40 Burst results for "harvard"

Fresh update on "harvard" discussed on Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

00:59 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "harvard" discussed on Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

"Thanks, Brandon Kay Away news Time is 6 47 Our top stories on Colorado's morning news. Denver's mayor wants communities outside his city to start doing more to stop the spread of Corona virus, like making mass mandatory were all calling on you to implement one. By doing so, you will send a strong public message that protects the lives of your residents and others will talk live about it with Mayor Hancock. It's 7 24 on K Away News Radio Denver public schools could opt to delay the start of their upcoming academic year and push it back until maybe August 24th versus the 17th Superintendent Susanna Cordova says the extra time will allow teachers for more prep time ahead of the highly unusual school year and reduce the amount of hot August days in the classroom as well. That district also considering a staggered start to the school year for in person. Attendance. Colorado College hosting a town hall later today on what school could look like in the fall semester. These C C students say they're in a wait and see mode. The upperclassmen won't come back. Until September for that second lock, So we're already bracing ourselves for more online learning by dependent on constantly changing local state in scientific guidance. I think we're just kind of waiting to see what happens. The virtual town hall set to begin at one o'clock on Colorado colleges. Facebook page. Harvard researchers concluding Corona virus Case surges in Southern states do too premature re openings, Harvard said the common thread among states seeing large outbreaks is the re lax ation of restrictions near the end of May, which led to an increase. In early June. President Trump says the U. S is doing well despite the ongoing pandemic and a battered economy. The markets are.

Colorado College Mayor Hancock Colorado Denver Denver Public Schools Brandon Kay Susanna Cordova President Trump Harvard Facebook Superintendent U. S
Why the pandemic is getting worse, and how to think about the future

Short Wave

10:28 min | 6 hrs ago

Why the pandemic is getting worse, and how to think about the future

"Okay Richard, so there are about forty seven different things we could talk about to unpack the story of how we got here in where we're going, but we chose a few of the big ones to focus on in this episode, so testing was a mess at the beginning. It seemed to get better for a little bit, and now it seems like it's a mess again, so what happened? Well it is complicated. Let's take you back to the beginning of the epidemic when the decided to develop its own test for the corona virus, which is standard practice for them, but honestly they bungled it, and instead of reaching for tests developed in Germany and distributed widely by the World Health Organization the CDC fix this quickly, and they kept trying, but really that turned out to be a big mistake, and it cost us a lot of time. I think the CDC didn't really realize the scope of this epidemic early on federal health officials should have done what South Korea did for instance what they did overseas immediately spur commercial companies to produce large quantities of tests. The US eventually got to that point, but you know it was really late, and now, of course we are in better shape. The US is averaging something like six hundred thousand tests a day or sometimes even more than that, but. It's still far short of the amount of tests that experts say we should be doing. Yeah, and let me ask you about that. Because I've seen estimates that we need to be doing like double or triple, the amount of tests to really control the virus right and you know the number of tests you need to do is really relative to the number of infected people, so we have so many infected people, and that number is growing. We really need to be doing a lot more testing. For example scientists at the World Health Organization uses a rule of thumb that you should have enough tests that your when you get the results back only about five percent or coming back positive. That, means that most of the people are negative, which is what you'd hope what you'd expect right now. Unfortunately, we have states like Texas and Florida in Arizona where the number of percent positive is like seventeen, eighteen or even twenty five percent, and you know the percent positive rates keep going up, which means it's definitely not true as the president has frequently claimed at the cases are only writing, because we're testing more. No seeing more positive cases as we see more tests so okay. Let's talk about the case numbers of it back in April we were at about you know thirty thousand cases per day and now we're. Sixty thousand new cases a day, which is objectively worse and to put that in perspective, sixty thousand people wouldn't even fit in dodger stadium, which is the biggest baseball stadium in this country, so we're talking about you know. Give you a visual image of what we're talking about it right right and you know. Some of that is driven by big outbreaks in places like California, Texas and Florida. Let's talk a little. Little bit more about why cases are up in those places. Yeah, it's complicated series of reasons, but some of it is that we're what we were talking about a little bit earlier. Some of these were in states like Texas and Arizona that were determined to open really early, and we're a lot of people including politicians thought you know starting. Their economies was more important than being really cautious about the virus. Could also be other stuff at play here because you know it is summer, and those are places that very hot, so more people are spending more time in air conditioning that is to say indoors and one thing we know about this virus is spread more likely indoors among people who are stuck together for at least fifteen minutes or longer in an indoor space. Yeah, honestly like this idea of being indoors is something I've been thinking about. Because I'm looking ahead right and we're looking at the fall in the winter when you're going to have the exact same thing happening all over the country like more people forced indoors. That correlates with of course, the beginning of seasonal flu, circulating some people in the hospital. That kind of stuff right it's going to. We're going GONNA have both epidemics happening at once. It's going to be a real mess. Okay, let's talk a little bit about mortality or people dying from the disease, so the president and others have pointed out in the last few weeks that the numbers of people dying per day are down from early on in the pandemic, and that is true back in mid April. There were days where we had well over two thousand people dying each day, and in the last week or so the US is seeing more like hundred people dying every day on average, although that number seems to be rising again. Let's talk about a few reasons why that could be why we're seeing fewer deaths now than earlier right well, certainly, one of the biggest reasons is not the biggest reason that the death rates are so low now compared to the spring when New York City got clobbered as you recall is nowadays the viruses infecting mainly younger people, and they just frankly less likely to die in Arizona for instance of these days, half the cases are in people aged twenty to forty four years old and only. Only eleven percent of cases and people over sixty five, and of course people over sixty five, or really at the highest risk of death, and you know that that shift younger age groups is both good and bad. The good part diseases hitting a population that can more easily survive, though we should say some people do die should bad part is that the spread is accelerating and putting vulnerable people at higher risk, because now the virus is traveling far and wide and putting more older people and. And people with underlying health conditions in harm's way right and you know one thing to note though is that especially in the younger demographic? This is where we see a lot of the huge racial disparities up, basically which young people are surviving and dying a paper out of Harvard June showed that in this twenty five to thirty four age group, the mortality rate for black people was seven times more than for white people really matters. Who are the those young people are right? It absolutely does. Does the overall risk of death is very very low in this age group, but it does absolutely hit some people harder than others, particularly because more people of color are at risk for contracting the disease because of their jobs, they have to be out and about and also underlying health conditions may also be playing a role here. Yeah, so it appears more young people are getting sick. Fewer of them ultimately die, but to be clear. Young people do get very sick and die from the virus. So that's one reason we're seeing fewer deaths right now. Compared to the beginning of the pandemic as far as why the numbers of deaths don't seem to be matching up with the increase, in cases, yet is partially due to the fact that deaths are what we call a lagging indicator Derek Thompson at the Atlantic wrote a really nice piece on. This will make sure to put in. The episode notes for Richard Let's talk about that a little bit right. Yeah, it's a very plainly put. There's a gap in time between the day someone test positive until the day the either recover or unfortunately die, and then of course. Course there's another lag in which that death is reported health officials. So what you're seeing now. It really in-depth really reflects people who got sick. You know two or three weeks ago or even longer than that, so that's one reason why deaths have not followed in lockstep with a big spike in cases. Yeah, and then there's also this thing called lead time bias right right, and that's basically a phenomenon where data can make it seem like something new is happening, but actually just about how you're collecting. The data with the increases in testing. We've seen in these past few months. We may simply be detecting more this. This virus earlier in people than we did before, people may have been really sick and not get tested to the hospital now people are driving up in their cars right and doing okay, and so there earlier on in the course of disease, but that doesn't really change the percentage of cases that wind up being fatal. It will just take longer than it did early on in the epidemic for those fatalities to show up and of course Richard there a ton of complications that we didn't have time to get into more hospital capacity ventilators, so what sheep the hospitals in actually plays a role in who survives and who? Who doesn't and then you know even though there isn't a cure, of course, doctors have had more time to learn how to treat this disease, so we don't have a lot of data on this yet. In the United States, but it seems like perhaps more people are surviving this disease than right in the beginning right, I think that is clearly the case and you know as long as hospitals aren't totally overwhelmed with patients. They can make use of what they've learned so far to improve treatments. I'll give you just one example steroids which are used to reduce inflammation. Turn out to be quite useful in many instances. So Richard I'm curious like overall how you're feeling looking at where we are compared to. Let's say April, there are ways in which I feel like are a lot more prepared like we understand the virus. A little better were obviously farther along on a vaccine and some potential treatments, but we still don't have adequate testing. Cases are at an all time high. We're heading into the fall, which means we're GONNA, have this consolidation of cold and flu and corona season, plus the schools potentially opening up your really cheering me up here. But maybe the most concerning fig just to keep you just to keep you down. Richard is that I? Just don't feel like we are a country with like one central goal to fight this thing together. Yeah well I think. I would agree with that first off a corona virus vaccine is not going to help much at least not in this coming flu season. Even if one is amazingly enough approved by the end of the year, we'll take really a long time to vaccinate enough people to make a big difference. What really could help would be a good flu vaccine. I think only about half of Americans typically get the flu shot every year and public health officials say if they can dramatically increase that it would really help a lot against this sort of one two punch that we're going to have to be confronting. But you're right about the country, not working well together on this starting with leadership both at the federal level, and also tim states, but also including people who are ignoring all the guidance that's going all the good advice from scientists and people are hesitant to get vaccines because of misinformation. As for testing you know by the fall. There will be some help. I expect doctors offices should have a supply of Rapid Kobe tests. They're like rapid strep test, or whatever the aren't super accurate, but they can help relieve some of the testing bottleneck and sort of looking down the line a little bit farther. Scientists are also working on next generation of tests that you might even be able to do. Do at home and you know those might be ready sometime. Next year next year seems pretty discouraging, doesn't it? It's pretty far off, but you know I'm pretty well resigned to the fact that we're going to be in this for the long haul. covid nineteen is going to be with us for years so even technology that seems far off right now. We'll still be needed

Richard Let United States Arizona FLU World Health Organization President Trump CDC Texas Dodger Stadium Florida South Korea Flu Vaccine Germany New York City Younger Age California TIM Derek Thompson
Fresh update on "harvard" discussed on Chelsea Mike'd Up

Chelsea Mike'd Up

00:53 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "harvard" discussed on Chelsea Mike'd Up

"Don't allow that goal to be scored, so yes, you need that. Extra quality and hockey is really important in breaking teams down Verner, the same and I agree Harvard's as that first midfielder in behind the front three. If you're still going four, three would be a huge issue into helping with that, but I still think I'm looking at the table and right now Chelsea are on sixty four goals scored, which is twenty seven behind men city's total for the season. Right and you think all right. That's a pretty huge gap. You're trying to bridge, but the bigger gap. Between Chelsea and Liverpool and the difference there in goal scored is only twelve, but in goals allowed. It's twenty two Chelsea of lot forty nine goals this year compared to twenty seven from Liverpool and I think being able to keep your goals conceded total under thirty, two thirty three is what wins titles, and so I do think that Chelsea's number. One priority is still the defending, and you just saw a number of mistakes happening in. Sheffield united that there needs to be some fixes along that back line, so you're getting that. That goals conceded number into a place where you can be within striking range with the attacking editions you've already made. Chelsea would dominate in many of their losses, and they'd come across these offensive minded teams, and they couldn't just unlock them, and the other team would capitalize on their one or two chances. I thought Norwich had one or two chances in this match credit for Ruediger for that diving slide tackle on the edge of the box thought that was massive, but they weren't really tested in this match, and like I mentioned. Mentioned in their losses, the games like at home, the borne myth, the both matches West Ham even the Newcastle to a degree in this match with Norwich in which Chelsea end up getting the three points well, so often aren't getting tested in these instances, so it's weird. That I've painted myself. As a devil's advocate, let signed one of the most attractive midfielder options available in the transfer market in.

Chelsea Liverpool Norwich Verner Hockey Harvard Sheffield Newcastle Ruediger
Trump administration backs down on restrictions for international students

BBC World Service

00:55 sec | 1 d ago

Trump administration backs down on restrictions for international students

"The Trump Administration is backing off a plan to revoke student visas for international students enrolled in schools offering classes online only from member station who are in Boston. Fred Tie, says the story, the government announced the decision in federal court in Boston. It reverses a policy announced last week that band international students if they studied at online on LY colleges. Simba Capella Glue Harvard student from Turkey, who can now stay in the United States was watching the court hearing on Zoom. It's a relief and I feel like just come on. The sounds pretty railed, actually, so it shouldn't have come as a surprise. Harvard and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology had sued the federal government. Just as oral arguments were about to begin in court. Attorneys for the government and the colleges told the judge the government would lift the restrictions for NPR news. I'm Fred Thais in

Simba Capella Glue Harvard Boston Fred Tie Fred Thais Harvard NPR Massachusetts Institute Of Tec Turkey United States
Fresh update on "harvard" discussed on Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

01:07 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "harvard" discussed on Colorado's Morning News with April Zesbaugh and Marty Lenz

