35 Burst results for "helium"

Here are the winners of the 2020 Ig Nobel Prizes to make you laugh, then think

Kottke Ride Home

04:45 min | 3 d ago

Here are the winners of the 2020 Ig Nobel Prizes to make you laugh, then think

"The Twenty Twenty Ige Nobel Prize winners were announced last night the ignoble prizes to achievements that. First make people laugh. Then make them think the prizes are intended to celebrate the unusual honor the imaginative and spur people's interest in science medicine and technology and quote. A. Common Misconception about the ignoble prizes is that they're like the razzies you know making fun of things for being bad. But as they say on their website quote, we're honoring achievements that make people laugh and then think good achievements can also be odd funny and even absurd. So combat achievements a lot of good science gets attacked because of its absurdity and a lot of bad science gets revered despite its absurdity and quote. This year, the award ceremony was held only online but fun fact for you the ceremony while always in person prior to this year has also been streamed online every single year since nineteen, ninety, five making it. One of the very first events to be streamed live online. Improbable research who runs the prize thinks that it may have been the first ever event streamed live online was. Not a music concert, which is pretty cool and now without further ADO, here's a rundown of the twenty twenty winners, the Acoustics. Prize. went to a multinational team that basically had an alligator inhale a bunch of helium with the high pitched effect you'd anticipate so that they could study how alligators communicate the psychology prize went to a North American, team who came up with a method to. Identify, narcissists based on their eyebrow movements. The Peace Prize actually went to the governments, of India and Pakistan. For quote, having their diplomats surreptitiously ring each other's doorbells in the middle of the night and then run away before anyone had a chance to answer the door and quotes and next up the physics prize went to a team who wanted to see what happens to an earthworm. When you vibrate at high frequencies, some of these I think make a lot more sense view actually dive into the paper ignoble does a really good job of describing them in the weirdest most intriguing ways possible. The Economics Prize was awarded to the team who tried to quote quantify the relationship between different countries, national income inequality, and the average amount of mouth to mouth kissing and quote. The management. Prize went to a team of professional Chinese hitmen who conducted a hit by having. So many of them pay the other one to do it with less and less money each time that eventually no one was murdered. The. Prize was awarded to Richard vetter for collecting evidence that Entomologists Aka people who study insects or indeed scared of spiders. Are Not Insects. Now, the medicine prize went to a Dutch and Belgian team for diagnosing missile phony A-. And this is one I remember seen in the headlines about when the research was published because I super identify with it missile phony is Stress at hearing other people make chewing sounds end quotes. The materials science prize sounds completely bazaar and pointless until you understand that this British and American team are archaeologists who were trying to prove something about an artifact that had been found. They won the prize for quote showing that knives manufactured from frozen human feces do not work well and quotes. And finally the Second Prize winner of the year to be more ripped from the headlines than based on academic papers. The Medical Education Prize was awarded to Jay Your Bolsonaro of Brazil. Boris. Johnson of the United Kingdom. Never Injure mody of India Andrea Manual Lopez Obrador of Mexico. Alexander Lukashenko of Belarus, Donald Trump of the USA or John of Turkey Vladimir Putin of Russia and govern Guli Berdymukhamedov of Turkmenistan. For quote using the covid nineteen viral pandemic to teach the world that politicians can have a more immediate effect on life and death. Then scientists and doctors can end quote. Wow. Yeah I mean scientists are pretty fed up. You might have seen that scientific American actually endorsed a candidate for president for the very first time in their one hundred and seventy five year history because among other points. Trump's rejection of evidence in public health measures have been catastrophic in the US and quotes

Prize Nobel Prize Medical Education Prize Twenty Twenty Ige India Donald Trump Belarus USA President Trump Vladimir Putin Alexander Lukashenko Andrea Manual Lopez Obrador Jay Your Bolsonaro Pakistan Turkmenistan Mexico Guli Berdymukhamedov Johnson
Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade will be television-only

Ron St. Pierre

01:16 min | Last week

Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade will be television-only

"Macy's parade is going to look a lot different. The Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade is going to be macho different this year because of covert 19 mayor did build the Blasio yesterday announcing the iconic parade will be a virtual event this year because of the Corona virus. In a statement, Macy said this year the celebration will shift to a television on Lee Special presentation showcasing the Macy's parade. Signature mix of giant character, helium balloons, fantastic floats, street performers, clowns and heralding the arrival of the holiday season with the one and only Santa Claus pulling up the rear. The floats will be staged in midtown Manhattan's Herald Square and will be secured two vehicles instead of by participants holding ropes, tether ropes. Local musical performers will also take the place of Out of state marching bands this year, apparently with Macy's, adding that the total number of participants will be down some 75% from last year, and those who do participate will have to wear face masks as well as follow social distancing measures a social distancing parade. Three hour event usually draws about 3.5 million Spectators in New York City more than 50 million viewers on TV going to still be broadcast on NBC at 9 A.m. Eastern Time on Thanksgiving Day.

Macy Herald Square NBC New York City Manhattan Blasio
David Blaine: Daredevil takes flight with helium-filled balloons

News and Perspective with Taylor Van Cise

02:57 min | 2 weeks ago

David Blaine: Daredevil takes flight with helium-filled balloons

"Illusionist David Blaine says he didn't have control of anything for his latest stunt that took him very high into the Arizona sky. Yesterday. 80 sees Matt Gutman reports took 52 giant helium balloons to get him up and gravity to bring David Blaine back down to the Arizona desert floor. In his first major life event in nearly a decade, the illusionist soaring more than 4.5 miles in the air, hosted by all those balloons. It was a scene lifted right out of the beloved kids movie on blame, dedicating the feed to his own kid, nine year old Desa, who was right there by his side as he took off and as he floated off into the stratosphere, the temperature dropping into the single digits, the air dangerously thin, available oxygen on lied about Half the amount at sea level, putting him in a serious risk. High poxy is when you don't get enough oxygen because you go to high. You have no idea what you're doing is you're completely five. It's like you're drunk, and as he keeps climbing, Blaine is communicating with his ground team. Including Desa anything up. Um Or it's 16,000 now. We're probably gonna go up. Where the airplanes go, and as he climbs to nearly a jets cruising altitude, the oxygen shortage hits it's 95 blamed, finally pulling his oxygen tank out trying to get his wits about him for the most dangerous part yet coming back down, Finally, almost an hour after he took off as you reaches 24,900 ft, he gets the signal. Releases the safety and plummets at over 125 miles an hour for minutes straight, he free falls towards the earth, then pulls that parachute cord came down in a Gallup almost deliriously happy. And for the flight back to go see his daughter Desa. This time he took a helicopter that was actually beautiful. Top to bottom. K. Ken's a professional skydiver who helped blame prepare and talked him through it while he was in the air, revealing just how hard it was to get this right on event that requires whether to be bright wind has to be perfect. Everything has to line up. There's no stopping start. It's all live for everyone to see such an incredibly complex stunt and made more so because so much could go wrong and was complicated by the fact that originally Blaine apparently wanted to try it without a parachute, but the basic idea of a human grabbing a bunch of balloons and floating right off into space. Well, that just made for an uplifting

David Blaine Arizona Matt Gutman K. Ken
Human Beings Being Human

Peace Out

04:44 min | Last month

Human Beings Being Human

"Hello. This is peace out stories for coming down and relaxation. My name is Chanel. This season, we talked about the life cycle of Pebbles Gio, D- mice, helium tomatoes trees, Sea Stars Sea. Salmon CICADAS and of course, the T. Rex. And now we're here. At the last episode of our fourth season. And it's all about you. It's about us. Human. Beings. Sit in a comfortable position. Rest your hands on your knees. If, you'd like to lie down go ahead. We're GONNA take our time settling into this first part today. Close Your eyes if you'd like. Breathing. In and. What's going through your mind right now? Our minds are always making thoughts. So. Sometimes, it might feel like we're standing in a river. The thoughts always flowing. and. They'll keep flowing and going. and. That's okay. But sometimes it can feel like to watch. If. We need a break from the flowing thoughts instead of trying to stop them instead of letting the water carry you away. There's always the option to. Step right out of the water. And sit on the riverbank and have arrest. You can just sit. And enjoy watching the water run by. But you're not feeling the push of it. Not Worried about where the water's coming from or where it's going. And then when you're ready and want to get back into the cool water. You'll be able to play in it and stand strong for longer. If the flowing river our thoughts. then. That little break on the riverbank is mindfulness. Mindfulness is about staying in the present moment. Not Thinking about what's happened in the past. Or worrying about what might happen in the future? Just being here. Now. Take notice of your breathing right now. Is it slowing down Or fast. Is it long and deep. Or short shallow. You don't have to change anything about it right now. Just notice it. Our brains are always working and making judgments on the information thoughts and experiences coming in. If you've seen the movie Charlie and the Chocolate Factory You'll probably remember seen when Ruka Salt Sasi Geese that lay golden inks. The golden eggs would come down onto the educators scale that would decide whether it was a good egg. Or A bag. Well, of course, in real life, there are many more judgments beyond good or bad. But, the brain is like that educator. Taking in each thought and making a quick automatic decision if it likes it and tells us that we should keep looking for these good things or doesn't like it and tells us to avoid these things. Or maybe our brain is neutral about them. We don't really have to pay attention or do anything about it. That brings us to another big part of being mindful. Letting. Go of the judgment. Our brains will always be judging the information coming in. which is not a bad thing. Let's say Mr Willy Wonka began noticing that there have been a lot of bad aches lately. He might wonder. Why are my kiessling so many bad eggs. Are They not getting enough healthy food. Not Enough water. Maybe, we should give them more to eat every day or something different to eat on Tuesdays and Thursdays. Should I get the Olympus to check on the more? Are the bad eggs really that bad. Maybe I need to think about how we measured what good eggs. And change it. Or maybe I need to let my geese run freely in a big field and not keep them in this room.

Mr Willy Wonka Chanel Sea Stars Sea T. Rex Olympus Charlie
Our Place in Space

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:32 min | 2 months ago

Our Place in Space

"Hello and welcome to misinformation, a Trivia podcasts for ladies and gents who have cooled Trivia and sticking it to join teams at pub quiz where your hosts I'm Lauren in I'm Julia Hey Schule hi, Laurin. We are just were like cranking through some episodes lately. We've been like recording a bunch of Italian. This is our. This is our finishing episode for this recording. And I figured you know what? We haven't touched on space in a while you know. I did that long series about dads and space. Aged MOMS Mason to the mission to Mars like I'm going to go back. To back to the beginning, WE'RE GONNA go back to the beginning, and even though you fear it, even though I fear it. It's like you know like that's why they why women love stories about serial killers, because ultimately we are the ones who will probably be murdered by a serial killer, just like statistically, so you have to face that fear and somehow love it. Together hair your brain. Get to know your enemy. Know your enemy exactly you gotTa. Know your enemy, so my enemy is space. I am at a constant battle with space and I know I'll lose on. Aren't we all time and space so today? I've decided to go back to the beginning. Go get like some elementary level info and today. We're GONNA. Talk about the solar system. Did you build a model for this sir, Oh, no, I should have model. Scrap. Is Episode Comeback When you alcon back? Steve has a model. He'll make a full like. One of those rotating. Oh, yeah, own. An oratory. Ory himself. He's GonNa. He's GonNa. WanNa. Make an ordinary, so you're welcome. Yeah, thanks! It's going to be my whole upstairs anyway. So just as an FYI, I I will not be touching on earth because we live here. You know what earth is A. And also I've already done an episode on Mars. So we'll just be doing the rest of the solar system to. Be going in order. To begin with. What is the solar system? The planetary system we call home is located in outer spiral arm of the Milky Way Galaxy. That's our neighborhood. Our solar system consists of our star. The Sun and everything bound to it by gravity. The planets mercury Venus, Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus and Neptune as well as dwarf planets, such as Pluto dozens of moons and millions of asteroids, comets and meteoroid. The solar system also includes the Kuyper belt that lies past Neptune's orbit, which way back there. This is a sparsely occupied ring of bodies, almost all smaller than the most popular Kuyper. Bell Object, which is Dorf Planet Pluto and we will talk about him in a minute. The most popular, the most popular of the Kuyper belt objects. So beyond the fringes of the Kuyper belt is the or cloud. This junk, yes, the worked cloud over RT cloud. This giant spherical shell surrounds our solar system like a big old bubble. And it has never been directly observed, but its existence is predicted based on mathematical models and observations comments that likely originate from there. So. The or cloud is made of icy pieces of space debris, the sizes of mountains and sometimes larger orbiting our son as far as one point six light years away. This shell of material is thick extending from five thousand astronomical units to one hundred thousand astronomical units, so an astronomical unit just for Reference One Astronomical Unit or AU is the distance from the sun to the earth. And that is about ninety three million miles or one hundred and fifty million kilometers. So one astronomical unit is ninety three million miles so. The ORT cloud is anywhere from five thousand, two hundred thousand astronomical units, so it's enormous. God I. Don't think about okay. The ordered cloud is also the boundary of the Sun's Gravitational influence where orbiting objects can turn around and return closer to our son. So that's that's the extent of how far the sun's gravity pull. Goes, to. The Sun's helium fear doesn't extend quite as far so that's like how far the light can travel from the sun. healers the bubble created by the solar wind, which is a stream of electrically charged gas, blowing outward from the sun in all directions, so it's like the soup that the sun is like floating that creates. The boundary where the solar wind is abruptly slowed by pressure from interstellar gases is called the termination shock, so it's like the edge of the bubble. Okay where it crosses into it. this edge occurs between eighty one hundred astronomical units, so that's the outer boundary of the Helius fear. And I've mentioned this before, but to NASA, spacecraft launched in seventy seven have crossed the termination shock, voyager, one and two thousand four in Voyager, two in two thousand seven. for more on that checkout episodes thirty five moms and space for the voyager program. It's good.

