22 Burst results for "hedy"

California wildfires force thousands to evacuate

Morning Edition

01:02 min | 6 months ago

California wildfires force thousands to evacuate

"Two new wildfires in Northern California have forced thousands of people to evacuate. Law enforcement say three people have died in the SOG fire in Shasta County. Separately, the glass fired north of San Francisco has put more than 65,000 people under evacuation orders from member station Kake, Hedy Kevin Stark reports. Officials say the wildfire exploded in size at one point burning across four miles in about six hours. Hot winds drove the flames across Napa Valley, showering members on tinder dry vegetation, sparking more fire and destroying homes. Mark McGuire, a state senator from Sonoma County, said firefighters worked aggressively to save as many homes as possible. This fire is the biggest threat biggest threat to public safety. More than count for me when I remind folks is We do have significant fires across the state as difficult as last night was. Firefighters save much more than were lost. Winds have subsided, but the region is still dry, which will make this an active firefight for the foreseeable future.

Mark Mcguire Hedy Kevin Stark Shasta County Sonoma County Napa Valley Northern California San Francisco Senator
Trevor Noah on the Beirut explosion

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

01:43 min | 8 months ago

Trevor Noah on the Beirut explosion

"Has been a week since the tragic warehouse explosion Beirut that killed two hundred people and forced hundreds of thousands out of their homes, and now for the residents of that city grief is. Turning into rage overseas now to Beirut where anger is boiling over nearly a week after that devastating and deadly explosion, the ammonium nitrate customs officials say was negligently stored here despite their repeated complaints may have been the spark for wider movement protesters took to the streets throughout the weekend, and now at least three key government officials have resigned. Their demand is clear revolution. This weekend thousands of protesters called for a new government in Lebanon and clashed with security forces sent in to disperse the demonstrators briefly occupied government buildings until they were pushed out. Yeah often discovering that governments officials repeatedly ignored warnings about the chemicals that caused that massive explosion. The people of Lebanon have taken to the streets and believe it or not. This explosion is just the tip of the iceberg because for years. Now, the people of Lebanon have been complaining about rampant corruption in all levels of governments and how big a countries are using them as political porn and you know things are bad when the people are saying look, it's not just about the explosion that blew up off the city but Lebanon is yet another example of this larger pattern that's happening around the world, a pattern of countries having to deal with multiple major crises at one time. Deciding which problem to tackle I like deciding what to watch Netflix's just keep scrolling through the menu and somehow more and more shit gets added on I could've sworn that s hedy island wasn't on this list ten minutes

Lebanon Beirut Hedy Island Netflix
"hedy" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

Encyclopedia Womannica

07:28 min | 10 months ago

"hedy" Discussed on Encyclopedia Womannica

"Of a full year of Encyclopedia Manica we wanted to revisit some of the outstanding women. We featured along the way today. We're looking back on hetty. Lamar had he was a genius brain living in a time where women weren't seen as much more than. Than a pretty face, no matter how society or husband or Hollywood treated her, she wasn't content just to sit around when I listened to this episode. My mouth was open the entire time he was seriously unstoppable from secretly eavesdropping on Nazi military secrets to drawing inspiration from nature and her inventions to captivating the nation with her charm. Her genius impressed me nonstop. Like we see again and again in history took far too long for her to get the recognition. She deserves, but if you didn't already know about heavy Lamar and her incredible mind will soon. This episode aired initially in September for our seminars month but I hope you enjoy re listening now for a month of favorites now. Here's host Jenny Kaplan to tell you all about Eddie Lamar. Hello from wonder media. Network I'm Jenny Kaplan and this is encyclopedia will Manica. Our stimulus day pioneered the technology that would become foundational for today's Wi Fi gps and bluetooth communication systems, but if you know her name, likely star of Old Hollywood. She was deemed beauty whose presence was treasured on the big screen. We're talking about. How do you Lamar? HEDWIG A. Keiler was born in Vienna Austria on. November ninth nineteen, fourteen to a well off Jewish family. Her artistic and inventive sides, or both supported by her parents. Had He was an only child, and was very close with her father, a bank director the too frequently took long, walks together and discuss the inner workings of machines around them like streetcars and the printing press head. He was fascinated by those conversations, and took two tinkering herself dissecting and reassembling her music box. had his mother was also a major influence on hetty. She was a concert pianist and introduced hetty to arts, enrolling her in both Valet and piano lessons as a young child. As she grew up head. He's beauty took center stage. When she was years old, she was discovered as an actress by director Max, Reinhardt and went to study with him in Berlin. She got her first roles on screen and began to gain name recognition particularly for nineteen thirty two role in a controversial film called Ecstasy. During her time and Berlin. Hetty also starred in a play called Sissy. One adoring fan turned into something more. Fritz Mondale an Austrian munitions dealer, saw heavy onstage, and the two started dating a married in nineteen, thirty three, but the relationship didn't last. He once said about the marriage. I was like a doll I was like a thing, some object of art, which had to be guarded and imprison having no mind, no life of its own. 1937 Hetty fled to London. She escaped her unhappy relationship, and she brought with her knowledge about German munitions that she'd gained through dinner conversation with her husband and his business partners, some of whom were associated with the Nazi party. In London had he's fortunes took a turn for the better. She met Lewis Mayor of Mgm Studios and found her path to Hollywood. In the US heavy, he captured audiences with her beauty an accent. She also captured the attention of real life characters, including businessmen and. Howard Hughes. Howard and Hetty dated and discovered a mutual interest in innovation Howard gave hetty a small set of equipment, her trailer onset, allowing her to work on inventions between scenes Howard also took hetty to see his airplane factories where he taught her how the planes were built and introduced her to the scientists responsible Howard wanted to make planes faster, and had he decided to help. She purchased two books for inspiration, a book of birds and book fish she looked at the fastest birds and the fastest fish, and from the to drew inspiration from their fins and wings to design a new kind of wing Howard's planes. When had he showed a sketch of the new designed to Howard? Your Edgy In nineteen forty, she invented what would be her most ingenious creation of all. She met a man named George Antilock at a dinner party. He was a Hollywood writer and composer and shared had he's inventive St. George and had you're both extremely concerned about the looming war? It was the eve of the United States involvement in World War Two had he's first. Marriage had equipped her with knowledge about German munitions, and she and George decided to work on inventions to combat the access powers. In the end! The duo developed new communication system to guide torpedoes to their targets. The system used frequency hopping between radio waves in order to prevent the interception of radio waves by the enemy. Had, he, George Patent, and military support for the invention. They received a patent, but the navy decided against implementing the technology during the war because of the complexity and expense. Had his patent expired before she received a penny for her invention, she continued her acting career, and in April, Nineteen fifty-three had he became a US citizen. Despite her continued success on screen until nineteen fifty eight. He's inventive genius largely unacknowledged for years. Finally in one, thousand, nine, hundred seven. He and George jointly received the Pioneer Award from the Electronic Frontier Foundation for their work. Had, he also became the first woman to receive invention conventions phobe. Ask Your at of Achievement Award. Head. He died in the year two thousand fourteen years later, she was inducted into the National Inventors Hall of fame. Her frequency hopping spread spectrum technology. The technology he developed to allow torpedoes to frequency hop had found a new home in the Wi fi and wireless devices. We know and love. Her work led her to be dubbed Mother of why and other wireless communications like GPS and Bluetooth. Tune in tomorrow for the story of another world changing stem. Special thanks to lose Kaplan, my favorite sister and co-creator. Talk to you tomorrow. Hey, I'm Cynthia and I am one of the producers of psychopathy of Matica, and if you love encyclopedia with Monica and one and learn more about these women or even get to know us behind the scenes. You should go to both DOT FM. Slash Manica in join our new membership program, and again that is at glow dot FM Slash Manica become a member today I talked..

hetty Eddie Lamar Howard Hughes US Jenny Kaplan Hollywood George director London Nazi party Berlin Fritz Mondale George Patent HEDWIG A. Keiler George Antilock Manica Wi National Inventors Hall of fam
"hedy" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