"Will the Broncos coming out with? I guess the plan. They know they're going to limit fans in the stands and how they're gonna handle it, Okay? We're not sure how many if any fans will be allowed in the stands the watch Broncos games this fall, But the team did send a memo to all of its nearly 60,000 season ticket holders yesterday. That memo said that he will not be able to accommodate fans at full capacity this year because of Corona virus and did provide a few options for the upcoming season, including a credit for the 2021 season or a full refund. And if ticketholders do choose to receive that full refund, they would still retain their priority number. And have the auction next season to sit in their same seats. But as the Broncos acknowledged in the memo, it's not going to be up to them. How many fans are allowed in the stands, saying quote Our decisions will continue to be guided by public health experts, local regulations and league policies. Today is the conclusion of the four day training camp for the absent Pepsi Center, and yesterday another award nomination for an exciting young player, Kalma car. One of the three finalists for the Calder Trophy, which is awarded to the league's top rookie. If he takes home the hardware, he'll become the fifth player in franchise history till win The honor, including Peter Forsberg and Chris Jury, as well as current AB stars Nathan MacKinnon and Gabe Landeskog. The Nuggets back on the practice court Orlando again yesterday and there was a joker, citing lacing up his high tops with his teammates. But coach Michael Malone said they aren't going to rush the All Star Center back in action. We're going to be really cautious and safe with any new player that comes into the Orlando campus and slowly worked them, and we want to make sure we're not putting anybody at risk of getting injured and work them here slowly and Nicole list on his job. He stayed in shape. He's done all the work it needs to do while he's been away from us, But we still want to be smart. With the reintegration of Nicole Yoga's to his teammates. Malone didn't give an update on Gary Harris story. Craig and Michael Porter Jr. Who are still not with the team and Tiger Woods headlines. The field at Jack Nicklaus is tournament The Memorial in Dublin, Ohio, although Justin Thomas is a favorite Tigers, playing in his first tournament since February and will be in the most watch group of the day, he set to tee off at 11 17 alongside Rory McIlroy. And Brooks kept that's board some grainy crystalline colonies radio on the Broncos. Lampson RUN. Thanks, Piquet. It's 5 16 K Away news Time. Our top stories on Colorado's Morning news. Denver Mayor Michael Hancock is putting a temporary end to its request for Corona virus Restriction variances. I've always said that when it comes to reopening, Denver was going to take a measured And responsible approach to those efforts, and the responsible thing to do right now is a slowdown on reopening plans. Hancock says he has concerns about recent spikes in Corona virus cases and wants to avoid shutting things down again. He also pressed other communities to implement mask orders, saying it's a good policy. We'll talk with Mayor live in our seven o'clock hour. For public schools could opt to delay the start of the upcoming academic year. Superintendent Susanna Cordova notified parents and teachers about the possibility the fall semester schedules to start August 17. But it may be pushed back A week later. Cordova says the extra time will allow for teachers to prep and ahead of a highly unusual school year and reduce the amount of hot August stays in the classroom. District is also considering staggering the school start for in person. Attendance. Colorado College hosting a town hall later today on what school could look like this fall. These C C students say they're in a wait and see mode. The upperclassmen won't come back until September for that second lock, So we're already raising ourselves for more online learning. Why depended on constantly changing local state and scientific guidance? I think we're just kind of breathing to see what happens. That online conversation set to start at one o'clock on Colorado COLLEGES. Facebook page. Harvard researchers are concluding that Corona virus case surges in southern states is due to premature re openings, Harvard's said the common thread among states seeing large outbreaks is the re lax ation of restrictions near the end of May that led to an increase in early June. Facebook is taking even more action to fight misinformation about Corona virus, the companies adding a new section to its website and APP. Called fax about covert 19. It'll debunk common myths. Users will also see statements from the World Health Organization like Hydroxy Claure Quinn hasn't been proven to cure, treat or prevent the virus. Mark Zuckerberg plans to interview Dr Anthony Fauci live today, The president says the U. S is doing well despite the ongoing Corona virus outbreak in the battered economy, the market's very good thie countries doing well, jobs are growing past..

Broncos Mayor Michael Hancock Nuggets Michael Malone Facebook Colorado College Susanna Cordova Nicole Yoga Harvard Orlando Denver Pepsi Center Tiger Woods Justin Thomas Calder Trophy Peter Forsberg Jack Nicklaus Rory Mcilroy World Health Organization
Foreign students in US: Trump administration drops deportation plans

Ben Shapiro

00:36 sec | 1 d ago

Foreign students in US: Trump administration drops deportation plans

"Hearing in a lawsuit brought by M I. T and Harvard University had just gotten underway when a lawyer for the U. S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement announced that the Trump administration was rescinding a rule that would have caused many international college students to leave the U. S. If their schools held on Lee Online classes instead, no return to the status quo under the policy international students in the U. S. Would not have received new visas if they had to take all of their classes online because of Corona virus, and they could have faced deportation. Universities help the White House was pressuring them to reopen. I'm Steve

U. S. Immigration And Customs Lee Online Harvard University White House Steve
Fresh update on "harvard" discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

Yahoo Finance Presents

00:25 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh update on "harvard" discussed on Yahoo Finance Presents

"And under that Formula Harbor was given some money harbor never actually got the money, but the white. House got upset that Harvard was going to get some money, so said we're not gonNA interest in take it. Well. Armored hadn't done anything. A lot of universities had given up the money they. The congress passed the law so in the same. Way You know Congress passed a law that said some of these companies could take money. Then they said well. We didn't really mean it. While what is an employer supposed to do companies to do so as a general rule of thumb they got the goal should be keep a people working, and if a company is owned by a public, is a public company and its and needs help, or it's a privately owned company owned by a family owned by private equity. It should make a difference who the owner is. Whether the employees are going to get the help or not, but obviously that's politically difficult to do. Private equity firms are seen as wealthy, and they should take care of other employees in some other ways so most of the privately firms that I'm familiar with chose not to take money, even if they were legally entitled to it for the companies, because the criticism that would arise and in fact I. I think some of the legislation didn't let some of the private equity firms. Take it for the ones you mentioned. I'm not familiar with the details, but I I suspect these people got. The loans are complying with the law, and if they didn't comply with the law then to give back, but I. I think the law allowed it. And so, what are you supposed to do if you're an employer and employee? Who are going to be laid off? Are you're supposed to say? I'm not going to take the money on allowed to the law. Right? David. You're pretty self aware about this notion that private equity is the bad guy in the economy or one of the guys. I think Carlisle. Did Hurts at one point, which is now in bankruptcy. How do you respond to someone who comes up to you at a cocktail party and said you? You're one of those bad private equity guys. As a general rule of thumb, people don't come up cocktail parties and say bad things. They usually do it behind your back, but as a general rule of thumb I.

Congress Formula Harbor House Harvard Carlisle David
Trump administration rescinds foreign students rule

Jeff Katz

00:21 sec | 1 d ago

Trump administration rescinds foreign students rule

"The Trump Administration has rescinded a rule that would have required international students to transfer schools or leave the country if their colleges hold classes entirely online this fall because of the pandemic. The decision was announced at the start of a hearing today in a federal lawsuit in Boston, brought by Harvard University and the Massachusetts Institute of

Trump Administration Harvard University Massachusetts Institute Of Boston
Fresh update on "harvard" discussed on Joel Riley

Joel Riley

00:45 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "harvard" discussed on Joel Riley

"Weather station news Radio 6 10 W TV end while not mandated everywhere, the governor says masks need to be warm when addressing the current Corona virus pandemic in Ohio Wednesday evening. Heurtaux Wine, said that every resident should be wearing a mask when out in public places. I know some may still question the wisdom of worry mask because we used to say when I was a prosecuting attorney. The jury's back. The verdict is in there is a broad consensus today in the medical, health and business communities that mask are critical. The governor says they don't only protect the person wearing it and others around them, but also protects the state's economy by keeping it open. I'm Sean Gallagher, the 2020 Circleville pumpkin show canceled due to the pandemic shows Board of trustees voted to cancel the event yesterday, citing problems with social distancing and providing adequate safety for the festival. Which attracts nearly 400,000 people every year. In October, the head of the CDC, facing pushback for suggesting northern vacationers may be partly to blame for Corona bar spikes in states like Florida and Texas. Doctor saw the director of the Harvard Global Health Institute, challenging claims made by CDC had Robert Redfield that northern vacationers heading South. May have caused a spike in covert 19 cases in Sunbelt states shot tweeting either he's looking at bad data or is learning the wrong lessons. However, Texas Republican Congressman Dan Crenshaw tells Fox is Shannon Bream. Of course, it's not just northerners travelling south. It's a whole variety of things, people letting their guard down large holiday gatherings. Meanwhile, taxes reporting a single day record Wednesday of 110 deaths. Sean Langil. Fox News American Airlines Warning of 25,000 furloughs. American Wednesday urged workers to take new buyout and early retirement packages to get people off payroll before baking cuts. About 20% of the airline's workforce were told their jobs are at risk A shake up in the president's reelection team the manager's demoted and replace deputy campaign manager Bill Stepien promoted to the top spot. The president demoted longtime manager Brad Pascal. It comes amid a string of botched efforts to reboot his campaign amid the ongoing pandemic, including his June rally in Tulsa, where only 1/3 of the arena was killed. Just last week, the president's team again failed to reboot. It's campaign canceling a rally in New Hampshire, citing weather concerns publicly, While privately, campaign officials tell ABC News they were fearful of a repeat of Tulsa and say, be seasoned Estela. Arop Former vice President Joe Biden addressed members of the Black labor movement Wednesday, touting his build back better agenda. It's not just calling out President Trump first failures, for God's sake, they're so well known. We know them. You live with him? I lost the job or lost a loved one during this pandemic because of those failures. This election is about really solutions. Tobe rebuild. Come back stronger by nabbing if he was president..

President Trump CDC Tulsa Vice President Heurtaux Wine Sean Gallagher Texas Ohio Attorney Joe Biden Sean Langil Bill Stepien Sunbelt Robert Redfield Abc News Congressman Dan Crenshaw New Hampshire Shannon Bream Harvard Global Health Institut
Foreign students in US: Trump administration drops deportation plans

WBZ Afternoon News

00:26 sec | 1 d ago

Foreign students in US: Trump administration drops deportation plans

"Boston's news radio and in the hearing that lasted all of a minute today in Boston federal court Trump administration has revoked a rule that would have banned the foreign students from taking all classes online in the fall announcement. Coming at the start of this hearing today at Boston Federal Court of Lawsuit by Harvard, MIT and Northeastern against Ice, those rules would have subjected those students to possible deportation if they didn't transfer schools. If those schools that they were already enrolled

Boston Federal Court Of Lawsui Boston Trump Administration Harvard MIT
Trump administration drops restrictions on online-only instruction for foreign students

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 1 d ago

Trump administration drops restrictions on online-only instruction for foreign students

"Is now said to be considering scaling back that new policy that would bar international students from remaining in the U. S while taking classes remotely this fall. This is according to the Wall Street Journal, and would come after the Trump administration faced lawsuits from 17 states, including New York and the number of individual schools, including Harvard and MIT. The administration argues there's no reason for these students to be in the country if their instruction is completely online. We'll ice has yet to formally published. The new rules in the Wall Street Journal says they may be changed before they do. President

Wall Street Journal New York Harvard MIT President Trump
The Trump administration says foreign students must leave US if classes go online

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

02:37 min | 2 d ago

The Trump administration says foreign students must leave US if classes go online

"Donald Trump I ran for president. He's had a lot of racist and homophobic things about immigrants, and how he was going to build a wall to many of them out, he also said this. I want people to come into our country legally I WANNA have a big fat beautiful open door. A BIG FAT Beautiful Open Door for legal immigrants. That's how Donald Trump tried to convince the American, And the voters that it wasn't really about hating immigrants, it was just about the rule of law getting the so-called bad hombres out. If you recall Donald Trump has done many things, both during that election, and in the four years, since that made it really clear that he really is prejudice against immigrants of all stripes, or maybe of most stripes, and doesn't seem to care much about the rule of law, either but some level of welcome for immigrants, some level of acknowledgement that immigration is actually important to America's economy, if not its. Its values and traditions was mainstream republican consensus at the time as recently as last year, administration officials were still telling reporters. Trump actually wanted to increase the number of visas for highly skilled workers, but here's the thing Donald. Trump has repeatedly and emphatically slammed his big fat beautiful door in the faces of those same immigrants that his party once tried to make exceptions for the latest example is the trump administration's announcement of a new policy for international students who study at an American College and who studies have moved online during the pandemic. Pandemic, the trump administration essentially told those students to go back to where they came from revoking their right to stay in the United States. The decision doesn't just end the lives of those international students. It's another discouragement of them to study and potentially build their lives in America. We're shutting the door on some of the world's best and brightest minds, giving up on their contributions to American business to research, innovation and society, now and down the Road Harvard Law School Professor Vivek Wadhwa writes that the effective pushing these students away will quote. Quote likely be an exodus of academic talent to schools in Europe or elsewhere and intellectual catastrophe of historic proportions with long-term economic ramifications. There is so much at stake in this move by the president for the students for the universities, and for all of us that today the attorneys General of Sixteen. States and DC joined the age of Massachusetts ensuing the administration to try and stop the policy. They're asking Federal Court in Boston to block. The policy is the case moves forward no word yet, but as Rachel says watch this

Donald Trump Pandemic President Trump America Professor Vivek Wadhwa United States Road Harvard Law School Boston Massachusetts Federal Court DC Rachel Europe American College
'Cruel, abrupt and unlawful': States sue Trump administration over college student visa rule

WBZ Afternoon News

01:05 min | 2 d ago

'Cruel, abrupt and unlawful': States sue Trump administration over college student visa rule

"Gathered at the State House today as well to protest the Trump administration's new visa rules that could force college students to transfer schools or leave the country altogether. Their schools decide to go online only. Many of the students read statements from international students who could not be here. This Harvard student from Germany, who did not want to be named, spoke for herself. I barely slept. I'm constantly right down by anxiety. I had nightmares of being dragged away from my professional private life. At a moment's notice. You know, I am sorry that we have to be here. Once again. Announcing a lawsuit against the Trump Administration, Attorney General Maura Healey spoke with passion and anger about the new rules. But what legal leg does she have to stand on? There's no basis for this directive, and under the law, you have to provide a basis. Healy said. She'll be in court on Tuesday for a hearing regarding her latest lawsuit against the Trump administration at the Statehouse. Suzanne Saws Ville W. BZ. Boston's news radio

Trump Administration Maura Healey Healy State House Germany Boston Attorney
Does Size Matter When It Comes To Health