ORY Reference One Astronomical Uni Kuyper Laurin Nasa Steve Wanna Mason
Our Place in Space

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:07 min | 2 months ago

Our Place in Space

"Hello and welcome to misinformation, a Trivia podcasts for ladies and gents who have cooled Trivia and sticking it to join teams at pub quiz where your hosts I'm Lauren in I'm Julia Hey Schule hi, Laurin. We are just were like cranking through some episodes lately. We've been like recording a bunch of Italian. This is our. This is our finishing episode for this recording. And I figured you know what? We haven't touched on space in a while you know. I did that long series about dads and space. Aged MOMS Mason to the mission to Mars like I'm going to go back. To back to the beginning, WE'RE GONNA go back to the beginning, and even though you fear it, even though I fear it. It's like you know like that's why they why women love stories about serial killers, because ultimately we are the ones who will probably be murdered by a serial killer, just like statistically, so you have to face that fear and somehow love it. Together hair your brain. Get to know your enemy. Know your enemy exactly you gotTa. Know your enemy, so my enemy is space. I am at a constant battle with space and I know I'll lose on. Aren't we all time and space so today? I've decided to go back to the beginning. Go get like some elementary level info and today. We're GONNA. Talk about the solar system. Did you build a model for this sir, Oh, no, I should have model. Scrap. Is Episode Comeback When you alcon back? Steve has a model. He'll make a full like. One of those rotating. Oh, yeah, own. An oratory. Ory himself. He's GonNa. He's GonNa. WanNa. Make an ordinary, so you're welcome. Yeah, thanks! It's going to be my whole upstairs anyway. So just as an FYI, I I will not be touching on earth because we live here. You know what earth is A. And also I've already done an episode on Mars. So we'll just be doing the rest of the solar system to. Be going in order. To begin with. What is the solar system? The planetary system we call home is located in outer spiral arm of the Milky Way Galaxy. That's our neighborhood. Our solar system consists of our star. The Sun and everything bound to it by gravity. The planets mercury Venus, Earth Mars Jupiter Saturn Uranus and Neptune as well as dwarf planets, such as Pluto dozens of moons and millions of asteroids, comets and meteoroid. The solar system also includes the Kuyper belt that lies past Neptune's orbit, which way back there. This is a sparsely occupied ring of bodies, almost all smaller than the most popular Kuyper. Bell Object, which is Dorf Planet Pluto and we will talk about him in a minute. The most popular, the most popular of the Kuyper belt objects. So beyond the fringes of the Kuyper belt is the or cloud. This junk, yes, the worked cloud over RT cloud. This giant spherical shell surrounds our solar system like a big old bubble. And it has never been directly observed, but its existence is predicted based on mathematical models and observations comments that likely originate from there. So. The or cloud is made of icy pieces of space debris, the sizes of mountains and sometimes larger orbiting our son as far as one point six light years away. This shell of material is thick extending from five thousand astronomical units to one hundred thousand astronomical units, so an astronomical unit just for Reference One Astronomical Unit or AU is the distance from the sun to the earth. And that is about ninety three million miles or one hundred and fifty million kilometers. So one astronomical unit is ninety three million miles so. The ORT cloud is anywhere from five thousand, two hundred thousand astronomical units, so it's enormous. God I. Don't think about okay. The ordered cloud is also the boundary of the Sun's Gravitational influence where orbiting objects can turn around and return closer to our son. So that's that's the extent of how far the sun's gravity pull. Goes, to. The Sun's helium fear doesn't extend quite as far so that's like how far the light can travel from the sun. healers the bubble created by the solar wind, which is a stream of electrically charged gas, blowing outward from the sun in all directions, so it's like the soup that the sun is like floating that creates. The boundary where the solar wind is abruptly slowed by pressure from interstellar gases is called the termination shock, so it's like the edge of the bubble. Okay where it crosses into it.

ORY Reference One Astronomical Uni Kuyper Laurin Steve Wanna Mason
"helium" Discussed on The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

05:37 min | 3 months ago

"helium" Discussed on The Internet of Things Podcast - Stacey On IoT

"Read. I immediately started thinking about this. This with this real sense, death camera, and the improvements made to it, because these type of autonomous vehicles that need to navigate the real world need to be able to do so through computer vision, and they need to be able to see well to avoid obstacles to get out of the way of people, then just travel safely before they can be adopted and used on a wider scale Gotcha and it's not just for delivering burritos. Industrial Iot Rise on the types of robots it can be everything from lakes, using computer vision to help a pick and place machine by pick the right part and place it in the right spot. People are using computer vision for like flair detection in oil and gas. This is a dangerous thing to do, but if you have a person trying to do it, and they get bored easily. It's a problem, even y'all even KIA uses computer vision to test actually light bulbs so when I was in it a factory. Factory know. Thy Kia tests laps. That's what it was in Elmhurst. They had computer vision tracking. Basically how light Bulb Burns because it's pretty boring to be a person watching the lightbulb all day long. Actually they don't watch it all day long. They come back every every couple of days to check in on it well, also, if you think about like just to bring it back to food, which is what I write about. If you think about cashier, let's check out stores like the Amazon Echo. which rely on computer vision right the ability to see products and individual them so that their algorithms understand what's being picked up and carried or even like dominoes. There's a system called dragon tail, which basically bounce a camera as a pizza is coming out of the oven. And it shows whether or not the pizza was made properly cooked properly, and then as boxed up. So that you the user can look at it and go like Oh. My pizza just came out of the oven. And now it's on its way, which is going to have actually some more importance as people sort of navigate a post covert world, and they want to make sure their food has been handled properly, but just computer vision is everywhere. Speaking of computer, vision and robots. Nightmares, y'all Boston Dynamics is now going to sell anyone their own spot robot for seventy, four thousand five hundred dollars place my order today Oh. My Gosh, I will run run. I'm sending down to your house. It's GonNa Trot on over and just sit and walk back and forth in your driveway. Yes, so spot is in if you're not familiar and it doesn't actually this literally Hans, my nightmares, if y'all don't know who it is. This is the robot. It used to be called big dog. It's terrifying, so just know that that's out there. There's one of these. Patrolling Park in Singapore making sure people socially distance. There's attachments that let it open doorknobs, which is totally a mistake is just terrifying all right? You guys combined. We're not gonNA. Get One I'm not going to buy one. Instead I'm buying a new house. But what if it brought you burritos? Even, still no no I will not trust it. There's no there's no hold on that. There are New Hue light bulbs out Gill. This is Philips Hue. Color Changing light bulbs. They've got the tune -able whites, one of the first in the space. The biggest news for people for fans of you is that they're going to have a new bigger brighter light bulb. It is only going to be a white bulb. But it is going to be equivalent to a hundred watt bulb as opposed to current bulbs, which are about sixty watts and I feel like he. A lot of people complained that they are very dim sixty watt bulb so. If. You really want a lot of late. It's coming for you now. It's going be a slightly bigger bulb as well. It's not a nineteen format that we all know in love. It is going to be an a twenty one format. Don't know if you care. They also are updating their hue light strips, and this is really cool. The new one is going to be called the Hue Lights Plus and it will have Bluetooth so you can actually control it from like a google or an Amazon device without. Having the Hugh Bridge in the late strips are just super fun adding pop of Color, everywhere. And they're going to also update their bloom table lamp which I don't really care about. It's going to be there. So speaking of Hugh is part of my I moving and I realized I. Don't have the proper cans and my ceiling. Install my old huby our thirties. And I was like Oh Christie want my old Hughes. That'd the balls. Were you know there were at the time? They're like forty bucks a pop, so this is a lot of expensive gear as you're going to have to buy your own hut. Though in Chris was like man I. Don't want it. Well okay one. You're making it sound like the only reason I didn't take. Them was because I was too cheap to spend sixty dollars in the hub, which is not the case. Okay? Well. No, and you said you said I just don't think I'd use them and I'm like. How could you not use color changing light bulbs that you can control with Amazon or Google when I thought about it because I thought Oh, I could use it in our den, and might be kind of neat, but then I started thinking like Oh. You know like I struggle with the connected. Connected Lights. Sometimes, we have one set up in one of our rooms and it it works well, but the and this is going to make such a Luddite, but like or get off my lawn, old man, but like to get into the room. I WANNA go into I. Literally have to walk past the light switch, and so adding voice seems like it's going to take longer than just hitting a light switch as I. Walk in what about when you leave the room and you want to turn off the light because you left it on, or your.

Amazon google KIA Boston Dynamics Philips Singapore Elmhurst Hugh Bridge Hans Hugh Chris Christie Hughes
"helium" Discussed on Short Wave

Short Wave

05:20 min | 4 months ago

"helium" Discussed on Short Wave

"Shell? Helium was actually used every stage of the Apollo Program from the giant Saturn five rocket to the Lunar Lander. When it took off, it used helium to make attention run. Thanks helium, so yeah. Helium is still used rockets today, but helium uses. Don't stop there Mattie. In fact, we're in a new age of helium. It's because of another remarkable property. It can be cooled down to very low temperatures. It becomes liquid at four point. Two Kelvin, which is real, real cold. Yeah to. To put it in perspective, I spoke to a chemist named Sophia Hayes. Sometimes my astrophysics colleagues tell me that the temperature of outer space is three Kelvin, so it's just one degree different from the temperature of Outer Space Oh my goodness. That's particularly useful for Sofia. Because her lab at Washington University in St. Louis uses ferry. Special type of material called a superconductor and basically these materials where when they get cold, enough electricity can flow through them with no resistance at. At all, and that creates very very very large magnetic fields, and so that superconducting state is only reached at low temperatures like that provided by liquid helium, so she uses liquid helium in magnets, and she uses these magnets for something called nuclear magnetic resonance. She uses it to study materials, but it's basically the same technology is something you may have heard of magnetic resonance imaging like we're talking. MRI's that we use on people, exactly and Emirates are actually a part of the reason. Reason, that helium missing such short supply now because MRI machines all over the world use helium, and they use liquid helium, which is much denser than the stuff in these balloons, so you know they need a lot of it, but there are only really three places in the world that produce most of the world's helium Algeria Qatar an the US. So say there's a crisis in the Gulf. Every researcher in these associations will sometimes be watching those news stories and think Oh. There's going to be a cutback in our supply. I mean I know a lot of scientists that are worried that work with lasers are worried about helium and general. That's right, and it's really an issue of volatility because. The prices can go up and down so much. That Sophia actually had to shut down some of her magnets. Those are very high capital costs pieces of equipment, and for want of a chemical to sustain it the liquid helium. We're taking those off line making smaller. The number of experiments at one can do or maybe even shrinking the size of the research groups. And I mean the problem is GonNa grow for the scientific community. Maybe you've heard about this new Google quantum computer that supposedly his beaten out classical computers at certain calculations well, it uses helium to cool the chip. Okay, so emory's quantum computers scientific research. Is this all kind of coming to ahead like? Are we running out of Helium Jeff's? You know when I spoke to Sophia. Hayes is worried about that. IT turns out. Out there, other natural gas fields and other parts of the world that do produce helium, and they're not being hardest right now. Some of them are planning to step up production, so that should help in the short term, but eventually we are probably going to run out. Because once it gets out into the atmosphere. It's flown off into space. It's not coming back, but what about it being like naturally made during the radioactive? You talked about that's true, but that all happens one atom at a time, and it takes a long time to accumulate even enough helium to Philip Balloon, so nobody knows of course exactly how much uranium missing the earth and where it all is, but if we had to guess, we would guess the accumulated helium is going to run out at some point, we'll now I feel like garbage because we've got these three helium balloons just sitting in here doing. Doing nothing while I asked Sophea how she felt about helium balloons. Okay, that's a that's a tough one, and there's a lot of debate in my community of researchers who really value the helium every puff. If you will I, will say I. Am not a balloon denier in part because of I, think the helium that's used for party. Balloons gets every person almost to care about this resource, whereas if I say, how do you feel about Argon? You may not have an opinion. About are gone. which is another inert gas? I do have thought about are gone. Jeff She's incorrect, but that will be later. Salute well. I'd be happy to come back and do this again. Mattie alright. Jeff knock up one of those helium balloons. Let's do this. You got it. Do. We have scissors I. Mean You have nature scissors? which are your teeth? Thank you for coming by. It's been an absolute pleasure, Maddie. Maddie sify. shortwave. FROM NPR?.

Helium Sophia Hayes researcher Mattie Jeff She Emirates Lunar Lander Maddie sify. Gulf Washington University US Sofia St. Louis Google Algeria Qatar NPR emory Argon
NASA's TransFormers Could Make Harsh Lunar Environments Robot Friendly

Innovation Now

01:02 min | 4 months ago

NASA's TransFormers Could Make Harsh Lunar Environments Robot Friendly

"No sunlight ever reaches the inside of a crater like Shackleton. Crater on the moon, instead the sun hits the Rim and casts a shadow over the entire valley, the darkness and subsequent cold create issues for rovers that might be used to explore these extreme environments. That's why researchers at NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory are building a special transformer designed to heat and Power Rovers by redirecting sunlight into these dark regions, the transformer would be hitched onto the back of a rover disconnecting once it reaches the rim of the crater, then unfolding itself into an array. Array of computer controlled mirrors called helium stats. The transformer would create a ray about the size of a football field, which the rovers would use for power and heat, while the rovers do their work. The mirrors can be manipulated to follow the movement of the Sun, allowing scientists to see the darker parts of the crater in a whole new light

Power Rovers Nasa Jet Propulsion Laboratory Football
How Does Uranus Work?

BrainStuff

06:32 min | 4 months ago

How Does Uranus Work?