08:10 min | 10 months ago

"hedy" Discussed on Citation Needed

"And, we're back when we left off. hetty Lamar was growing a really slow pitch that made the sound of a car stalling and. Entitled Patriarchy was swinging wildly missing over and over and over, and she was about to get rich and famous. What's next? Yeah okay so heavy arrives in America since about learning to speak English, which would be her fourth for language and losing weight because America's obsession with unhealthy amounts of ten was already in full swing at this point, she got her first starring role in the nineteen thirty eight movie Algiers. The first of many times she had, she would play the exotic foreign seductress, and she was fucking. Sensation American audiences loved her. Women started like everybody wanted to be blonde before that they all the women started dying their hair black pertinent. Pertinent in the middle of the way she did. When women went to plastic surgeons that she was to most requested profile now she goes on to star in a bunch of fucking movies and be a movie star, in Shit, and that's interesting in its own right, but it's going to kind of shift to the background of this story. Because while she was busy, being one of the most glamorous women in the world, she was also working on a new type of radio guided torpedo to help. The allies win the war. Awesome yeah, which is at the very least atypical and a little unfair when I work in my private munitions lab, I get the all expense paid Cuban vacation. Saying attractiveness, privilege rears its beautiful head. People Right? Yes, absolutely sexism goes both ways. So, I should also point out that hetty Lamar hated being billed as the most beautiful woman in the world. Because while she could legit. Make that claim. It really shoulder short. She famously quipped poetic. Love this quote, so Goddamn much. Any girl can be glamorous. You just have to stand still and look stupid. That's the and every director in Hollywood was like. I couldn't put my finger. That's all right. That's right that is script. That's it. Right, so so sure yes, she did all glamorous ship, but she was also a fucking genius like Howard Hughes dated a lot of movie stars head. He was the only one that improved his aviation. Dates a nice yeah. No, she was like she s. she actually was the one that Kinda pointed him towards birds, and said Hey, you know this should be shaped like this. So when the war broke out, she decided there was more important ship for her to do than just make movies so the impetus for her to get involved with something that hit a lot of Americans pretty hard in the lead up to the battle of Britain, a bunch of ships went out Trenton. Lake ferry children away from the island, nation and A. German blitz one of those ships was the SS city of, but Benares it. We're. Has Thank you. which was hit by a German torpedo in September of Nineteen, forty, two, hundred and sixty, four hundred and seven people on board, including eighty children. Now hetty more than those kids right along with the rest of. Her newly adopted country, but when she was done morning head, he decided to torpedo. Those mother fuckers back so so head. He didn't have much in the way of formal education what with dropping out of school at sixteen to be an actress, but she taught herself quite a bit and one of her passions was invention. She made up all kinds of she invented an improved traffic light. She invented device to help mobility. Impaired people get in and out of the TUB. She made breakthroughs in plastic surgery. She invented a little cube. You could drop a glass of water to make carbonated soda, and on top of that. She also spent a couple completely immersed in the world of munitions. It's right like she knew the INS and outs of that business up to it. Including classified Australian weapons development so as we're is, it sounds to say a Hollywood superstar decided like I'm going to design better torpedo. She was actually weirdly qualified to do exactly that. A got an idea for you Mr Mayer. What do you make a movie about a woman who invents torpedo to kill Nazis? How cool is that? Or I understand still in look stupid. It'll ninety dollars. I'm sorry. So. Sorry Obama. Get really nerdy on this I apologize I love this Balkan story so much, so here's the problem she set out to solve. Torpedoes weren't super effective if he couldn't steer him right, there's only so fast you can get a projectile going underwater sound like a fucking bullet. The targets can't like. move out of the way, and they do honestly at this point just zigzagging here and there was often plenty to thwart uncontrolled torpedoes, so modern torpedoes had to be navigable, which means that you? You need to communicate with them after you launch them. One option of course is to run a wire behind the torpedo all the way to the ship. That's firing it, but that's fucking. Silly, right? The other is to use radio. The problem with radio is that there are only so many frequencies, and once your enemy figures out which one you're using. They'll just jam the damn. There is a third way, but you a major to ride it in a battle. He's got a ride at like. Hell try to hang onto your cowboy hat underwater. Yeah. That's the other problem. Shaw also sharks. So head he's idea is to change the frequency in both the sending and receiving unit in Unison Rachel both the torpedo and the steering device are coated with which frequencies to us, when and without knowing which frequencies they're about to shift to. You can't jam the thing, and if you just ought to yourself, oh, you mean like how a cell phone works. You're starting to see. Why had he? Lamar is in the inventors hall of fame Cell Phone Celebrity Phone I. Get it now. Sorry Eli is not here and someone had to say something incredibly stupid this. Jump on that grenade good work and I'll lie and pretend I've read a book by proosed. What else do I do? He. Said No, it doesn't. To make her invention work. Ramji. or INVENTION WE'RE GONNA make it past patentable. She enlists the help of composer named George Antilock. He was a pioneer in electronic music, and at the time he was known for this ambitious project. We tried to synchronize a bunch of player pianos in concerts like nineteen forty squawks. He really was listenable without massive amounts of drugs, okay. Yes, I'll see you have just exactly explained the alley mckinney. Okay, so now at at this time, the government had an office called the National Inventors Council and the goal was to give American citizens that had ideas on how to improve the war effort one central place to submit their inventions because up until then people would literally just mail it to the house. Voted this white powder. Stuff out or so headed. Tell the council about this concept and pretty much right away the utility. Of course they don't build a fucking torpedo to demonstrate, but they demonstrate the principle using what amounts to two small player piano reels to tell the sender and receiver what frequencies to shift to okay, so of course the governor mmediately classifies the puck out of this idea, right and some word of that leaks to the press, so the new. York Times ends up running this story that says like how would. Would superstar Hetty Lamar's had been at something so crucial to the war effort. We can't tell you what it hits right because like. Since it's classified, that's all they can do in terms of details so when they submit for the patent in hopes of avoiding charges that it only went through because of her celebrity, she files it under the name Kiesler. Instead of the Mar. even though Lamar was her legal name at that point The patent is granted in nineteen forty two. So at this point, all the apple left to do is sell the invention. Of course there's only one potential buyer for this classified information that would be the US Navy and the US Navy has really really shitty torpedoes, and really needs the help. The one buyer thing, but does make sense I.

hetty Lamar Hollywood America Algiers US Navy Howard Hughes Obama Benares Lake ferry director York Times Britain apple Mr Mayer TUB Trenton National Inventors Council Shaw George Antilock Eli
"hedy" Discussed on Citation Needed