Diet Starts Tomorrow

05:06 min | 4 d ago

Does Size Matter When It Comes To Health

"Dr Stanford is an obesity medicine, physician, scientists, educator and policymaker at Massachusetts General. Hospital and Harvard Medical School. She also lectures at Brown and Teaches Med students at Harvard. Hello, and welcome well. Thanks for having me. It's an absolute delight to be here today with both of you. We're just we're the most accomplished person ever had this podcast like I cannot even begins. Batum were all you have. You guys are the best and this is. This is what I need to me through the rest of the day as I conquer the world. Yeah! We're honored that you made have the time the time to come talk to us just a little, so thank you so much. Did I get all of that right? You did I I. Guess What I can do is explain it to people because people are kind of like is all of that absolutely so? I'm obviously a mathematician, so the MD is the easiest part I think to understand on my completed my masters in public health nineteen years ago, so it shows you that I'm older than I appear. And that was in health policy management. My masters impose ministration was from the Harvard. Kennedy School, government and government. Currently working on my MBA executive MBA, so that hasn't quite made it to the end of my name, but I may lead US next year. Let me tell you guys. We'll have more to talk about. The the all the that you see after not team for fifteen, but it is nice that it goes with that, so those are all fellowships, so my fellow of the ANC, which is the American Academy pediatrics I'm a fellow of American College of Positions. American college positions represents all Physicians for adult so internal medicine, a fellow of the American Heart Association so basically. I'm looking at cardio metabolic health and being the fellow in the American Heart Association what represents that and then a fellow in the obesity society. Society which is the F. Toss? So you know these fellowships come you know after having accomplished in those different on areas domain, so I see children I see adults I work in this kind of Cardio Metabolic, health space obviously as obesity medicine physician I work in that space, so it really is a combination of kind of who I am, and just looking at Vegas, the letters that come after my name really talks to the work that I really care about and working with my patients patients across the wall. That's amazing. Wow -gratulations. What inspired you study obesity. One of the things that I was always very concerned about as a black one in a black woman who was born and raised in Atlanta Julie obviously in Boston is that's where mastermind Harvard are? I'm I was really. Perplexed I think is the word I WANNA. Use about the disproportionate impact obesity on communities of color particularly I'm the black community. That was what really brought me to this work, so if you go back twenty years ago, I think you've as you're in your twenties for twenty years ago. When I was doing my m H, you're not okay. Across. Our loved anyways Oh! That's Cute I. Love it still have you guys by? Decades! but one of the things I was really interested in seeing was like. I felt like there was a lot that we weren't doing to understand why. Obesity obesity disproportionately impacted certain groups and the groups that are more likely to kind of tackle these issues or the people that are representative, so those scripts so as a black woman and the group that is most disproportionately impacted by obesity I felt compelled to really approach and tackle this headline, so the projects that I was doing back at emory school of Public Health, back in ninety nine two thousand etc, We're looking at specifically obesity in the black community one project I was doing was. Was Looking at obesity in the Black Church community was looking at obesity among African, American, adolescent girls and one was looking at obesity within those that are law resources within the wick programs. It'll women's and children's for Ram, and how could we fix their Their plight in terms of recognizing that we can in some ways with the limited resources that they may have available to enhance their role house. So this was something that was kind of lingering. I didn't anticipate that I would choose obese medicine. 'cause that was not a field when I was twenty years ago. It really was not a field. There was no board certification in obesity medicine. The first Brit sort of patients directly. No Be Madison didn't start until two thousand well, which was well after I finished medical school, but I can tell you I was on. Call in the pediatric ICU when I was in residency and I as internal medicine pediatrics and I literally just googled obesity in medicine at about two thirty in the morning after I just intimated three kids in the ICU in a new. I was going to sleep at nights. I figured I'd just need to keep myself busy. And, the fellowship here at Mass General at Harvard popped up and I was like. What is this? You know I I really interested in obesity. I had no idea there was a fellowship, indeed the first ship and so I came and I spent three years. Doing a fellowship dedicated to understanding the disease of obesity.

Obesity Harvard Harvard Medical School American Heart Association Black Community Dr Stanford American College Of Positions Brown Massachusetts General Black Church Kennedy School United States Batum Emory School Of Public Health American Academy ANC MD
The U.S. Coronavirus Numbers Are Shocking Compared to the E.U.

Vox's The Weeds

03:24 min | 6 d ago

The U.S. Coronavirus Numbers Are Shocking Compared to the E.U.

"The pandemic is back in the United States in a big way, and as I was pointing out to me off line is some things are kind of different internationally? When you say it is shocking. Sometimes when we do the coronavirus podcasts I drop into this weird vocal register where I. Don't feel like I have the range to describe how bad what I'm describing is. But I want to try here because I think it's really important that people don't feel like what is happening. Here is simply a natural disaster, and it is understood the size of the policy failure. We're living through and how many people suffer and die because of it, so I think the simplest way to do a comparison years to look at the European Union because European Union is. Similar to our size, similar level of wealth has a governing institutions, which will not the same as ours are comparable in many ways. It experienced the virus, if anything a little bit earlier than we did. The outbreaks and say Italy came first so they've been dealing with longer. They started dealing with actually less information than we had their there. Good reasons to look comparable. If you go to our world and data. And you look at seventy rolling average of cases per million in the US in the you. I don't know how to describe. How wild charts so? They're currently a hundred and sixty cases per million people in the US every day on a rolling seven day, average, one hundred sixty, and of course we know the true numbers much higher than these are confirmed cases around testing. There are nine in the EU, nine nine. Yup? Nine. And the EU has more not like nine. The use a cup. Arizona alone. is seeing more cases per day than the EU there? This is not as far as we can tell testing issue if you look at like rates of testing positive the things you would look at to see if you're seeing something like that. That is not what we are seeing. So then I wanNA take this one step further. At Stat News which they've been doing great coverage throughout this entire crisis. If you're not falling, them should be stat news. Isaac Sabinas and James Sabinas her both at Harvard, did a piece looking at China answer the question. How many of the deaths that we have seen in the US? Reflect at least potentially bad policy. How many of them seem given the experiences of other places? Preventable, and the places choose to comparator Germany, South Korea Australia and Singapore, and that they choose US places in the bribery of reasons one the virus head the amount of the population lives in sort of urbanized areas, etc.. They calculate that somewhere between seven percent to ninety nine percent of the US fatalities from covid nineteen averted seventy ninety nine percent so most of them the vast majority of them. And just to go back to that EU US chart for one more second look at what is also just truly striking about it is its shape. In the EU this plateaued some time ago and it has gotten lower and estate staple and in the US. We are just going up. So it's all very disturbing, but what we are living through. Here's a failure, not an inevitability.

Stat News United States European Union Italy Arizona Preventable Isaac Sabinas Harvard Bribery Germany China James Sabinas
Ivy League rules out playing all sports this fall due to coronavirus pandemic

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

00:22 sec | 6 d ago

Ivy League rules out playing all sports this fall due to coronavirus pandemic

"The Ivy League announcing that they will have no sports competing in the fall semester, and what that means as it pertains to the sport of college basketball is that no ivy league programs? Not Harvard not pin not Yale not any of them that play college basketball game before January and the Ivy League has added. There is no guarantee they'll compete at

Ivy League Basketball Harvard Yale
Ivy League rules out playing all sports this fall

The Situation Room with Wolf Blitzer

00:25 sec | Last week

Ivy League rules out playing all sports this fall

"Just learned that the Ivy League is cancelling all college sports for the coming fall season the First Division One conference to scrap football for the fall, and this could obviously influence major conferences as they decide whether to move forward the college, football, basketball and other sports during this pandemics, so no college sports in the Ivy League over. Over at Harvard Yale Princeton or some of the other, all the other members of the Ivy.

Ivy League Harvard Yale Princeton First Division Basketball
Vindman retiring from Army, lawyer blames Trump

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last week

Vindman retiring from Army, lawyer blames Trump

"Italy Harvard in president Germany's United the as the U. national one president S. and of trump its MIT has Airlines health is security final trump urging is hit minister demanding another ramps rulings sued is aide the warning Graham European up who to schools pressure played of block nearly has this Commission expressed a a virus central term reopen on the half trump schools of pandemic administration concern the its role Supreme to this U. develop fall in to president S. milestone reopen Court staff better and from trump's is over barring this siding is that threatening fall impeachment the coordinated they formal with could international he's the trump vice be federal getting U. furloughed administration president S. measures backlash students has notification action announced pence in to from October from prevent is in his against staying a touting New retirement birth York passengers those control in a boost the of that U. its cakes with stay S. it's withdrawal from in corona the the governor virus army clearest closed virus if Andrew the they signal from testing take affordable the Cuomo World classes the yet lieutenant with writing Care yesterday Health of says more how colonel entirely Act Organization deeply than in school the Alexander requires thirty the president E. the openings U. corona nine online insisted most van are million virus been employers at St this people served the yes pandemic students fall call on tested provide call mom the comes National need is off hurting to women period Security be among back to the at with the says lawsuit those least airline in Council no it's classes the thirty cost not notification seeks as industry six more up to an prevent expert to birth than the it's president control federal time on three of out United Ukraine to immigration the million of do of dural as the two United it a officials preventive seventy this Americans authorities States but morning four cast is trump service a from step passengers have he ousted and enforcing it tweets tested as says back a him worst officials from positive the the the the administration's may on case post rule international the will flight scenario cut the just university open three off two from days been them Bangladesh million funding cooperation letting and after when say say more they the it's the if president four still directive safe employers not hope months open was tested to violates to and acquitted do limit who into Europe so positive cite without the by the pandemic number the would the everybody a Senate religious administrative upon immediately work of layoffs arrival with to or more been reform wants procedures saying moral men in than by have one Rome what the testified offering act objection hundred schools the funding UN thirty open before because early opt health now he'd thousand the officials house retirement everybody out agency cut impeachment Italy off failed dead for health panel lower to but under the offer comments the minister that warning hours courts president what he didn't a epitomize reasonable of authority blocked earlier think for possible trump better it said was the basis mayor Esperanza rules furloughs yesterday proper concerns bill changes the president's de justifying went Blasio for the crisis in out trump Europe but been to is some proposing saying the announced High the thirty policy is to Court without demand being over most six evidence has new the that handled New a WHO's thousand ruled foreign and York because Democrats request seven City the government public airline we're students largest to precautionary was are keeping not employees investigate on will the given the contributor schools right only administration measures notice side be closed in former of to class things comment in that acted vice a to preparing letter could as score president two properly include more or political I to to people three Joe pull the just up European Biden notified to out are days fifteen points tested a following Commission week colleges the before government's thousand and more his the of because trump Monday son's the the estimated health positive election administration's flight of that social work international attendants the tests for changes it and the distancing to complains energy be not are suspended to students because would be company cause expected eleven most of will virus flights about that to thousand be respond the forced agency from seventy schools risks but Bangladesh customer experts in to thousand Ukraine leave will too on the service he's not Tuesday US say readily women arguing be if to able or in and accepted lose the a statement gate transfer virus nations birth after agents to control like China's Veneman's the is to another passengers Germany have coverage being all college lawyer explanations on fifty controlled and their in Monday's kids accuses a five year if Norway flight their hundred schools the of president have in the maintenance tested its and percentage operate school reopened at most of positive entirely at running handling the workers schools same of a positive campaign one time with another online hundred of some in tests of no the two twenty cluster clone other bullying thousand this should problems six fall of major ours be linked thousand coming school new two intimidation hundred pieces to down districts Spahn a and returning will sabar fifty plan not has soccer and posted be the it's Bangladeshi retaliation pilots same mag issued going on make ani thing Twitter to students up ani worker Washington across with Washington more at those the forcing online United now schools global nearly comes bin and cannot cooperation men learning the others around to entire lay choose the at a off other dozen universities between not nation days workers less cases adhering before offering outside to is the October Sager sabar needed law a mix Rome first of made mag online to fight Donnie ani or pleasing pandemics I'm and Washington Washington as in Charles a person condition a president the classes of last the I'm five Charles month Ben will billion Thomas the be last barred dollars Washington month from taking it receives all of their in classes federal online aid to help Harvard airlines president cover Lawrence payroll back out says costs the order was cruelty I'm is Ben surpassed Thomas only by its recklessness I'm Julie Walker

Italy Harvard President Trump Germany
Trump ups pressure for schools to reopen

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last week

Trump ups pressure for schools to reopen

"Italy Harvard in president Germany's United the as U. one president S. and of trump its MIT has Airlines health is final trump urging is hit minister demanding another ramps rulings sued is the warning Graham European up to schools pressure of block nearly has this Commission expressed a virus term reopen on the half trump schools of pandemic administration concern the its Supreme to this U. develop fall to S. milestone reopen Court staff better and from is over barring this siding is that threatening fall the coordinated they formal with could international he's the trump vice be federal getting U. furloughed administration president S. measures backlash students notification action pence in to from October from prevent is in against staying a touting New birth York passengers those control in a boost the of that U. its cakes with stay S. it's withdrawal in corona the governor virus clearest closed virus if Andrew the they signal from testing take affordable the Cuomo World classes the yet with writing Care yesterday Health of says more how entirely Act Organization deeply than in school the requires thirty the president E. the openings U. corona nine online insisted most are million virus employers at St this people the yes pandemic students fall call tested provide call mom comes need is off hurting to women period be among back to the at with the says lawsuit those least airline in no it's classes the thirty cost not notification seeks industry six more up to prevent to birth than the it's president control federal time three of out United to immigration the million of do of dural as the two United it a officials preventive seventy this Americans authorities States morning four cast is service a from step passengers have he and enforcing it tweets tested as says back a worst officials positive the the the administration's may on case rule international the will flight scenario cut the university open three off from been them Bangladesh million funding cooperation letting and when say say more they it's the if four still directive safe employers not hope months open tested to violates to and do limit who into Europe so positive cite without the the pandemic number would the everybody a religious administrative upon immediately work of layoffs arrival with to or more reform wants procedures saying moral in than by one Rome what the offering act objection hundred schools the funding UN thirty open because early opt health now he'd thousand officials retirement everybody out agency cut Italy off failed dead for health lower to but under the offer comments the minister warning hours courts president what a epitomize reasonable of authority blocked earlier for possible trump better said the basis mayor Esperanza rules furloughs yesterday concerns bill changes the president's de justifying went Blasio the crisis in out Europe but been to is some proposing saying the announced High the thirty policy is Court without being over most six evidence has new the handled New WHO's thousand ruled and York because Democrats request seven City the public airline we're students largest to precautionary was are keeping not employees on will the given the contributor schools right only administration measures notice side be closed in of to class things comment in that acted a to preparing letter could as score two properly include more or political I to to people three pull the just up European notified to out are days fifteen points tested a following Commission week colleges the before government's thousand more the of because trump Monday the the estimated health positive election administration's flight of that social international attendants the tests changes it and distancing to complains be not are suspended to students because would be cause expected eleven most of will virus flights about that thousand be the forced agency from seventy schools risks but Bangladesh customer experts to thousand leave will too on the service he's not Tuesday US say readily women arguing be if to able or and accepted lose the gate transfer virus nations birth after agents to control like China's the is to another passengers Germany have coverage being all college explanations on fifty controlled and their in Monday's kids a five year if Norway flight their hundred schools of have in the maintenance tested its and percentage operate school reopened at most positive entirely at handling the workers schools same of positive one time with another online hundred of some in tests no the two twenty cluster clone other thousand this should problems six fall of major ours be linked thousand coming school new two hundred pieces to down districts Spahn a and returning will sabar fifty plan not has soccer posted be the it's Bangladeshi pilots same mag issued going on make ani thing Twitter to students up ani worker Washington across with Washington more at those the online United now schools global nearly comes and cannot cooperation learning the others around entire lay the at a off other dozen universities not nation days workers less cases before offering outside is October Sager sabar needed a mix Rome first of made mag online to fight Donnie ani pandemics I'm and Washington Washington as in Charles a person condition the classes of last the I'm five Charles month will billion the be last barred dollars month from taking it receives all of their in classes federal online aid to help Harvard airlines president cover Lawrence payroll back out says costs the order was cruelty I'm is Ben surpassed Thomas only by its recklessness I'm Julie Walker