"Scientists have coined an appropriate term for the large chilly bodies like Uranus ice giants. Neptune falls into the same category. But you're in. This is quite an odd duck compared to its neighboring planet. For starters you're a spins on an extreme tilt resulting in some truly wild seasons around the polls even the ice giants name is a bit peculiar and not just because it makes school kids chuckle. Okay let's not kid ourselves. You're never too old to enjoy good year in joke. Headline Writers certainly don't thinks so if article titles like NASA wants to probe urinate in search of gas and Uranus. Smells like farts are any indication. These jokes if you're not getting them hinge on the spelling of Uranus you are an US allowing for an english-speaking mispronunciation as your anus meaning rectum that where classy puns. Aside you're in his represents a break with nomenclature old tradition mercury Venus Mars Jupiter Saturn and Neptune all took their names from Roman gods or deities however uranus uniquely was named after a Greek God in the religion of Ancient Greece. You're an was revered as the primordial God of the sky he had a son named Cronos and a perhaps more famous grandson notice Zeus. Those two figures were later conflated with two Roman Deities Saturn and Jupiter though the planet Uranus was discovered by Stromer William Herschel March thirteenth of seventeen eighty one. He didn't give it the name we use today. A loyal Britain Herschel wanted to call this far away. World Georgie 'EM CD's or Georgia Star. In honor of King George the third but by nature. That name was politically charged to avoid. Alienating non-british Stargazers German astronomer Johann Alert Buddha suggested calling the planet uranus in seventeen eighty three eventually his alternative Monica one out but back to that axial tilt a planets rotate around an axis. Which is the imaginary line connecting their northern and southern polls and they simultaneously orbit on an imaginary plane around the Sun now Earth has an axial tilt of twenty three point five degrees. This means there's a twenty three point five degree angle between Earth's axis and its plane of orbit around the Sun without the tilt our home world wouldn't have seasons or possibly life. Uranus is skewed to but to a much greater extent in relation to its orbital plane. The ice giants access has been tilted at a chopping ninety seven point seven degree angle next to Saturn and Neptune. Urine looks like it's lying on its side so what we are orientation. A computer simulation published two thousand eighteen suggests your was hit by a huge Proto Planet. Around four billion years ago then again there may have been multiple impacts or a long gone circum. Planetary Disk could have played a role however it happened. The tilt subjects both polls too long dark winters long. Bright Summer's on Uranus was orbit around the Sun or one year lasts for roughly eighty four earth years. Each poll is aimed almost directly at the Sun for about twenty one St Earth years during its summer season. Meanwhile the other pole faces the opposite direction. Enduring Alliance Dark Winter. Despite the extreme tilt urine is warmer at the equator than it is either poll. Nobody knows why. And this isn't the planets only mystery. Jupiter Saturn and Neptune already radiate more than twice as much heat as they received from the Sun. Yet you're innocence. Heat output is significantly lower. This disparity has long baffled planetary scientists as we already mentioned. You're innocent. Neptune are both ice giants planets of this sort have rocky cores covered by mantles rich. An icy half frozen slush of ammonia methane and water next up there's the atmosphere whose outer level is full of hydrogen helium and even more methane researchers found that urinalysis atmospheric clouds contain hydrogen sulfide. A compound responsible for the rotten egg stench. We all know in hate so yes. You're in literally stinks to the densest part of its atmospheric sees brutal temperatures of negative two hundred forty three to negative three hundred seventy degrees Fahrenheit. That's negative one fifty three to negative to eighteen degrees Celsius. That's hardly a welcoming environment for any future astronauts but at least the color scheme would be familiar. Earth isn't the only blue planet in the solar system. Methane absorbs red light giving Uranus and Neptune deep blue complexions of the two worlds. You're in a slightly greener since nineteen seventy seven. We've known that Ernest has a ring system around its equator to date. Astronomers have counted thirteen rings encircling the planet the structures are relatively dim and lack the fine particles observed and other rings systems like Saturn's each one is composed of debris chunks that are golf ball sized at minimum for some reason smaller material gets exiled and space between these rings in also has twenty seven known moons twenty five of which renamed after Shakespeare characters like affiliate Juliet. There's Dimona puck and Miranda who's namesake appears in the tempest geologically complex. Miranda contains the single policy cliff known to humankind dubbed Verona repays. It has an estimated height of twelve point four miles. That's twenty kilometers. Meaning that if you happened to be walking along its peak and you happened to fall off. You would plummet for twelve minutes straight before hitting the ground. Others satellites of note include sicker acts and Caliban while most of your Ennis's moons spin in the same direction as the planet does these to revolve the other way. Scientists think they were once independent objects that the ice giants gravity in snared by the way how ban is another tempest character and sicker. Iraq's was said to be his mother from it's weird rings. It's puzzling climate. You're Ennis's found plenty of ways surprises. Only time will tell what further mysteries the planet holds until then although it's very dim your is visible to the naked eye on some dark clear nights if you have sharp vision if not so much. It's easily visible with noculars or a telescope.

Ennis Stromer William Herschel Miranda Britain Herschel Nasa United States Ancient Greece Iraq Johann Alert Buddha Cronos King George Georgia Star Verona Monica Ernest Shakespeare Dimona Puck
Searching For Cockles

Gastropod

07:54 min | 5 months ago

Searching For Cockles

"We're in central puget sound in a body of water that we call Port Orchard Passage. This is a very good body of water for Shellfish. Because there's a lot of current coming through this little bottle neck area. There brings a lot of nutrients food. Oxygen Vivian. Barry is the shellfish program manager for the tribe and we met her and her colleague. Jeff more on a tribally owned beach across the sound from Seattle to areas famous for all sorts of seafood especially shellfish oysters and gooey ducks and course clams that we have different types of clams here. We have the the native little neck clams and we have an introduced Manila clam. That's very similar to the little neck. But it's from Asia originally and of course there's The star of today's show cockles which we actually couldn't see so they like to live in the lower intertidal zone and then the subtitle. Apparently there are more cockles. Living under the water than on the beach for those of you who are not up on their whole tidal geography. The Inter title is that part you see at the beach. The wet sand that gets exposed as the tide is going out. The subtitle is under shallow water almost all the time. It's that sliver of sand that only gives exposed at super low tides. Like when there's a full moon and so to get to the cockles in that subtitle's zone Vivian. And Jeff have to wait until the tide is at. It's very very lowest point this time of year. That's around three. A M which is go at night we harvest at night. Yeah we were out there during the day but fortunately there were some cockle shells available on the beach as visually. They see a cockle there. Jeff grab it. Yeah they're weathered but there you can see they look like those ripple chips. They're they're ribbed. They have these long ribs. Come down longitude only. This is what you would see when you're looking in the garden. Cockle shells right from the nursery room round more. Like a ball shape. The Long Ribs Jeff is describing on the shell. It's those same lines in the cockleshell flowers that give the flowers their name. If you've never seen a cockleshell and frankly I hadn't as Jeff said you might know them better from nursery RHYMES MARY. Mary quite contrary. How does your garden grow with silver bells and cockle shells and pretty maids all in a row? No one knows exactly what that means. There's a theory that Mary as Mary. Queen of Scots and the cockle shells are somehow Catholic. But yeah no one knows. And then there's another old English rhyme. I knew as a Kid. It was actually a jump rope song for me. Blue Bells cockle shells a vans British rhyme. So they would have been talking about the different species at cockle. The common cockle as it's called which you find in the UK and Ireland Portugal and all down the Atlantic coast. Morocco cockles have long been a popular food in all these countries. Just one of the many shellfish people enjoyed you might have heard the Irish Song Molly Malone where she selling cockles in the streets of Dublin. We streets gone in the UK. Coco's used to be a pretty common seaside treat. You'd often buy them boiled served in a paper cone and sprinkled with Malt Vinegar. They were popular in the east end of London. And especially in Wales but today those kinds of traditional shellfish like welk's and winkles and cockles. They've become less and less popular. But while cockles are no longer common snacks in seaside towns. They are still actually harvested all along the coast of the UK. They're shipped overnight to elsewhere in Europe like France and the Netherlands where cockles are still popular law of blazes in the UK. That harvesting is still done by hand using cocoa rake. It can be really dangerous work if you get caught by the tide but while we were researching this episode we discovered off the coast of Norfolk. They've developed an ingenious technique that involves driving boats around in circles. This is from a channel four documentary about calls three to four minutes. Yes that's the war talk. The boat's propeller push the sentiment in these re off. Would you use the boat? Wash all the sideway basically There's yet another species of cockle that's widespread in Asia. In Japan. There's a popular cockles Sushi. That's available only one month a year but in a lot of places. Kaka leading has really fallen off. The shelves are hard to open. And especially these European cockles. There's only a tiny bit of meat. Once you do manage to pry them apart but west coast cockles like we said there are different species and they are most decidedly not dainty little things. They're actually quite hefty. They probably can get about a good four inches four five inches. They can get fairly large and heavy in terms of like maybe a schoolboy size little apple so cockles are bigger than clams but there are unusual in another way to most shellfish like the little neck clams in the Manila clams covered the beach. We were on their pretty stationary and when they settle from larvae to an adult they basically dig themselves in and stay in the same place for the rest of their lives but cockles. They are not quite so sedentary. These cockles have a really heavy and strong foot and they're very mobile so they can escape. They're predators by just jumping away from them this jump. It's not just a little hub. This is a full-on leap leap leap away. So one of the Faster Sea Stars is the Sun Star Picnic. Odia helium authorities. These sunflower seeds. Stars are freaky looking. They range in color from bright orange to purple. They get to more than three feet wide. And they have up to twenty four arms covered in suckers and they love to use those suckers to pull apart the two halves of cockleshell and then they chomped down on the flash. They can sense when the sea star is trying to get a hold of him in a foot to just kick away and they can jump off. We're talking we're talking mostly sideways. And then the kind of kick away and SORTA roll along to get away so at a time but enough to get away from a sea star and as long as there have been people living along puget sound. They've been eating those leaping cockles over ten thousand years. I don't know I mean bivalves have been around for you. Know millions of years in the ocean and the tribes have been around these waters. For at least I think the archaeological record say at least fourteen thousand years by all accounts cockles are one hundred percent delicious and a favorite food of the first nations people in the area so they will build a large fire with rocks so the rocks become very hot and they will put the shellfish right the rocks and cover them with seaweed so they basically steam in their own juices. It's over an open flame and it's yeah the the way they've been doing it for forever so it's they've perfected the art they're good. They're really sweet. Really sweet and kind of a rich kind of seafood taste little chewier a little bit meaty so they compared to other clans. I would say there's more richness in the

Jeff Asia Mary Manila Port Orchard Passage UK Seattle Barry Program Manager Atlantic Coast Molly Malone Morocco London Wales Sun Star Picnic Dublin Coco Europe Kaka
How Does Saturn Work?

BrainStuff

07:37 min | 6 months ago

How Does Saturn Work?

"The Planet Saturn takes its name from a Roman God of agriculture and of all the planets revolve around our sun. It's cultivated if you will the greatest ring system by far shining rings filled with ice dust and rock orbit its equator. The whitest one called the phoebe ring has an outer edge. That's millions of miles away from Saturn itself. For comparison the average distance between Earth and our moon is a paltry two hundred thirty nine thousand miles or three hundred eighty four thousand kilometers once again. Astronomy PUTS THE HUMAN EGO IN CHECK. Saturn's rings get all the attention but we shouldn't ignore its other attributes the sixth planet in our solar system. It's also the biggest after Jupiter. Those two are in a league of their own. If you mushed every planet from Mercury to Neptune together Saturn and Jupiter would account for over ninety percent of the cumulative mass of that planetary mass but despite its immense size Saturn is the least dense planet in the sun's orbit and the spherical to. We'll need to look at. Its physical makeup to understand why research published in two thousand nineteen showed that a day on Saturday and lasts just ten hours thirty three minutes and thirty eight seconds. It's spin rate helps explain one of the ring. World's stranger qualities is he. Saturn is ten percent wider than it is tall. A difference of over seven thousand miles or nearly twelve thousand kilometers. Astronomers call that kind of disparity an equatorial bulge every planet in the solar system has one but Saturn's is the most extreme saturn rotates around its axis at a very high speed. Hence the brevity stays. And here's where density comes into play like. Jupiter Saturn is a gas giant such worlds predominantly consists of hydrogen and helium and whereas Earth is solid on. The outside gas. Giants are not they may however have hard intercourse now. Saturn is downright huge in terms of volume. Some seven hundred sixty four earth sized objects could fit inside of it and the planet is ninety five times as massive as our home world and yet relative to its size. Earth is eight times more dense. In fact water yes. Plain water is denser them Saturn although that doesn't mean the planet would float. It's not cohesive enough so thanks to its low. Low density zippy rotational. Speed Saturn's been deformed into a oblong world that looks kind of squished in profile Jupiter's southern hemisphere famously has an ongoing storm called the great. Red Spot Saturn's answer to. This is the great white spots which are periodic tempests that arise every twenty thirty Earth Years I detected in eighteen seventy six. These weather events are colossal scale ness as Cassini spacecraft spent thirteen productive years hovering around Saturn on December fifth of two thousand ten. It witnessed the most recent iteration of the great white spot phenomenon. The storm was about eight hundred miles by sixteen hundred miles long when it first began. That's about thirteen hundred twenty five hundred kilometers but over the next six months. The spot expanded Longitudinal early until it had looped itself around the planet in a gigantic circle. Some researchers think the great white spots might be part of a cycle that sees the outer layer Saturn's atmosphere slowly lose heat allowing the warm air from lower levels to burst upward. Meanwhile Saturn's North Pole. There's a cloud pattern shaped like giant hexagon. This pleasantly symmetrical jet stream spins counterclockwise measures about twenty thousand miles or thirty two thousand kilometers across and includes a hurricane. That's been swirling right over the poll ever since it was discovered back in Nineteen eighty-eight. Of course it's not the hexagon earned Saturday. A place on. Chucky festers T. shirt you know from rugrats anyway. The gas giant is most famous for the spectacular ring system encircling it a planetary rings aren't rare per se Jupiter Uranus and Neptune. Have the well yet. In terms of sheer scale network around Saturn is totally unrivaled. Most of the primary rings come with letter names. The closest one to Saturn is called the D ring which has an inner radius of about forty two thousand miles or sixty seven thousand kilometers a lot closer than our moon. It's surrounded by these C B A F G and earrings in that order by the way. The rings aren't arranged Alphabetically. Because the naming system reflects the dates of their discovery Abmc recited before the rest when measured from its outside edge. The earring showcases an impressive. Three hundred thousand mile radius or four hundred and eighty thousand kilometers. Or at least that looks impressive until you get to know the big bad fearing that. We mentioned earlier. I spotted in two thousand nine. This one was named after one of Saturn's moons untold trillions of ice rock dust particles. Make up these rings. Some bits are the size of a sugar grain. Others could probably Dwarf Your House in any case. The ring material is stretched. Remarkably thin Saturn's rings may be as thick as two miles or kilometers wide. Found just thirty two feet or ten meters wide so proportionately. The gas giants iconic rings thinner than a typical sheet of writing paper as noted by Astronomer. Phil plait whereas Saturn itself is probably around four point five billion years old. The age of its rings isn't as clear. Some scientists think that they were formed ten million to a hundred million years ago when an icy comet or some ice covered moons came too close to the planet. The visitor or visitors would have met a grisly end. Getting ripped to pieces by Saturn's gravity as those fragments collided they grew smaller and multiplied giving rise to the skinny but brilliant system. We all know today on the other. Hand a twenty. Nineteen paper argued that the rings might have originated at an earlier stage in the history of our solar system. We'll have to see how the debate unfolds as new evidence arises. There's lots about this planet that we're still learning in October of two thousand. Nineteen the international astronomical. Union heralded the discovery of twenty newfound moons orbiting the gas giant with these bodies added to the mix. There are now eighty two verified. Saturn moons altogether no other planet in the solar system has that many natural satellites not even mighty Jupiter. You can find Saturn's moons in around and beyond the ring system before Cassini was retired in two thousand seventeen it revealed that some of them gather clumps of ice and dust. From the Rings Saturn's Moon Titan is especially well-named it's our solar system second-biggest moon overall and it's dotted with seas lakes and rivers of liquid methane and pain. There's only one other body within the Sun's orbit that has standing pools of liquid that we know about. And here's a hint. You're sitting on it right now. Tighten is also noteworthy for having an atmosphere and it's theorized that there could be ice volcanoes that spew water instead of lava like Earth Saturn gets auroras at its poles. They're invisible to the unaided human eye. But the Cassini spacecraft and the Hubble Space Telescope have captured footage of them using infrared and ultraviolet