Citation Needed

07:31 min | 10 months ago

"hedy" Discussed on Citation Needed

"Hello and welcome citation needed podcast choose a subject read a single article about it I'm wikipedia and pretend we're experts, because this is the Internet, and that's how it works now I'm heath and this one goes out to all the sapio sexual is out there. Also just all different, other sexual and I'm joined by men who are so much more than just the glamorous. You'd faces of podcasting that you know them for seasonal Tom and no looking forward to another thirty emails about how my face and body don't match voice, doesn't me great I can't wait to face body. Don't match each other. I borrowed them. Holiday work where they were from yeah now, you, Photoshop! painted. Everybody always tells me I sound bald on the one. I. Don't get it. That's just a way to say depressed you South That's probably it. This is so delessio sel. What Person Place thing concept phenomenon event we're GONNA be talking about today today. We're GONNA. Be Talking about a film actress and Genius Heady Lamar, antastic and Noah you clearly own rare copy of an erotic Buster Keaton movie. That made you think of this. Heady Lamar. Okay, okay first of all. He's all buster. Keaton. Movies are erotic. If you properly appreciate physical. And secondly you bet your ass, I am. Bluster sexual awesome. Okay and I asked this a lot, but Why though why? Well okay, partly because no matter how intimidating the emails are, there is no opposite of the trust skins for me to do an essay I'm. Trying nor are you reading the emails tomato snack. But also. Because I fucking love Hetty Lamar. Okay I'm back at her day. She was billed as the most beautiful woman in the world, and not many people were arguing with that, but she was so much more than star of stage and screen and a beautiful woman. She was also a classically trained pianist. She spoke four languages like a native level. She amassed a personal fortune of about a third of a billion dollars in today's money She's an inducted into the national inventors hall of fame. In fact, everyone listening to this show is carrying one of her inventions around with them. How at least one? She's The fucking Leonardo Davinci was smoking hot. Okay? This throwing shade Davinci right away weird. knows. Shell like raise your hand if you'd fuck eventually. fucking time someone took Leo Davinci down a peg there you go. Exactly. All right so headway Kiesler was born in nineteen, fourteen in Vienna a rightist World War One was getting ramped up. Her father was a successful bank manager, and her mother was a pianist, both her father and mother came from Jewish families, but they converted to Catholicism, because God isn't real and Vienna was crazy antisemitic. That's an interesting choice. If you're looking for something less anti-semitic, but okay. Sure so of course back. Then Vienna was one of the world's centers of art and culture. It wasn't exactly Bohemian, but it was like any one hundred miles shy of it so naturally heavy grew up wanting to be an actor, so the age of sixteen she shows up at a movie lot with a forged parental permission note and applies for a job as A. A script girl. I gotTa admit had no idea what that meant parents an early sexist turn prescrip- supervisor, but it doesn't much matter. Because had he didn't know what it meant either she just knew there was such a job as script girl. She was a girl, so she because she was probably qualified for your very qualified. You'll be working right under worst boise and. We are very misogyny. Joe There is a teenager here wants to supervise the script. But what? Yeah? Of course? She's got a permission slip. Yeah right right? No, but the question. They would then ask how her games. Case. They hired around the fucking spot. I'm at that point. Of course. She has to tell her parents spur real these up, but there's every indication to shed. Her Dad wrapped around her little finger. That was a pretty easy south, so she goes to work for this little Viennese outfit called Sasha films. She's a script girl for all the three days before. Somebody's like. Wow, she's way too pretty to be on this side of the camera, so she's pretty much immediately taking small roles. In fact, she got the job at nineteen, thirty, nineteen, thirty one. She's appearing in her first of three movies with Peter Lorre well quickly, turning into a postscript girl good for. Feel like we're on the wrong side of the microphone for how? We are. Not, enough people agree so. She moved her way up the ladder OPA. Austrian film pretty quickly because it turned out that in addition to being gorgeous, she also could really bucking act pretty sure. She catches the attention of Max Reinhardt probably the most influential German director ever to live. He convinces her to come to Berlin and well. He Never Castro in any of his movies. She did really well in the Berlin. Movie scene regardless okay feels like that's a euphemism for something like hey, in really well in the Berlin. Yeah the parting words for father, still wringing her ears, only if they ask you to take your top off, get the money i. Only her dad had. A bad, so at the age of eighteen asterisk pin in that she lands a role in a movie called ecstasy, and this one would make her famous, but more than an infamous kind of way. This is nineteen thirty-three, and of course movies were a lot more conservative than than they are now less Germany and Austria than in America, but still you didn't see things like boobs in movies back then. But you saw head. He's in ecstasy and far more controversial than the brief nude scenes in the movie was a close up shot of her face, having an orgasm, which was downright fucking scandalous by the standard of they. In fact, that sequence is widely believed to be cinemas. First sexy can see people getting upset. Especially women getting upset about that. Though there's no way women of the day could compete with that a trained actor faking an orgasm. Seen wasn't even all that controversial until she started squirting and show. When heady met Sally? All. These people in the theater I'll have what she's having. A. Couple of quick notes on ecstasy first of all. She almost certainly was not eighteen when it was filmed. New scenes illegal even back then which more the director at least. Some stories suggest that director tractor into doing the scenes by telling her that like Oh, yeah, but you're going GONNA be way far from the camera. We're just barely Kinda see the outline of you, but then she didn't know about high powered telephoto lenses at the time, so she believed them I'm also and I only include this detail because it's so fucking weird. The infamous orgasm scene was achieved. By pricking her with a pin pin.

Heady Lamar Vienna Berlin director Buster Keaton Leonardo Davinci Photoshop Leo Davinci Tom Joe There Peter Lorre supervisor Kiesler boise Sasha Max Reinhardt Castro America Noah
Internet memes are the new coronavirus coping mechanism

The 3:59

04:27 min | 1 year ago

Internet memes are the new coronavirus coping mechanism

"I'm Roger Chang and this is your daily charge with US special guest abroarall hedy bright. You've got this fantastic story. Which initially we wrote off as a fluff piece because it's Internet memes and means you're so disposable but there's actually like a series star behind such a fascinating story behind it kind of breaks out. What exactly where. Exactly how our Internet memes Being designed or created as a reaction to what's going on with crowbars absolutely you're right. It's it's true that you can kinda push off these things that we see on instagram and twitter ads. Just these these things that people joke about but it turns out that means can be a very healthy way to cope with stress and anxiety. And there's a lot of stress and anxiety right now. Given the krona virus pandemic psychologists actually saved that means our healthy way to cope with anxiety because humor is something that we have used as humans to cope for ever so this is something that people did during the world. War is something people did during the civil war. They found ways to incorporate humor into magazines and posters and journal entries and this is how we process things and make light of them And so it means are kind of the modern day way that we do that we take a very serious situation like quarantine and then we find ways to make jokes about that like. I'M GONNA put on my living room pajamas as opposed to like my bedroom pajamas. Like all the ways that we find You know the ways that we find humor in kind of the serious reality of the world right now so this is actually something. That is very help healthy for a lot of people to use a time like this. Yeah I love Sort of the the quick kind of walk back through history of how humorous played a role right. And it's fascinating to me that you know that the civil war civil war era was largely considered the age of practical jokes article. Joking which you know when you're watching those. Ken Burns documentary like I don't it. It's weird to Kinda like juxtapose. How the Civil. War's been presented with the fact that people were playing practical jokes on each other. Which boggles my mind. But you're it's a great point. We've we've long used humor as a way to deal with extraordinary circumstances and this is a particularly extraordinary circumstance absolutely and this is something that I spoke with Dr who runs this me McCowan. And he was saying that you know sometimes a laugh is the only bit of sanity that you have in your day because when you don't have that ability to kind of diffuse that tension and a few that anxiety like what else do we can't somebody. One of the psychologists I spoke with Dr Andrew's was saying that this isn't a scenario where we can kind of band together and be like okay. You know. We're all facing this crisis together. Let's go and volunteer drives at helped people. We can't even come together. Well if we have to stand six feet apart from each other we have to social distance we have to be essentially isolation from one another and the only way we can really reach other is through the Internet and so when we are communicating through the Internet. One of the best ways we can make light of a situation and one of the best ways that we can connect with. People is with humor because when you relate with somebody when you can share a joke with somebody that's really what creates those connections and those connections are so critical right now at a time when people really crave social interaction. Exactly this is an audio podcast right now just given our limitations but as wondering if you could run through some of the more memorable means that you ran into and of course reporting and I know this isn't a visual medium but You can talk to your best. Describe the the memes that the great. Yeah absolutely there's wine with Matthew mcconaughey where he's like smoking a cigarette and he's really intense looking at phone and then the caption says me reading about current virus thirty seconds after. I swore I wouldn't read about corona virus anymore and it just really captures like like. Why am I doing this? Why can I not put down my phone? Why can I not step away? You pledge that you're not going to do it and then you do it again There's a lot of good distracted boyfriend means where it's like. Yeah yeah look over. And it's like oh two weeks according t and you're looking over and it looks so good and then like work is in the background trying to juggle. Like hey headway how do I do this There's there's one that was kind of a little bit on the on the darker side. It was a picture of a baby. And you know how like sometimes people will have a sign that says like my first Easter. My first Christmas it said my first pandemic and I was like wow. That's funny. It's extremely dark. Extremely funny exactly are fascinating but even even dark humor psychologists. I spoke with April. Former saying they'd even dark. Humor can be a healthy way to to cope with these things. And so you laugh and you feel like slightly like. Oh my God. This is awful. But then you're like you know like it's the reality. We have to make some