Italy Harvard President Trump Germany
US hits 3 million positive virus tests

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last week

US hits 3 million positive virus tests

"Italy Harvard in president Germany's United the U. one S. and of trump its MIT has Airlines health is final urging is hit minister demanding another rulings sued is the warning Graham European to schools of block nearly has this Commission expressed a virus term reopen the half trump of pandemic administration concern the its Supreme to this U. develop fall S. milestone Court staff better and from is over barring siding is that threatening the coordinated they formal with could international the trump vice be federal U. furloughed administration president S. measures students notification action pence in to from October prevent is in against staying a touting birth passengers those control in a boost the of that U. its cakes with stay S. it's withdrawal in corona the virus clearest closed virus if the they signal from testing take affordable the World classes the yet with writing Care yesterday Health of more how entirely Act Organization deeply than in the requires thirty the president E. the U. corona nine online insisted most million virus employers this people the yes pandemic students fall call tested provide mom comes need is off hurting to women be among back to the at with the says lawsuit those least airline in no classes the thirty cost notification seeks industry six more to prevent birth than it's control federal time three of out United to immigration the million of do dural as two it a officials preventive seventy this Americans authorities morning four cast is service a from step passengers have he enforcing it tweets tested as back a worst positive the the the administration's may on case rule international the flight scenario cut the university three off from been Bangladesh million funding cooperation letting and say say more they the if four still directive employers not hope months open tested violates to and limit who into Europe positive cite without the the pandemic number would the a religious administrative upon immediately work of layoffs arrival with to or more reform procedures saying moral in than by one Rome what offering act objection hundred the funding UN thirty because early opt health now he'd thousand officials retirement out agency cut Italy off failed dead for health lower to but under the offer comments the minister warning courts president what a epitomize reasonable of authority blocked for possible trump better said the basis Esperanza rules furloughs yesterday concerns changes the president's justifying went the crisis in out Europe but been to is some proposing saying the High the thirty policy is Court without being over six evidence has new the handled WHO's thousand ruled and because Democrats request seven the public airline we're largest to precautionary was are keeping not employees on the given the contributor schools right administration measures notice side closed of to things comment in that acted a to preparing letter could as score properly include more political I to to people pull the just up European notified to out are fifteen points tested following Commission colleges the before government's thousand more the of trump Monday the the estimated health positive election administration's flight that international attendants the tests changes it and to complains be not are suspended to students because would be cause expected eleven of will virus flights about that thousand be the forced agency from seventy risks but Bangladesh customer experts to thousand leave too on the service he's Tuesday US say readily women arguing if to or and accepted lose the gate transfer virus nations birth after agents to control like China's the is another passengers Germany coverage being college explanations on fifty controlled and in Monday's a five year if Norway flight their hundred schools of have the maintenance tested its and percentage operate reopened at most positive entirely handling workers schools of positive one with another online hundred of in tests no the two twenty cluster clone thousand this should problems six fall of ours be linked thousand coming new two hundred pieces to down Spahn a and returning will sabar fifty not has soccer posted be it's Bangladeshi pilots mag issued going on make ani Twitter to students up ani worker Washington across Washington more at those United now schools global nearly comes and cannot cooperation the others around entire lay at a off dozen universities not nation workers less cases before offering outside is October Sager needed a mix Rome first of made online to fight Donnie pandemics I'm and Washington as in Charles a person condition the classes of last the I'm five Charles month will billion the be last barred dollars month from taking it receives all of their in classes federal online aid to help Harvard airlines president cover Lawrence payroll back out says costs the order was cruelty I'm is Ben surpassed Thomas only by its recklessness I'm Julie Walker

Italy Harvard President Trump Germany
United sending layoff notices to nearly half of US employees

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | Last week

United sending layoff notices to nearly half of US employees

"Italy Harvard in president Germany's United one and of trump its MIT Airlines health is final urging is minister demanding rulings sued is the warning European to schools of block nearly has this Commission expressed term reopen the half trump of administration concern the its Supreme to this U. develop fall S. Court staff better and from is over barring siding is that threatening the coordinated they formal with could international the trump be federal U. furloughed administration S. measures students notification action in to from October prevent in against staying a birth passengers those control in the of that U. its cakes with stay S. it's withdrawal corona the clearest closed virus if the they signal from take affordable the World classes the yet writing Care yesterday Health of how entirely Act Organization deeply in the requires the president E. the U. corona online insisted most virus employers this the yes pandemic students fall call provide mom comes need is off hurting to women be back to the at with the says lawsuit least airline in no classes the thirty cost notification seeks industry six to prevent birth it's control federal time of out United to immigration the of do dural as two it a officials preventive seventy this authorities morning four cast is service a from step passengers he enforcing it tweets as back a worst the the the administration's may on case rule international the flight scenario cut the university off from been Bangladesh funding cooperation letting and say say more they the if still directive employers not hope open tested violates to and limit who Europe positive cite without the number would the a religious administrative upon immediately work of layoffs arrival to or reform procedures saying moral in by Rome what offering act objection the funding UN because early opt health now he'd officials retirement out agency cut Italy off failed for health lower to but under the offer comments the minister warning courts what a epitomize reasonable of authority blocked for possible better the basis Esperanza rules furloughs concerns changes the president's justifying went in out Europe but been to is some proposing saying the High the thirty policy Court without over six evidence has new the WHO's thousand ruled and because Democrats request seven the public airline largest to precautionary was are keeping not employees the given contributor schools administration measures notice closed to comment in that acted a to preparing letter could score properly include political I to to pull the just up European notified to out fifteen points following Commission colleges the before government's thousand the of trump Monday the the estimated health election administration's flight that international attendants the changes it and to complains be not suspended students because would cause eleven of will virus flights about that thousand be the forced agency from seventy risks Bangladesh customer to thousand leave too on the service he's Tuesday US readily women arguing to or and accepted lose gate transfer nations birth after agents to control like China's the another passengers Germany coverage college explanations on fifty and in Monday's a five year if Norway flight their hundred schools of have maintenance tested its and operate reopened at most positive entirely handling workers schools one with another online hundred of in no the two twenty cluster clone thousand this problems six fall of ours linked thousand new two hundred pieces to Spahn a and returning will sabar fifty not has soccer posted be Bangladeshi pilots mag issued on make ani Twitter to students ani worker Washington Washington more at those United now schools global comes and cannot cooperation others around lay at a off dozen universities not workers less cases before offering outside is October needed a mix Rome first of online to fight pandemics I'm and as in Charles a person condition the classes of last the I'm five Charles month will billion the be last barred dollars month from taking it receives all of their in classes federal online aid to help Harvard airlines president cover Lawrence payroll back out says costs the order was cruelty I'm is Ben surpassed Thomas only by its recklessness I'm Julie Walker

Italy Harvard President Trump Germany Mit Airlines
Germany laments US exit from WHO, says EU seeks to reform it

AP News Radio

00:43 sec | Last week

Germany laments US exit from WHO, says EU seeks to reform it

"Italy Harvard in president Germany's one and of trump its MIT health is final urging is minister demanding rulings sued the European to schools of block has this Commission expressed term reopen the trump administration concern the Supreme to this develop fall Court better and from is over barring siding is threatening the coordinated formal with international the trump federal U. administration S. measures students notification action to from prevent in against staying a birth passengers those control in the of that U. its cakes with stay S. withdrawal corona closed virus if the they from take affordable the World classes the writing Care yesterday Health entirely Act Organization in the requires the president E. U. online insisted most employers this the yes students fall call provide mom comes need off to women be back to the at with says lawsuit least in no classes the thirty cost notification seeks six to prevent birth it's control federal time of out to immigration the of do dural as two it a preventive seventy this authorities morning four is service a from step passengers he enforcing tweets back the the the administration's may on rule international the flight cut the university off from been Bangladesh funding cooperation letting say more the if directive employers not open tested violates and who Europe positive cite without would the a religious administrative upon immediately work arrival to or reform procedures saying moral in Rome what act objection the funding UN because opt health now he'd officials out agency cut Italy off failed for health lower to under the offer comments minister courts what a epitomize reasonable authority blocked for better the basis Esperanza rules concerns changes the president's justifying in Europe but been is proposing saying the High the policy Court without over evidence has new the WHO's ruled and because Democrats request seven the public largest to precautionary was are keeping not the given contributor schools administration measures notice closed to comment in acted a to preparing letter score properly political I to to pull the just European notified out points following Commission colleges the before government's the of trump Monday the the estimated health election administration's that international the changes it and to complains be not suspended students because would cause of will virus flights about that be the forced agency from seventy risks Bangladesh to thousand leave too on the he's Tuesday US readily women arguing to or accepted lose transfer nations birth after to control like China's the another passengers Germany coverage college explanations on and in Monday's a year if Norway flight their schools of have tested its and operate reopened at most positive entirely handling schools one with another online hundred of no the twenty cluster clone this problems six fall of ours linked thousand new pieces to Spahn a returning will sabar not has soccer posted be Bangladeshi mag issued on make ani Twitter to students ani worker Washington Washington more at those now schools global comes and cooperation others around at a dozen universities not less cases offering outside is needed a mix Rome of online to fight pandemics I'm and in Charles person the classes last I'm Charles month will the be last barred month from taking all of their classes online Harvard president Lawrence back out says the order was cruelty is surpassed only by its recklessness I'm Julie Walker

Italy Harvard President Trump Germany
James Montgomery Boice

5 Minutes in Church History

04:16 min | Last week

James Montgomery Boice

"Welcome back to another episode of five minutes in Church history on this episode we will be in the twentieth century visiting with James Montgomery Boyce. Doctor Boyce was born on July seven, nine, thousand, nine, hundred, thirty, eight. He lived in a bedroom community of Pittsburgh. was quite a high school athlete. His Dad was a doctor and position voice for a fine education as a high school student voice was sent to the Stony Brook School and New York. He was mentored by Frank E. Gabe line, Biblical, scholar and theologian in his own right. Well after Stony Brook Voice went to Harvard for his undergraduate, and then he went to Princeton for his give. After that he was on his way to Basel for a PhD in theology while he was in Basel all there were a group of people who pressured him to start a Bible study, and he started a Bible study that became a church and to this day there is an evangelical church there in Basel that great, reformation city. And there's a church there founded by doctor. Boyce well. He graduated from Basel and Nineteen. Sixty six and two years later in nineteen, sixty eight, he was installed as the Minister of Philadelphia's Tenth Presbyterian Church near Rittenhouse Square on Spruce Street and Philadelphia Historic Church its. Spire went way into the sky, and its organ and its pipes could be heard throughout the city on a Sunday morning. Well in the nineteen seventies and nineteen, seventy, four to be exact Boyce started the Philadelphia Conference on Reformed Theology. And in those early years people would gather there and intense church to hear John, Gersh ner and a young RC sprawl and J I packer and others, this constellation of reformed theologians in Nineteen, seventy, eight, a number of them joined together informed. The International Council for Biblical and A boy served as the chairman Dr. Scroll served as the President and see put out the Chicago statement on an errand see. They established themselves for a ten year run, and that was the life they had a voice also helped establish the Alliance for confessing evangelicals and nineteen ninety-four. That group stood strong against the evangelicals and Catholics together document, and took a stand for justification by faith alone well, in addition to those organizations. We have the books that doctor. Boyce wrote one of them. Foundations of the Christian faith is his systematic theology. It's billed as a comprehensive and readable theology. He also wrote renewing your mind in a mindless age, and another one of his books to cities to loves is subtitled Christian responsibility and a crumbling culture in addition to those books. He was known for his. Commentaries these of course grew out of his many sermons preached from Nineteen Sixty eight to the year two thousand from the pulpit of Tenth Presbyterian Church. She did a five volume series on John that was published a four volume series on Romans, two volumes on the minor prophets, three volumes on genesis and three volumes on the psalms. They're also commentaries on acts flippy in Nehemiah, Joshua Equations and Philippians and a few more books well Dr Voice was married to Linda. They had three daughters, nineteen, eighty, eighty-two Linda and Dr, Boyce. The city. Centre Academy School there in Philadelphia. On the morning of Good Friday, April twenty, one, two thousand Doctor Boyce was diagnosed with cancer. He died eight weeks later on June fifteen, two thousand. During those eight weeks he had one more thing to write in. There were hymns. He wrote thirteen in all. One of them is entitled Hallelujah. The other come to the waters, an invitation for all who have no money, but are thirsty, and those who have no funds about are hungry to come to the waters to come to the fountain to drink freely of Christ.

James Montgomery Boyce Tenth Presbyterian Church Philadelphia Stony Brook School Basel Stony Brook Voice Philadelphia Historic Church John Frank E. Gabe Line New York Harvard Spire Pittsburgh. Dr Voice International Council Rittenhouse Square Centre Academy School Princeton Gersh Ner Joshua Equations
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

05:52 min | 2 weeks ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"Walk into the Hobbit. Kennedy School Policy Cost I'm your host Togo morial. Judy Today on Kenny school professor's and Jacqueline Baba both at the Harvard Kennedy, School Carson Tougher Human Rights Policy, not not history governments of US crises to consolidate and cement power. Yet while some official actions, Nyquist Britain movement ramping up surveillance curtailing freedom assembly emplacing this can be a cause for concern. They also helpful in trying to manage control catastrophes such as the Code Nineteen pandemic. Professors risks and Baba say that while some of these measures may be temporarily necessary to prevent loss of life. Safeguards must be put in place to.