Astronomy Giants Cassini Phil Plait Chucky Festers Hubble Space Telescope North Pole Union Abmc
Betelgeuse

Astronomy Cast

09:40 min | 7 months ago

Betelgeuse

"Beetlejuice able juice could use. Try Our weekly facts based journey through the cosby help. You understand not only what we know but how we know what we know. I'm Fraser. Cain publisher of University with me as always Pamela. Gay a senior scientist for the Planetary Science Institute and the Director of Cosmic West. Hey Pamela I'm doing well. How are you doing fraser? I'm doing great and I mentioned this in the preamble but I just wanted to say this again. Which is a huge congratulations to our good friend. Dr E-e-e-e-no Neil who just announced that he's going to be working at NASA jet propulsion lab in their media department in is terrific science journalist. One of the best in the business and it's a pretty good fit that he's now working over at NASA he was the editor for the Astronomical Society of the Pacific's Mercury He has been a columnist for discovery and seeker. He did work with us at Universe today. And and this is great. Congratulations Ian Android. GonNa take the next two weeks off. I'M GONNA call it spring break. I'm not going anywhere. I'm just going to be writing software but you sir are going on a grand adventure. Yeah I'm going to Japan with my son and there is. This is not work. This is literally just him. I said where do you WanNa go and he goes? I want to go to Japan and then I waited for cheap tickets to come around and he did and so we're off to Japan of course rough Japan when there's a corona virus of but you know we'll take precautions and it doesn't look like it's that bad they're currently so And I can't wait to see this place. I've wanted to go to Japan all my life and to be able to do. This is going to be a lot of fun. Definitely take pictures. Might Visit a few spacey. Things like the Japanese space agency but this is about. This is about his trip. Not You know now. My trip are able see. You might be surprised to hear that we've never done episode of astronomy cast featuring beetlejuice. Were good news. This is that episode. Let's talk about the Star. Why it might be dimming. And what could happen if it explodes as Super Noah I? I've had to do a search for I actually You know wrote on my intro and I think we suggest that wanted to pursue put on the calendar and like all of this time. We've talked about a Ryan. We've talked about the way stars die and we've obviously mentioned bill many times as a candidate for new supernova but had never actually spent a whole episode on this one specific star. Well obviously good timing on our part because it's so interesting right now So what does beetlejuice? It is a red supergiant star that is visible to both the northern and Southern Hemisphere. We have no hemispheric bias. In choosing this star it has evolved off the main sequence which means it is no longer burning hydrogen in its very core and it probably did this only about a million years ago and now it is systematically burning through heavier and heavier shells of elements deep in its well. Many many solar mass self as it hangs out shining bright in the northern winter and the southern summer and it is. It is a Ryan's right shoulder. I mean when you look at it. Looks like it's on the left but if you were a Ryan and you were facing towards us than it would be his right shoulder and there's some fascinating history on its name and I have to admit I went down a little bit of a rabbit hole. Prepping for this episode. It's it's name is Arabic and yes over. The years has probably been missed. Transcribed so that there are those who believe that it translates as a Ryan's armpit right and this can be caused by dropping a little dot under one of the characters at wrong moment in time It probably has a much better name than a Ryan's armpit. This is still up for a fair amount of discussion. We'll actually one of our one of our viewers Rami amid who speaks Arabic. He's saying that it is the name comes from the Arabic Abbott L. Josiah which literally means the armpit of the mighty hunter so that sounds better than Orion armpit. It's of the mighty hunter it's true. It's yeah true and we. We're going to mispronounce it and of course. The hilarious thing is is how people give us such a hard time. Because they're expecting that it should be beetlejuice. Yes but and we tend to say bail juice and that is. That's a little bit of a holdover from. I think the way they used to describe it before the movie came out. Seattle has has shifted it to Beatlemania. Even that isn't correct so so maybe we can after. The fact may be get Susie to get maybe Romney or someone to do the proper Arabic pronunciation in the show and then you know then that conserve as the as sort of the standby and I've heard a lot of people like even the German say people are say that well. Actually it's a German word but it's not no near Bec- yes it comes from. Yeah it's has an Arabic root so anyway. Yeah so we're going to say bill. And maybe even shifted beetlejuice every now and then Please just just bear with us and however you choose to pronounce it. This isn't an object that was strictly noted and observed by a people living around the Mediterranean Ocean. This is an object that it's variable in its brightness as all of us can currently go out and see and this variability appears to have. I been noted by the aborigines of Australia. It it is a star crops up in the Lore of society after sisters after society but the science the awesome saw. Science is why we're here today because when you ask which objects in the sky are most likely to go boom. This is one of the two ADA crane has the other it is strictly southern hemisphere. Cirilli beetlejuice is the one we want so that all of us can enjoy the experience. And the problem is we don't know when this is going to occur but scientifically reproduced sure. It's not now right but you can hope to be wrong. Yes yes so. It's it's a random event. We'll talk about this a little bit about what's going on and how we might know but So I wanNA talk a bit about just what stage it is kind of star. It is compared to say a star like our Sun. So so how does this star compare to to our son? I radically different. Our our son is because it is ours. It is used as the measuring stick by which we well measure everything outright. It weighs one the Sun. Exactly yeah exactly one. The Sun Beetlejuice is estimated that when it was in the same of illusionary stages that our son when it was on the main sequence burning hydrogen in its core. It's estimated to have been just under twenty solar masses if we had seen it during that stage it would've been one of those bright blue o type stars like we love to enjoy in the Orion Nebula Orion is a massive star forming region. That entire swath of the sky is rich in all the things needed to make stars and there's lots of young stars in that direction well beetlejuice isn't necessarily young. It finished burning all of that hydrogen. But because it's so massive as it evolved off of the main sequence as it expanded out it didn't go through this massive flash that we see in smaller stars where it suddenly was like boom. I'M GONNA burn helium in my core instead because it was so massive it was able to gradually transition into doing this and as it did it just basically migrated sideways across the color magnitude diagram. That hurts been Russel Diagram ending up in the top center of that diagram being cool red and kind of unable to hold onto all of its atmosphere.

Beetlejuice Ryan Japan Fraser Pamela I Nasa Orion Nebula Orion Planetary Science Institute Cosby Russel Diagram Southern Hemisphere Cain Scientist Astronomical Society Dr E-E-E-E-No Neil Ian Android Seattle Publisher Cosmic West Mediterranean Ocean
Residency pairs aspiring restaurateurs with temporary sites

Monocle 24: The Menu

08:05 min | 8 months ago

Residency pairs aspiring restaurateurs with temporary sites

"Today we meet the team behind residency. A new initiative assistive to pay or vacant restaurant spaces with emerging culinary talents launched in London. The new enterprise already looking to go into national with the mission to support young talent and budding entrepreneurs can me. Let's opium of restaurants consultancy districts and sip fork of restaurant experts. Montana Montana fog are co founder of residency. And I met them here at Majoria. Oh studio one to find out. More residents say is an initiative which we have creates it which pass up and coming chef superclubs new concept's any sort of emerging thing and food and beverage or hospitality with vacant spaces basis at the moment across the capital but our ultimate jets viz and beyond and through our combined expertise so it's a residency is a collaboration between between district. which is a property restaurant? consultantcy Montana fog which is a restaurant. Consultancy and through combined expertise we can create pop-ups ups and empty spaces very easily. We have contacts with landlords because district says a property business. A Montana can support the operators on the ground and enable the space for operators to go in and start trading. So how did you find each other. What kind of discussions did you have when this idea was born? Well we've nine furlongs. I have yeah we have. I think we first met when my partner and I were looking to open a restaurant or committed was advising us and thankfully we didn't do the deal not through any issue with Camilla ritual. It was the wrong space the wrong concept at the wrong time which is a restaurant consultant but then we work together on a project for the crown estate and had assault on Heddon street which was ironically the property like you offer done or any love it and synergy edge we and then we came together and they had a site where that essentially the keys are being put through the letterbox in the previous tendency unfortunate made it and they had a site that was fitted the Dow and ready to go and they didn't know what to do with it really they'd been thinking for a long time about how they could launch some finish itself which is something we are seeing from landlords now because if you were wind a few years back when a new site came up with an estate in central London landlords always wanted the latest new concept concept the newest operator and since then has been a few burnt fingers so in terms of pushing brand new concept landlords our little bit more cautious about that mom so they are thinking of ways that they can do that without perhaps taking on a long term risk without of committing so when ten had in st came back to the landlord new I think one of the stories I think sub told me was that they only bought some new carafe when St when and everything else was was there and it's provided a great opportunity to trial the poop concept and so the crown at hired Montana fog and district separately and district in terms of helping helping with some sort of strategic direction but also in terms of doing the licensing making sure that all the documentation and Montana fog to find the operators and support them on the ground from day one so basically what you're doing now you're looking for these spaces and he also looking forward to preneurs budding restos operators. I would like to take over the spaces for some time. What kind of conditions are we talking about? How long would this pop ups for example? And what kind of operators are you looking game for. Exactly it depends side-by-side how long the pop-up lost with Tennessee. I think we are moving into month. Eight seven and Republican another three or four months. We'll see so it depends on the landlord. I mean typically day-old Adage from restaurateurs is once you found this all you want twelve months later you'll open the door was that's how long it takes to sometimes raise the money to get your lease. Signed your heads of terms obviously to fit it out so adama landlord or have an empty site. It could be there for a year before I'm actually GonNa say that open again so we can activate that site pretty much within a week to week turnaround. Make sure it's fit for purpose and get an operator in there. And they could trade their quite happily for four to five months whilst unseen the new incoming operator who takes a full lease is doing doing the negotiations with the landlord. Millennials have let so I activated is very flexible model rarely because some operators will want to go in for four to six months and north of gang of presence in makes him return perhaps but others will perhaps wants to do a supper club or decently much shorter term or might be happy. Just go in somewhere for a week to Derby PR and some of the landlords that we're actually talking about our existing operators already have to activate spaces particularly helium pumps and they could be much shorter. Say It's bespoke and it's flexible. An in terms of your other question of what sort of entrepreneurs are we looking for. The Sky's is the limit. We've had interest from a large very well. Funded American Vegan concept. which is very edgy? We've had interest from people who've superclubs in Hackney these people some of well funded and well back to existing. Operators is the ones that aren't who would have a great concept on great passion Russian but to get in front of a landlord to get a lease for ten to fifteen years. No way you ever going to be up to do that. Unless you've got some very very well funded ended backers of which most people don't because the banks unfortunately won't be lending anyone any money for quite a while for the smaller operations and this gives us the opportunity he to educate the operator in terms of how a landlord works. We should very much district comes and for us the Montana folks of of residency to work with them and help them and with the figures look concept introducing to suppliers etc etc.. Actually so there is a lot of support available when you choose. The operator so veto need to be worried about north knowing everything takes yeah. I think that's our biggest point of difference is it's three hundred. Sixty degree support system. Why there will be people who the first people we've introduced a ten Heddon street with David Carter from smoke stack and Chris Leach who worked at Bratton cooked lots of different places? How much support do they need? Not a great deal to be honest with you because they're incredibly experience but moving forward when we take someone from WHO's done of a food stall pop pop somewhere. They will need to understand how the western works because the West End Actually David. Chris did put their hands up and admit that the learning experience of coming from east blondel shortage into what is basically mayfair. Soho borders different world. Because lunch is a big thing. Lunch makes the difference. It doesn't make you a millionaire China but without lunch you really suffer if you're in the west end but you cost this much higher You've been following London restaurant scene for years. How has it changed changed? And what are your predictions. What is going to be happening in the future and always the landscape changing thing? We've seen this of past. Few years is a huge increase in the number of restaurants in London and this was sort of lead from consumer trend to solve. Eat out more and with the sort of casual dining lining crunch the so called and they changing political landscape confidence decreased and the oversupply of restaurants. Met not this wasn't in any way sustainable stable anymore. So that's when we started to see like restaurants going back to landlords and whilst the market is still very vibrant. There's loads of new. You operators out there that wants to take on site and central London. There's nowhere near as many as there was before and what it's done is created a survival of the fittest backdrop so the good restaurants still still trading while and a very very good and another thing. That's sort of is in between nether is is suffering. We've also seen rents go very very high because of the lack of supply of restaurant

Montana London David Carter Opium Chris Leach Majoria Co Founder Hackney Partner Tennessee Assault DOW Camilla Consultant China Bratton
Could There Be a Fifth Fundamental Force?

BrainStuff

06:38 min | 8 months ago

Could There Be a Fifth Fundamental Force?