Roger Chang United States Instagram Hedy Bright Ken Burns Matthew Mcconaughey Twitter Dr Andrew
Hedy, Producer And Lancaster discussed on Donna and Steve

Donna and Steve

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Hedy, Producer And Lancaster discussed on Donna and Steve

"And just weeks after saying goodbye to game of thrones and her character sir she lancaster lean a he has been cast in a drama de pilot called rita lena hiti says she's wanted a better death for sir see and hope she'll find it in this show according to showtime hiti will star as the title character a headstrong unconventional teacher and single mother who takes on every kind of thority as well as her family in a messy and unfiltered way looks like hedy will also serve as active producer on the show on the show time show at an

Hedy Producer Lancaster Rita Lena Hiti
Firefighters reflect on deadly NorCal Camp Fire after blaze fully contained

Morning Edition

00:49 sec | 2 years ago

Firefighters reflect on deadly NorCal Camp Fire after blaze fully contained

"Fifty three thousand acres and destroyed nearly fourteen thousand homes in San Francisco more than two thousand Marriott hotel union employees remain on strike as the two sides are expected to get back to negotiations later this week they've been on strike since early October. They could not come to an agreement before the thanksgiving holiday says unite here local to spokeswoman Rachel comfort. We need to have very significant raises to make up to the fact that the cost of living here has spiraled out of control. We need to have our healthcare continued at the rate. The Marriott has said the workers are well compensated, the hotel chain reached settlements with striking union workers in San Jose. And Oakland earlier this month, I'm Brian watt. Hedy news.

San Francisco Rachel Comfort Brian Watt San Jose Hedy News Oakland Fifty Three Thousand Acres
"hedy" Discussed on WLAC

WLAC

01:42 min | 2 years ago

"hedy" Discussed on WLAC

"WNYC. I'm Hedy Hanson officials with the TB I am clay county sheriff's office given update in today's triple shooting that left one child dead Susan island is with the TV. I and says deputies found an adult male who had suffered from gunshot wounds outside of the home an inside. There is a juvenile female who is deceased. An adult woman was also found shot a short distance away. The suspect was arrested just before eleven this morning and Vanderbilt University. Grad helps lead the Boston Red Sox to a World Series championship. David price went seven innings while only giving up one run on three hits. The Murfreesboro native also became the first pitcher to start World Series games. No more than forty s apart while also making a relief appearance. The latest Fox News timesaver, traffic and Weather Channel. Forecasts are always just minutes away on talk radio ninety eight point three m fifteen ten WNYC. That's the sound of a paper shredder a sound that Phil Bredesen's knows all too. Well, governor reports of sexual harassment sword in state government. But Brad hasn't kept complaints against top secret. And the records were shredded the media gave him the nickname governors. Shred is isn't one case involved? A top read is an aide who only got a slap on the wrist. Another man was accused of placing a flesh colored pan near his groin and repeatedly asking a secretary to pull it. One woman said she was fired for speaking out. Another said she was pressured to resign. Resins response anytime, you mix men and women together in a work environment. There's going to be issues blatant disregard for women. That's Phil Bredesen paid.

Phil Bredesen Hedy Hanson Boston Red Sox Brad Susan island Vanderbilt University clay county David price Murfreesboro Weather Channel Fox News harassment secretary three m
"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

"The transmitter station though it indicate if there was a real channel of communication open or not and operators were meant to keep an eye on the lamp so they would know whether the communications with the receiver were really active they could send commands during times when the communication wasn't active in order to confound the enemy but they would have to keep in mind those were not quote unquote real commands they were going out to a deaf audience it was only when the communication channel was complete on both sides that they could actually send a command to the torpedo that would be acted upon as for the physical operations they were remarkably similar to a player piano they would use electric pumps to suck the air from the system creating the same sort of vacuum as you would find him player pianos although those tended to be foot pedal and bellows type systems when the holes in the paper would pass over their respective holes in the bar in the system air would pass through on the other end of the transmitter side our series of pistons with springs inside them the springs are coiled with stored potential energy but the vacuum in the system prevents the springs from extending so the pistons would be retracted against the springs because the vacuum is sucking all of the pistons to their their compressed state when air would be allowed to pass through one of those pistons the vacuum would be broken the spring would extend and that would cause the piston to move up and close a switch which would activate that specific frequency and then once the whole would pass over like once the whole in the paper would pass away and it would be sealed again the vacuum would reestablish and the piston would retract and so it would change to a different frequency whichever frequency was active for that specific moment the design was an elegant solution to a very real problem and lamar and untile submitted their idea to the united states navy in our next episode we'll talk about what happened next and how that concept which lamar dubbed frequency hopping would become a principal in multiple technologies today there were other people who had suggest concepts either similar to frequency hopping or pretty much the same idea but hey lamar's presentation showed a practical approach as to how to accomplish this and it takes a special kind of thinking to go from hypothetical concept to a practical idea so i don't mean to suggest that hetty lamar's notion of frequency hopping was the one and only time anyone ever came up with us there were earlier ones they were not widely publicized but they did exist if you knew where to look for them but it was still appears to me that lamar pretty much came up with this idea on her own she was not aware of these other hypothesized versions of frequency hopping and no one had called that yet before i sign off in this episode i wanted to mention one of the sources that i referenced heavily while i was putting together my research then is a documentary about heady lamar's life called bombshell and it focuses not just on her work in developing frequency hopping but also her work as an actress her life in hollywood her trials and tribulations her various marriages her family life her struggle with drug addiction it's a fascinating story so if you have the opportunity i highly recommend checking out the documentary again it's called bombshell well that wraps up this particular episode in our next one we will continue the story and also look at some other interesting inventions that celebrities have have put forward over the years if you guys have suggestions for future episodes of tech stuff send me a message you can email me at tech stuff at how stuff works dot com or drop me a message on twitter or facebook the handle at both of those is tech stuff h s w don't forget to follow us on instagram and i'll talk to you again about hey lemar really soon for more on this and bathrooms of other topics visit how stuff works out com by the end of this podcast nearly ten thousand new malware variants will have launched now i can help protect your data wherever it lives from threats using ibm security let's put smart to work learn board ibm dot com slash smart

"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:17 min | 3 years ago

"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

"Actually pretty easy to read compared to a lot of other patents particularly more recent ones i've gone through a lot of patents as a podcast or of tech stuff but this one is pretty straightforward and incredibly clever here's how their system would've worked both your transmitter and receiver which in this patent was a torpedo specifically they referred to it as a torpedo but they also explain within the patent itself that the system could be adapted to other things would have identical rolls of paper with holes in the paper representing specific frequencies up to eighty eight in number the paper rolls did not contain any actual commands themselves that would make any sense they just made sure there was a channel of communication that was open so those holes when make sure the transmitter and receiver were connected commands would actually be sent by an operator it wouldn't make any sense to preprogrammed commands in because it would all be situational right you're you're trying to steer toward beato you can't predict in advance which way you're going to need to steer the torpedo so this was all about just creating that open channel of communication that could not easily be jammed by the enemy the patent points out that the system could work not only aboard a ship with a torpedo but also a plane and torpedo so you could have a plane with a synchronized system mm issuing commands to the torpedo over in the air so you could have a plane monitoring the pathway the torpedo and taking over and commanding it to turn laughter turn right or hover it needs to go to synchronize the two systems the patent suggested a method that would include sahlin lloyd's held into place by electric current so sullen loyd is a type of electromagnet it's typically a coil wound in a helix and it can act as a transducer that turns energy into linear motion so think of a piston and it has an electromagnet inside the piston so when you have current running through the electromagnet the coil moves to one end of the piston and sort of locks into place because that's where the magnetic force is pushing or pulling the coil if the electrical current is broken the electromagnet turns off the sullen oy is unlocked it moves into the opposite direction in the patent the invention describes such a solemn loyd that holds a pin in place and when the pin is pulled out of the device a clockwork motor turns the paper roll so a battery would provide current to pens in both the transmitting and receiving stations so both aboard the ship or the plane and aboard the torpedo upon firing the torpedo this electrical connection breaks and the pins release which start the electric motors in both stations and spins the paper rolls in their respective spaces whether it's on the plane or on the show or in the torpedo at the same rate of speed and that synchronizes them not all of those eighty eight frequencies would be necessary for the receiver in fact the patent suggests that the transmitter include frequencies that the receiver cannot physically detect now it's not so that you send extra information it's actually i guess in a way it is to cynic extra formation but specifically to confuse the enemy so if the germans were to pick up the signals they wouldn't know which signals represented a real open channel between the ship and the torpedo for example or which ones were dummy frequencies that were coming from the ship but could not be picked up by the torpedo by transmitting across both you would reduce the chance the enemy would catch onto which signals are important which is similar to the way baseball players will use various signals to communicate with each other such as when a pitching coach sends a message to baseball pitcher you'll see this whole series of hand motions that get increasingly weird and bizarre some of the signals are just filler they're meant to confound the imposing teams so they don't know which of the signals are actually meaningful in order to indicate which signals are real and which ones aren't the invention also included a lap for.

