located even farther away his astonishment he discovered that many of these cepheids were so far away that they were actually beyond the milky way. These stars were in other galaxies. Meaning that the universe was much bigger and filled with much more than humanity had imagined up to that point in nineteen twenty one having truly made a name for herself in her field. Henrietta was named the head of the stellar. Photon matry department at harvard college observatory. She passed away before she could start her new job. Henrietta died on december twelfth nineteen twenty one in cambridge massachusetts from stomach cancer. She was just fifty three years old. Due to the importance of henrietta 's work the development of the fields of cosmology astronomy and astrophysics. Magnus costa mitac leffler. The swedish academy of sciences tried to nominate her for the nineteen twenty six nobel prize in physics. His attempt failed however when he learned she had already died nobel. Prizes are not awarded posthumously tune in tomorrow for the story of another brilliant stem nest for more on. Why we're doing what we're doing check out our newsletter manica weekly follow us on facebook and instagram at encyclopedia britannica and follow me directly on twitter. At jenny am kaplan special. Thanks to liz. Caplan at my favorite sister and co-creator talk to you tomorrow before you go. I want to tell you about an awesome organization ignite worldwide or inspiring girls now technology. Evolution is the only nonprofit. it's kind serving girls and nonbinary students at school during the school day through life changing stem programming at every event girls interact with women stem from their communities. Who helped the girls explore the career. Choices in stem help ignite worldwide serve more students with personal contribution or corporate sponsorship. You can learn more at ignite worldwide dot org. Check it out..

Henrietta henrietta swan levitt Henrietta i henrietta discovery oberlin henrietta harvard college observatory harvard harvard university College observatory edward pickering jenny kaplan Lancaster massachusetts oberlin college wisconsin united states George cleveland ohio europe
COVID-19 vaccine: UNICEF to stockpile more than half a billion syringes

UN News

00:56 sec | 4 months ago

COVID-19 vaccine: UNICEF to stockpile more than half a billion syringes

"Countries around the world gear up to distribute covid nineteen vaccines, the UN Children's Fund. UNICEF. has begun laying the groundwork for safe and efficient delivery by buying and pre-positioning key equipment. The agency said on Monday it will begin by stockpiling around five hundred, twenty million syringes in its warehouses to have a billion ready for use throughout twenty twenty one to ensure syringes arrive before vaccines are distributed. This will be on top of the roughly six, hundred, twenty, million syringes that it will purchase for other vaccination programs to US next year against diseases such as measles anti. FLOYD UNISEX CHIEF HENRIETTA FOUR Spelled out that in order to move fast later, we must move fast now noting that by the end of the year over half a billion syringes should be in place that's enough syringes to wrap around the world one and a half time she said

Un Children's Fund Henrietta Four United States Measles Floyd Unicef.
Stillbirth rate rises dramatically during pandemic

UN News

00:58 sec | 5 months ago

Stillbirth rate rises dramatically during pandemic

"Nearly. Two million babies are still born every year or one every sixteen seconds a figure that could worsen due to the covid nineteen pandemic according to a new U. N.. report. Most stillbirths or eighty four percent occur in low income countries but high income nations face this challenge. Losing a child at birth or during pregnancy is a devastating tragedy for a family said Henrietta four executive director of the UN Children's fund UNICEF. Many of these deaths could have been prevented with high quality monitoring, proper ante, natal care under skilled birth attendant she added. UNICEF issued the report alongside the World Health Organization who the World Bank Group and the U. N. Department of Economic and Social Affairs. The partners warned that a reduction in health services due to covid nineteen could cause nearly two hundred thousand additional stillbirths over a twelve month period.

Unicef World Health Organization U. N. Department Of Economic A World Bank Group Henrietta Executive Director Un Children
Want To Dismantle Racism In Science? Start In The Classroom

Short Wave

09:25 min | 5 months ago

Want To Dismantle Racism In Science? Start In The Classroom

"All right today in the show were unscrewing what's not working in science education around representation and racism, and how to teach science in a more inclusive way and idea from listener and scientists Esther Kunle yes. Thanks to Esther we went looking for K., through twelve teachers teaching at the intersection, of Science, and racial justice at all grade levels I want to start with. Let me see fears. She's a post doctoral fellow in the collaborative for stem education and outreach at Vanderbilt. Okay. She's a black scientist. Out in science classrooms Tennessee in among fifth graders. At this one particular school, she is a total rockstar. So walk into a classroom and they'll be like. Yeah it's me. It's me everyone autographs today. We lit up each others world. Our say, let me see a drops into fifth seventh and eighth grade. Science classrooms like a real life. Miss Frizzle I'm not kidding you. She wheels the cart between classes clattering with beakers and different very interesting looking chemicals and students. They're so intrigued they run up to our like remind wife we've. Just all that stuff and then when she's in the classroom, let me see a doesn't just help them run experiments. She'll also delve into the ethics of designing an experiment. Okay. She'll talk about how wrong the Tuskegee study was, which is winning scientists studied syphilis in black men and withheld treatment Sushi's like introducing bioethics to kids as important part of the curriculum. Yup. Scientists are presented as very human herself included and her students can totally handle these conversations. We see what's happening with this generation with them protest and they're speaking out on, they're not having it. They're not. They're not going to allow us to continue to destroy their and our point is that if science teachers can tap into that compassion and That curiosity and show the way that scientists have messed up. Kids might take an interest in science I love, and if we can't do that, then we are GonNa lose them and I think it's hard for minority kids. They already don't see themselves as the teacher or the Christmas doing the science. So that already unemployed simple block of well, that's just what the old white man with the crazy hairdo. and. So another thing let me see Ya does is namedrop scientists of color as often as possible. She'll talk about a physicist did Eisler medical physicists had he and Ecole, green astronauts, Joseph Akaba, and genetic APPs. She designed a paper rocket lesson around them and this helps kids develop a mental picture of a career in stem beyond a doctor or a dentist. This is so cool because it's not just about teaching science history, right? It's also helping students see themselves as scientists and for Gretchen Craig. Turner. The next teacher I, want to introduce you to. This level of engagement becomes even more important students get older and start to you know get into their teenage years and develop their own opinions their own opinions about science. Yeah. You know to be critical of it. Oh. Yeah. That was not in my k. through twelve science education hers either I don't remember a lot of writing or opinions being a part of science. In fact, it was very much I believe taught the opinions didn't belong in science right that it was supposed to be a right answer Gretchen teaches. At Burlington Edison High. School. In Washington state she is white and her classroom to be as inclusive as possible and to reflect the diversity of the student body and in her first year of teaching a biotech class. This was back in two thousand, ten in English teacher gave her a copy of the book. The immortal life of Henrietta lacks was like you should teach the steer students. Yeah. So the history of the Hilo Cell Line Yep. So Henrietta, lacks cancer cells were used for years by scientists without her family's knowledge cells that. One. Of the most important cell lines in medical research, her case raises so many questions about patients, rights. Yep questions raised in this book. So Gretchen got a bunch of hardcover books for her class and we read it and. It shaped how I teach in tremendous ways because the students responded to it. So strongly, you know they were excited maybe not at first I still get a lot of Turner. This isn't an English class, right but but they got into it. So into it, it is a six week unit the book in a Science Class. STUDENTS DO SELL labs while they're reading and they journal to. Okay so they're jotting down notes on different themes like medical apartheid informed consent lab science, and at the end they write a big paper and also oftentimes in class, there will be students who who's own families have experienced medical apartheid in the. Effects of that and I think some of the students and see themselves in the story of the lacks family. The conversations become really personal and probing not. You know necessarily what you'd expect in science class but exactly what Gretchen is hoping for well I, think what you know many young people ultimately want from their teachers is to be seen into be heard. And so if the science curriculum. if they feel seen and heard through that curriculum, they're more invested. So when her students learn about genetic testing, Gretchen includes a film about the innocence project and they're a group that uses DNA testing to exonerate those who've been wrongfully imprisoned. And Gretchen has her students, write poetry and songs as kind of oaths to those wrongfully convicted my blood, my skin, my hair, all held the key to my freedom DNA. My eyes glazed over desperate for relief with a pain. I now understood my hand reaches for I. Don't Know How often you're around teenagers. But the. Teenagers of this just tremendous sense of justice and what is right you know, and so those conversations are often very passionate for students But it's also the world that they live in. Wow I mean kwong, there's so many things in here. That are so powerful in and I know there's a lot of science teacher who listened to shortwave who might want to incorporate racial justice in history into their teaching too I mean, where do they look well Gretchen and let me see a- had the same advice which is at teachers should fill in the gaps in their own racial understanding I learn about the history of science or their field, and that's exactly what the last teacher I spoke with is doing. Vigia satiety is a college professor at University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and looking critically at her own field statistics has been hard painful work. You know I honestly I just feel like I'm I missed something that was really important to learn about my discipline and I'm I'm a little bit mad at myself for not being curious on my own to figure out the origins of things and she has been startled to realize the full extent to which modern statistics draws upon the work of you. Genesis Francis Colton Karl Pearson Ronald Fisher. Some of the most foundational tools and stem like the normal distribution curve were applied to support their racist and eugenicist theories tools that we. Use today, but we don't really stop to think about the people who created them and why they created them. So the is trying to stop to teach yourself where these came from, but to not rush the process with some slapdash curriculum, she wants to incorporate these historical into her classes with care I want to give it the space deserves and of course, and not not to feel like this awkward add on that people can optionally engage in in a way that centers the students Vigie like all the teachers I spoke with designs, her classes by asking herself who's being left behind with this material, and how can I bring them along? That's what can be gained from. And anti-racist science education I think all of us in our minds have been in or heard of course where the professor says look to the laugh looked the right. One of you won't be here at the end of this time or you know something horrible this should not ever be uttered in a classroom. I say look to your left to your right like I. Want you all to stay. I want you all the love my field as much as I. Love my field because there's so many interesting things you could do with it and we really could use your wonderful mind and our discipline. We could use your perspective and the things that you bring. So basically to change science, we have to change how we teach science. To fix the lab gotta fix the classroom.