"The four fundamental forces are the most important quartet in science so far is anyone's been able to prove the universe is governed by these forces forces gravity electromagnetism the strong force and the weak force. But maybe this foursome isn't alone in two thousand fifteen. A Hungarian and team led by physicist Attila. Credit Hawkeye reportedly discovered new evidence for a fifth fundamental force. Something previously unknown to science. The the group uploaded another paper about the subject to archive a research database in October of two thousand nineteen while many scientists are skeptical about these findings. The research search does give us an occasion to talk about the major forces that we all take for granted the Fab four fundamental forces are irreducible meaning. They can't be broken down into other more basic forces. These are the core phenomena behind every other known type of physical interaction. For example friction tension and elasticity busy are all derived from electromagnetism. And what's that you ask. ELECTROMAGNETISM is a force that affects all positively and negatively charged particles articles those with opposite charges attract while ones carrying like charges. Repel each other. Not only does this principle. Keep magnets on your fridge. But it's also the reason why solid solid objects are able to retain their shapes compared with electromagnetism. Gravity is rather weak surprisingly enough. It's actually the weakest of the four fundamentals including including the so-called weak force. We'll get to that one in a bit. A gravity is the attraction of any two objects in the universe to another moons. Dust motes coyotes. Whatever ever everything exerts gravity on every other thing but at least one of the things in question has to be pretty massive in order for it to make much of a difference? That's why we you don't have dust mites orbiting our heads like asteroids and why we don't fall into orbit of coyotes when we encounter them but let's turn to the appropriately named strong force course. This is what hold Tomic nucleus together. Even in spite of their charged protons which are constantly trying to escape and last but not least. There's the Weak Force Aka. The weak interaction. This one is the hardest to explain and honestly I'm not an expert here but it's the force by which which subatomic particles can transform by decaying into different particles by losing boasts on which disintegrates into positron and or neutrinos this week force force fuel certain kinds of radioactive decay which means it's responsible for everything from medical imaging to the radiometric dating that researchers use to determine the ages of fossils thousand artifacts to the nuclear fission that occurs in the sun. So kind of a big deal. Scientists have a theory that nicely describes three of those forces known these standard model of physics. It's made up of various measurements and mathematical formulas. It also breaks down. Elementary particles into categories is an subcategories. We spoke by email with mit physicist. Richard Milner he explained. The Standard Model of physics is the present framework for describing describing the subatomic world at all energies. It was developed post World War to end. I count at Least Eighteen Nobel prizes in physics since nineteen fifty that have been awarded for contributions tribulations to its development alike all good theories. The Standard Model has accurately predicted numerous scientific breakthroughs including the discovery of the elusive higgs. Boson particle back in two thousand twelve yet. It doesn't answer every question. The Standard Model offers no explanation for gravity and it hasn't brought scientists any closer to understanding dark matter a mysterious ingredient that makes up about twenty seven percent of our universe. Here's where crossing a Hawkeye and company. Come in during a twenty fifteen experiment at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Institute for Nuclear Research They watched excited brilliant eight atoms decay inside a particle Michael Accelerator normally this process releases light which is later converted into electrons and positron are a type of Subatomic particle with a positive charge. And sure enough. That's what happened but then things got interesting. Normally brilliant eight decays predictable fashion yet. A weirdly Lee high number of these electrons and positron repelled each other at a one hundred and forty degree angle to explain the surplus crasner. Hawkeye's team argued that a never before seen particle had been formed as the atoms decayed by their calculations this theoretical subatomic body would have a massive around seventeen million electron-volts on volts. They went ahead and named the x seventeen particle and now ex seventeen is again making the news. Recently the same Hungarian Carrion scientists detected an anomaly indicates samples of helium four according to their archive paper. An unforeseen surplus of positron and electrons were released. Possibly because another seventeen particle was created. If this mystery particle exists. It might be something very special. Maybe just maybe it's a newfound carrier boasts on both sides are spinning particles that probably lack internal structure their known to carry forces making them an integral part of the standard model under the standard model. Milner Explains Forces take place by exchange of the carrier Bussan's between other subatomic particles articles. It's said each of the four fundamental forces has its own corresponding boasts on the one that transports gravity hasn't been found yet but the carrier bones associated it was strong force. Weak force electromagnetism are well documented. Presumably at seventeen would be the Kargbo sound for a fifth fundamental force that we never knew existed listed and perhaps said force is somehow related to dark matter but or getting ahead of ourselves. There's no hard proof that x seventeen exists. It's in the first place. The European Organization for Nuclear Research better known as sern has yet to find any trace of the particle and the new archive paper is still awaiting peer review and replication from other scientists milner and his colleagues have devised a proposal to try to generate seventeen particles in a scattering experiment at the Thomas. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News Virginia at present the standard model does account for any new fundamental forces. So if the x seventeen and the fifth force that allegedly carries a real we'll have to modify the good old standard model at any rate. It's clear the Potomac world is still rife with

Richard Milner Hawkeye Physicist Hungarian Academy Of Sciences Thomas Jefferson National Acce European Organization For Nucl MIT Tomic Newport News Virginia Sern Thomas
Could There Be a Fifth Fundamental Force?

BrainStuff

06:38 min | 8 months ago

Could There Be a Fifth Fundamental Force?

"The four fundamental forces are the most important quartet in science so far is anyone's been able to prove the universe is governed by these forces forces gravity electromagnetism the strong force and the weak force. But maybe this foursome isn't alone in two thousand fifteen. A Hungarian and team led by physicist Attila. Credit Hawkeye reportedly discovered new evidence for a fifth fundamental force. Something previously unknown to science. The the group uploaded another paper about the subject to archive a research database in October of two thousand nineteen while many scientists are skeptical about these findings. The research search does give us an occasion to talk about the major forces that we all take for granted the Fab four fundamental forces are irreducible meaning. They can't be broken down into other more basic forces. These are the core phenomena behind every other known type of physical interaction. For example friction tension and elasticity busy are all derived from electromagnetism. And what's that you ask. ELECTROMAGNETISM is a force that affects all positively and negatively charged particles articles those with opposite charges attract while ones carrying like charges. Repel each other. Not only does this principle. Keep magnets on your fridge. But it's also the reason why solid solid objects are able to retain their shapes compared with electromagnetism. Gravity is rather weak surprisingly enough. It's actually the weakest of the four fundamentals including including the so-called weak force. We'll get to that one in a bit. A gravity is the attraction of any two objects in the universe to another moons. Dust motes coyotes. Whatever ever everything exerts gravity on every other thing but at least one of the things in question has to be pretty massive in order for it to make much of a difference? That's why we you don't have dust mites orbiting our heads like asteroids and why we don't fall into orbit of coyotes when we encounter them but let's turn to the appropriately named strong force course. This is what hold Tomic nucleus together. Even in spite of their charged protons which are constantly trying to escape and last but not least. There's the Weak Force Aka. The weak interaction. This one is the hardest to explain and honestly I'm not an expert here but it's the force by which which subatomic particles can transform by decaying into different particles by losing boasts on which disintegrates into positron and or neutrinos this week force force fuel certain kinds of radioactive decay which means it's responsible for everything from medical imaging to the radiometric dating that researchers use to determine the ages of fossils thousand artifacts to the nuclear fission that occurs in the sun. So kind of a big deal. Scientists have a theory that nicely describes three of those forces known these standard model of physics. It's made up of various measurements and mathematical formulas. It also breaks down. Elementary particles into categories is an subcategories. We spoke by email with mit physicist. Richard Milner he explained. The Standard Model of physics is the present framework for describing describing the subatomic world at all energies. It was developed post World War to end. I count at Least Eighteen Nobel prizes in physics since nineteen fifty that have been awarded for contributions tribulations to its development alike all good theories. The Standard Model has accurately predicted numerous scientific breakthroughs including the discovery of the elusive higgs. Boson particle back in two thousand twelve yet. It doesn't answer every question. The Standard Model offers no explanation for gravity and it hasn't brought scientists any closer to understanding dark matter a mysterious ingredient that makes up about twenty seven percent of our universe. Here's where crossing a Hawkeye and company. Come in during a twenty fifteen experiment at the Hungarian Academy of Sciences Institute for Nuclear Research They watched excited brilliant eight atoms decay inside a particle Michael Accelerator normally this process releases light which is later converted into electrons and positron are a type of Subatomic particle with a positive charge. And sure enough. That's what happened but then things got interesting. Normally brilliant eight decays predictable fashion yet. A weirdly Lee high number of these electrons and positron repelled each other at a one hundred and forty degree angle to explain the surplus crasner. Hawkeye's team argued that a never before seen particle had been formed as the atoms decayed by their calculations this theoretical subatomic body would have a massive around seventeen million electron-volts on volts. They went ahead and named the x seventeen particle and now ex seventeen is again making the news. Recently the same Hungarian Carrion scientists detected an anomaly indicates samples of helium four according to their archive paper. An unforeseen surplus of positron and electrons were released. Possibly because another seventeen particle was created. If this mystery particle exists. It might be something very special. Maybe just maybe it's a newfound carrier boasts on both sides are spinning particles that probably lack internal structure their known to carry forces making them an integral part of the standard model under the standard model. Milner Explains Forces take place by exchange of the carrier Bussan's between other subatomic particles articles. It's said each of the four fundamental forces has its own corresponding boasts on the one that transports gravity hasn't been found yet but the carrier bones associated it was strong force. Weak force electromagnetism are well documented. Presumably at seventeen would be the Kargbo sound for a fifth fundamental force that we never knew existed listed and perhaps said force is somehow related to dark matter but or getting ahead of ourselves. There's no hard proof that x seventeen exists. It's in the first place. The European Organization for Nuclear Research better known as sern has yet to find any trace of the particle and the new archive paper is still awaiting peer review and replication from other scientists milner and his colleagues have devised a proposal to try to generate seventeen particles in a scattering experiment at the Thomas. Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Newport News Virginia at present the standard model does account for any new fundamental forces. So if the x seventeen and the fifth force that allegedly carries a real we'll have to modify the good old standard model at any rate. It's clear the Potomac world is still rife with

Meteorite Contains Material Older Than Earth

60-Second Science

02:09 min | 9 months ago

Meteorite Contains Material Older Than Earth

"Sunday morning September. Twenty eighth nineteen sixty nine. A fireball lit up the skies north of Melbourne Australia and people were getting ready to go to church and then his heard this loud. Sonic boom Some of them saw OUGHTA bright fireball. Broad daylight and people were surprised. What's going on? Especially those who were not outside. Area is their airplane. Came down it sounded sounded really dramatic and then suddenly. Shortly after that there was a smell that was detectable. Over the whole area. People describe it as methylated spirits. Strong organic organic smell. COSMO chemist Philip Heck of Chicago's field museum describing this spectacular arrival of what's now known as the Murchison Meteorite named for the village where it was found a portion of the space debris now resides at the field museum and heck says it's our best source of pre solar stardust meaning stardust older than the solar system and the sun itself a scientific treasure trove inside the meteorite is dusty debris leftover from windstar slightly larger than our sun fizzled out out over millions of years. Those dust grains were battered by cosmic rays which slightly altered their composition Adams of elements got broken down into smaller ones like neon on an helium and then some of that stardust was swallowed up within rocks such as the Murchison Meteorite during the formation of our solar system. Those rocks served as time capsules preserving preserving the material for unimaginable ages previous astronomical observations have hypothesized that there was a baby boom of stars about seven billion years ago by studying the merchants ingrains elemental composition HEX team was able to date forty nine Greens and found that two-thirds of them were four point. Six to four point nine billion in years old and that all makes sense because the parents are they farmed seven billion years ago. Took them about two two and a half billion years to evolve ECON Planetary Nabala become thus producing the results are in the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Some of the grains are actually up to seven billion years old making them. The the most ancient material on earth delivered here without notice on a quiet Sunday morning fifty years

Murchison Meteorite Philip Heck Field Museum National Academy Of Sciences Melbourne Australia Chicago Greens Adams
Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker Recap (Spoilers)

Post Show Recaps

06:37 min | 9 months ago

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker Recap (Spoilers)

"Just want to put my cards on the table. Right at the front rise of Skywalker is not a great movie. Okay it is not even really a good movie. It's all right movie. Get what happens in less which left a lot of people who are fans a star Star. Wars really annoyed his. They decided to clean up the mess and cleaning up the mess leads to a really really jam packed movie. That doesn't have any room to breathe. It takes a lot of weeks that I don't know where the puck thing force. Helium Lean. How how did you see? She's deflecting line. Lean only Mason Nokia. Whatever anyway it takes leaves is trying to say and I think it's not a good movie however compared to the last Jedi it is like Shakespeare because the last Jedi for like five minutes here getting the this shit the way because this is what this is initiated us to talk about this in the first place? Wow you feel or personal. Do you feel like the last night is a good movie or do you feel like it's just the best of the three. I think I would qualify it as a good movie. Yeah I enjoyed it. I don't understand that. The side is objectively a bad movie. The choices it makes and the things that ask us to do with the characters that we've long loved it just but uh-huh Here's the thing I didn't feel like we need to really have a discussion about that. I feel like what we can agree on is the Disney. Didn't have a plan. They bought a four billion dollar franchise and and decided to make a trilogy which I guess they did that. Just because that's like the cool thing to do like they did trilogies. Let's do one now. But they didn't have a frigging plan. And like I know people have problems with the prequels but as I said so if you bought online at least the prequels had a plant it had a line of thought it had lower like the writing was terrible. Oh and I felt like the execution was pretty bad and somebody effects weren't great but at least I believe that the screenwriters and the producer and the director like had a vision of what they wanted to show us like growing up and then he kills the people killed his mom and then he becomes dark and we saw how that happened. I couldn't even tell you what the last three movies were about like. I guess they were about this girl named Ray who was the daughter. Granddaughter Powell Patine which how did that happen did he get busy. I don't know but like I just like why. Here's the thing. Why do I care about these people? At least I cared about Anna. Can I cared about luke doc I cared about layoffs on never gave a shit about ray fin and I never cared about any of these people. Why did they did they show them my TV? So my movie screen and I'm like why are you here. Why are you bothering me? So that's where I'm coming from. I here's the thing that the rise of Skywalker can be accused of anything and one of them is having a lot of fan service in it but considering that the last Jedi I had virtually no fan service in it I feel like the rise of Skywalker can be excused for like letting fans is literally get wet with themselves with everything. They've got nights of rain on my God. Oh my God lake For Stanley all my God like real Landau Landau like. It does so much that we wanted to see. We hope to see in like this entire trilogy. It was just like shoves them all into one movie. And there's no time to breathe and you're like how the hell do that happened. BALCON game bag. I guess I guess he's back like like he cloned himself just sorcery. Oh again like they did. They don't even explain it. They don't even get a hand. Wait to your and it's just like it happens deal with it and then so we can talk about the movie. Now go ahead. I know you agree with me. They showed about a pre compliant. Yes I completely agree that I mean I I definitely I I will agree with you. I thought the Prequel trilogy was the better trilogy. And it's not even close not even close so thank. God Oh my God okay okay literally. You're not totally malfunctioning. Okay well I also say that as somebody that probably enjoyed the prequel trilogy Morrison focused because I actually think. It's pretty underrated I think that I think George. Lucas is really good at world building and he has a lot of interesting ideas and I know this is a fairly common opinion but he just needs to be. I think edited a little bit helped along with some dialogue choices and so on But I would much prefer stilted dialogue weird performances and silly CGI then like a bland flat world that that doesn't really go anywhere and a story. That is not really a cohesive because that's what star wars to to me at least is it's fantastic and like yes. The new trilogy is much prettier and the performances are better and the dialogue is beer but lots of movies can do that. You know what I mean. The imagination being imaginative. That's would star wars was to me. It's it's really like was when I was a kid like opened my mind to like all of these new crazy worlds and aliens and fun fantasy like things and that's what I liked about it so personally for me. I enjoyed the prequel trilogy much more than and I personally will say well. They didn't know that was going to be Luke's Luke's father in the empire strikes back. They just thought of that along the way so it wasn't like they had a plan back then but they had lucas as somebody who has an over arching figure who was in charge of Star Wars. Here what do you have. Kathleen Kennedy. I guess who just doesn't care really. What way director takes again? I feel like the ends of the three is the best one we because when I saw the force awakens yes it is basically a reprise of new hope fine but like it helped me and I was like excited for where we could go. Oh my God like seriously this is serious. Part of Brent. I'M NOT CLASSIC J.J. Abrams is that he's he's good at starting things. Yes exactly and I'm like Oh my God like who smoke in like what's his backstory and the Knights of ran and how Kylo fall to the dark side. Who's this ray girl and she can do everything? I'm sure there are going to explain that. Not