"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:22 min | 3 years ago

"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

"Paper lineup with the holes in the bar mounted on the piano eric in pass through from outside three through the whole into the player piano because remember there's vacuum inside the system so it's constantly sucking against that paper so whenever there's a hole in the paper air can come through the air travels through the tube to the individual note and inflates tiny bellows each note has its own set of bellows and that interns that's forth a motion that is translated by several lever elements that ultimately ends with a hammer striking the respective string and producing the note so each time a hole in the paper passes over this bar this happens and some us editions like antilegal began to compose music for player pianos in particular because they could also play more notes at one time than a single human musician ever could you have eighty eight keys on a piano you could do a eighty eight holes next to each other and you could have all eight keys play at the same time so you could play more notes than a human being could ever manage his or her own self so some people began to use that as a means of composing music for a piano that human could never play at least not by themselves so if you wanna hear when my favorite versions of this you can search for gershwin plays gershwin and listen for rhapsody in blue which is one of the gershwin's most famous pieces the recording was made by taking a role of piano paper that was designed by gershwin himself of his famous composition and then they digitized the information they took all the information from the player piano roll and converted them into digital information they added in some dynamics because that was not in the player piano roll in other words there was no way of telling the difference between a hard note and a soft note but they added that information and so there's a little bit of extra info that was added into this stuff and then they ended up playing it back on the equivalent of a high tech player piano and is pretty phenomenal stuff antilegal had synchronized player pianos simply by making sure the piano were set up to the right speed as you could use different levers to engage gears for a faster or slower rotation of the role of piano paper though would be dependent upon the needs of the peace so for example if you had something that needed to be played at a slightly slower tempo you could adjust the player piano to rollback the paper at a slower speed if you need something faster you could change that up to and then he had to make sure that he was starting all the heroes all at the same time so why not take this system one that worked for player pianos and poured it over to a torpedo control system instead of notes the holes in the paper would correspond with radio frequencies specific frequencies in a whole band the technology already existed to create the rolls of paper because they were used in in player pianos and lamar antilock proposal was to use those eight radio frequencies just like a piano has a standard piano has eight keys fifty two two white keys and thirtysix black keys unlike a typical player piano song you'd really only need to engage one frequency at the time so it's not like you would pull an actual song of that already existed in player piano form you're not gonna take mary had a little lamb off the shelf and plug one copy into a torpedo and another into a guidance system and then use that to steer your torpedo to a target but the basic idea was the same lamar and anti sent their idea to the national inventors council in washington dc this organization grew out of the department of commerce's office of technical services it was sort of a predecessor for darpa in some ways as the inventions were meant to aid the efforts of national defense and the military in general the council liked what they saw in the proposal and they put antilock and lamar in touch with an electronics expert at caltech now we're going to take another quick break but when we come back i'll talk more about what came of this collaboration and how this incredible idea was treated in the world of the military but first let's take a quick break and thank our sponsor sixteen million.

"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:08 min | 3 years ago

"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

"In the hole for the radio station that you want and dial it and that would tune the radio across the room to whatever the station was of your choice lamar saw that and thought well if we can come up with a means to allow a a radio set to tune in this way maybe we could use that same sort of technology for torpedo we would be in business if we could do this but while she had a great idea she didn't have any mechanical engineering or electrical engineering training so she ran up against the extent of our knowledge however she did talk about her idea with a friend of hers named george antilegal who would add another piece to this concept antilegal was born in nineteen hundred in trenton new jersey he also was not an electrical engineer or a mechanical engineer he finished school or dropped out depending upon how you read it when he was fifteen years old he was a musician and composer he became interested in avant garde performances and eventually composed a piece called la ballet mechanic which was a piece scored for player pianos and other devices as well as actual musicians he wrote the piece in nineteen ninety four and it's a fairly jarring piece of music you can actually find recordings of it online and listen to it and it's not easy listening but untile synchronized the player pianos so that they would play in time properly with each other and with the rest of the musicians and it was this idea that would be valuable to lamar's concept and now i get to talk about how player pianos work which i did not intimate when i chose this topic so you may have seen a player piano in person or on television or in films particularly in movies set in the old west they tend to be on those these are the pianos that always have those rolls of paper in them their their stand upright pianos and you can see these rolls of paper the paper has little holes cut out in patterns on it and obviously those holes correspond with notes but how does it actually work in a classic player piano or pia nola that's what they're also known as everything is dependent upon pneumatics which is a system that uses air to move things mechanically typically a player piano has foot pedals and if you pump the foot pedals you power bellows that are inside the player piano but you're not pumping air into the system you're actually creating a vacuum you're sucking air out of the system and if you were to take the role of paper off of the piano you would see underneath it there's kind of a horizontal bar that's mounted at about i height typically on player pianos and has a bunch of holes cut into the bar might be a brass bar or something like that and they'll be little holes cut in through this those holes will correspond with notes each hole connects to a tube and the tube runs to a specific note more on that in a second so the paper acts as a seal over those holes so in the paper turns and the holes in the.

fifteen years
"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

03:45 min | 3 years ago

"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

"Hey lemar would then go on to marry a screenwriter named gene markey in nineteen thirty nine he would be these second of six husbands lamar had a tendency to attract men to her but it seems most of those men didn't really know her as a person they saw her beauty that's what they fixated upon so i'm not going to go through each and every marriage because that would be excessive and far beyond what we need to talk about in this show but i think it's good to know she had trouble finding someone she fit with because it gives a sense of the frustration and isolation she must have felt throughout her life we we had seen at this point the war was inevitable war had actually started to break out in europe and by nineteen thirty nine that war was well underway and lamar was ordered by meyer to never mention her religion remember heady lamar grew up jewish lamar seemed fine at least would leaving behind her jewish identity at she doesn't seem to put up any kind of fuss about this and never had a problem sort of moving beyond that but she did very much want to find a way to have her mother join her in the united states her mom had successfully fled austria to arrive in england but she was kind of stuck there for the time being and meanwhile german submarines were terrorizing the seas around britain with several high profile attacks including one resulting in a passenger ship being targeted and destroyed with all the passengers aboard passing away including children so lamar began to think about ways that she might be able to help britain because at this time united states was not in world war two one of the big problems that the the allies were facing at that point was that the submarines were able to avoid torpedoes effectively enough to pose as a massive threat so hetty lamar had this idea for a radio controlled torpedo the big challenge with radio communications is that they aren't secure on their own if i am communicating with you on a radio frequency anyone with a receiver can tune into that frequency and listening to that conversation so unless i speak in some sort of code everything i say will be clearly heard and understood on your end further if someone else wants to ruin my attempts to communicate with you they can start transmitting noise on that same frequency the one that i am using to try and communicate with you and if they just use more transmitter power than i am using whichever signals the strongest will win out so their signal will overpower mine and that's what we call jamming jamming just involves flooding the frequency band with a stronger transmission signal now that was the challenge that engineers were facing with radio controlled torpedoes if they settled on a control frequency and they sent the torpedo on its way and then they started to send commands like rudder left or rudder right or determine the torpedo the germans could potentially pick up on that radio frequency and then start broadcasting on that same frequency and they could broadcast nonsense jamming the signal and preventing the allies from being able to control this torpedo lamar's idea was to use a system that would allow you to change frequencies as you transmit information so you might start your commands using a frequency like three hundred kilohertz then jump up three hundred twenty kilohertz them back down to three hundred ten kilohertz and so on and so forth as you're transmitting and because you are varying the frequency.