Jacqueline Baba Kennedy School School Carson Tougher Togo morial Harvard Kennedy Judy Today US professor official
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

08:35 min | 3 months ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"With them officials in the Western Cape. What's the role of politics in all of this? I mean this is sort of competing. Motivations that politically driven The question I can expand in terms of what? I'm mean you know we see here in the US that you know. They are interests that are being used to in terms of the decisions. Made when I think of some countries in Africa where you into the issue of politics She May You winning the next election. They are actually be that important initiative for leader. Because you if you're an incumbent you're most likely going to be turned so maybe less of a motivation who to do the lightnings in the crisis because the stakes that high How about politics in this context? I think it's really difficult because I think that actually we had we had zoom cold earlier and one of the questions that was raised was like. What do you deal with spoilers? What do you deal with politics in the case that you're going to have a bunch of people actually even incumbent party's who gain to see this as an opportunity and and you could potentially have people in the opposition party? Your party. Who are instructing the people not to listen who instructing the people to do different things and one of the things you're trying to do is get a single trusted message that everybody is behind the other thing that is interesting and other dimensions. Sometimes we we actually had an opposition party official from country on the call and he said but what happens. If you think spoiler but all I'm trying to do is put what I think is legitimate idea. So that was that was something people race where they said you know. We are trying to do this work and we have people telling us we're doing it wrong. And they're getting in the way all they obstructing the message or they obstructing the supply chain. They doing something to spoil the process That that's kind of what the term is and this person said. Look I'm trying to. I have some ideas that I'm trying to communicate into government from the opposition party on not at the table. No one would invite me to table high to bring my dear to the table so I think this is actually tremendously complicated. Because I think you do have you do have a politics right now. That can get in the way if people start to play too much politics right now. It can get in the way one idea that I have for some people as I say look. I think that parties should try to invite people from opposition parties into these discussions into these advisory processes. The people who empower the president or the provincial premia or the school district commissioner. They'll they'll get the ones you have to decide and we need to. We need to leave them to decide that they would probably be very well positioned all very very well advised to try and bring people from opposition parties and opposition voices because sometimes even within the NGO communities. They organized politics but they have different voices. Bring them into that advisory process. Bring them into that discussion process so that they at least part of the process the process. Mattis. What is that? Is that realistic. I guess you know these are unprecedented time. So one hopes that you know your lead behaving in a different way for holiday list equity is if very often in the number of countries. Ngos civil society position ponds up one at onto the job. Not Talking to gather or sharing ideas in constructing way. How in your experience? How competitive she happened. So you know. Here's what I will say. Is You know whether you say it's realistic. Lit say on a scale of what percentage likelihood is again to happen in most times. We'd say this kind of thing. I'm suggesting there's zero percent chance that this is going to happen now. I think we need to move into the into into the world we. I think you're GONNA see this happening but it's not gonNA happen as much as we needed to happen. That's that's the truth. It's very very hard to do. I think that when you have seen gigantic crosses in places before you do find that people's thoughts leave aside the The the The differences and they do come together because they realize that people are dying and I do think that that does happen. I have spoken to people this week. Who have said that Even even when the country faced the two thousand eight crosses across the Middle East some countries faced the Arab spring later on and they had crossed season. Those crosses did not bring people together. They telling me that this is looking a little different in quite a few countries right now. That people coming together. I do want to suggest that one of the key ingredients for this is leadership. I think the people who have power need to extend olive branches to people and say come and be part of this with us. I think that if you a forcing those other voices two shots at you from the outside and to criticize you they will do those things and they will party do those things because they themselves off your full. They will partly do those things. Because they know that politics can be about stoking fear but if you bring them into your tent and if you include them in those conversations and this is going to require humility by the people who are in power I think that it is it. Is You who needs to be the first movement in doing this. How many countries will do this talk? Oh I don't know how many countries need to do this because this is something that is a virus that is not hitting people based on their political for the Asian. This is Equal Opportunity Virus. Everyone is going to be affected by this. And if we clock get people together than it is going to haunt us nine some cases just to say I think there is a role full outside is if the government is really routinely not doing the right thing if the government is putting its own political fortunes ahead of others if the government is not responding if the government is not engaging experts if the government doesn't seem to be providing clear messages. I think that is actually a very uncomfortable. But important role Rut now four civil society and for opposition parties to take a position on that and to come with their their truth and to speak their truth to their people. It should not be done is in a cheap way though. It should not be done in a way to say we are going to bring you down. It should be done in a way to say we all get to force you to be truthful with the people right now. That is a role that is important where governments are not being truthful and not engaging accurately with their people and Matt when you look at on some developments that we've seen from bake multilateral financier such as will bank setting aside billions of Donna's for Kobe nineteen response if you advising them not as a global public health expert but as you know sort of thinking about some of the other areas that meeting thinking about where would you say some of that Funding could be used in the context off target ship in critical rule. That you might find right here so I'm actually not a public health expert at all. My work has more in public management and leadership. So but I I would say firstly The awesome great pieces. That will be written right now by some economists at Harvard Ricardo Hausmann has done something very interesting this week. The is a A series coming out Through some affiliates Danny Rodrick with multiple articles in the school but also leverage faculty all over the world who are trying to advise on where we need to be to be spending money in the future what we need to support. I have a very simple message is. We need to support state capability states matter. What I have seen in in development in a long long period of time is that a multilateral have said we'll support you if you deregulate we will support you if you decrease the size of government. We will support you if you if you produce results. And we'll we'll tell money to results. The results are short-term things. What we don't want is more short term results. We want long-term capability wants states that have systems that can that can achieve an example of what I think. The kind of change you need in development is relates to health care. We have made huge advances. And I don't want anybody to him. Criticizing people cheaply have made huge advances in health in developing countries. Whoa kids immunized them wherever immunize before the the The the mortality rates of kids.

government US Africa Middle East official president Ricardo Hausmann Harvard Danny Rodrick commissioner Kobe Donna Matt
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

13:16 min | 5 months ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"Hello and welcome to the Harvard Kennedy School Policy Cost. I'm your host Tumble Moyle. The Code Nineteen Corona virus has spread from Asia to Europe and the Middle East and appears to have the features of a pandemic. But it's not the first global crisis humanity has faced an expose. It won't be the last man storm. Cyber threats rising seas. We'll have a world. Were planning for the next. Disaster is a key to survival. So is there a playbook for responding to a global crisis? Are Disinformation an irrational fear? Making things harder for disaster planners today we're joined by Harvard Kennedy School Senior Lecturer. Julia Qaim Dude. It teaches consult some crisis preparedness and Response and she joins me to talk about the best ways to prepare for the worst..

Harvard Kennedy School Tumble Moyle Senior Lecturer Julia Qaim Middle East Asia Europe
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

13:15 min | 5 months ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"Eight -ment that we're living through very interesting times just about everywhere you go in the. US and outside people are trying to make sense of the confusing political times with lots of questions like is populism about to slay. Democracy is public support for democracy flagging in favor of authoritarian leaders. How can democracy function with the decline of truth and proliferation of conspiracies? Well Harvard Kennedy School Professor Arkan Funk has been looking into these questions his research explores policies practices and institutions. That helped make democracy work better. His latest work focuses on today's American political climate. He's is my guest today. You've written a paper that examines the political moment differ and you're exploring a period that we've entered the posture for years which is dramatically different from the previous. Say Forty years and you call it appeared of wide aperture low deference democracy. Let's just start with first piece white aperture. What does that mean? What talking about that? Yeah so you know I I Start writing this paper a way to sort out in my own head. What I thought about how the State of democracy that were in and probably like a lot of people around the Kennedy School and maybe some people listening to this podcast? We're a little confused and feeling a fairly high state of anxiety about looking around at the democratic. Seen that we're in but what exactly is different. I'm from the moment that came before. And what is the moment that came before and this is in the. US annacone tonight. Mostly I'm thinking about the US. But I think many of these ideas or the sensibility also applies to what's happening in places in Europe especially England but also other places and the first characteristic that I see happening is I describe it as a wide aperture world and some of your listeners. Who who are a little bit younger? Maybe you don't know what an aperture is. The aperture is a hole in an old film camera and the wider. The whole is more light it lets in and the narrower the whole is the less light it lets in and I'm thinking of the prior era in Democratic Democrat governance which I'm thinking of roughly one thousand nine hundred eighty two two thousand and sixteen in the United States from Reagan to the end of the Obama era as a fairly narrow aperture aperture world in which in the halls of Washington or among political leaders are experts. There's a fairly narrow range of debate. Ah between the centre left and centre right. And after two thousand fifteen in two thousand and sixteen that is after Brexit and the election of Donald Trump to the president of the United States and in our current Democratic primary season. It's very wide aperture world in the sense ends that the range of political and policy ideas that are on the table is much much broader than in that prior era and indeed in that prior prior era many many of these ideas by leading national figures would have been regard indeed were regarded as ridiculous more or rather absurd certainly not feasible not worthy of discussion among serious policy. Give me an idea of some of these ideas that just would not. aww made it to the table. Sure so one idea. I'll begin with a couple of them. One is Andrew Yang's idea the universal basic income. which was it's not his idea? Actually the one of the first people to propose it in a rigorous way is a philosopher named Felipe. Vampire easson famous article famous among philosophers. I called should surfers be fed and he's FSP should surfers Bafana's question was well. Would it be the right thing to do in public policy for Ramallo boost surfer. Who all he or she wants to do is surf? All Day has no interest in working to receive a universal basic income that is from the government a check of love. However much you want you know maybe five ten thousand dollars a month so that he or she could continue surfing? Would that be a good public policy. And Philippe said yes indeed. That would be a good good public policy. We should adopt the universal basic income. And I remember talking about the universal basic income to friends at the Kennedy School and to a one all of them regarded As absurd why would you even be talking about that. And now one of the Democratic primary candidates it's his major platform proposal is a universal basic income. Andrew under Yang of course is not one of the two or three leaders in the Democratic primaries according to polls right now but senators warn and Sanders our Senator Warren earn has notably proposed a significant proportion of seats on corporate boards be representatives of Labor and Organized Labor that proposal so I think is novel for the United States not for Europe but novel for the United States and I I hadn't heard anybody in the Obama administration our prior administrations. I consider that proposal seriously and my my intuition is that it would not have been taken seriously in the pre two thousand fifteen two thousand sixteen. The era as like similar to a wealth tax or indeed Medicare for all is it is a itself a novel proposal and on the right wing of the spectrum backtrack and of course you have a lot of proposals. A lot of policies now being pursued by the trump administration which center right administrations and centre-right leaders. I certainly didn't regard is very sensible policies prior to the election of Donald Trump. And he's saying you'll pay for that. A lot of summation institutions have been leapfrogged wronged by this course of events. What what does that mean? What what do you mean by that so? I think it's interesting that well. They're mainstream institutions like the Democratic Party and the Republican Publican Party and policy intellectuals in social policy and foreign policy and economic policy and social policy. We've all keyed Our thinking to that prior era of you have to if you want to engage in serious policy debates with the policy thinkers and available politics of the day and so have reformed groups like the more conservative side the American Enterprise Institute or the Heritage Foundation on the more Progressive Side Center for a new America or for American progress or reform groups like common cause of which I am on the board full disclosure. We all AW. He'd our discussion and our thinking to center left and center right policy discussion. And if you're a conservative advocate you're trying to pull the the centre-right a little more to the right and if your left or progressive advocate you're trying to pull the center left a little more to the left but in a lot wide but it's a lot wider now and if you look at the national debate in the United States I believe what's happened. Is that the national debate and discussion on both the right if you like and certainly on the progressive side have leapfrogged the advocacy groups and policy intellectuals of that prior era and so organized labor even organized labor wasn't talking about seriously. It wasn't a major proposal to advance the idea of of Labor representation on corporate boards right so in that sense they've been leapfrogged by Senator Warren and so they don't know how to react to that. I think they're adjusting adjusting some of them. But I think for all of us who have been accustomed to that to the prior decades a rare of a relatively constrained debate it is stretching our intellectual muscles and sometimes emotional muscles. So we'll see we'll come back to a minute off to talked about the difference. How we yeah? She got here but I'm just curious to hear we talk about this. I mean what are the implications of this. I mean surely one hearing the idea of wider range of ideas at the table wide inclusion of more diverse perspectives. One could say is a good thing. What are the implications? What do you think about all of this happening? Well how how you come down on whether the wider aperture is a good or bad thing and I think they're good and bad aspects to it depends on whether you think. Thank the views that are were excluded from. The narrow aperture were excluded for good reasons or bad reasons. So if you think you know with the wisdom of hindsight hindsight and everything you can muster to bear on the question that yes the the reasonable positions that would be discussed in advanced industrial industrial. Democracy are those positions that are covered by the center left to the center. Right between one thousand nine hundred and two thousand and sixteen that yeah. We basically had the debate right and that was what could should reasonable people. Well informed people should discuss. Then you think the white aperture world is a disaster because all all of these views come in and they're either irrational views or wildly implausible views or discriminatory views and they were excluded in the prior era. And you you think on this from this perspective. They were rightly excluded. And now it's it's a terrible thing that all of these views are coming in. I happen to think that usually usually all things being equal. A wider debate is better for Small D democracy than a smaller debate and that some of the views entering the debate. Right now how are views that were improperly disregarded during the more stable period from one thousand nine hundred eighty two two thousand and sixteen and we'll examine that in a bit more detail talk about. How do we actually get here? What were some of the features that she led us to to this current situation? But it's the second piece of paper which is the low deference. So what are you talking about that. And what do you mean so this. I'm a little bit less sure about and I'd be interested in what your listeners think. I think that a a second major change a second characteristic of the Post Two thousand sixteen era. And it's been coming for a long time is that we live in quite a low deference deference world in which many people from many walks of life are deeply suspicious of organized institutions and into hierarchies of data's or intellectual achievement or expertise or political accomplishment. So just in the political domain nine one way in which this is a low deference world is that many of the leaders ascending to the national stage or close to it are people who come outside died of from almost from the margins of the political apparatus and the political parties that they nominally serve so I regard. Donald trump is definitely political insurgent from the point of view of the mainstream of the Democratic of the. I'm sorry Oh the Republican Party. At that time mm-hmm I regard senators warn and Sanders as coming from the fringes of the mainstream of the Democratic Party. I regard Dr Jeremy Corbyn in the UK in the UK. And even Boris. Johnson is not the candidates that the party stalwarts would have immediately pro preferred and even although relatively centrist in policy terms manual McCall and France. His Great Ah political achievement. What happened in that election is he decimated the main political formations that had dominated French politics for most of the postwar period? And so this is politically right now for the last few years. The era of the insurgent insurgent candidates on the national stage and that insurgency is a manifestation of a low deference politics and that low difference politics reflects low load deference for many received institutions in the United States Public opinion polls show very low trust in mainstream media I think the average respondents in a win one pew survey something like a quarter to thirty percent of Americans trusted mainstream media a lot. And it's something like twelve or thirteen percent of Republicans and thirty three percent of Democrats or something like that. So so trust in media is very very low trust I in Congress has been low for some time but is in I think the teens on a on a good day So trust in a lot of these institutions to swallow that. There's there's no trust in some quarters of the net positive of universities and colleges yeah Puke conducted an interesting survey a couple of years ago in which they asked asked maybe it was only a year ago in which they asked. Do you think colleges and universities are have a net positive or negative effect on the nation and the result. It was something like sixty seven percent of Democrats and Democratic Party..