Skywalker Luke Lucas Director Landau Landau Nokia Disney J.J. Abrams RAY Powell Patine Anna Kylo Morrison Kathleen Kennedy Producer George
"helium" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

11:43 min | 9 months ago

"helium" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"Accidental science week that we're having this week we didn't plan for it to be science week but it happens that way. It's always funny running to me because often Tracy and I don't always consult each other on what we're working on at this point. We've both done so many that we don't really you you know need to check in all that much But every once in a while this happens where we both seem to be on the same wavelength. We do slightly related episodes. Yeah sci-fi install usually at most. They're sort of an F. Y.. Check in stop of what the topic is or if it's something that one of us knows is sort of more difficult subject territory for the they'll be sort of A. Hey just as it are we. Are we okay to talk about this. Yes yeah so. In my life I have always struggled and continued to struggle with basic arithmetic. But then when I got into like more complicated mathematics and then like ensue ensue. More mathematically involved physics and chemistry and stuff like that in school actually did pretty well and all of that but the work that that she was doing in experimental Sabac physics. I don't understand. I watched so many explanatory videos on Beta decay. Basically get on a basic level But I watch so many any videos that were about her experiment about what parody is and about the The the more general state of the field of experimental physics at the time. I and I'll be like okay. I I don't feel like I understand what this means is. It was weird. I felt like I was pretty good as a physics student at until I got the thought in my head is so weird. I'm reluctant to say it but I'M GONNA I feel like I'm going to sound like a crazy person. Come with me. I feel like this is one of those places we're having studied leads. Samuel Beckett really helps me here's why because there is a level of just acceptance with Beckett like you have have to understand that you don't always grasp all of what it is and you just accept it and then you're in the material and it sort of starts to make its own. We're logical sense and I feel like that same thing. I am a little bit better now. At applying to things like physics that are difficult concepts and it kind kind of makes a weird sense to me. Does that make sense. Yes I'm like. Oh yes of course. The Mirror image of parody makes absolute. Of course that makes sense and if anybody ever had to really get a scientific explanation I would be like Book Yeah there. There was a whole lot of physics. Hijacking I also really appreciated the fact that there is a biography of Shangwu and it was actually written in China Chinese and translated into English and one of the things that folks who read a lot of literature that is outside of where they grew up in the language. They speak one of the things that people notice is the way different cultures address language and address arrests the craft of how you put a story together like there can be differences and it was really interesting to me to read this biography which was written in Chinese translated into English but like the structure of it was a little different from what I'm used to. There was like more repeating of previous material at the beginning of chapter which I I just found fascinating and was it was it led me down a whole rabbit hole of like is this more a more common way of structuring. A story in China and in Chinese or is this like this one particular writers style and so now I'm very curious I wonder too I do do not speak Chinese but my understanding is that there are not conjugation verb tense in Chinese. So it's not like a verb conveys vase future or past. It's all sort of now so I suspect in translation that might lead to some of that. REPETITION where it seems like it's the same thing coming up again and again but in fact it probably through nuance was conveyed as being framed in different ways on the timeline would be my guess? Okay okay that's fascinating to that kind of reminds me of how occasionally when I will need to run some like French through Google translate that it gets really confused about the gender of anything Because you know all the nouns there's and the law And when you when you speak French she will understand that. We're talking about her dog but suddenly Google translate will be like his his dog. And I'm like no you're just confused translate anyway. Neither of US as Chinese speakers is Very the amazing pronouncing Chinese words. No they're very very difficult for me. And I said loud last week's casual Friday or not last week's several back I think I speak everything with a frenchaccent which is a garbage way to do it. And I'm dying to cure myself of that very very bad habit. Yeah got our our our pronunciations on this one did come from Mandarin Chinese speakers and then we did our best try to render that accurately so fingers crossed cross that we did okay and apologies. If we did not so so tracy I I have to confess that in recent years I have felt a large degree of guilt over every time that I ever inhaled helium to make my voice sounds silly now knowing that it is a finite resource that we kind of live on a precipice of running out of all the time. I don't think I've come to that point but when we had that conversation at the top of the episode about how I was the person that had to go get the little helium tank and balloons for my brother's wedding like it was the smallest tank that was available at the you. You Know Party supply store but I did start feeling kinda guilty by the end. That what I wound up doing with it was when I moved and I was like I still have this little helium Liam tank. I basically brought it to the house. Stuff works video department and who knows who knows whether it made its way into some kind of video use. After after that point probably their resources group they are very resourceful. Yeah I also just I know I messaged you about it while I was working on it but I was so pleased that this had an instance in this episode of scientists who could have gotten into an argument over who should get credit for their work but instead became best friends is to me. That's the well and I like to some extent. I get it when there are big scientific disputes. Because I mean sometimes those Kinda any discoveries really make or break. Somebody's career so I understand but at the same time they can become so acrimonious. Yeah it's We talked about this a little bit in our our Saul Hertz. Episode is well. Like there's there's that part of me that just is sad because I'm a little bit of an idealist. I want the pursuit of knowledge to be this pure and beautiful thing and everybody to work together and and cheer each other but as you said there are high stakes in terms of people's livelihoods and it does does make sense that there would be moments of disparity between people. I don't know how to fix that. I don't I don't know how to fix the human condition. Yeah but I'm I'm pleased. That in this one instance related to observing the sun without the need for an eclipse and figuring out how to use a spectre scope for any time viewing it resulted in a nearly four decade. Close friendship I really appreciated that by a total coincidence. We did this episode episode after our earlier episode of the week Because when I was working on Xinxiang Woo I really was like my. I felt like the understanding of what she was talking about was on the other side of a wall in my mind that I was banging my head against and then we got to come over to helium which included like all my favorite types of things from when I took physics and astronomy and I was like. Hey Yeah I brain my brain can still do science. It just can't do you Some Beta decay parody atomic physics situation. Yes element signatures in the visible light. Spectrum is good and stuff and it it as I said in the episode. It's one of those things that I still I can see. I can wrap my brain around what's happening but I'm still wowed. When when when astronomers and astrophysicists today look at at a new thing that we've discovered out in the the vast expanse of space and they're like? Oh we think it's made of this and this and I was like wow I Love I love science. I always feel like a little bit. You know my science grasp is hit or miss. I find but I still love it so deeply and I I love the the there are people who use their incredible intellect for the betterment of our understanding of our place in the universe to me. That's like one of the noblest pursuits for sure. And if there are folks that are like man what is why is it so much science. I don't know what you're working on for next time but next time what I'm working on his very far away from what. We are talking about This week yeah same same. Same I always want to talk about science but I know I do it a lot. I almost had a moment One of the the people while I was researching this episode there is the person that came up and then it became about photographing the moon and I was like no no way you've does. I responded to a couple of listener mirror suggestion emails that we got over the past week with with basically. Yeah that is actually on my shortlist for thing but it has so many overlapping being Themes with stuff. We've just done that. I'm trying to save it for a little bit later. That doesn't always work out. We still have runs of a similar theme on the show but you mm-hmm we try happens As we said this was completely coincidental that we both picked science time. Sometimes that's just how it goes. Yeah we're on. Whatever we're both in the science zone for big you missed the district last production? iheartradio's how stuff works for more podcasts. For my heart radio. visit the iheartradio APP apple podcasts. Or wherever you listen TIRR favorite shows. My name is Brandon FIBS. I want you to stay away with me. Aboard Apollo Eleven. We'll be covering covering the mission from start to finish day by day hour by hour minute by minute suffused with original music and fully immersive sound effects. This podcast is going the next best thing to actually being aboard Apollo Eleven. This is nine days in July new episodes arrive every Thursday through February. We six listen to nine days in July on the iheartradio APP on Apple podcasts. Or wherever you get your podcasts..

Google Apollo Eleven Samuel Beckett apple Tracy Saul Hertz China Chinese US Brandon FIBS Shangwu China Liam
NASA’s Parker Solar Probe Is Unlocking the Sun’s Mysteries

Quirks and Quarks

07:37 min | 10 months ago

NASA’s Parker Solar Probe Is Unlocking the Sun’s Mysteries

"Just over a year ago NASA launched the parkers solar probe towards the Sun. It's an ambitious mission is going to get closer to our star than any spacecraft has ever done and to do so it has to withstand the Sun's intense heat and radiation in fact the probe job is literally going to touch the sun and take measurements inside the corona the Sun's outer atmosphere to help us better understand our star and the space weather it creates before it gets there though the probe has been slowly testing the waters with ever-closer approaches gathering. Data's does so and this week scientist a just released. The first batch of research from those fly buys one of the scientists getting their hands on this hot data. Was Dr Justin Casper. He's a professor of space. Sciences is an engineering at the University of Michigan Dodger. Casper welcome to quirks and quarks. It's great to be here. Thank you now before we get into your new findings Give us a quick overview of the mission in What are its goals and where we're at right now? Short so parker solar probe is the the largest helium physics mission. NASA has ever undertaken And it has a few main objectives one is to figure out why the Sun's Corona is about a thousand times hotter than the surface of the sun. So something really interesting is is happening that can take the six thousand degree visible yellow surface of the sun and produce a million degree corona glowing x rays ultraviolet light The second the thing is we want to figure out how the existence of that hot corona produces a really fast solar wind a stream of particles ions and electrons Iran's that travel out in the space away from the Sun at Millions of kilometers an hour now and to do this. You're actually going to the Senate's how how close are you going to get the way I like to think about. It is in units of the radius of our Sun so earth is about two hundred and fifteen solar radii away from the sun and to date the closest the spacecraft has ever gotten to the sun was seventy solar radii away from it What Parker solar probe does as it has Multiple orbits around on the Sun. where it plunges close to the sun and then pops back out again and then repeats Every few months and so far we've been closing within thirty five solar RADII but but over the next five years we're GONNA fly by the surface of Venus six times then each time we do that. Venus Bend our orbit closer and closer to the sun at the end of the mission will be about ten solar radii from the Sun. Wow well how is your probe able to survive getting that close to our star. This is very very difficult so at closest approach the spacecraft has a heat shield That reflects her absorbs about five megawatts of sunlight It's front gets up to about fifteen hundred degrees Celsius but it's back is only about three hundred degrees c wow that's astounding. Well tell me about the the latest data Ada even getting from the probe as it's on its way there. Yeah sure so. One has to do with how the silicone is being heated. Now when we've put spacecraft aft- into the solar wind in the past in her planetary space they see this constant stream of a special type of magnetic wave moving away from the sun. We call call those Alpha waves Think of it like Plucking Guitar string but the guitar string is a magnetic field line the magnetic field wiggles and the particles wiggle wiggle with them And those Al Fain waves carry a lot of energy So we were wondering when we got closer to the sunlight would just see more of these random Alvin fain waves may be there. There are a little larger amplitude. Could that possibly be the source of heating the Corona And what we found to our surprise is these he's Instead of just a random ocean of waves. That's maybe a little more intense. There were these huge rogue waves traveling by very coherent well-defined. Uh Spikes and the velocity in the changes in the magnetic field so just to describe the spacecraft would be coasting along through the solar wind And then suddenly within in seconds the speed of the flow jumped by about five hundred thousand kilometers an hour And we'd be sitting there in this weird jet of of flow flow And then just as suddenly a few seconds or hundreds of seconds later we pop out The other side. And we've left it. And when we analyze the data ada looks like these things are kind of s shaped kinks in the magnetic field. It's a it's a wave that so violent it's actually twisting the sun's magnetic field field around on itself so they're carrying an incredible amount of energy and this is really exciting because it could potentially explain the energy source that heats the corona. It does the data you have so far. Tell us anything about space weather. Since we're affected directly by that here on Earth. Yes absolutely so so. When it comes to heating the corona I'll give you a very specific example of this Coronal mass ejections are like violent eruptions of material from the Sun's Corona Rona. A A large mass ejection might involve an amount of mass Roughly equivalent to the water in Lake Michigan Going from rest to moving moving at a few million kilometers per second in just minutes That's incredible amount of energy expelled out in space. And if those hit earth they can you know disrupt Communications radar navigation electrical power. So he really wanted to be able to forecast whether or not a cme criminal mass ejection is GonNa hit Earth. The same way we're able to. With some reliability forecast weather hurricanes going to make landfall given place the speed of a wave in the sun's atmosphere as a function of the temperature of the atmosphere. So if we don't know how how things are you know. We're missing out on very fundamental things. Like just how faster waves going to to travel around Are we going to good job. Forecasting the path of interruption. If we if we don't even know how fast the waves are moving so this information is directly. Are you going to improve our our models in our simulations that we use to forecast based weather. Where's the pro right now? So the program now is actually pretty far away from the sun but it is headed towards Venus and on December. Twenty six. That's GONNA pass Just two thousand kilometers above the surface so Venus And that's going to deflect its orbit's so in January we can have our next perihelion down twenty eight solar radii instead of thirty five. What are you looking forward to most in this mission? There's a point that I really WanNa Cross with the spacecraft so these Al Fain waves that travel travel away from the Sun. There the fastest wave that moves through the sun's atmosphere And as you go away from the sun the solar wind speeds up and the speed eight of the Alpha waves drops down and at some point. The wind is escaping faster than an Alpha brain wave could travel back to the sun. The material truly disconnects from the sun on and becomes the solar wind. We call that point the AL fame point and if we get the spacecraft below the AL fame point will truly be in the extended atmosphere era of our sun. will be basically touching star for the first time I like to think about it And so I'm I'm very hopeful that between now and our final final orbits ten solar Radii we're going to cross elfin point And touch a star for the first time after Casper. Thank you very much for your time. My Pleasure

Corona Al Fain Nasa Scientist Corona Rona Dr Justin Casper Professor University Of Michigan Dodger Alvin Fain Lake Michigan Senate AL Wanna Cross Iran Casper Five Hundred Thousand Kilomete
Effects of the Solar Wind