Gretchen Craig Science Class Henrietta Esther Kunle Turner Vanderbilt Doctoral Fellow Scientist Tennessee Hilo Burlington Edison High Tuskegee Professor Francis Colton Karl Pearson Ro Washington Physicist Ecole
RBG in Her Own Words

Can We Talk?

05:18 min | 5 months ago

RBG in Her Own Words

"Hi It's no rouse and Judith Rosenbaum. And this is, can we talk the podcast of the Jewish women's archive where gender history and Jewish culture meet in this episode we're honoring and mourning the loss of Supreme Court. Justice. Ruth Bader GINSBURG. The first Jewish woman to sit on the nation's highest court Justice Ginsburg died on the eve of Russia China after a long battle with pancreatic cancer. In the days and nights following her death the steps of the Supreme Court have become an impromptu memorial. Thousands of people have gathered to express both grief and gratitude leaving flowers, writing messages and chalk lighting yard site candles. Some have even blown show far in her honour Ruth Bader GINSBURG was not only unapologetically Jewish but she and her experience as a jewish-american really guided her work. The Biblical Dictum Setback Sabatier Dove Justice Justice. You shall pursue adorn the walls of her chamber and the Word Setback Justice was embroidered into one of the lace collar. She famously war with her robes though tiny person justice GINSBURG was larger than life a Jewish hero and an American and feminist icon she stood for gender equality and racial justice and modeled fighting steadily for what you believe in. Her famous friendship with Conservative Justice Antonin Scalia showed that you can disagree and still get along. She was a role model for so many people, but it's important to remember that she had role models to in two thousand and four justice Ginsburg spoke at a Jewish women's archive event marking three, hundred, fifty years of Jewish life in America. She talked about some of the Jewish women who inspired her. One of them was Henrietta sold. Zolt was born in eighteen sixty in Baltimore and like Ginsburg was both visionary a doer who faced in overcame many obstacles as a woman. She founded DASA and helped build the social service infrastructure of what became the state of Israel. So here's ruth. Bader. Ginsburg one of our heroes talking about one of her heroes, another inspiring Jewish woman from history. In my growing up years, my mother spoke of glowingly. Though new had to say no. Better than any other person whose words I have read. Sold had seven sisters. And brother. When her mother died the man well known for his community spirited endeavors. Hi, imperative. Offered to say the codfish. The mourners fair that Ancien customer instructed to be recited only by men. Zone responded to that carrying offer in a letter dated September sixteen. Nineteen sixteen here Kuenssberg reads the key passage of the letter Henrietta sold wrote in response. It is impossible for me to find words in which to tell you. How deeply I wish touched by your offer. To Act as. Well my dear, mother. What you offered to do is beautiful beyond thanks. I shall never forget it. You will wonder then that I cannot accept your offer. I know well and appreciate you say about. Jewish. Custom. That only male children recite the prayer and if there are no male survivors. A male stranger may act as substitute. And Jewish custom is very dear and sacred to me. Yet I cannot ask to say after my mother. The cottage means to me. That the survivor publicly manifest. His intention to assume their relationship to the Jewish community, which is parents had. So that the chain of tradition remains unbroken. From generation to generation. Each adding its own link you can do that for the generations of your family I must do that. For generations of my family. My. Mother had eight daughters and no sun. And yet never did I hear a word of regret. Past, the lips of either my mother or my father. That one of us. WAS NOT, a son. When my father died, my mother would not permit others to take our daughters place. In saying the cottage. Until I am sure. I am acting in her spirit. When I am moved to decline your offer. But beautiful you offer remains nevertheless. And I repeat I know full well. That it is much more in harmony with generally accepted Jewish tradition than his might while my family's conception. You understand me don't you. Flee or celebration of our common heritage while tolerating indeed appreciating the differences among us. Concerning religious practice. Is, captivating, don't you agree?

Ruth Bader Ginsburg Justice Antonin Scalia Supreme Court Henrietta Judith Rosenbaum Pancreatic Cancer Ancien Israel Russia Zolt Baltimore Kuenssberg China America
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

07:59 min | 7 months ago

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal. I one hundred percent agree into because of that I think about what the solutions, all the problem. I always come back to equity. And that's ultimately I think about risk driving for and I think what makes this time so ready Angry special in many ways, is that the asking leadership to support us with? Of. Traditional tax. Supporting. Mental. Internships I think already doing now is we're actually asking our structures like quite literally reopen is themselves to include us and then from where all collectively dying today. Tearing structures, things I. think that's really the only way that detained from a call out that house structure best is the Cha I'm. Deploying mechanisms to. Erase. Racism, I I think it is about equity. Entering do you have anything to add to that? Now I think this are. Really great points. I. It's definitely. A lot of things that Lindsey and my style and the executive or have been working on in terms of. What our goals out of its in having a long term strategy with friends is really essential. There's no way you can teach someone to unlearn something that was you know systematically in place for all of this time. So it's essential for us to not only educate work alongside people who are really willing and ready to make those changes. Over time in for us, it's a three to five year period with benchmarks and timelines and touch points. To see where are in how they are evolving

Founder Black Fashion Council Harlem Sandrine Charles Salting Sandrine Charles Charles Henrietta Galina Brandon Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay United States Brandis Daniel Chief Executive NBA Consultant Lindsay People Chairman Executive Editor Branston
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

06:11 min | 7 months ago

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal.