US Donald Trump Democratic Party Kennedy School Europe Harvard Kennedy School Labor and Organized Labor Andrew Yang Senator Warren Sanders Professor Arkan Funk Republican Party FSP Dr Jeremy Corbyn Congress Ramallo Obama Felipe
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

12:25 min | 6 months ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"So this year's tagline was time for action and it does come at a time when there's been more and more scientific evidence to show that they are devastating effects of climate change on land oceans and societies. So we started off by saying that you thought it was a moderate moderate success. Let's talk a little bit about the sort of hopes expectations of goals of the meeting. Going in so they were twofold. I mean there were the popular popular press and from the activists expectations and hopes and those. We're four statements in what is called. The decision was just means. The statement statement comes out at the end of the COP with no legal force statement. That comes out at the end. The decision that they wanted a statement that countries where committed to coming up with much more ambitious targets a year from now in two thousand nine hundred eighty when the next set of targets will be submitted at the next cop so that was for them and that definitively did not happen. And that's why those individuals I think much of the press because that's a pretty obvious sort of thing to talk about is. What are the targets? What's the aspiration have characterized it as a terrible failure? I Know The New York Times did this morning but for those people both negotiators and for those of us on the outside in NGOs and universities who are very engaged in the process and in research what we were looking got much more was the actual text of the Paris Agreement. What wasn't completed and what needed to be completed just in order to achieve the targets that they already have pledged let alone thinking about the next set of targets and that was something very specific in particular and it ties in the note with the notion of international personal carbon markets? So there's one portion of the Paris agreement which is article six or you need to be more picky article. Six point two that provides for countries to cooperate with one another so that one country can help another country to accomplish something and then the a country that does the helping contain credit for that against. Its pledge that it's made okay so said another way if you are performing poorly on your targets. It's you could set up a deal with a country. That's over performing their targets. And Somehow get I mean how they wouldn't necessarily be. The country was performing poorly. They might be performing perfectly but nevertheless that they could finance. What's taking place in another country so it's a matter of finance in fact it's as a means of foreign direct investment so it just means that the incremental costs when economists call the marginal cost of reducing co two emissions vary tremendously mendaciously across different countries? And that's because the modern economies were already very energy efficient and so there isn't a lot of low hanging fruit but if if you go to other parts of the world there is low-hanging fruit their lot. That can be done at relatively low cost. So that means if you're in one of these countries where it's very costly you could finance finance things being done and one of those other countries that's to everyone's benefit if it's voluntary on both sides and it's a means of foreign direct investment into those countries which of course they're very happy about the big issue there though is to make sure that both countries don't take credit for that same emissions reduction. Okay that there isn't double-counting counting right. That's where the Paris agreement comes in. That's what article six point two is potentially about our accounting measures to prevent double-counting counting that was not completed. That's the one part of the Paris Agreement. What's called the rule book? which is the text of the rules that was not completed last year in Katowice? It was punted to this year. So for the condescending for those of us who are really involved a lot in the Paris agreement in the negotiations the goal all was to complete article six. That's what it was about and was it completed. An article six was not completed. But I'm going to tell I'll give you a caveat an important caveat. I was not completed because Brazil and Australia. Saudi Arabia in particular wanted some aspects in in there that would have introduced loopholes that would allow double-counting. And so what I take as the good news. That's why I say you know. Qualified success is that rather than producing what would have been a bad deal They produced no deal. And I'm very serious about that. We did research here Eh. At Harvard years ago with colleagues at at Tufts University and and MIT in which we said what needed to be in the Paris Agreement on this issue of sharing responsibility bringing down costs. And we said the first important thing is that they not put in the following kind of items which would make everything worse uh-huh and that didn't happen so in that sense that I think it's a qualified success that we even though there's no deal. There's still a possibility for it at the next meeting at the next meeting. So you think that something had happened in the next twelve months before Glasgow to get to a point where you have the sort of accounting rules or standards that could get article six done. That's exactly right. I think that that can happen. I wouldn't say that I think will happen because there's political opposition to it happening so let's talk a little bit about the voices at these talks so the most obvious sort of divide as it were would be between developed and developing nations. How does that play out? I mean who who who gets a talk here and and who gets listened to so that's an exceptionally important point as it is in the United Nations in general so you know as an economist whereas normally most of the analysis we do and whether it's teaching in the classroom or its research on the outside or it's conversations with government are focused on on efficiency issues but when you get get into climate change the international aspects the the aspects of equity of distributional equity are extremely important. Going all the way back to the beginning nineteen ninety-two to Brazil. Summit there is a very important principle in the overarching document. The United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change. Which is Although Woods Global Commons problem? Were all in it together. Nevertheless there there are common but there are differentiated responsibilities. Different countries have contributed different amounts to the accumulated stock. United States is number one China's second and there are different capabilities different wealth so that principle is exceptionally important and everyone in the negotiations recognizes. That having said that as you said Ed that there has been in the past polarization between the industrialized countries in the developing countries and that was codified in the Kyoto Protocol because only the industrialized countries series has responsibilities under Paris. It's much more of an even playing field. Although obviously some countries particularly the European Union take on much much more aggressive targets than do poor countries certainly countries in sub Saharan Africa from my point of view Nina. Do anything I mean their contributions are small and they're mired in terrible poverty so there is that differentiation remains but there are lots of other constituencies at play a very important one are the small island states. Because you know for most countries in the world ranging from the United States to the European Union to even the Gulf oil states when we talk about addressing climate change. We're talking about an increase in cost to our economy or a reduction in productivity for the small island states climate changes existential. Oh so it's at a whole `nother level of concern so their voice is very important in although they are very small in terms of population although although they are very small in terms of their share of global gross domestic product. They're actually very vocal and very effective. I'd say in the talks folks remember one. Last point is that under the rules of the United Nations Voices are all one country. One vote The united nited States has the same vote as the smallest country in the world. So just one more question just looking at the actual meeting so another thing. That's being that we're getting used to seeing the protests and demonstrators and I know in Madrid. One session you had. Protesters actually stormed the session. And you we read a lot about the protas oh to sell on the streets. Is that actually having an impact. Is that sort of pressure. Having an impact on the deliberations and the progress that that could be made. Well I think it certainly provides support for example for the small island states in the countries that wanted the most aggressive pledges to be made because because they feel tremendous support there i. I don't think it had any effect on the pace of the negotiations themselves except that you know they were disrupted opted for a few hours that one afternoon other than that. I don't think it has any particular influence. I'm not making a judgment with that. Maybe it should. Maybe it shouldn't I didn't but I don't think it does okay and so we've talked a little bit about your an environmental economist. Why is the economic perspective important in environmental issues? And what are some of the things that you think about an necessarily what's in your research. Well what I'd start by saying that. The causes of environmental environmental problems whether it's economics or has local hazardous wastes. The causes of environmental problems are essentially economic. It's a result of the fact that that there are unintentional Negative aspects consequences factors that are result of fundamentally meritorious. CBS activity by private firms. Making the products or the services that you and I want to buy and sometimes the result of consumers when they're using those products. aww They are external to the decision making which is why economists referred to environmental pollution as an extra analogy and if the there are also then consequences of environmental pollution that have economic dimensions so surely if the causes of environmental pollution are fundamental economic which they are and if the consequences of environmental pollution of important economic dimensions than that would suggest that an economic perspective can be helpful for understanding ending those problems fully. But you know we're sitting here at the Harvard Kennedy School Not at the Department of Economics in the Faculty of Arts and Sciences so it's not understanding just for understanding handing sake. It's understanding so that we can make the difference And the way that this understanding can make a difference is to identify public the policies that are effective mb effective. I mean they reduce pollutant emissions. They don't simply demonize the bad guys that they are economically. Sensible by which I mean. They're cost effective that we don't shoot ourselves in the foot and spend more than we have to after all we don't really care about environment we care about the cost list of education healthcare food fuel and a thousand other things and that perhaps they're more likely to be politically pragmatic. I think this economic perspective Jeff although it's not the only legitimate perspective surely can be helpful in those regards. So you mentioned the private sector in that actually and we haven't talked about that one. What role does the private sector have? Instead of. The the solutions in a changing world sort of actions are required. And what sort of actions that private sector taking well the private sector plays an extremely important role because that's where the emissions for the most part. Come from either actually from private industry from manufacturing electricity. Here's the degeneration or from products that they produce such as motor vehicles so their role is exceptionally important. I've long Viewed had the view that Only working through the market can much be accomplished. You know that's why if I may say back in one thousand nine hundred eighty eight when I first joined the faculty at the Kennedy School Previous Dean Graham Allison.

Paris United Nations United States New York Times Katowice European Union Glasgow Harvard united nited States Madrid Dean Graham Allison Saudi Arabia Brazil Jeff Kennedy School Harvard Kennedy School CBS
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

09:27 min | 9 months ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"Just aware want solve the problem think of healthy e being are exercising just being aware that we shouldn't eat more than two thousand calories or one thousand five hundred calories depending on on people size is not always easy for us to live up virtuous intentions hello and welcome to the Harvard Kennedy School policy cost I'm your host Moyle today I'm very pleased to welcome irrespon- It who was the CO director of the Women and Public Policy Program here at the Kennedy school she's also academic Dean Ariza's a behavioral economist and a leading research into gender bias as she's giving out some tough advice recently to government anti-big corporations stop wasting your money on traditional diversity training programs because they don't work it turns out that the matter how enlightened we think we are researchers that regardless of race agenda we are all pretty much affected by unconscious bias however there's some good news to using behavioral design and organizations can create better prices that help prevent US imperfect humans from making bias decisions welcome to policy cost in your work Qalat about unconscious bias being one of the drivers of the reasons that we don't have as many women in leadership positions would want this is start at the very beginning what is unconscious ice and how is it affecting women the first of all thanks very much for having me it's a pleasure to talk more about our work on how can debiasi how we live how we learn in how we work so unconscious bias is very much part of the human mind sets and that's in many ways good and bad news in that good news is that this is about all of us had noticed that is about all of us I I'm saying that in the sense that the unconscious the shared by people this is not about pointing fingers at particular people exclusive to one group no not at all not at all and it has to do with DS images that we have of certain individuals today fit the category that I have in mind when I want to hire a conductor whenever hire an assistant to hire physician as a seeing very much believing and if we don't see people can fitting into certain cats agrees we don't imagine that is right for them so let's make a more concrete so when we talk about women in the workplace give me an example of what the research of the evidence shows in terms of unconscious bias and how it affects women so in our universities now use of Harry Simple Exercise to help our students understand what unconscious bias es in a matter of minutes really we do a case study with them about Heidi Royston. Heidi Rosen is a venture capitalist real person Wilko's enter capitalist in Silicon Valley and is the case that he that most of our listeners would have seen before that describes what she did how she built it enterprises how she network invalid center and then if you colleagues of ours took discuss that each was written by Kathleen Mcginn of the Harvard Business School originally and replaced lady's name of Howard and now we give half of our students to case idealistic protagonist being cold Heidi and the other half protagonist being called Howard and students don't is prepared case but also evaluate how well Heidi and Howard did and students agree that both Heidi and Howard did a great job in fact because the same person there same person that's exactly right there's nothing different really auditor names but men and women and that's important to note men and women agreed that height is it's not quite as likable as Howard we less likely to want to hire her I want to work with her well and this is based on the same information that's based on the exact same formation and the reasoning that Heidi doesn't quite conform with our stereotypes of what typical venture capitalists looks like Grosso stereotypes for a good woman does has interesting and this was both men and women because you'd expect that maybe men would say that but women held the same view about what a woman what a venture capitalist could be what a good woman is yes exactly so there are nuances so there are some gender differences in terms of the sex or gender of the observer but they're much much smaller than most people think so most people in fact I would think that men are more likely to associate things men women are more likely are more lenient judging women but we don't actually find that so is it possible I mean that that's that's quite something so is it possible then to change minds excite imagine that you'd want to try and work on changing people's idea of what a venture capitalist is You know what a good woman is I mean can you do that yet sadly is real the hard so the first part of my research focused on research not my own on just evaluating the research out there on whether in fact diversity training is possible take train out by from our mindsets and unfortunately at the time and I wrote the book my book what works in Two Thousand Sixteen I had found one single study evaluating diversity training that works now you know could be to explanations one is it really doesn't work and I'll give you some reasons why I think it might actually not work so well but secondly an important message it also is that we don't measure nearly enough you know most organizations just do diversity training so to speak finely ever evaluating impact is it possible that the diversity training that you look that was just bad I mean better diversity training might have resulted in that that's possible that is totally possible that somebody has come up with diversity training that wasn't evaluated that number has discovered the secret sauce but table economist and in behavioral science we have been trying to so to speak fixed mindsets not just in terms of gender bias but lots of other is is cognitive biases so we've been trying to fix mindsets for a very long time with relatively little success and the problem is that we don't typically of our better better selves Superego so to speak sitting on our shoulders and whisper into our ears whenever you want we are about to fall into those traps I find that quite scary actually and I we're GonNa get to good news piece but you always imagine that there's a possibility to change someone's mindset in that you know you do enough of the right things that you could do it but if you're starting from the premise that I see you can't so where do we go from there so let me maybe for some nuances I'm not saying that we cannot at least open some hearts and minds and making people aware of some of these shoes and I think that's in many ways kind of good news I think the more complicated news is that just awareness want solve the problem and you know think of an example an totally different example from a different domain as in healthy eating or exercising just being aware that we shouldn't eat more than two thousand areso one thousand five hundred calories depending on people size day doesn't necessarily mean that we won't have ice cream tonight and that's the same problem that is intention action gap is real for human beings and that is not always easy for us to live up to our virtuous intentions so in that sense does nothing ah very different about gender bias compared to many otherwise it's just hard then to move beyond awareness we have to give people the tools to make those virtuous intentions and reality that's quite an idea I mean the estimates say I think about eight billion is spent in the US diversity training so that's quite a mine shift what sort of things are you advising when you talk to Corpus NGOs et Cetera the money that they're spending on diversity training what are the things that do work yes it's definitely um literally checking the box as having short half hour one hour online training to to longer types of interventions but yes it question is how how do we move beyond diversity training what more can we do and there I would very strongly argued that we have the Debiasi our systems instead of trying to de by our mindsets okay so let's talk about that some more what what does that look like him so maybe it's easy you just go oh no in fact let me start with a concrete example and then maybe we can talk a bit about the workplace but I wanted to take a bit of a detour and just give an example of how uh-huh simple these interventions can be so one of the Very salient examples comes from orchestras in the seventies of our bigger symphony orchestras in this country have introduced curtains and have had musicians audition behind the curtain these blind audition nhs have in fact increase the fraction of human musicians in our major.