lemar three hundred twenty kilohertz three hundred ten kilohertz three hundred kilohertz
"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:30 min | 3 years ago

"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

"Those movies at your theater that practices ultimately what brought down the whole studio system because there was an antitrust lawsuit in the well started in the thirties but really didn't completely develop until the fifties and at that point the movie studio system started to break apart and eventually the studios had to stop this practice and so you know longer have this system where a movie studio will sign an actor to a certain number of pictures you have franchises that will do that like star wars or the marvel films where they'll sign an actor and it'll guarantee a certain number of films within that franchise but they are no longer a studio exclusive they they can still do films with other film studios but back in head as day that wasn't the case and one hundred twenty five dollars a week did not seem like it was going to be enough for her because here's a woman who came from a privileged background she grew up in a wealthy household in austria she then married a wealthy man the armaments manufacturer she still had a great deal of money and jewels and really nice clothing on her she didn't just flee with the clothes on her back she really had a pretty pretty swanky luggage on her at the same time so she knew the hundred twenty five dollars wasn't going to be that wasn't going to cut it and so she told meyer no thanks i'm not gonna take that deal however she did want to go to america and she did want to work in movies so what she did what she found out what boat meyer was taking back from england to return to the united states and booked herself on the same ship then she made it a point to walk by him as frequently as she could in different outfits including one where she was just dressed to the nines decked out in the most amazing gown and meyer said i have to have this actress in my studio so he went back to her and gave her a new offer of five hundred dollars per week which she accepted in america she took on the stage name of hetty lamar which they figured was a better name at the time there was a lot of fear on myers part of having actors and actresses who had jewish last names and this is just an unfortunate side effect of the time so she ended up adopting the name hetty lamar as her stage name she dated several prominent men including howard hughes the businessman pilot film director and later on kind of a eccentric i guess is the word you use when you're that wealthy but he was famously odd hughes and lamar struck up a friendship lamar had built an inventing table in her own home she still enjoyed experimenting in tinkering with stuff and when howard us found out he ended up giving her a gift of a smaller inventing table one that was semi portable that she could set up in something like a movie trailer so when she was on a movie shoot she can have a little inventing table in her dressing room trailer and have a place to kind of unwind and tinker with things there's actually a story about houston lamar that i want to mention before i go to break hughes was working hard on building airplanes he was a pilot but he also had designed desire to create a plane that was really fast and maneuverable largely because he anticipated that the united states military was going to have a need of them with the possibility of war in europe looming but his designs were not producing the results he wanted so lamar took a look at these planes which had wings that ended in sort of a squared off shape they kind of like like flat rectangles extending out run the sides of the plane and then immediately structure is wrong so she went out and bought books on fish and birds and started studying their fins in their wings respectively and started looking for the fastest animals in those categories and then looking at their wings and saying how or their fence and saying how are they shaved how that help this animal move through the air through the water and then she sketched out a wing for an airplane based on those shapes and told hughes he would have better luck with a similar design and he said that she was a genius now in the next section i'm going to talk more about the technology that lamar helped invent and why it was so important but.

one hundred twenty five dollar hundred twenty five dollars five hundred dollars
"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:58 min | 3 years ago

"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

"Was nineteen he was thirty three according to interviews several historians have suggested that lamar liked the thought of being an influential man's wife she found that idea appealing but she soon found mandal to be controlling and domineering he was also supplying weapons to germany which meant he was weaponising the nazi party this was early in the history of the nazi party in germany hitler would not become fuhrer until august second nineteen thirty four mandel though jewish was seen as incredibly important for germany's plans and while hitler probably never visited mantles a state personally because he would not want to be captured on film as associating with someone who has jewish it is true that mussalini was a house guest of mandal's fritz was reportedly a very jealous man constantly suspecting had lamar suspecting his wife of infidelity and he tried to buy up all the prints of the film ecstasy and or to suppress the movie he didn't want other people seeing his wife nude on film but really that just gave the filmmakers more incentive to make more prince of the negative because he kept on buying them so there was a ready made audience even if it was just a one person he spent more than a couple of hundred thousand dollars buying up prints of this movie and they just kept printing up more and so finally he kind of gave up on that the two remained married for four years but by nineteen thirty seven tensions were running high in europe and in her household hitler had already begun his anti semitic policies by that time though mandel was again sort of insulated protected by his occupation as an armaments manufacturer but head heads father emil was distraught by what was going on in the world and the stress was really getting to him he actually would die of a heart attack that year and that devastated hetty hetty had decided that by this time she had to get away she was scared she was angry she was disgusted by what was happening in europe and hitler's campaign against jewish people and so one evening she decided to escape from mantles home and flee and there are different accounts of how she managed this including some in which she supposedly drugged a made us some sleeping powder mixed in a drink and gave it to the maid which which made her fall unconscious and then she ended up switching places with the may dressing in the maid's outfit and then making her escape that night whatever method she used she did flee to england in england she had the good fortune to run into louis b mayer the co founder of mgm studios meyer was touring england looking for european talent who were fleeing the continent so he's kind of taking advantage of a really bad situation and saying hey if things are too hot here you should come to america sign with me become an actor in my studio and i'll give you a living so you offered lamar the princely sum of one hundred twenty five dollars per week if she would sign onto a studio now quick word about this from the nineteen twenties until about the nineteen sixties movie studios had sort of a death grip on film stars and directors and movie theaters talent would sign contracts with a specific movie studio and that would guarantee a certain number of films or pictures for that studio and they would be locked in they could not make movies for competing studios unless there wasn't agreement between the two studios in some sort of exchange so the studios also would own chains of theaters and they would have their own films shown in those theatres and not their competitors films there were some independent theater owners in the united states at that time but the movie studios would also end up leveraging their power over those independent outlets as well what they would do is something called a block booking deal block booking was where let's say you're an independent film theater operator and you really want to exhibit gone with the wind and you really need to have a print of gun with a win because you want to show it in your theater booking would mean that if you wanted to show that movie the movie studio would say all right well you can by gun with the wind print for x amount of dollars but you also have to show these other four movies that were bundling with that film and you would be forced to take on all those movies and try to show all of.

one hundred twenty five dollar hundred thousand dollars four years
"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