Black Fashion Council Founder Henrietta Galina Brandon Sandrine Charles Sandrine Charles Salting Harlem Charles Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay Brandis Daniel United States Chief Executive NBA Consultant Chairman Lindsay People Executive Editor CEO
Ceasefire during COVID-19 pandemic essential, to safeguard 250 million children

UN News

02:13 min | 11 months ago

Ceasefire during COVID-19 pandemic essential, to safeguard 250 million children

"N Children's Fund UNICEF F. One on Friday that two hundred and fifty million children around the world living in the waking nightmare of conflict desperately need warring to stop fighting as the cave in nineteen pandemic spreads in an appeal UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta. Four urged belligerent. To consider that they would not be able to battle the disease while still fighting each other to the children through these waking nightmares. A ceasefire could mean the difference between life and death. She said adding that it would protect children from being killed maimed or forced from their homes and stop the attacks on health centers water and sanitation systems. Misfortune call comes nearly a month after you and chief. Antonio Guitarist appealed for a global ceasefire which has resulted in a temporary lull in hostilities. In eleven countries violent conflict continues nonetheless in parts of Afghanistan became a facile Libya Mali Myanmar Syria Ukraine Yemen and elsewhere. The unions have appeal coincides with the release of UN research suggesting that the recession caused by cave nineteen could cause hundreds of thousands of additional child deaths this year responding to the findings which would reverse gains in reducing infant mortality. Un Secretary General Antonio guitarfish called for urgent action to protect youngsters wellbeing even before the pandemic childhood malnutrition and stunting were at unacceptable levels. He said now with classrooms closed almost everywhere. Nearly three hundred ten million children who rely on school meals are missing out on this. Daily dose of nutrition children are victims and witnesses of domestic violence and abuse with schools. Closed and important early warning mechanism is missing the UN chief explained reviews household income will force poor families to cut back on essential else and food expenditures particularly affecting children pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers and the self-services become overwhelmed. Seek children are less able to access get with the global recession gathering base there could be hundreds of thousands of vicious child deaths in twenty twenty in addition to the suspension of polio vaccination campaigns measles immunization has also been halted in at least twenty three countries the UN secretary general continued

UN Secretary General Antonio Guit Libya Mali Myanmar Syria Ukrai Unicef Antonio Guitarist Afghanistan Executive Director
Detained children at 'grave risk' of contracting COVID-19

UN News

00:36 sec | 11 months ago

Detained children at 'grave risk' of contracting COVID-19

"Hundreds of thousands of children in detention around the world are at grave risk of contracting Kobe. Nineteen ahead of the United Nations Children's fund UNICEF said on Monday calling for the original release executive director. Henrietta four painted a picture of children detained in overcrowded spaces with inadequate access to nutrition health care and hygiene services conditions. Hardly conducive to spreading disease and outbreaking. One of these facilities could happen at any moment. She said in a statement adding that these children were also more exposed to neglect abuse and gender-based marlins especially with low staffing levels or care negatively impacted by the pandemic