Harvard Kennedy School Heidi Royston Women and Public Policy Progra Heidi Rosen Dean Ariza Moyle director Qalat Kennedy school Silicon Valley Wilko one thousand five hundred calo two thousand calories one hour
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

11:56 min | 10 months ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"I actually think it's not about trust. I think it's about respect the people across the table from you have interests you may not think they're legitimate interest but they have interests and they have politics that they have to deal with and I need to understand that and I want them to understand my interests and my politics and see if we can find a place where some of their interests can be addressed but I never lose sight of the objective which in the case of Iran was to make sure they never have a nuclear weapon the hello and welcome to the Harvard Kennedy School policy cost. I'm your host talk. Moyo today joined by Ambassador Wendy Sherman who is professor of the practice of public leadership and the Director of the Kennedy School Center for Public Leadership Ambassador Sherman served as Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs at the United States Department of State between two thousand eleven and two thousand fifteen during her remarkable career. She has been at the table for some of the most. It's challenging negotiations in recent history. She's held talks with the late. North Korean detail Kim Jong Il she sat across the table with Iranian officials to hammer route the twenty fifty nuclear weapons deal and she's bought what she's learned about authentic leadership diplomacy and succeeding as a woman in a male dominated field to a new you book which is titled. Not for the faint of heart lessons encourage power amp assistance. Welcome to policy cost embassador chairman. It's great to be with Talker so my first question given your diplomat has to be about protocal. May I call you Andy Ambassador so let's let's start with the reflections so you've worked as a diplomat. You've been at the table and some of the most challenging negotiations what's the common thread. What a some of the things things that you think about nausea look back on those times in the work that you've done particularly in the context of you coming to the Kennedy School teaching courses on negotiation and leadership well. It's very interesting that you ask that because about to teach my first course here at the Kennedy School in the second half of the fall semester and it's called leadership. I've been negotiations away from the table. Everything you need to know to get the job done and the reason for the courses that a lot of students think that the way you really get a deal done is to be in the room at the table. The table when in fact it is all the things that happen away from the table that really get the job done in any negotiation and what are some of those things some of those things include the history the norms the culture of the parties sitting at the table. people negotiate differently depending on their culture. The history among and between parties may have a lot to do whether there's any respect at the table let alone alone trust it has to do with politics and power Do you understand the power relationships. Do you understand all the stakeholders. Do you understand the politics that are playing out not only in in our country been in any other country or with any other party in the context of their organization Tation. It has to do with policy development. what's going to be your objective at the negotiation. What are the right and left guard rails. How will you know if you succeed and it also has to do with setting the table all the tools that archer disposal to set the table including your arena which is communications and public affairs affairs can very much shape what happens in the room so this a little bit about some of those elements in detail so culture. I know when I was reading your book talk a little bit about the cultures of interplay that came into the negotiations for the Iran nuclear deal and you talked about one specific example about how women and men don't shake hands and you did the you put your hand to your chest in a little bow. That's an example what other examples of of culture and sort of interplay and impact that that you've seen happen. I'd start in the Iran situation with history. Most Americans think that history begins in nineteen seventy nine when the Iranians took Americans hostage for four hundred forty four days at the start of the Iranian revolution in fact for the Iranians history starts back in the nineteen fifties when the United States working with British intelligence knocked off democratically elected prime minister are because we were afraid that Iran was going to nationalize all the oil and make it difficult for us and for Great Britain so the Iranians hostility towards the United States historically started long before hours because we put in place the Shah of Iran who was whereas very good to the United States but truly a horrible dictator to his people and brought about the Iranian Revolution in the case of with North Korea. The United States obviously fought a war on the side of South Korea against the north the north at at the time of the Korean War was the growing economy in the southwest the poor economy now the south is the behemoth in Northeast East Asia along with of course Japan and the north is the poor cousin so where you start what the history is how how people negotiate differently. Some countries are very transactional. I'd say the North Koreans are more transactional than the Iranians are the Iranians artist transactional. I mean means. They're ready to do a deal if they can get what they need and you can get what you need. They're quick to quicker to do a deal. I think than some uh-huh the Iranians are much more sophisticated negotiators very legalistic very complex. It's not to say either of these. Negotiations are easy. They're quite quite difficult but people have different negotiating styles some countries negotiate top down others negotiate bottom up and the same would be true for businesses and any organization so the history matters so when you walked into for example Iranian negotiating table. It was fairly hostile EILLY. You looked at with distrust I mean how do you get from that given the history to a point where you're actually talking and bill developing some trust that are you working towards common ground which we'll talk about later on. I actually think it's not about trust. I think it's about respect. I don't think that given the history between the United States in Iran that one can really have a basis for trust and I think it is however about having some respect act that the people across the table from you have interests and you may not think they're legitimate interest but they have interests and they have politics that they have to deal with and I respect that they have interests and that they have politics and I need to understand that and I want them to understand my interests and my politics and see if we can't find a place where some of their interests can be addressed but I never lose sight of the objective checked which in the case of Iran was to make sure they never have a nuclear weapon and a which point. Did you feel that you've got to a place where there was respect. And how did you know you would there. We got to know each other quite well. Because we spent hours and hours and hours with each other and remember this was a multilateral negotiation so I not only had to get get to know the Iranians but I had to get to know the English. I had to get to know the French I had to get to know the Germans the Russians the Chinese and all of their delegations what all of their interests were the European Union. I had to understand. US politics I I joke all the time that I negotiated inside the US administration. I negotiated with Capitol Hill. I negotiated with interest groups in the United States. I negotiated with each one of the partners in the negotiation and bilaterally and with them as a group I negotiated with Israel which had a huge interest in what we were doing it and negotiate with all the Gulf countries I negotiated in any country that had had an interest in this and yes occasionally even negotiated with Iran. It is a very complex time intensive process and all the while I was doing the negotiation I was the under secretary of state responsible for all the rest of the world so one of the things that you would do one of the things that I was doing but not the the only thing I went to fifty four countries while I was the under secretary over four years from twenty eleven to two thousand fifteen some of them more within once so it was a privilege to have the job but in exhausting job it was and you were saying that you got to know the other party at the table fairly well and that the relationships that you built over the time started to develop into respect yes I think respect for each other's positions and interests even if there was not agreement agreement respect that we couldn't get to a solution unless we all sort of came to agree on what with the objective was during this negotiation a Russia for instance invaded Ukraine and took over Crimea and and that was a situation where the United States was going to have to take some significant action to sanction Russia for this but at the same time I I was negotiating table with the Russians trying to solve another problem and I had gotten to know Sergei Rehab cough my counterpart quite well because we had actually work together with Secretary Kerry and Secretary and Foreign Minister Lavrov to negotiate the Syria Chemical Weapons Agreement so I know new Sergei rather well by now as a negotiator and he I was had great respect for his skill and you went up to him at a cocktail. I think I think in your book you mentioned that it was actually morning coffee. A coffee said it was a very busy room and I went over to him and I said Sergei. How could you possibly do what you have done and it took him a moment to realize is when I was talking about and then he realized it was Ukraine. He looked at me for a moment. He said nothing is Amiss and he walked away and the reason he walked away was to say to me. If I stay here we you're going to have a fight and that will not serve our purpose in this room. We will have to deal with this issue for sure but not right now not right this moment while we're trying to ensure that Iran doesn't obtain a nuclear weapon so it makes sense yes makes perfect sense and you have to be able to walk and Chew Gum and run and skip all at the same time right and and that's what we did as a essentially. He compartmentalized yes he was able to say there's something else that we're working on. Its focus on that and we'll come come back to two that. Did that. Increase your respect for him or was that just it you know Did you feel very very skillful diplomat so it increased is my respect for his skill right okay so let me just come back to sort of getting to know the parties at the table and building up to a point of respect. It didn't always go through very smoothly. MD's apart in your book that you describe where you said something in a Senate hearing I think it was and you said that deception is in the DNA to the Iranians and that made it all the way to Tehran and how that affected and how we when you look back on that what's the lesson there you stop there..

Iran United States Harvard Kennedy School United States Department of St Sergei Rehab Under Secretary of State for P Ukraine Wendy Sherman Kennedy School Kennedy School Center for Publ Ambassador Sherman Andy Ambassador Moyo Kim Jong nausea MD under secretary chairman
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"It's there is protection, not as a major instrument of social change. It's they're just like the first amendment as an anchor to make sure bad things don't happen in the future. One equality of rights under the law shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of sex to the congress shall have the Power to enforce by appropriate legislation. The provisions of this article three, this amendment shall take effect two years after the date of ratification. What I've just recited is the full text of the equal rights amendment or the ER. It's amazingly simple concept, but the fight to add it to the US constitution in the late nineteen seventies and early eighties was anything but simple after countless pitched political battles across the country. The amendment ultimately came up just three states short of ratification by the congressionally mandated deadline in nineteen eighty two for decades. It was assumed that was the end of it. But in March last year, Nevada became the thirty six state to ratify bringing you just two states short of the required thirty eight in between the women's March and metoo movements. The idea of resurrecting the ERA doesn't. Seem so far fetched. Hello and welcome to the Harvard Kennedy School policy cast. I'm your host had water in joining us today. Today's H professor Jane Mansbridge who originally authored the book why we lost the ER a in one thousand nine hundred. Six also served until very recently is chair of the American political science association fresher Mansbridge. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you. Would seems really interesting about the is that in its history, it is kind of defied our our partisan lines. You know, when it was first proposed, it was opposed by progressives when it was first put into a party platform. It was the Republican party. Absolutely. Can you trace us through the history of how this developed over time y'all? The Democrats Jamba critic party and the Democrats oppose the area at the beginning because they were, I think, correctly that it would. Eliminate the protective laws for women in this country. A lot of labor legislation began, and indeed that sometimes as far as it got was laws saying that women couldn't were more than X number of hours or bear X more than X number pounds or whatever. Because the country was very anti labor legislation. And so the only way labor legislation could get in was by being legislation for women and children. And so the Democrats were afraid that that was going to this would eliminate that special legislation and it would have so they opposed it. But then what happened was the those laws got changed to include men and two wasn't as necessary. There have been Eva Lucien in the law and the administrative law. So that actually before the era came to the congress. Or. The the discriminations. The special provision for women had been upgraded to be provisioned for men or or eliminated. So those issues were were sort of began to be gone by the time. The then the Democrats took took the array into their platform, but but it was definitely a Republican issue for awhile when it first came before the states, it was absolutely a bipartisan issue. It was bi-partisanship ill. Ronald Reagan, didn't put it in his platform in nineteen eighty. But before that both parties headed and their their political platforms, what actual effect would it have on legislation especially today? Well, we don't actually know, and there was a section in my book about what it would do. It's a little bit. Like as I said, the first amendment you put the principal in and then you know, all sorts of strange things might happen. For example, under the first amendment, we have citizens. Netted, which keeps us from having any reasonable campaign finance laws, but we hope there wouldn't be that kind of what I consider perversion actually of the amendment. You put you just you put an amendment in because it you think that there's a principle that ought to be in the constitution, like free speech or that that equal rights for women, and then you can't completely predict what the court will do with it, but you assume that

United States congress Jane Mansbridge Republican party Harvard Kennedy School Nevada Eva Lucien professor Ronald Reagan principal two years
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