TechStuff

04:43 min | 3 years ago

"hedy" Discussed on TechStuff

"To talk a lot about hey lamar's life not just her work in technology and i'm doing this because i think it's really important to get an understanding of what her world was like and what it must have been like to come up with a fiendishly clever and useful idea that would go unacknowledged for decades her story is in many ways tragic but to understand that tragedy we really need to learn about her life in general so heavy lamar was born on november ninth nineteen thirteen in vienna austria to a well to do jewish family her father was a banker and technology enthusiast and as a child child lamar was known to be really curious and inquisitive and drawn to the sciences particularly chemistry she enjoyed studying and she enjoyed experimenting with stuff at the age of five she took apart a music box to see how it worked and then meticulously reassembled it so that it would work again reportedly she spent a lot of time talking with her father emil kiesler and an effort to learn how stuff works sounds like she would have really liked the website i wrote for she wanted to know stuff about electrically how streetcars worked now power plants work and when she grew into a teenager she also knows that people started treating her differently she was a beautiful young woman and she could not help but notice that she had a real effect on other people when she was in their presence particularly among men and she found she kind of liked having this sort of power and affect on people at the ages sixteen she started modeling for photographers including doing some nude modeling and in nineteen ninety interview lamar referred to herself as a long phone terry terrible child in other words as a french expression and it typically means a child who speaks without any kind of filter someone who might just speak what they're thinking immediately without considering its effect and thus potentially embarrassing an adult nearby for example it happened to me personally when i was in a grocery store and a mom and her little son are walking pass me and the little son looks at me then looks at his mom and says mommy that man has no hair well that's true i'm bald but i know that i'm familiar with it it's not a shock to my system i've been living that way for two decades but the mother was horrified that her child would say something like that in public in earshot of me i thought it was funny because it was just an observation that didn't bother me at all but that's sort of the kind of thing they mean but the expression can also refer to someone in the creative arts like an actor or a dancer or an artist or photographer someone who thinks outside the norm who is more of on guard and more daring and potentially more offensive as a result someone who goes against the standard and therefore can end up stirring up trouble she referred to herself in this context in nineteen thirty three when she was just nineteen years old she was cast in a check austrian film called ecstasy see this movie became infamous at the time for one thing heady lamar appears nude in the film in a couple of different scenes and there was also a sex scene in that movie that was considered positively scandalous by the standards of the day lamar would earn for herself a reputation that would follow her throughout her life largely because of that movie unfairly i would say especially when you compare it to films today it was nothing particularly racy by a lot of today's r rated movie standards but at the time it was considered absolutely scandalous she also had to reconcile with her father whom she loved dearly in fact she would later say in her life that no man she ever was attached to could measure up to her father he was extremely upset by the film and the scandal and then sort of as a way to kind of redeem herself in a sense she went on to to perform in a prestigious stage production a very respectful stage production and that kinda helped heal her reputation at least for the time being she also met and then married a wealthy arms manufacturer named fritz mandel who was fourteen years older than she was so she.

lamar fourteen years nineteen years two decades
"hedy" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"hedy" Discussed on Skip and Shannon: Undisputed

"But i mean he dame not ultra dane lillard in the play of more natural james are i would too i would agree with that banks but the dame's had some quiet too i know because some of them against my spurs well innovating years i mean he lost lamarcus lamarcus now i believe lamarcus light defect now dang was coming in and it was about to give team no they were clashing and he went to san antonio like oh tian duggan go i got that's true no mid destiny owned a very road he took to abort it somebody said that one you hedy if you give what he didn't want to share he wanted to be the big fish real hair come dave and he went to san antonio is you'll know who got home when he plays get the demasked who mm yeah if you yet with a lot of progress in this egg live shane and finally admitted you know what where's were down twenty three the spurs said that you actually that came out of your go but i wanna read so they know you wanna worried at all as a cheap shot down you should have been were witty with down but the bryant had to take a break he had an platelet 45 forty minutes and you're like okay liberal we will give you a break nine is that could have a twelve paulini comeback in is too that would happen who came here talking to you know again when talking about game three the warriors led the cavaliers you know what.

spurs lamarcus lamarcus tian duggan dave shane bryant cavaliers san antonio hedy 45 forty minutes
"hedy" Discussed on WSB-AM

WSB-AM

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"hedy" Discussed on WSB-AM

"The flag he can't a respect the flag because america oppressive black people colin cooper necklace making as i understand it 14 million dollars when he made that statement he had been heralded when he was a success he was relegated to the bench because he had been a failure and suddenly he discovered that america approaches black people i mean it just boggles the mind to hedy rick athlete who give nothing to charity who don't who don't engage in anything civic other than promotional activities it it it's really i think a a shame that they are leading the because they are not american in minnesota to contribute to the society there no celebrities really there like hollywood an attempt right at this deal that story and others have overwhelmed your story your column is is so meaningful this but this week is that many people are talk about what's going on this masking in unmasking and it turns out one of your lines is perhaps you know the president was right when he said they'd was prison obama was tapping my fault wiretapping my phone's well look bridal had come from a from a colleague from a story folk route two colleagues of ours park bret baier and catherine eric both of whom you know much better than i do but they are respected journalist and day they report that samantha power obama un ambassador on may two hundred six he required to unmask americans an intelligence report in one year alone the final year of the obama administration all the way up into the inauguration now she and un ambassador have absolute lee no need for those names she does nothing about counterintelligence he's not just not every supervisory or operational responsibility that for anything like that so what we doing with those name how did you get them what was she doing with them why wouldn't you want them and i as i said in a column if not much of a threat to think that she was involved in the middle leaking of many of those names and look if there are two hundred in named unmask i mean that is an enormous number of american what how why does it surveillance go as i say in there basically does the guy who delivers.

minnesota hollywood president obama obama administration america colin cooper hedy rick bret baier catherine eric samantha un 14 million dollars one year
"hedy" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

WCBM 680 AM

01:53 min | 4 years ago

"hedy" Discussed on WCBM 680 AM

"Guided team and go on votes to creep or all hedy to worry about uh for the rest of his uh if thomas president the hanno communication what i would i would be absolutely thrilled if he would make deep nowhere the press secretary from my side for the night thing you could do for us what making cry cool you spared effecting to go you said that uh if this move i go back and forth between the two but gimmick of that it wasn't stephen miller give narrative mit i don't i don't disagree he absolutely started it that doesn't mean that miller behaviors what's your one out of press secretary as i say you have warner of my side of the fence happy go or it i love it but uh i don't i'm not cutting across the and black he's not fair to give its opinion and q uh to forced his point of view be fair to ask why you get a new he didn't do that yesterday at the same time miller accommodated him by getting into a fight instead of waiting the bill because i thought with the point wife jonathan listen if working for free press conferences don't where we make a whole lot of steps because that they are more uh out who had get a soundbite merit explanation of a bill and the thing about stephen miller and fair huckabee sanders is that if that big game the media's gonna fight because you gotta remember these press conferences therefore clarity and transparency and uh the administration at all offering these people out so they give the exact location but the media shows up with their bias and they try to get in there fi fifty four thousand them you're doing that yesterday i thought your mccaw i even thought glenn thrush doing a little bit from the new york times which writer toilet fief of air so rather than say the media if if you have a fee which i thank you sir with mr akashi that than they have to have the problem but what's the point of saying all the.

press secretary stephen miller new york times mr akashi hedy president jonathan huckabee glenn thrush writer
"hedy" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