United Nations Children Executive Director Unicef Marlins
Making Do

Your Brain on Facts

09:36 min | 1 year ago

Making Do

"Dissolve one packet of Lemon Jello in one can or one cubes worth of Beef Bouillon. Add lemon juice and allowed to cool. Add three hard boiled eggs diced. One Cup diced celery. Half an onion grated one cup miracle whip and one can of corn beef chopped chill until set slice and serve congratulations. You've just made corned beef luncheon salad. My Name's Moxy and this is your brain on facts. Use It up where it out make it do were do without my grandmother would say. I thought that was clever saying from her side of the family but it was actually a slogan from World War Two encouraging the public to use fewer resources so more could be diverted to the war effort. We're all getting a taste of that as we're hunker down unable to shop at the spur of the moment and much more limited in our choices when we do thankfully we do have precedent to fall back on after all people are still alive today it through the Great Depression children. The roaring twenties came to an abrupt stop with the Stock Market Crash of Nineteen Twenty nine which saw billions of dollars evaporated into thin air. The crash wasn't the sole cause of the Great Depression. There were things like the dust bowl wherein incorrect farming methods turned the fertile American planes into a desert but the crash did act to accelerate the global economic collapse by nineteen thirty three. Nearly half of America's banks failed and thirty percent of the workforce was unemployed. You had to make the most of what you had and you had to get good at that fast to women. Help struggling homemakers to be able to feed their families. Eleanor Roosevelt an aunt. Sammy beginning in nineteen twenty. Six and Sammy had a popular weekday. Radio show called housekeepers chat about cooking and other domestic concerns as well as chitchatting about whatever else was going on at the time and Sammy was very popular especially in rural areas. Thousands of people wrote into her for recipes by nineteen thirty to one hundred and ninety four stations broadcast aunt. Sammy show and she published aunt. Sammy's radio recipes. Parenthetically the Great Depression Cookbook. It would be the first cookbook published in Braille. Interestingly enough though I struggle to think of how difficult it would be to cook on wood or old timey gas stove without good eyesight on Sammy's recipes. Were meant to be simple healthy and easy to cook. She's even credited with helping Broccoli. Find widespread acceptance prior to which it was only found in insular Italian neighborhoods and Sammie helped many wives and mothers through the Great Depression but once that was over then country was back on its feet. People lost interest. The show was cancelled sometime in the nineteen forties. Though sources don't agree when exactly. There's one other fact about aunt Sammy. That's worth mentioning. She didn't exist in the latter half of the twentieth. The Department of Agriculture Bureau of Home Economics created a wife for uncle. Sam The on creatively named Aunt Sammy. The character was voiced by different women at each individual radio station that way the listener would hear an accent similar to their own and feel more connected to aunt Sammy. Three women worked behind the scenes at the USDA to prepare the script each week that all the regional aunt. Sammy's would use fanny Walker. Contested Recipes Josephine. Harmful wrote the chatty portions of the show and Ruth Fan demine coordinated all of the Menus and recipes. The other woman who guided homemakers through was the very real first lady. Eleanor Roosevelt. When Franklin Roosevelt entered the White House in Nineteen thirty three? A record number of people were hungry but being president is not without its perks and the first family eight well even extravagantly while people stood inbred lines. Eleanor Roosevelt. Who didn't know how to cook realized that the way she and the president ate in the White House had the potential to influence and even help the nation through the depression. She hired an acquaintance. Henrietta Nesbitt whose husband was out of work to be the new White House housekeeper housekeeper at that time more like how we use the term homemaker today and not as we use a euphemism for cleaning lady. Nesbitt and Roosevelt retooled the entire kitchen installing modern appliances and coaxing the skeptical White House staff to use them. This was the first kitchen in America and it wasn't even sanitary recalled. Nesbitt in her memoir. Meanwhile Eleanor turn to home economists for menus that would balance nutrition and economy the healthiest recipes in the world wouldn't help people if they couldn't afford the ingredients what's more she resolved to serve these humble dishes in the White House. Her efforts were covered by national newspapers and followed closely by housewives. There was a catch. These nutritious economic meals were awful. The first kitchen was turning out some of the most unpalatable meals in modern memory. The president himself was usually the test subject for these new dishes and he obligingly choked them down. Things like deviled eggs with tomato sauce and prune pudding in place of lavish dishes. The White House table was the stage for things like Spaghetti with boiled carrots. Cold jellied billion and bread and butter sandwiches served so much mutton that being grown sheep which is cheaper than lamb. Because it's much tougher that it became a joke throughout Washington. The first lady experimented with foods like milk corno a mix of dried milk powder and cornmeal developed by Cornell University milk. Porno could be eaten as a gruel like dish or worked into recipes. I was not brave enough to research. What those recipes might be. The bland meals became so notorious that visitors to the White House would eat before they went nutrition. Not Taste was paramount in the time of soup. Kitchens and bread lines and eleanor. Roosevelt was trying to use her table as a way of encouraging and inspiring other Americans to get through this uniquely challenging historical moment. It was just as well they got used to eating a limited range of food because FDR's presidency also included World War Two and the Roosevelt's eight rationed food just like everyone else Roosevelt's White House eight modestly in an act of culinary solidarity with the people who were suffering. Jane's Eagle men. The CO author of a square meal told The New York Times. Here's a sampling of menu items. The first family and the public general might have enjoyed in massive bunny ears spaghetti with carrots and white sauce. The sauce was basically just milk. Meatless loaf made with peace oatmeal peanuts. Rice and or cottage cheese. Whatever you could get your hands on Mulligan's stew any animal. You could kill or find dead with whatever veggies you could manage or anything. That would keep hungry. They for a few hours without killing you like sawdust. It was reportedly created by the massive homeless population during the depression. Where people in homeless or migrant worker camps would pool their resources so that everyone could eat none of my sources mentioned where the name Mulligan might have come from. We do know the name origin of another STU. Hoover Stu Herbert Hoover had been elected just in time for the crash. But Unlike the Roosevelt's he continued to live the good life in the White House. Shantytowns BECAME HOOVER. Villes and the soup from soup. Kitchens became hoover stu the weirdest one of all and this report is opinion was peanut butter in baked. Onions was a whole onion hollowed out stuffed with peanut butter and baked. Just because we have two things on hand doesn't mean we should eat them at the same time as Eagle men succinctly put it. Peanut butter has nothing to say to a baked onion. Some recipes sound like they shouldn't work but surprisingly do like mock Apple Pie. Apples weren't readily available. But Americans weren't willing to give up their conic Apple Pie. The apples in mock apple pie were actually Ritz crackers and it worked. If you're not already familiar with Youtuber Emmy made in Japan. I'll link her hard time series in the show notes and on the website. She all kinds of dishes from times of deprivation including hot water pie grapefruit. Peel steak toast soup. And even the Haitian dirt cookies which you can hear more about in episode number ninety four. My name is mud while we can be grateful that recipes like ketchup soup and peanut butter and mayonnaise. Sandwiches are behind us. Some food created during the depression is still with us. Meatloaf is a comfort food classic and shaping food into loaves go to during the Great Depression. The same goes for casseroles which were a good way to use up odds and ends or to mask less palatable ingredients the depression also gave us the mother of all comfort. Food Kraft Macaroni and cheese or kraft dinner for my friends up. North in Nineteen thirty seven craft heard about a salesman from the tender Roni. Macaroni Company of Saint Louis. A Scottish emigrant aimed grant Leslie going rogue and selling his noodles with packets of greeted kraft cheese attached. They hired him to promote the concept and started selling it for nineteen cents for four servings.

Eleanor Roosevelt Aunt Sammy White House Depression Franklin Roosevelt President Trump Great Depression Cookbook America Stu Herbert Hoover Henrietta Nesbitt Sammie Hoover Washington Cornell University Mulligan Department Of Agriculture Bure
China coronavirus causing chaos for U.S. and foreign companies in China

Vickie Allen and Levon Putney

00:23 sec | 1 year ago

China coronavirus causing chaos for U.S. and foreign companies in China

"The virus outbreak is still creating problems for US and foreign companies that operate in China Henrietta traces with beta partners they are a entirely globalized economy now and so I would expect that this would be pretty significant disruptor and the fear component I think is just starting to seep out apple Google Starbucks a McDonald's have already seen their operations disrupted by the corona virus

United States Apple Starbucks Mcdonald China Google
9 million children could die in a decade unless world acts on pneumonia, leading agencies warn

UN News

00:56 sec | 1 year ago

9 million children could die in a decade unless world acts on pneumonia, leading agencies warn

"Boosting efforts to fight. Pneumonia could avert nearly nine million child deaths. This decade from pneumonia and other major diseases is a new analysis is found ahead of the first ever global forum on childhood pneumonia taking place this week. According to a new model from Johns Hopkins University in the United States scaling-up pneumonia treatment and prevention services can save the lives of three point. Two million children under five that would create a so called ripple effect that would prevent five point seven seven million extra child deaths from other major childhood diseases at the same time if we're serious about saving the lives of children said UN Children's Fund Executive Director Henrietta four. We have to get serious about fighting pneumonia. The current corona virus outbreak shows this means improving timely detection and prevention. She added it. Pneumonia is the biggest single killer of children. Worldwide claiming the lives of eight hundred thousand last year or one child every thirty nine

Pneumonia Fund Executive Director Henrie Johns Hopkins University United States UN
Trading in suffering: detention, exploitation and abuse in Libya

UN News

03:38 min | 1 year ago

Trading in suffering: detention, exploitation and abuse in Libya

"This is the news. In brief from the United Nations. The world should not accept the dire an untenable situation facing children in Libya the head of the UN Children's fund UNICEF said on Friday children in Libya including refugee and migrant children continue to suffer grievously amidst the violence Arlington. Chaos unleashed by the country's longstanding civil war executive director Henrietta. Four said in a statement since last April when the hostilities ability is broke out in Tripoli and western Libya conditions for thousands of children and civilians deteriorated further with indiscriminate attacks in populated areas that have caused hundreds of death and UNICEF has received reports of children being main killed and also recruited to fight. Since the fall of President Moammar Gadhafi twenty eleven Libya has been in the throes of ongoing instability and economic collapse despite its large oil reserves preserves meanwhile over the last eight months more than one hundred fifty thousand people ninety thousand home or children have been forced to flee their homes uh-huh and are now internally displaced the U. N. High Commissioner for Human Rights has condemned the continued killing and displacement of civilians in northwestern western Syria despite a ceasefire announcement last Sunday. Michelle Bachelet called for the immediate cessation of hostilities. In and around. I'm the de Escalation zone of it. Live as well as the protection of all civilians and civilian infrastructure. The latest ceasefire as with others in the past year ear has yet again failed to protect civilians. Who faced the threat of being killed and means going about their everyday lives. She lamented it. is is deeply distressing. That civilians are still being killed. On a daily basis in missile strikes from both the air and ground she elaborated hundreds of thousands of people have been displaced by the violence and forced to traverse conflict zones. Some have fled to smaller territories in northern Italy job while others have crossed into areas in northern Aleppo under the control of Turkish backed armed groups independent. UN Human Glenn writes experts on Friday expressed concerns about the treason trial that opens this week against Cambodia. Opposition leader Kem Sokha saying the the entire process has been beset by regularities. Mr Socha was arrested. Detained and charged with treason for twenty thirteen speech. He delivered delivered in Australia. That was broadcast by. CBN The Cambodian Broadcasting Network if convicted. He faces a custodial sentence of between fifteen to thirty years. The experts said they had strong grounds to believe that the treason charges politically motivated and forms. Part of a larger Roger Pattern of misapplying laws to target political opponents and critics of the government following his arrest in September twenty seventeen. Mr Socha was detained without bail and held in pretrial detention for a year. Then put under house arrest allowed to leave home last year he. He was then banned from travelling abroad and forbidden to conduct political activities. The experts repeat their call for restrictive bail conditions to be removed and for all political rights to be reinstated with compensation and reparations lists. Kapiti U._N. News.