NASA ScienceCasts

03:13 min | 10 months ago

Effects of the Solar Wind

"The wind speed of a devastating category five hurricane can top over one hundred fifty miles per hour hour or two hundred and forty one kilometers per hour. Now imagine another kind of wind with an average speed of zero point. Eight seven million miles per hour or one point four million kilometers per hour. Welcome to the wind that begins in our son and doesn't stop until after it reaches the edge of the Helius fear the solar wind. The Corona is the Sun's inner atmosphere the brightness that can be seen surrounding eclipsed sun and home the continually annually expanding solar wind right now. The Parker solar probe a NASA mission launched in two thousand eighteen is orbiting the sun. And we'll get as close as three eight point eight three million miles or six point one. Six million kilometers of the Sun's surface Parker is gathering new data about the solar particles and magnetic fields. Also that comprise the solar wind more specifically two of its main goals are to examine the energy that heats the corona and speeds up the solar wind and and determine the structure of the winds magnetic fields while many theories described the solar winds history. This is what we do know. The solar wind impacting Earth's magnetosphere is responsible for triggering those majestic Aurora's typically seated locations close to our north and South poles in some cases it can also said off space weather. Storms that disrupt everything from our satellites and space to ship communications on our oceans to power grids on land. Nikki Fox is the division director for helium physics at NASA headquarters. She explains in more detail. How the solar wind disrupts are magnetosphere as the wind and flows toward earth it carries with the sun's magnetic field? It moves very fast than smacks right into Earth's magnetic field. The blow causes a shock shock to our magnetic protection which can result in turbulence. NASA also has another reason to study the solar wind and its properties. The solar older wind is part of a larger space weather system that can affect astronauts and technology as Fox notes we not only have to ensure our astronauts are protected from the harmful effects of radiation. We have to protect our equipment to so we've already found aluminum to be a good shield to protect our crafts from many energetic particles us but there are also faster particles that travel at eighty percent of the speed of light which can cause havoc with parts of spacecraft. They can smash into damage. Solar alert panels disrupt electronics or affect electric currents that flow along power grids so we're currently conducting tests with small pieces of technology to study. How well they can survive? In intense radiation areas knowing more about the effects of the solar wind is not only important to those of us who live on earth it will be critical to know how to mitigate its effects once our astronauts travel back to the moon and beyond for extended periods of time. Fox concludes my feeling is if the the sun. Sneezes earth catches a cold because we always feel the impact of what happens on the Sun. Thanks to the solar wind

Nasa Nikki Fox Parker Aurora Division Director Four Million Kilometers Per Ho Forty One Kilometers Per Hour Six Million Kilometers Eighty Percent
"helium" Discussed on Planet Money

Planet Money

03:30 min | 1 year ago

"helium" Discussed on Planet Money

"This planet money from n._p._r. Nick snyder is devoting his life to this one element on the periodic table helium and it's kind of like a tribute to his great uncle is name was charles conrad. I won't call them pete. His name was charles conrad and everyone compete uncle pete was an astronaut he walked on the moon was the third person to walk on the moon but he wasn't like serious. Nerdy astronaut think daredevil prankster astronaut yeah his personal motto tongue-in-cheek was if you can't be good be colorful like as uncle pete walked down the ladder toward the moon he he made not a dramatic pronouncing but a joke about being shorter than the other astronauts zeal warm with <music> small step for neil armstrong but along one for me. Uncle pete is walking on the moon just like dum dum dum dum. This is actual audio from the work. At all times <music> today a lot of <hes> colorful things in his nasa career quite a memorable character because of his uncle pete nick grew up obsessed with everything about outer space and this is what brings us to nick's obsession with helium. You cannot send a rocket doc into space without helium and a few years ago. Nick heard that the world is running short on helium and that is going to put at risk space exploration and access to space which certainly was something <hes> near and dear to <hes> migrate uncle and my whole family oy helium is crucial for way more than space. You need helium to run m._r._i. Machines like for doctors to detect cancer and tumors. You need helium to keep deep sea divers safe electronic chips for our cell phones and computers made using helium so the helium shortage threatens all of that also birthday parties their entire birthday parties and prom with droopy helium liz balloons because some party stores are out out of helium so when nick hears about the helium shortage he thinks of his great uncle pete and all this other important helium gilliam steph and he decides he's going to go looking for more helium. Hello and welcome to planet money from n._p._r. I'm sarah gonzalez today on the show the helium shortage and how we got here helium is is so special and so rare that the u._s. government wants tried to buy up all the helium and hide it before anyone else in the world knew where helium was or what it could do. Also we go exploring for new sources of helium with nick. We've got our steel toed boots on any drill made of diamonds kind of support.

uncle pete pete nick Nick snyder charles conrad sarah gonzalez neil armstrong nasa
"helium" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

04:10 min | 1 year ago

"helium" Discussed on Elvis Duran and the Morning Show

"About to get into some sound with Garrett great stuff. Excellent stuff today. Including Jennifer garner giving the graduation speech at her all modern. I love her speech way. You hear what she has to say we're gonna play that for you in just a second. Hang on. Hey can we talk about helium for a second? This is really funny, stressing, his out this helium, we've always taken it for granted. Okay. Well, I want some balloons, we blow them up and they float. There goes a parade with balloon does ED's Amelean. And that we love talking with helium. I've done this for Garrick. Housing. Not to be confused with this, this other gas, sulfur. Heck's floral makes you speak lower. Gold. From America's got talent. I think we have plenty of that sulfur wall. We're back to helium. So there are several things going on this planet of ours, as, you know, helium is a naturally mind gas. It's caused by a naturally occurring radioactive materials that are actually rotting beneath the surface of the earth. And so what they do is they mind this helium, it's difficult to store because it's the coldest thing on earth Kalisz gas on earth. And if it gets us a little bit warm. It turns into a gas that doesn't do helium things now. We we saw helium we put it in balloons, we take it for granted. But can you imagine a world where we don't have balloons that float anymore? Because because there's no helium right? Really become balloons. No balloon can either float or beyond. So the thing about helium of mining is, it's very expensive to find new mind new ways to find there. They do believe there is a lot more helium below the surface of the earth, but it's very costly to put these projects together to get down there and get it excuse me. So yes, we are in one of three or four helium shortages that we have been through in the past fifty years. So this isn't the first time like he's going to have to use your hot air from your body to up and just tape them. Exactly tape to hang them. I hope we don't have a hangar crisis. Right. But another thing you to keep in mind. Haleem is more than just balloons at the birthday party. They use helium with MRI machines of the military uses helium, helium helium is used for many things other than your, your big Mylar, or whatever they are balloons. So just this is one of these things where, you know, we may live. Long enough to see a world with no helium now, I don't know. I'm not saying that she, but, you know, I, I know that more people are more companies have found different pockets of helium, and they are harnessing it, but it's becoming more and more expensive is just one of those things helium, who would think about it. I know straight Nate brought to brought a balloon in here. A helium balloon it we have out in a luau room. Let me go ahead and suck his no they've it to wasting. It's like wasting gas. What are we going to do with it? I mean, we're gonna get a container and save all the healing over to enjoy the balloon magically floating hair get so sad. When it starts to limp. And it's not limply to me, how long helium balloons do Lau. Yes. Those mylar. Yeah. We do. Well, let's let let's let it float in its natural state. We're gonna we're going to enjoy the helium longer. If we let it float them, if you start doing the ABC's. Well, if it's there's going to be a shortage, I think we should collect all of the balloons now and then we have then we could start selling it on the black market. All right. Well, what do we put it in though? Yeah. Keep it in the balloon, like Elvis, sin. Keep him like. Yeah. Storing helium is really not our forte. So we'll leave room here, your office never gets us. What just put a bunch of balloons scientists? But it turns into a different form of gas, it'll, it'll fall to the ground. Eventually with people don't know that when they're buying it. All right. This is a pointless conversation. I'm just talking about something we take for granted out of the many things on earth..

helium Jennifer garner Garrett Haleem Elvis Garrick ABC America Heck Nate ED fifty years
"helium" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

03:49 min | 1 year ago

"helium" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"It's like how I do watch RoboCop. Like, yeah. Part of the cultural vernacular kind of a little more of a commitment to hours little thrown sixty two hours. Yeah. That's a long time. I don't know how long at this point in my life who would take to get through them all six seasons of lost. Yeah. Okay. Okay. I did all lost as well. So you're right lost after it was on TV. Okay. I have never seen lost. I'm saving it for the nursing home. There's certain shows I wanna have something to watch in the nursing home. And by then I won't won't matter that it's confusing never resolves because because everything. There's a helium shortage. Oh, yes. Ran into this in Vegas. A couple of weeks ago. We don't training. Balloons for my friends about shrimp party. We bought some love balloons as you do. And we went through two three stores, and there was a helium shortage guess a global helium shortage, by the way helium is also used for mixes for deep sea divers. It's used in airbags. It's used in rocket fuel MRI machines, fiber, optics and semiconductors. The shortage of helium is not going to get better. It's used in the production of the chipmunks series. Yes. No down so party city. And it has it's gonna shut down forty five stores this year. Oh, casualty I don't know if that's related to the healing. It is because that's the whole reason. People went to party city because the dollar tree won't do it unless you buy balloons from them. Oh, which I also knowledge listen, we we went to a lot of. Party city. She is the Queen of seventeen dollar, wedding, dresses and balloons. You don't have to buy. Party. So. Goodyear, blimp operation not currently affected by the helium shortage. That's a relief. They could just fly a plane. Wow. The closing forty five stores because of a helium shortage. Would you buy anything party city when you could just order ahead of time from Elliot express for like a fraction of the price? It's balloons you. Don't order balloons by mail you. Yeah. You do for Amazon inflated. No. But you inflate him after you get, but there's no helium. But you have air. You could just stick out the same. Plus the wall with scotch tape. We have a national helium reserve. They're shutting it down and twenty one Twenty-one. Yeah, we have. I don't know it's floating up there helium is extracted from natural gas mining and from the national helium reserve it's mostly kept in caves. Helium is a non renewable resource at current consumption rates has been estimated that well, we've got some time left two hundred years. We'll be out. Some of us are urging the recycling of helium. This is hard to do. Yeah. I bet you they could make helium. All the helium that that there ever has been was created in the big bang. That's it. We're after you can't come on helium you with fishing. You could make helium. No, no. You could do it with Uson fusion, you can make you. Okay. Well, we fuse some hydrogen atoms. We got helium what's so hard about that. That's so exp-. What's so hard about? By the way, started watching Chernobyl last night..

Helium Vegas Elliot Goodyear Amazon two hundred years seventeen dollar sixty two hours
"helium" Discussed on Dear Hank & John

Dear Hank & John

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"helium" Discussed on Dear Hank & John

"Yeah, I'd be fascinated to know this next question comes from the seem who writes, dear John and Hank since there's helium in the air. Does that mean that are actual voices are really deeper and in our atmosphere? We're just always slightly talking like took a breath from a helium balloon. Thanks. There is we've ever received because I have no idea what the answer is. And be my immediate assumption was probably. So I I you gotta you gotta say all right. Is that in that case if it's if it's true is it actually like what's the natural state? Right. Right. Because like, we'll know the natural state is the current state, obviously. But what I'm what I'm asking is if I go to one of those fancy oxygen bars in Vegas, and I have and I like, you know, drink pure oxygen for four minutes for eighty five dollars. And I have my voice start to be deeper just for a few minutes because all that pure oxygen. I just had. So he the helium in the be clear, it's not just the helium. It's all of the gases are affecting the density of the air and the density of the air is the thing that matters. So if you do pure oxygen, I don't know whether pure oxygen is heavier than pure nitrogen. I should I vote. If I thought about oxygen is eight and nitrogen is six what you got to realize. This isn't just about. The density of helium like all gases. Do this affect the tone of our voice? And so like we are used to hearing our voices at the density of of like the air the particles in our air, which is almost entirely nitrogen and oxygen. And so if you breathed in air that was like a heavy like a heavier gas all of them are poisonous, unfortunately. So it would be hard to do it. So except for the except for the job. Oh, gases like so. So if you breathed in pure argon, your voice would actually be lower than it is or crypt on what she probably wouldn't wanna do or Radonovich. My reading of superman, actually, I think it'd be fine to breathe and pure kryptonite will just be expensive. But you definitely wouldn't wanna breathe pure rate on because that would give you ought to camp. I got it. I can picture it. So the the mix that we have now is. Lightened little bit by helium. And so if the helium was removed per, I guess our voices would be point zero zero. I looked this up zero five to four percent deeper or divided by the actual amount that helium deep lightens, your voice, heightens your voice. Seem the answer. Your question is guess according to Hank's marginally educated. Guess I went to several different Wikipedia pages. Hankas scanned for Wikipedia. Single source multiple Wikipedia. I've done my lateral reading. I did it wall answering the question. Okay. This next question comes from Caitlyn kale's got a question. Dear John, whenever I write an Email on my phone. It has an automatic signature of sent from my phone..

helium Hank John Caitlyn kale Wikipedia Vegas Radonovich Hankas eighty five dollars four minutes four percent
"helium" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"helium" Discussed on The Science Show

"An immense. Temperatures hundred fifty million degrees c to get helium your favorite. Yes. And it's very difficult process. And so we're going to do it on earth. Well, yes in Tony does is we have but Mike energy. That'll be difficult. The positives. Czar is of course, there's no waste partner. Little bit of water. And yeah, we'll good luck. Why are you? So keen on helium helium is a lot of fun because math rolled kids have at at their birthday parties. And it goes up and escapes in the atmosphere. It. Reaches skype. Hello city as hot engine, but we have helium in the atmosphere, permanent amount and hydrogen. And the question is why. Well, we don't have autism because we're not release much hardly any, but the earth does release helium and so kids and the parents at the party where does the helium come from? And nobody knows nobody knows where helium comes from. And the irony is that comes from radio activity comes from the alpha particles possibly the most dangerous emission coming out and grab two electrons and become sweet lovely useful. Helium? Isn't it just made in the summer league out all in spice this quite a bit? Yes. Ben what we're here to celebrate the periodic table one hundred and fifty years old, and we've mentioned hygiene number one and helium, and if you look at the periodic table itself, then you've got a couple of lines. I'm going to as where. Alone. I'm going to tell you something terribly embarrassing who all close more years. I had to invent a pneumonic. In other words, a prompt that I could write down in front of me in chemistry exams, and I did about ten of the move the us and the first line a hate saying this because I try to avoid the word like like I was here. And like he said, but the first word is like a thin Brigitte Bardot cannot often. Niro. What was practiced doing? It's a case of fluorine accusa Florin, but say the Monica something else and the next line is even worse. Nasty. Maguire L always.