07:36 min | 4 years ago

"hedy" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"And the next one then. We weren't too sure we're going to go see it. Because of the reviews they got from the village voice by the way Danny King did not write a very good Review of ice mother as well as just missed the whole point of this movie but the other movie that we read about and we were having second. Thoughts was November. Is Estonian movie. So you see this picture in the book. And it's dark in its scraggly in its inner talking about werewolves in this and then in the description by village voice or saying don't go see it's all muck and dirt and we said okay. We're going to keep an open mind because we love these movies that come out of I don't know some pagan mindset recalls it a mash up of fairy tales but it's more than that it's legends. It's a way of life for people living in this part of the world and some very old and very dark superstitious magic against everything that you think of trying to understand your place in this universe and you're always fighting against the odds because these people look awful why we should set it up and say when did it take place in what part of the century which century in year. Eight nine years or something like that. Yes I think it was. It was very rustic people. Dress tattered clothes dirty placed to the great impact for me on this movie was that I could not for the for the life of me understand where it was going because of the way it started the there was very little exposition as to what he was really so I think it was very visual. And it had an impact on both of us it was the black and white but the richness of the black makes me feel the way they used to do in film they would like double it up. Really rich blacks. You just can't explain it. That's what this movie was all about. So it was very very visual and expressive. These images in these items would come alive like this thing called a crack. What was this? We weren't sure but it had some animals skull and some side Sir Blades and like things that could hurt people with in all of the sudden. You think it's gonNA come at everybody. And it turns out to be a family slave or the family servant but in a kind of a violent way part fantasy in it because of the crops were rice slaves and servants of their creators their masters. Where did it start? And why is it called November which I think is a misnomer as well may not be a good title but he was started on all souls day and as we know that is the very revered holiday time where the ancestors can come to closest to the earth to meet with their loved ones that were left behind or not so loved ones whatever so that was interesting we had ghosts because that's the night that started and it was really creepy in the woods with all these crosses and everything and and again we're starting to see a the seeds of a love story between Lena and Hans? Okay so that's where it all began in an all these other elements of wear wolves. She was turning into aware wolf. He was in love with another woman. She's trying to get a potion for him or how to break the spell and then you get all these people. These are the ones that were really not actors. They live in these woods and I would try to be very nice to them if I ever came across their way there were so many smaller stories that we were thinking that. Perhaps these stories may not have been necessary. But maybe that's because everybody. It's like the neighborhood. I think they were vignettes. Okay rather than one story. I think you're right okay and it would change. It would surprise you throw your left carve there were a lot of red herrings. As far as I was concerned there was obsession. Happened with an old man and a young woman. A woman with another young man who was in love with us all these emotional blackmail things going on through. Wolves represented wildness. And this is how these people were living. There was the baron with castle and then there were these people who were living rather close to the edge of life and barely hanging on their living all alone. It was terrible there sleeping cows. We have that yes husbandry and in the in close to nature. Yeah they would be always this evil spirits thing and then you would have charms and curses and blessings and everything. We're all mixed up together. So the religion was this. I think on the cost when the superstition was ninety percent of the religion. Still and then religion would kinda win over and force them to give up these These charms and superstitions and mysteries of thanks. And just to listen to this. I think the the greatest thing about our day was we saw three movies. Two of them were international. One was done in English language completely. So the other two were subtitled so that we had a taste of international all good taste to reach rational way. A lot of sexual and everything will go a lot of sex in this movie. To every time we go to Tribeca I think we spend more time on international entertainment. I'd like to go and explore every country that has movies made and see what their cinemas all about what their movies are great about film festivals. Right we'll get a chance to see a cross section in the time that we have and the resources we have. So go see bombshell. Go see ice mother. Go See November. That's a great one and have a good day. That'll be a few months from now. Get soulful ooh. That's good get soulful until next time. This was recorded at we. Chief productions and for MORE INFORMATION TO MARCH HARE MEDIA DOT COM film festival reviews DOT COM or torching tunes dot COM.

Danny King Sir Blades Lena Hans
"hedy" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

Film Festival reViews

10:06 min | 4 years ago

"hedy" Discussed on Film Festival reViews

"What do you think of when you say Hetty Lamar? Glamorous and actress didn't know her origin till I saw the movie. She has many many talents. Other than acting primarily she was studio actress for MGM a lustrous career but it was varied. She add many marriages. Did I know anything about her before? Not In depth. This would have heard of her. Because there's some great movies that I've Seen Sweden. We enjoy watching the black and white films while we go for the classics but there are a lot of people that probably don't know who heady Lamar is or was. I found it really fascinating to learn about her invention mouth. You look at the chronology of her career. It's started with her in a rather erotic movie in German ecstasy and then she got reputation as a an actress of dubious morality. She capitalized on her beauty. She wanted to be thought of as a thinker and intellectual. It was tough for women to be anything but glamorous when you say or something akin to femininity rather than brains. It's really if you are an attractive person. Attractive woman you're not thought of as right bright so she invested that that all misconception with her beauty to get ahead in other ways she was thwarted and right. It was saying no. Don't you worry about this? It's being taken care of you. Just go and sell war bonds. Well what happened was she had a patent that was called the frequency hopping the conception. Was this George. Until was her partner in this other than the fact that he was brilliant also as a musician she and actress as an inventor he devised or he wrote this piece for sixteen player. Pianos each player piano playing its parts. Correct so what they did was. They took two rolls and offset them. Because the punch outs are not even you can change frequencies to another punch shout and therefore they created what we know. Today is Wi Fi we know is bluetooth. It was a way of sending messages cryptically during World War. Two and a navy brass turned her down because Oh player piano rolls wanted to just go back and do what you do best. And they ignored it and stored it but she did get the patent yes then it was put away like in Raiders of the lost Ark. Somewhere top secret and put away somewhere and nobody knew out. Secret was just no she says. I think she said was top. Secret labelled top secret and then it's gone. It was really interesting hearing her voice because the crux of this documentary was her story. As they explained the beginning she did not leave. Anything behind there was a memoir but was by ghost rider. Not by her. She was very upset by the facts. Were changed all the time and just exploited made everything over the top just to sell. What happened was she was interviewed. He was central IMP-. Having about four tapes. Ninety minutes probably of a phone interview with her although because of the channel which I loved about this because it really made it feel so a fantastic so genuine that she's actually been recorded on this and so there were times when I had a little difficulty understanding what was said but for the most part. I got the gist in her voice. So a melodic to listen to her Austrian accent. She still had it but I think in acting. She was able to be coached dialogue coach. Now really have it as thick but those tapes. She went back to her Austrian background. Her accent there. The crux of the thing was her. Life was not easy. You have great parents. Her father taught her all about Maf- science from from childhood and that's where she got her interest. I think so. Many people were the shocked. Surprised or her can't believe that she actually thinking about these things in imagine it would just come to her her head. She would just see these. The ideas yes she saw in her head and that's where they come from but she had her all completed in her head to formulate something and say well. Here's a problem. I would like to improve upon it or who were invent something completely new. I love the fact that when she was five years old. She took up her music box and put it back together L. K. Now so that's a precocious child sense. Okay so that's what we call it. But it's just that she had a brain and she was beautiful and on top of that. She was beautiful absolutely and Pat of actresses. Try to copy her look her style with the hairstyle and the face and makeup use then then she said she said the home even when she started having plastic surgery that was later. Set The trend for that too she was. She was explaining what she wanted done. Very aerodynamically perhaps you. We're to hide them. But in my to have some structural right. She told the doctors what she wanted. And how it was to be done and where the scars were to be which astounded the doctors because they weren't using that technique. That was the whole thing now as not to jump ahead too far but it did not helper later in life having all that surgery by that time she was so naturally beautiful and she was naturally beautiful into her later years as well if she did not feel compelled to alter our look to maintain that what was perceived beauty because she was holy beautiful person from hearing those tapes really the stories and everything that she wanted and about her family and things. She didn't have to do that. She something that's over. What was it thirty billion dollars industry? That's worth three hundred billion ever got paid for her patent expired. She didn't know the legalities up. Your patent expires. Through certain time and she can reapply for extension and she didn't and expired so who takes over whoever discovered the use for the eventually adopted it the armed services and in today's technologies due to what she she came up with them. So this is all this information that we got from seeing this document. And I have to tell you that the director of this documentary Alexandra. Dean is an Emmy Award winning journalist and producer and she did news magazine. Docs for P. B. S. and series for Bloomberg Produced Series Innovators Adventures and pursuits. She writes about invention for Business Week. And she's a founding partner at reframed pictures. That's a journalist and producer. Who just created this story? That was so full of information but it was so wonderful to watch because we got so much archival and different elements of it. There was a lot of research done to this. So that's what moves the story instead of just having talking heads which happens quite a bit. If you're able to find all the images that completed this whole decade or decades of historic information about a movie person and a genius in inventing. And then you're getting all this technology. I think were director. Did very well was tell. A story of a woman who lived quite a long time had very career five husbands different children. How those children as they were interviewed in this movie knew her reminisced about her. There was so many nuances in this movie. That were really good. And the editing was good. Because it didn't well on what you said talking heads only our footage ours work absolutely yes but in essence she was constantly the sex bomb shell title and she never sounded bitter. She never an all the interviews. Even on that on those cassette tapes. She had a sense of humor. She was never bitter. Maybe privately off camera or something like that but whatever we got to see in. That movie was an incredible woman through thick and thin when when her husband left with nothing. The first one cheap bounced back. She just didn't have luck in love at the end. It was her individuality in spark in her zeal for things in life and she gave over software kids and show because they gave back. They were very positive about their mother. I think this was a great story and I think it's. She's a great role model rugby. And I hope this gets picked up. I'm sure we'll see.

Hetty Lamar founding partner director MGM producer Sweden Wi Raiders Emmy Award George Pat Bloomberg Dean Ark