Mr Socha Libya Un Children Michelle Bachelet Unicef United Nations Kem Sokha UN Henrietta Tripoli U. N. High Commissioner For Hu Moammar Gadhafi Executive Director Aleppo Arlington Cambodia President Trump
News in Brief 4 November 2019

UN News

04:16 min | 1 year ago

News in Brief 4 November 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations unbearable levels of air pollution in India's capital New Delhi declared a public health emergency by the local the government as of Monday have made the invisible killer visible a U N senior pollution expert has said according to media reports residents of the capital city are set to suffer record levels of smog for at least a week even with emergency measures in place to tackle the problem with some flights delayed and in diverted due to thick smog. Valentin Full Desk Senior Program Management Officer for the U N Environment Programme in India you net told you on the news that current levels of fine particulate matter containing unsafe chemicals harmful to human health are forty times higher than the World Health Organization W. H. Show recommended level the major contributor is poor farming practices Mr Full explained with states adjacent to the capital region practicing widespread stubble-burning in open fields in addition waste mismanagement and heavy traffic girl so raising toxicity levels. Who H. O. has outlined the detrimental impact of particulate matter pollution or pm two point five on humans stunting children's brains and triggering heart disease he's stroke pulmonary disease and lung cancers with an estimated four point two million premature deaths globally linked to ambient air pollution you up is working with various sectors in a bid to help reduce the toxic smog in New Delhi and beyond including government led agricultural initiatives and projects on the ground around to eliminate harmful open burning practices the head of the U. N. Children's fund UNICEF is appealing for governments to repatriate scores a foreign born children stranded in northeast Syria in wake of the Turkish offensive which began last month the agency estimates nearly twenty-eight thousand children from for more than sixty countries remain trapped in the region mostly in displacement camps this includes almost twenty thousand from Iraq more than eighty percent of the stranded foreign children are under twelve and half are under five additionally around two hundred fifty boys are being held in detention though that number is likely to be higher some are as young as nine executive director for UNICEF Henrietta Four said on Monday that the escalation brings brings eight renewed urgency for governments to repatriate these children before it's too late adding that all are living in conditions not fit for children children so far at least seventeen countries have repatriated more than six hundred fifty children who are now living with family members. UNICEF has supported the process by helping some of the youngsters to reintegrate but misfortune pointed out that these countries are the exception rather than the norm and finally the UN Security Purity Council on Monday expressed deep concern over Guinea Bissau 's political crisis following President Jose Mario Vazquez decision last week to dissolve the Government Vermont including the Prime Minister and appoint new leadership in a statement the council called on all actors to fully respect the response from the regional body of West African States it's echoes which deemed the president's actions illegal and urged top politicians to reach agreement over a way forward the president's dismissal and replacement of Prime Minister Aristide Gomez intensified a bitter power struggle between the president and the ruling party just weeks before four fresh presidential elections set for the twenty four th of November one demonstrator has died and several have been injured during related political protests President Vases term in office expired this June but under terms agreed with echo us. He will stay in office until this month's poll in the hope of being reelected elected the council reiterated its strong support and commitment to the country's peace process and underscored the urgent need to hold the already delayed presidential election as agreed and allow for a peaceful transition of power Natalie Hutchinson U. N. News.

U. N. Children President Trump Un Security Purity Council New Delhi India Unicef President Jose Mario Vazquez United Nations Prime Minister Aristide Gomez World Health Organization Desk Senior Program Management Mr Full H. O. Valentin Guinea Bissau Prime Minister
"henrietta" Discussed on Tales

Tales

15:56 min | 1 year ago

"henrietta" Discussed on Tales

"Underneath her covers eyes, shut tight waiting for the door to open hours, passed by but she remained wide awake recalling the words she had heard that evening. She prayed, the light from the Half Moon was not bright enough to spoil her ruse Henrietta. Let her eyes open just a crack when she heard the door opening in dim blue light cast by the window. She could see shadow pass darker than the rest of the pitch black night, her stepmother stocking steadily up to the end of the bed, where Berta lay blissfully asleep as the witch past the window, Henrietta thought she saw the blade of an axe glint in the moonlight. She shut her eyes tight ready to bolt for the door if her stepmother got any closer, the bed shook sharply underneath Henrietta, and she stifled. Gasp, the axe had not struck her neck. She risked another peak toward the end of the bed and saw the shadow raising the axe over its head for a second strike. Ill. So brought down the axe again cursing as it got stuck. She put her foot up against the bed and wrenched it free. Then she brought it down one final time breathing heavily ill. So withdrew acts dragging along the floor. She went Henrietta waited as long as she dared before throwing off the covers and sliding off the bed when her bare feet touched down. One of them slid a wet and sticky. Patch on the floor blood Berta 's blood, a shiver ran up, her spine as she tiptoed towards the door shoes. Clutched in her spare hand Henrietta crept out of the room, she passed the witches room with agonizing slowness measuring. How much weight she put on each foot before proceeding when she heard her stepmother snoring, she stopped? And I d a forming with a deep breath. She pushed open the door to the witches room ill says room was even darker than her daughters, since her curtains remained drawn overnight, but Henrietta did not need to see clearly the table. She was looking for never moved. It was where the witch stored her magic wand, Henrietta felt her way along the wall using the witches snores to keep her oriented, in the darkness, she walked as lightly as she could holding her breath for fear of X hailing too loudly. Eventually, she felt her foot brush against a table leg. She then felt her way through the trinkets on the surface until she grasped the wand. A spark ability trinity passed from the stick to her palm when she gripped, it Henry Etta almost laughed in shock and relief. Once she left the witches room, Henrietta, flew through the house with dreamlike speed hallway kitchen front steps. There was only one place to go and only one person who would help her her sweetheart Roland. Whatever unspoken contract, she had with the witch. For adopting her was truly broken. She reached Rowlands farmhouse and pounded on the door with all her might for a horrible moment. Henrietta worried that Roland slept so deeply that the witch would wake and catch her before Roland even heard her knocking, but the moment passed and the door opened revealing a bleary eyed Roland. We'll thank heavens my stepmother, killed her own daughter and thinks she killed me. When the sun rises, and she sees what she's done. I'll be lost. She was almost out of breath when she realized Roland was barely understanding anything. She said, so she collected herself. And told him the story from the very beginning from the apron, he'd given her to the murder to the theft of her stepmother's magic wand, she saw the sleep follow away from his eyes with every new detail Rowlands, brow, knitted and concern. But it's almost dawn. How shall we put enough distance between ourselves and your stepmother?.