Helium Brigitte Bardot partner Niro Tony Mike energy Monica us Ben hundred fifty million degrees fifty years
"helium" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

WCBS-FM 101.1

01:39 min | 1 year ago

"helium" Discussed on WCBS-FM 101.1

"She's probably I say that girls on their seventeen nineteen years old. Okay. Girls on at it. And the one girl. Who was the person? So she's got this little voice. Yeah. Yes, she sound like she's about fourteen. It sounds like she lives on helium. Turn smart. And she's really smart. Yeah. But she's voice can fully account is figure out something actually wrong with RIC because what happens is she she kind of talked. She then move her mouth much as a kid. Maybe she had braces, and she didn't want to show him some. But she's very very nice girl. And very smart. Okay. So what it sounds like he's on helium? Do you? Remember any of the questions did they play. This might have it on. Okay. No. It's not loading loading. Bo find it in a minute helium girl. That's her. She's here crescendo with was. Yeah. Again. Teaching. When she talks. She's about seven, but she's not. Yeah. That's kind of it was just weird. But what about the questions? What did you question? I can't remember what got. You got the answer that quick. But then it all went out of your head. Yeah. I didn't memorize them. I just knew the answer look at over and get you a couple of a whole Taylor swift category. He swept now..

helium Bo RIC Taylor seventeen nineteen years
"helium" Discussed on Who? Weekly

Who? Weekly

02:44 min | 2 years ago

"helium" Discussed on Who? Weekly

"In that guy called in and asked about noble gases being who's in them's and then ended his call with air body face. It's so funny. So what do we think about helium. Even engage with this call because it's riding me to hell. And I know it. I'm sorry, we'll do you want at least reference the other noble gas, what are they Bobby, their Google helium. No, their helium. There are gone. They're crypt on. I don't know much about her Xena. She's a Disney channel. There's raid. I know he's radioactive, and then there's a neon. The only them's are neon. Helium and I think radon because no, no, no. When the helium. Yeah. Because people think it's it's superman world the wrong thing. It's it's definitely just helium neon. That's I can't believe you just answered this question caller. You are a troll. I wanna play a lot of stars born calls because a lot of you called in with your reaction to Starr's born. We just wanna play them unfiltered. We just want you to express yourselves because we all know how excited you are about stars born and alley. And Jackson can't wait to see you all wearing the alley merch because I know that Lindsey not gonna buy those t shirts, right. Lindsay. Shirt you're already awning. Are they. Are they, but before we get into the actual calls, listen to this call because I didn't know this. I may be rate to game on this, but havi no-name, Ashley, and Halmi is Ashley, if you mix the first four letters up. 'cause window sewing. I didn't know that Lindsey did, of course, you got it. That's like the number one thing you know about halls a real names out. Okay. There's nothing holing. Gerald g. easy and Halsey. Ashley in Gerald forever. I knew that, but I didn't ever put together that whole z. was like a jumble. Yeah, it's a jumble of Ashley, here's your stars. Born calls. Please enjoy. Dr. Is the best movie. I have probably ever seen there was not a drive end, and I just hear sniffling all belly. So thanks for hyping it up. I short time short time still crying from the stars for I'm calling because in the lake of the three, this cinematic masterpiece the two thousand eighteen a SARS born has been some disagreements about what Allie stands with call themselves in the fictional stars universe. I think allies. They shorts to the point, but there's plenty of their who think alligator's would be the would be like the moniker for Allie stands, which reminds me life stands should never name themselves..

Helium Ashley Allie Lindsey Bobby Gerald g. SARS Disney Google Starr Lindsay alligator Jackson Halsey Halmi
"helium" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

BBC Inside Science

04:05 min | 2 years ago

"helium" Discussed on BBC Inside Science

"So today, our main sources of helium come from regions with radioactive rocks, so radioactive decay releases one form of radiation. It's called an alpha particle which is two protons and neutrons these up subatomic particles that are spat out of unstable atomic nuclei. And this article is actually just helium, helium nucleus, and Ernest Rutherford shows this the star of the twentieth century. So those are main reservoirs. They come from radioactive rocks but are increasingly being depleted and his actually a bit of a world shortage of. Liam at the moment and it's really important gas, we need it for kinds of applications, MRI machines, particle physics experiments. The one I work on the sources of it running. It was actually real problem. Harry cliff from the science museum in London. Now that very technique spectroscopy has not gone away and is still used by Astra. Physicists with twenty-first-century ambitions. Jessica spe has been doing much the same as those early helium spotters except her quarry is a planet, two hundred light years away. We found helium in the atmosphere of a gas giant planet about the same size as Jupiter, but only has ten percent of his mass and it orbits about once every six days around a small orange style. And these smaller orange stars because they're smaller. They have quite complex magnetic fields, and they have the active regions in the upper parts of these stars and these activities get very hot and they emit high energy extreme ultraviolet and x Ray radiation. And when that high energy. Radiation is absorbed in the upper atmosphere of a planet. It can put the helium in this special excited state, which is the state that we need to be able to detect it. So it's not just the helium filled balloons with these days. I, it's in a particular state and that and that's what gives the signature which allows you to identifiers. Exactly. It's cooled meta stable helium. This stays excited on average for over two hours. So it's the longest live excited state of any atom. And when it's in that state, there are other absorption lines that we see, and this is how we're able to detect it and the size of the signal. Was it tell us about the concentration of helium in in in those Gus joins? Yeah, the size of the absorption signal that we met. It was very large, and it tells us that there is a huge cloud of helium that extends tens of thousands of kilometers above the low atmosphere of this planet. Now we, we know we're ready. This actually planet has clouds and water and it's low Rumsfield, but we didn't know anything about is upper atmosphere. But this huge signal tells us that there's at least you know this great cloud of helium that extends very far up presumably hydrogen on other species as well. And it tells us this material is lightly escaping away from the atmosphere. And how generalize about, do you think they say now that we know of thousands and potentially millions of billions of exoplanets in the in the universe? Do you expect to see this type of signal often or is, or is this a peculiar normally? Yes, we do. So there's actually medicine will helium in the earth's atmosphere. For example, although in very small quantities, I'm very excited in as a few other people in the field about what we can do more with this new way to study exit times. We think there are quite fundamental questions. We cannot say with this, if. We look for helium and many more time. It's right now. Much of the exit planet community is giving up to look for rookie small on us, the orbit small, an active stars. So on the hunt for a size planet is this is the search for helium. Is this another sort of signature that is useful tool in the in the tool kit potentially because we're probing the upper atmosphere of these planets, which extend much further than the lower atmosphere which is normally targeted by exit plan, atmosphere studies..

Ernest Rutherford Jessica spe Astra Harry cliff Liam London Gus two hundred light years ten percent two hours six days
"helium" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

WHYR 96.9 FM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"helium" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

"In their bottle that gave energy was at a cigarette lighter or what it's really hard to tell palladium has an extraordinarily interesting chemistry has been fooling researchers for years as you noted that not only is there that patent a number in the early twentieth century to researchers thought they had achieved fusion and palladium and because they came to we're thinking along the same lines fleischmann where and they thought they detected helium inside an excess of helium inside palladium which would be a nice time fusion because you're rating helium it turns out that they were deceiving themselves because it turns out palladium soaks up helium just as well as tokes hydrogen so you haven't richard helium so if they were seeing excess energy and it's not entirely clear from the setup of the experiments that they were i mean they certainly thought they were there was some sloppiness but it's certainly possible that they were seeing it would most likely be a a matter of chemistry a chemical reaction where bonds are breaking rather than a nuclear reaction where bonds in the center of a nucleus are being formed that that the nuclear bonds that change adams into other atoms are what are changed in a fusion reaction as opposed to the attachments between atoms which are chemical bonds which are being changed in a chemical reaction like burning paper or or cracking water and so whatever they were seeing almost certainly was a chemical reaction and chemical reactions are well studied and there's only so much you can do for solving the world's energy problems with chemical reactions back burning.

palladium richard helium adams fleischmann
"helium" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

Stuff You Missed in History Class

01:56 min | 2 years ago

"helium" Discussed on Stuff You Missed in History Class

"I said it's just a is bad of an idea as it sounds horrible idea please don't ever go up in a helium balloon this with our region don't do helium either now don't set off fireworks show vote with even if the what's inside of it is not an immensely flammable gas yeah on june 24th eighteen pen sophie made her 16th ascension as part of a celebration of the marriage of napoleon and marielouise and napoleon was extremely fond of sophie he appointed her chief air minister of ballooning and in this role she actually developed an assessed plans for balloon based aerial raids of england for napoleon although she eventually had to report him that this really was not a feasible way to wage war that these were not missions that he should plan on doing they needed dragons like in the tampa even after the french monarchy was restored sophie stayed in the good graces of the nation leaders as part of louis the eighteenth restoration celebration sophie ascended in a balloon from pontneuf and was eventually named official aeronautics of the restoration by bourbon king and she was also something of a daredevil in the air and she really did become quite famous throughout europe uh what's interesting is a she accomplished a lot of feats that her husband had only dreamed of and of course she also got herself in a lot of dangerous situations one of the big accomplishments was that she crossed the alps by balloon which uh jeanpierre had always said he was interested in doing but never achieved on route two turin in april of 18 twelve seeing had nose bleeds and icicles formed on her face and hands you a little bit dangerous i and 18th seventeen she had a really weird sort of brush with danger she mistook a flooded field for a meadow and she tried delay.

helium balloon helium sophie england napoleon tampa pontneuf turin official europe
"helium" Discussed on The Tech Guy

The Tech Guy

02:10 min | 3 years ago

"helium" Discussed on The Tech Guy

"As lebed's lost i'm kind of intrigued by how it um house a big screen a a little phone since actually a screen very close to if not a little bit bigger i may be the same size as the iphone a plus but look at this the size of the phone compared to it not a on a a led spring battery life is phenomenal yeah i i i use the um i use the samsun backup so helium to titanium get renamed the helium and helium renamed weren't they the same keyboard another not a k titanium does need route that's right helium i know very intrigued by the g thirty lille the port the tech guy this is a so what our last caller wanted to do is is what we call the words are image backup and if you've used a computer you probably familiar maybe not but it's a it's a handy tool familiar with the idea of backing up the an entire hard drive as a almost he's like a freeze dried package as a single file which can then be whipped back on the hard drive very quickly uh there are lots of programmes the do it it regionally was norton ghost so sometimes he'll call his ghosting the harddrive norman's long i don't think the get nor ghost anymore but there's lots of the duplication or similar programs like as the caller was talking about a krona's true images very popular that's a paid program ease us has a disc clone if it's free there's there's a linic spaced one that you know you can use on any harddrive cult clones tzila.

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"helium" Discussed on Dudes Doing Business

Dudes Doing Business

02:08 min | 3 years ago

"helium" Discussed on Dudes Doing Business

"The man i am i need a couple or these now he could race like little air rv races it's like mario cart with the balloons i still think that that is a bullshit question because i think it's impossible to identify the location of every inflated helium balloon in in texas i just said austin impossible in austin too because how are you gonna know if it's at like some fucking kid's birthday party down the street so i we got a knock on every a you have to know you'd after literally go into every house in asta i was thinking as also get a giant extremely powerful static electricity device and then they come to you yet this isn't a fucking cartoon joh that's not possible that's what that's what google google doesn't want to hear impala podcasts static electricity mission there you'd like to call it when you on ask skin like build this machine yeah i didn't say there was a budgetary constraints to this sad is hypothetical balloon on very true i go down to you teach campus think about find the pledges and i say look figure it out anything is possible on the wages the thing is low either have to be some serious adverse effect but look even if you built this machine it's not just gonna suck up helium balloons human life was also not a constraint to this i sure if i gave a couple thousand nato air like the eu on musk's fear of ai yeah like the computer the computer to eliminate spam it kills all the people because of his yes wade who exactly i am i are just trying to get balloons sat you know like maybe a homicide all rampage is part of it speaking a home saddle rampage about the grand shop you has seen while you guys seen the shop we got dude straight murder in the games murdering in that shop it's a place where we sell products related to total frap move post grad problems total sorority move will not yet tolls will remove coming soon for all you ladies out there uh all the podcasts it's just gears year when when ideas arise for a tshirt.

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"helium" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"helium" Discussed on The Dan Le Batard Show with Stugotz

"Okay let's figure out how to do this code is a find it's a fine thing to settle for rush get a helium balloon in here and give it a little test run you want douglas on the show for some advice your next move here we've just gone mediation and negotiated the helium balloon hold on a second cody had the rare good idea i think measurement ward him for it by doing up i don't think so i'm i'm really can leave now what i'm conflicted on this because oh you are thrown above that's the one that's the one i like those things that's the one i like i was thinking about throwing him a super super the day bone uh let us the other day means is much the greg then alot bozo reward the lazy behavior though after velvet not rare good carjon is i don't want to do any of his stuff because he didn't do back in my day he didn't do his job we so i don't wanna reward hank allowing energy this is off that he likes to do he's afraid levitra afraid of talking in a helium was thinks it'll embarrassing for those lawyer is big lobos news you guys really like this are you kidding me guys like his fantasy sports non i realize what football is right around the corner and as you know greg lobos are the de facto thirty third nfl team were a natural will become a national france it is the best thing that we do hartland rose shut up play the arm be done with it so stupid i'm this is infuriating.

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"helium" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"helium" Discussed on KGO 810

"Who are making claims about themselves that they cannot substantiate better exaggerated they're only seeing the good side of the show and then they're blowing it up like a helium balloon helium balloons or easily punctured no full of anything is now substance skin kid a picture interior punctured your oversensitive you're in goes up and down like a mercury not tomorrow monitor you know look hot and cold external thing then you have narcissistic owner of bility someone shellfish team has more not obviously is high but more realistically if they don't have narcissistic disorder or adaptation in my making kind of clear a healthy investment in yourself it's realistic it's not narcissistic disorder normal happy selfconfessed liking of yourself so so and i apologise before we run out of time so so if you would since we all exhibit varying levels of narcissism as as you just talked about we don't necessarily all have narcissistic personality disorder but just with our with our own narcissism even if we we don't have the disorder what what is what is like the biggest mistake that we're making with our kids that we need to be paying attention to nowadays there isn't any different today than i guess it used to that we should be paying attention well you can situational north them culturally induced narcissism yet it kind of guy if he here if we're focusing on children being special we're not doing them a safer we reward them the amount of effort they put into the work they are doing and not coming in i so much for telling them how special they are special and unique and then like snowflake like but so so i would say reward for effort and recognize the true selfless your child that not everybody is going to be good it everything they're not gonna be many use achieving better than yeah they're going to be themselves and if you're kind to them when they're not doing let you want that's likely to be very helpful the okay this is great i am so glad that we had a chance to talk i this is actually been a topic i've been thinking.

helium balloon