Henrietta Roland Berta Half Moon Henry Etta Rowlands farmhouse Rowlands murder theft
"henrietta" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

Talk Nerdy

04:30 min | 2 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on Talk Nerdy

"Do you use? He Lascelles ever. So we haven't in our word. But I know, of course, about the history, and actually it's really exciting when I was at Hopkins, right? Because that's where everything started. So we can talk about the history of. But when I was there Rebecca screwed the author of the immortal mortal life of relax. Yeah. She came in the lacks family came. She did a reading of her book. And so there's still some friction between the lacks family, and like in age and other people sure there's a lot of ethical companies who have taken advantage of that technology. So, but I was just really excited to see the author to see some of the family members into be right in the heart of where it started. Yeah. Guys, if you don't know anything about the heedless story about Henrietta lacks in about these cancer, this cancer cell line that was taken basically without consent from a page. Patient who had cervical cancer and be literally became the key cell line. And almost every laboratory across the world. It's a fascinating story of this basically ambivalence, right? There's a deep inbev lands with about the fact that this cell type has saved so many lives, but at the same time this was utter and more than questionable deeply unethical practices. Taking somebody's personal information. Their personal data the personal actual tissue with from them without their consent. And of course, the conversation here is because this was a less informed. More black family in an era. When was this? It was early in the nineteen hundreds or like mid nineteen hundred. I'm gonna look it up because that's obviously a big part of the conversation right before informed. Consent was even thing. Yeah. Nineteen fifty one is when she died. So it was she was born in nineteen twenty. She died. Fifteen fifty one. So it was just before she died. Right. And then they use those cells this before informed consent. It changed a lot of the way that we do practices, and of course, people have profited off of. Yes. A lot of people have done nonprofit, incredible work, and people countless lives have been saved downstream from that. But also a lot of big companies have profited and the family didn't really see any of that. Which is where the tension comes. So I highly recommend Rebecca's. Glitz book is incredible. I think they did they didn't HBO special on it with Oprah. I watched it too. It was pretty consistent with the book. Yeah. And it actually was pretty good with the science. I felt like yeah. Which is always the coast. That's true. So yeah, highly recommend, but that's fascinating that you got to see the family, speak and see the I don't know. We don't often get that. What do you what do they call it? Whenever you watch antiques roadshow. This is such a dumb thing to say provenance, you know, like when there's a an artifact of history, and it's so far removed from our everyday lives. And we've only heard about it and newspapers and books, but then all the sudden we get to read the letter of the person who made that piece of pottery or we get to see the hands it passed through or things to see all the rich history around it and be lucky enough that her kids were still alive could have those conversations about what it meant to them. Right. Exactly. Oh my God. So I don't wanna say cool. That's not the right word. Yeah. It's very interesting story. Yeah. It's it's hard. And there's a lot of deep, you know, obviously just comfort around, but it is fascinating. So your lab doesn't actively UC. Is you need more unique more than just a cell line? You need all these inner place. So, and it's also the type of cancers that we're looking at for the metabolism piece. We're looking at colorectal cancer and also pancreatic cancer. So yeah, very devastating progressive disease. And then for some of the other signaling models that we have were looking at breast cancer. So it's just making sure that the experimental tool set that you're utilizing is relevant to the disease setting that you want to study. So your work is interesting because it's not quite basic research. It's not quite applied. Would you call it like what do they call translational it somewhere in the in the chase sort of in the middle?.

Rebecca pancreatic cancer Lascelles Hopkins HBO Henrietta UC
"henrietta" Discussed on NPR News Now

NPR News Now

02:29 min | 3 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on NPR News Now

"Our news gaza city of federal judge says special counsel robert muller was within his authority when he brought charges against trump campaign chairman paul manafort today's decision is a setback for manafort in his defense against charges including money laundering false statements acting as an unregistered foreign agent manafort argued muller exceeded his thority because the case was unrelated to russia's interference in the two thousand sixteen elections a strengthening economy has us homebuilders more confident about sales prospects the national association of home builders wells fargo builder sentiment index rose two points this month ending a fourmonth slide for builders wall street lower by the closing bell the dow down one hundred ninety three points the smp are the nasdaq down fifty nine the s and p five hundred down eighteen points asian markets are trading lower at this hour the nikkei the main market in japan down about three tenths of a percent you're listening to npr news from wash washington on parts of hawaii's big island the forecast today includes the possibility of volcanic ash as a what you public radio's bill dorman reports just one of the developments that residents are dealing with the hawaiian volcano observatory says a driven explosion at the holy crater remains a possibility but scientists say the summit areas currently acting as an open vince system and excessive pressure is not building up at the top of the volcano bill dorman reporting a painting of henrietta lacks is the latest addition to the national portrait gallery in washington dc her cells help transform medical science with neither her knowledge nor her consent as npr's neta ulaby reports her story was told enough as selling book and a film that helped inspire the painting henrietta lacks is shown in a cherry red dress from the nineteen fifties that's when she died of cancer her cells have helped cancer patients going through chemotherapy and people with the seizes ranging from polio hiv lexus grandson offered lex carter came to the museum and was thrilled by the recognition this is a great honor for her to be hanging here with so many prestigious people lax's portrait hangs not far from presidents but museum curator said it's an honor to acknowledge a person whose life profoundly changed science and conversations about medical ethics netted lippi npr news.

npr neta ulaby japan national association of home chairman special counsel gaza lippi lex carter robert muller henrietta holy crater hawaiian volcano observatory bill dorman hawaii washington russia paul manafort
"henrietta" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on How To Be Amazing with Michael Ian Black

"It's how to be amazing i'm michael ian black when you think about theater at its best eat lives in a kind of electric state he can be a vibrant and startling experience in which every moment onstage has been mind to its core but it somehow has to remain new every time it's perform and that's a very very hard thing to get right my guest today the great american stage and film director and writer jorge seawolf has spent a career getting it right from his early successes with the colored museum jellies last jam and the first broadway productions of angels in america parts one in to do his work helming the public feeder soon after its founder joseph papp died where he directed among many many other plays bring into noise bring into funk to his more recent work directing for example elaine stritch at liberty shuffle along long the immortal life of henrietta lacks for hbo in now the iceman come with which is about to open on broadway pan stars denzel washington george c wolfe has made a career out of finding truth and presenting it as unvarnished as he can to america and it is my delight and honor to welcome him to how to be amazing hello hello hello so happy you're here and excited but it is daunting when you're speaking to when i'm speaking to somebody that i consider as much a philosopher as anything else and i was watching you in many interviews speak about truth and speak about using this work to find the truth in it made me wonder is there a truth in any production that you're trying to find or is the truth.

director joseph papp elaine stritch hbo george c wolfe michael ian black writer jorge seawolf america founder henrietta
"henrietta" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

The Ben Shapiro Show

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on The Ben Shapiro Show

"Okay so speaking of media bias as if the media didn't henrietta badly enough at the white house correspondents association dinner then there are some pretty great examples of media bias over the weekend that are just astonishing and once again i repeat we hated the media before trump let's not pretend this is about trump it is not about trump trump rightly sums up the state of the media according to many in the conservative movement their garbage there's there dumpster fire at one of the reasons we think they're dumpster fire stuff like this joy reid over at msnbc she's a commentator over there enjoy reid came out in the last couple of weeks had a bunch of old post on her blog that were quote unquote homophobic or as love afo bec you know the ones that i saw maybe there's some ones i haven't seen seemed relatively mild in any case sheet apologize for them in the past but because joy reid is kind of a crazy person joy reid came out and instead of saying oops sees sorry i did that i've changed my views since then she suggested that instead someone had hacked her website retroactively to put incriminating posts up about her and then she came out on msnbc and she finally apologized and here is what her apology sounded like here's what i know i genuinely do not believe i wrote those hateful things because they are completely alien to me but i can definitely understand based on things i have tweeted and have written in the past why some people don't believe me i've not been exempt from being dumb or cruel or hurtful to the very people i want to advocate for i own that i get it and for that i am truly truly sorry.

joy reid msnbc henrietta white house
"henrietta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Henrietta lacks well she wrote this whole book because she was in a class and they just referred to the he'll like oh that was some woman named henrietta right and she thought that she wanted to find out who this one wasn't how really vitally important she was so she's most well known as as you said for for the odyssey but she has all these other relationships to to greek myth so she's the daughter of the sun god helius and she is also the aunt of the mini tar the horrible half bull half manmonster she's the aunt of the witch medina famous for killing her own children she's the area adne she's cousin to permit the as and a whole host of other notable divinities and so she really has this and she creates monsters as well so she has this whole life that has nothing to do with odysseus and that was something i was really fascinated by because you know we just get to see her as a cameo in odysseus story but i wanted to kind of flip that now deceased as a cameo in her story it's this the first line in your book is quoted almost every review because it really sets the stage for who served is or what we're going to learn about sir saying i'm going to read it to you if it's okay you wrote it already when i was born the name for what i was did not exist they called me nymph assuming i would be like my mother and aunts and thousand cousins least of the lesser goddesses are powers are so modest they could scarcely ensure our entities are trinity's excuse me so the idea that there wasn't a name for what she was that she was in this incredibly limited society you know within the world of god's we often think about god's greek god we think about zeus throwing thunderbolts you know he'll ios the sun god athena these major deities and if you were one of those gods life is pretty good for you you got to do exactly what you wanted you got to.

henrietta right
"henrietta" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

WHYR 96.9 FM

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

"We know about today okay well now let's get into a henrietta levitte's word itself i tell us a little bit about uh where she was born uh where she grew up and how did you wind up as an astronomer at radcliffe the all very interesting trajectory xu uh the daughter of a congregational west bennest or uh very very puritan kind of upbringing and lancaster pennsylvania at some point or family moved to cambridge massachusetts were father had a church and later out to the midwest to uh first ohio and then to wisconsin loyd wisconsin and she followed the family there uh went to the family values of educational and they encouraged her to go to school and she was voight the collagen wisconsin at first then later transferred to radcliffe university back in cambridge massachusetts uh partly because she got relative there and uh during school she had what was wrong the general liberal arts education she had some science class and uh but mostly humanities towards the end for raw for time there before she graduated she took them mom astronomy classes that were taught by astronomers who just walked across the street from the harvard university observatory and that's when she got hooked and she took a volunteer position and a half the observatory right after school i mean right out of school and the threatened to her job is what they called a computer someone who was hired to do calculations now even today grad students have to support themselves either by parttime jobs are scholarships or what have you are you're mentioning her book that she came from probably an upper middleclass background so she didn't have to worry about a job right i think he probably i never able to confirm that but it seemed clear that she must have good up somewhat independent b because there are these letters in which you talked about going off on cruises to europe and things them uh the food think pay 25 cents an hour which if you put it into an inflation calculator comes out to be about five dollars in today's terms so um you know basically what you.

henrietta levitte radcliffe lancaster pennsylvania massachusetts ohio wisconsin harvard university observatory cambridge wisconsin loyd wisconsin radcliffe university europe five dollars
"henrietta" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

WHYR 96.9 FM

01:32 min | 3 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

"The most egregious example is that of henrietta levitt we all know that the stars are very far away but precisely how far are they in order to judge citizens to a star you need what is called a standard candle that is a star that is the same throughout the universe therefore a star that is very far away could be very dim or very bright depending upon how intense is light is so you need a standard candle a star that doesn't change in brightness throughout the universe and that's what henrietta levitt found she founded the sepe variables are in fact the standard candles anywhere in the universe and you can calibrate them you know exactly how bright they are using a formula that she came up with however she never god credit foreign so today we can measure the scale of the universe using the result of henrietta levitt who in her own lifetime and many lifetimes afterwards never got any credit for a great discovery we also have the sad story of joscelyn bell a woman graduate student who discovered the pulsar but it was her thesis adviser who won the nobel prize in physics for the discovery of the pulsar and we also had the sad story of the aruban back in the 1960s ios one of the first people to point to the fact that the universe seems to be full of something called dark matter but her result was ignored and only recently had the theory of dark matter been been given experimental verification because of all the males who have now jumped into.

henrietta levitt graduate student nobel prize
"henrietta" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:09 min | 3 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"At the lowest level it's been in forty or fifty years so in you know you're put up her we're way and you're making for people that if they tried to climb over its biggest electric shoes or it's what i put the guys from iit's along the border uh anyone tries to commend you shoot and kill the guy dream both of those extreme but what about the shoot will kill you know the of his whole think other problematic good idea i'll lose my life again oh i think you're hugged and that's the only way we can solve it i mean that's the other ethnic groups serb the irish a local police should of a good one step henrietta mentioned the bill remind rv did the mexican syrup machar huddle the next autumn yep like you give them the solve isolated cobham because when they're doing their property and taking care of things they of the noisiest people what i'm trying to watch tv oil if funds sick uh at the it seems to me like they're ignorant i'm going to go out there one day ending a tunnel hey look at you know i don't feel good max max canceled wednesday's godsell but now i i agree with you in riyadh or i think i in i i said the same thing though they are in the minority but doesn't mean they should be treated differently if you're going to enforce the law you really do have to be colorblind and enforce it across the wall and i believe that ice and i believe that the federal authorities are are doing everything they can to to do that at least from what i've read it what i've seen happen to mean there have been people deported who've been here for twenty years who who are irish and there's a large number of irish immigrants here are nothing but we're at one time there were a legal so darker goals we do it alone we leave it as a dead it's an uh one someone bell a screw up why they end up getting the rest to go to court of the their in what legal they found guilty big at the port it that's that's how i feel are again thank you.

iit henrietta rv riyadh twenty years fifty years one day
"henrietta" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on KELO

"To go onto henrietta in annapolis good morning henrietta i'm good morning i thank you for taking my call i agree with its travel it just you'll was on the phone trevor yeah yeah i agree with him that i think that we should go ahead and try to prosecute him ankle dick and the death penalty because we have to set an example of people come to this country and do think like that horrific murders op people it's really not acceptable why agree with you the thing about president trump and guantanamo is that president trump is kind of grandstanding on this in a way that's not productive he is he is cutting he's cutting antiterrorism funds for one thing and then complaining about chuck schumer well there are lots of reasons to complain about chuck schumer humor but chuck schumer was also part of the gang of eight that wanted to do away with with the uh the way that seifart's i four saipa i've got into this country he wanted to get rid of that and you know it's wherever again it's a case of president trump picking fights were they don't exist and taking the focus off getting these bad guys you don't want to leave the bag out location haitian how long have kate projects is ridiculous how long it takes an alleged fittingly have the in fayette and taking care of ludicrous that we should preclude him as soon as possible and get it done thank you henrietta it's ryan and kansas city you're on first light ryan good morning ivan thank you for taking my call everybody result andreatta and trevor have got it completely right and and grant is not a general krolak is one of the lord is marine leaders in in modern history and i absolutely the best way when when in court the last few years we've six hundred prosecution number eleven and did you chuckle are hit get mo it's not the right idea however.

trevor trump guantanamo chuck schumer seifart annapolis president kate fayette ryan kansas
"henrietta" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"You know i am i gonna i get you on the way we got full lines i want to give everybody a shot here i appreciate you calling night side and you do it a often in i i really appreciate your lodal is pro you'll loyalty to this program like you thanks john have a great night henrietta is in lynn henrietta or you are on the ring central nights i caught a langa right ahead help oh i think henrietta didn't did never radio turned down an reenter you they're probably not okay let's do this we will hold henrietta we'll get back to henrietta let's go down pennsylvania gloria in pennsylvania gloria euro the ring central nights i call it a longer right ahead okay now um i've been getting bits and pieces on debt while i'm not completely clear on if he has in a nursing home or what at that the tampa i don't think he's in a nursing home i i think he he was in his wheelchair has been in a wheelchair for five years okay okay now he's gonna will care and i understand he's got all time it right i don't know that that's been determined i haven't seen that he is up and aid so healy's ninety three of the chinanet we can agree on that right and i don't know that ngoma nabi on medication with that medication can affect the mind and in the fifth away than it did not go baker and let them brought up but if any than he could have heat a mature woman he could have gently the poked her hand liu hand politely over two am and give him a darren momneen nasty are angry look but did not gain without mile and say hey let get pracha but i don't appreciate that do not do it again faith all right at all and he'd get not half the public by it after all the man it his last few years come back yet again he he didn't have a reputation as a hound dog there are some presidents who with head who had had reputations now udbina a hound dog bit me uncertain like clinton yeah and a different opinion all right glory.

lynn henrietta tampa baker darren momneen john pennsylvania healy clinton five years
"henrietta" Discussed on WWL

WWL

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on WWL

"Pick about chelsea is what it here comes the red flag that's a worthwhile challenge your because it looks like he scored and you're saving time do as he catches in a retired challenging the ruling on the field of an april way path will renew the play so i think he got both feet down now the question is does he have total control of the ball before he is feats lid onto the chalk he definitely caught the ball heat definitely got both feet down were you said exactly right are they going to believe that he has possessor won the two feeder down because these poor liberal is one head i think the overturn i think it's touch that i think it is too weak rapid with his left hand brought it onehanded into his arm to his body while both feet were are still in bounds i think this is what up of the way by the kid are you kidding me that was unbelievable was really good coverage that is an unbelievable football play by him we cloudy even if it's not a touch they'll give it to them yeah and a charter fancier seeing this on the big board to stop help center and they like what they see they are freezing it bringing back that level build advantage make sure the officials can't hear that now the call is ultimately going to be made from new york direct alberto river on is talk with carl jeffers right now unser henrietta eight touchdowns as a rookie last year that was tied for tops among nfl tied ends so i believe is the touchdown but remember the standard which is that there has to be beyond any reasonable doubt to overturn it jefferson still on headset and now he's taken them off sison has been may after reviewing the play the ruling on the field has been changed the receiver control the path man home it is a touchstone charges will not be charged with a time out a brilliant catch by sir henry has made this a three point game with the eight t heading a fouryard pass from philip rivers and its twenty six twenty three with six forty four laps one of the best fouryard touchdown catches you'll ever see by the.

help center alberto river carl jeffers unser henrietta jefferson sison sir henry philip rivers chelsea new york nfl fouryard
"henrietta" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on KQED Radio

"For your experiment you'll you'll do twelve mice you'll say it's a pilot study new cross your fingers that if you had done it with the right number of mice he would get the same result so that's a problem partly because of funding constraints and partly because scientists no make the best with they have and and sometimes that's enough often it's not enough and and then scientists are sometimes lobby in the way they use mouth mice an experiment right right you mentioned even that the kind of bedding that used for mice in one experimental one part of it might be different an app or their this group with mice will be more stressed out then this group of my and so many little so some things that can go wrong exactly and you can if you have if you start with a group of mites for your experiment if you if you if they if you're not careful in some of them we put 10 from the same litter in one one part of your experiment and ten from another litter and another part of your experiment the difference may not be that you that the experiment is different on one the other it may be that you've got different litter so so the answer is assigned to should know that they should mix them up so that some from one litter going in each side of the experiment but those sorts of things don't always dawn on scientists and the and so those are the kinds of problems that i talk about loon route down en en cell lines i remember i mean probably a number of you here of red the immortal life of henrietta lacks and i remember reading that learning about here's this this this cell line from it from a cervical tumor correct right very virulent tumor and an end that it there is the first time that that scientists were able to keep cells growing and multiplying outside a body and was very exciting now you have this these cells that you could test drugs upon all but i didn't realize is that not only are they immortal but they're kinda like out of control the other kudzu at away grow like crazy and they outcompete anything so if you're not entirely careful in your lab and you get one he'll also.

henrietta
"henrietta" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

Stuff You Should Know

01:44 min | 3 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on Stuff You Should Know

"Lackyes which is being options by oprah ya for hbo yeah they'll be goodwin for movie here should be um so she apparently buys it in in because she was saying that for many many years after the book came out what for a couple of years after the book came up because it came out 2010 here and this explanation came out this year um that they had to tell people i'm booked her like we have no idea why herself kept growing growing in now we have a better understanding but the the explanation chuck now referring to everybody um so you get cervical cancer from the human papilloma virus the two also all right okay ahpv and come up parents really which is very common by the way yes there um but that's what cervical cancer comes from for the an interesting yes okayso the hpv iin henrietta lacks head insinuated its own genetic material into her dna right above a gene called mikemyc the and this gene to regulatory geneso when it starts to win it's expression starts get haywire it can lead to cancer so they think that the placement of this hpv is what causes the cells to grow and divide so quickly yet and so robustly because these healer cells are in immortal line of cells when you put them in the right conditions you take one sell it will keep dividing indefinitely near and we should probably talk about why the two big thing why other people cells don't normally do that.

chuck cancer goodwin
"henrietta" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:01 min | 4 years ago

"henrietta" Discussed on KELO

"We are going to start with henrietta in annapolis good morning henrietta all right where do you think of all this well who watergate i really in fact it appeared that the part of air wants to act like a dictator in telling people what they do like that were found to me while so you think there's obstruction of justice some people say this justifies the president of what he said that uh the director colmey had told them he was not on under investigation do you think that's ordinary that beside the point uh i think it was the point y you know all come out and we are going to be paying attention to it absolutely all right hey thanks henry other going to jerusalem in charleston south carolina governor jerome warning reflected oh ferry corker you throw big reported baker thank you for your delivery you're aware we're back all no you're not going to give you your more or you're talking about the access hollywood tape somebody somebody was talking about the president's ally said they have had crises like that the allegations of sexual assault repeated unfounded claims and they also won an election that a lot of people thought was unwinnable so if for people that don't lie donald trump this is not over and for donald trump and his supporters this is an over by a long shot i don't care what the learning okay i don't care what the trip and bird after older matter before he actually because you care call worker earn more oh no are i won't show ma here tomorrow is oh all right hey thank you jeff.

henrietta president colmey charleston governor jerome baker assault donald trump annapolis obstruction of justice director jerusalem south carolina hollywood jeff