10:28 min | 2 years ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"When you suddenly decide that your loved one needs to go into serious inpatient treatment, you suddenly become frantic. I've got to find a place to put this person, And each addict is different. The opioid epidemic is frustratingly difficult to untangle. There's little doubt that have reached a crisis point in the United States some time in the last few years. And there seems to be political will on both sides of the aisle to tackle. But how our guest today is no stranger to complex challenges after military career culminating into tenure as vice chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He's very familiar with marshalling the resources necessary to overcome formidable obstacles. And so when his son fell victim to addiction, he leapt into action ranging for the best possible treatment he could find. But even then it wasn't enough. Now a father's grief for his lost son has transformed into a mission to help save other families the same fate. Hello and welcome to the Harvard Kennedy School policy gas. I'm your host Mak had water in this week. We're joined by retired US Navy Admiral James Sandy winner felt He's currently a professor at Georgia Tech in a senior non-resident fellow. Here at the Kennedy schools Belfer Center Fesser Admiral. Thanks so much for joining us morning, Matt. It's really a pleasure to be your Thank you for having me. This is a subject that has touched so many people around the country. It's something we see in the news, and it's also something that seems to have no easy answers. Of course, we're talking about the opioid crisis in the United States. You just as we were speaking right before this interview started. You say you have not found a problem that is as complex as this. Can you talk a little bit about that? Sherma The the opioid epidemic is indeed probably the most complex public policy issue that I've ever dived into. The dimensions are all over the place. The the cultural problems, The the interrelatedness of the solution threads are is terribly important. And it's it's if it weren't such a tragedy in my own family will be one of the most interesting and and rewarding things I've ever done. And unfortunately. It lives inside this background noise of sadness that we have now half because we lost our son in September. We decided at that point that we could either Curl up on a little ball and wish this away, or based on some of the experiences we've had an and getting things done, people we know that sort of thing. We felt that we should try to contribute to the solution. So I feel terrible if I didn't try to do something about this. And so we started our foundation That's designed to attack some of the complexity that you're talking about. Can you tell us a little bit about your son Jonah? Jonathan grew up in a military family seemed like a fairly normal kid, good athlete, very smart, very creative. Younger brother had a mischievous bent to him All. I'll never forget when we got a phone call one day from his second-grade teacher informing us that he had been selling school supplies to his students and lending them the money and charging interest in order to do it. So he's an I didn't know whether to be, you know, happier sad about that. But John was was a really, really interesting kid. A good baseball. Pitcher, unfortunately, he also grew up with a anxiety and depression, which so many young people these days have a I think the there's a large number of God, teenagers in particular who have this, you just don't hear about as much because there is a little stigma associated with that. And we found that John's started to self-medicate in that regard in it was that was contributed to by the fact that he was misdiagnosed as having Attention Deficit syndrome and was prescribed Adderall, which is a methamphetamine, which is probably the worst thing you want to give to somebody who has anxiety. And so John gradually grew in through a alcohol eventually weed and then Zan acts. And who knows what had a series of unfortunate events that cause us to become more and more are concerned. And then it culminated in a major event where we decided that he absolutely needed to go and inpatient treatment. Now, of course you by virtue of your position had access to treatment options that may not have been available to others, But even. Even then it sounds like from your experience, It was difficult to find those treatment options. Well, two dimensions that problem, First of all, when you suddenly decide that your loved one needs to go into serious inpatient treatment, you suddenly become frantic. I've got to find a place to put this person. And each addict is different at different dimensions of age gender, how they got into addiction in the first place And what their insurance is like. So there was a frantic week there while John was detox in where we were very lucky to find a good place in Pennsylvania to take him. The challenge was through the military healthcare system non-striker at the time. They really did not have a grip on what this was all about. They just didn't understand the disease of addiction and in particular what you call the the dual or a Komor bitterly of a a mental challenge, uh, anxiety depression and addiction at the same time, that has to be treated very, very carefully in a very special way. And there aren't very many places that can do that and track. You're just didn't understand. On top of that, John was one months shy of his eighteen th birthday. And there are some places that only take people younger than eighteen others than only take them older than eighteen and you're, we really didn't have a place to take him. Uh, until we were fortunate to discover a this again, this place very good place in Pennsylvania. Very complex trying to get into a treatment system. We were very fortunate in that, uh, we were able to afford this ourselves because insurance Just didn't understand. I think I read a EU wrote about this in the Atlantic And, uh, you mentioned that this The further fifteen months that Jonathan spent in this care system. I, it cost more than four years of of Harvard. He have private highly divergent. Yeah, It really did. Have you spoken with people have been in similar positions is yourself except for who didn't necessarily have access to the resources that you might have? Well, we we are. Loves light. Looks gives me website wet live on now the twenty nine th of November. At the same time, reduce CBS News interview in the Atlantic article came out. So we got a, a torrent of emails, and I would divide those emails into three categories. Some people just cheering us on a lot of people willing to help who said, I'm good at this. I want to help you. But a large number of people crying for help. I have a loved one who's in addiction. I don't know what to do. I don't know where to take him or her for treatment. And so many people can't afford this or don't have insurance that will cover it. You find a lot of people are are brought into safe thirty days of inpatient treatment, or even only a week of inpatient treatment. What I tell audiences is that if you put your son or daughter and thirty days of inpatient treatment, You know what it's going to get you thirty days of sleep, and that's about it because it's just not enough for the brain to really began its recovery from the changes, its undergone, uh, in the course of becoming addicted. So this is a big problem. We have a a shortage of capacity for treatment in the country. We have a shortage of capability for treatment. Treatment Centers That really understand the problem. And then of course affordability as a real issue, I believe I read that in 2017 its estimated that more We'll have died in 2017 alone from opioid overdoses than in the Vietnam Afghanistan Iraq wars combined. Well, I think that's the country. A yo in 2016 around sixty four thousand people died from overdoses, Not all those were opioids, but a substantial majority were. And that in that, that one year for the whole country is more than people who who died of Vietnam War and presents in combat. That just indicates the true human nature. This tragedy, the scale of this crisis, and how terribly important is that we as a nation, invest in the capability to to treat people. Now, that's only one of the lines of operation the country needs to take aren't, but it's probably the most expensive one in terms of dramatically scaling up our ability to bring people and and give them the treatment that will work. In most cases. When you put Jonathan into treatment center, how. How confident Did you feel though it during that time, while he was undergoing treatment that there was a way out? How would n- what was the process for you as a as a family? Well, it began with having no idea. We were just desperate that put Johnny on a place where where he had a chance to stay alive. And as we, we really didn't understand addiction until we actually got him into the treatment. And they have these parents symposiums where they've literally described to, uh, uh, The Journey of addiction, how it really physiologically works in in the brain, which is part of public-awareness raising our knowledge of that. But as we gradually began to both understand that and watch our son recover. We gained a lot of confidence that maybe this is going to work Now ultimately in the end it didn't. But, but we really did have a lot of confidence as he got further and further into his treatment. He decided to get his emergency medical technician qualification as the empty Call. He was very excited about that. He was more excited about that than anything I've ever seen him do other than maybe get on the mound and pitch a baseball. He wanted to help other people like himself. So that was very encouraging to us. He had a gap year from the University of Denver that we were fortunate enough to have a and uh, he decided as he got towards the end of his treatment that pay, You know, I can do this. Denver main asked him asked every incoming freshman to write an NSA. And in the the question posed in the essay was, who has had the most profound influence on your life And what Jonathan throat this very profound essay about an ambulance ride that he took during his empty qualification that involved him finding himself performing CPR on a heroin addict, undergoing an overdose in a McDonald's bathroom. And that moment was very seminal for him. It cost him to realize that this guy had a family. What about my own family? And at that point, he decided to dedicate himself to other people. Will we didn't know is how deeply the opioid molecule had burrowed into his brain. And even as we had rapidly gained this great confidence, 'cause he wrote this amazing essay. He was just starting his relapse. And

Jonathan throat John United States baseball overdoses Pennsylvania Harvard Kennedy School Mak Jonah Kennedy schools Belfer Center University of Denver CBS Denver vice chairman of the Joint Chi Harvard Matt Georgia Tech depression Admiral James Sandy
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"In 2016 in 2017 false information spread like wildfire across social networks around the globe especially in lead up to elections and democratic countries while disinformation campaigns are nothing new democracies in elections the scaled the seemingly new phenomenon was unprecedented soon it earned nickname fake news it's a term that since been repeated far and wide most notably by politicians and autocratic seeking to discredit legitimate journalists but also by the news media itself as they attempt to grapple with what's going on but if there's one thing two days guests implore you to do it's to stop saying fit f start star start in stars stars star hello and welcome to the harvard kennedy school policy cast i'm your host mak had water in joining us today or shorenstein send a research fellow claire ward of leads first draft in organization recently brought under the auspices of the kennedy schools shorenstein center as well as writer and researcher who seemed iraq sean her they're both coauthors of the recent report information disorder toward an interdisciplinary framework for research in policymaking the to that in show nuts claire thanks so much for joining us thank you for having health so we're going to have hussein he's he's he's traveling to the studio right now we're going to have him with us very very soon on but until then i let's just open up in talk a little bit about this report is a fascinating i would really encouraged all of our listeners to go and read it it's a fastening breakdown of information disorder do you spend a lot of time in this report canvas tablet zhang and defining terms for the various types of information disorder why was that important from the outset.

social networks news media claire ward kennedy schools shorenstein ce writer hussein harvard kennedy school research fellow researcher iraq two days
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"In in eighteen 75 a bribery scandal threatened to derail the administration of ulysses s grant or grant himself wasn't implicated his personal secretary was creating an obvious conflict of interest so grant turned to a novel concept at least at the federal level he appointed a neutral special prosecutor to investigate the matter shortly thereafter grant set yet another precedent by firing the man he had boy had appointed but in doing so he caused a political uproar forcing him to hire yet another prosecutor to take the place of the original today we find ourselves and not too dissimilar territory as former fbi director robert muller engages in one of the most important investigation since watergate the rest of the world's left piece together clues about where the case might end up in with every new development speculation has intensified about whether president trump will attempt to quash the issue by firing moeller earn all who might stand in the way hello and welcome to the harvard kennedy school policy cast i'm your host mac had water in today we're going to try to make heads or tails out of where things stand with the help of each case lecture juliet kayem previously served as assistant secretary for intergovernmental affairs at the us department of homeland security during the obama administration and in dishing teaching heritage gas is also ceo of zemke i should also note in full disclosure that up until recently i served as juliets producer by the skift her erstwhile podcast at of g w g v h news it's great see i know it's good to be back in the studio with yearly eta we had to say goodbye to the podcast not fair well that goodbye is given some of my other work commitments fed is good to be back here i can imagine given all of your what your portfolio is raid now it's a little overwhelming and i think in general if for anybody who's following the news ram.

secretary prosecutor robert muller trump moeller juliet kayem assistant secretary obama administration ceo producer bribery fbi director president harvard kennedy school us
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"Her provisions in this bill than just about anything else if i right not bad on the tax bill i'll say this the bad bill and it has a terrible passed through profession i'm a republican friend of mine will right not dead no be like this is a great bill and we could make it even better if weeds rocked the passer provision and the reason for that is that a basic principle of taxation is you he wanted tax similar activities at similar rates you want people doing what makes the most sense economically not what makes the most sense to exploit differences and loopholes in the tax code and what the past supervision does is says depending on how you label your income you might end up paying at a higher rate might end up paying at a lower rate if i go out on the side and do some consulting and give people economic advice should i be paying a lower tax rate on that because that's pastor incumbent on the small business or you know i should be paying the same amount on that that i get paid um to teach here at harvard i think there's not a lot of justification for saying you're gonna tax different activities at different rates similar activities at different rates so before we say i want to invite all the folks who are watt watching on facebook live as well as i believe periscope along those lines i want to ask one question by jacob eiser a person who i really don't know and i don't meyer.

harvard facebook jacob eiser meyer
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"Last month when we first sat down with professor jason firm to talk about the gop tax reform effort a specific bill hammond even been me public yet yet now just a few weeks later not only have we seen a bill but several bills two of which have already been approved by the house and senate respectively it's a what to have taken place in such a short amount of time especially considering the farreaching consequences of the landmark piece of legislation so if your head still spinning and you're looking for some perspective whole tight we've got you covered hello and welcome to the harvard kennedy school policy cast i'm your host mak had water and as we wait for the final version of the builder who emerged from the conference committee we ask professor furhman the former chair of the white house council of economic advisers under the obama administration to join us once again give us an update on where things stand this time in a live broadcast on the kennedy schools facebook page as a side note were open a livestream more of these interviews going forward so if you'd like to ask one of our guests the question should follow us on twitter policy cast to find out when will be going live next okay here's professor firm that the speed of this has been dizzying i'm five weeks ago there was no draft legislation at all we didn't really know what this was gonna look like and fast forward tiny bit over a month later on both the house and senate have passed bills a final bill hasn't been passed for the president's signature but the house and senate are similar enough that i certainly would expect that to happen in terms of what's in here of the most important things to know with any tax bill our number one how much does it cost and here the estimate is that after accounting for economic growth this would cost one trillion dollars over the next decade.

professor jason firm hammond the house white house council obama administration president gop senate harvard kennedy school professor kennedy facebook twitter one trillion dollars five weeks
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

01:48 min | 2 years ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"Millions amazon than their own rating system okay are they upset the we gave all this product slide scars if so than maybe they shouldn't have products that don't rate fox hey health la held layer up but so it was a brilliant idea by barkley and we had a ton of fun with it and believe it or not we had a la to people who took notice of it and it allowed the other thing that was really cool it was a way for the citizens of kansas city to chime in and get them to tell google that we want it or amazon amazon that we wanted him to conquer going entrusted to google now we'll take him both why i'm interested in that because obviously this was a pitch for amazon yeah but something tells me that you are just talking to add or more people who knows something about kansas city today than there was that's what everybody wants in that was a way to market the city even if they didn't read the reviews they heard about it and they thought it come from kansas city all kansas city maybe on a think about going there seeing what's going on in kansas city um and it worked thank you so much for coming on policy casadei really per rabbits great talking to your rule out things that matter and stay away from all the political nonsense and squabbles that don't achieve policy cast is production harvard kennedy school i met cad walter that's at met canada on twitter my coproducer natalie montaner sara abrams in becky whicle have something to tell us about this or any other episode let us know on twitter policy cast or via email it policy casted h care start harvard dot eu in visit us at each case policy cast dot org cnn ext week.

barkley google amazon kansas city harvard kennedy school walter canada sara abrams becky whicle twitter
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"As 2016 the us census bureau estimates that more than eighty percent of the us population now live in urban areas americans have become by and large city slickers of course that doesn't mean most americans live in super dense areas like manhattan but if you think about it in terms of the development of public policy city governments are playing an important role in the daytoday lives of the vast majority of americans in while the federal government seems stuck in partisan gridlock many municipal leaders if embrace their role as incubators for innovations and governance hello and welcome to the harvard kennedy school policy cast i'm your host mac had water and joining us today is one of those leaders kansas city mayor slide james who was first elected in 2011 then reelected in 2015 he's on campus as a visiting fellow at the institute of politics swells the ash center for democratic governance and innovation before we get to mayor james i just want to note that unfortunately i ran into some technical issues with the recording of this interview and while i've tried to smooth things out and preserve as much of the interview as possible you'll probably notice a number of odd jumps that were unavoidable despite my best editing efforts under and 78 episodes in in you'd think i'd have nailed this process by now but i appreciate your bearing with me is mayor thanks so much for joining us less bigger bat first of all did you always want to be mayor you seem like you are you were made for it i may have been made ford but it wasn't something i always wanted to do some of the only thing that i knew i always wanted to do was to be a lawyer and that a lot of other opportunities sprang from that and was going into the election that you one that you decided i need to be a need to be in that role no you know it's kind of like you know what they say about frogs if you toss of frog into boiling water the hop ride out but if you toss a frog into the water warm up whoa the.

us manhattan federal government visiting fellow harvard kennedy school kansas institute of politics ford eighty percent
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

02:30 min | 2 years ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"Oh ho ho low last week the kennedy school center for international development launched a brand new version of its atlas of economic complexity before you go searching for it let me warn you can be slightly addictive the atlas is at its core a database of decades worth of economic data from every country honor imports exports industries products but if you picturing a series of snoozing do sing spreadsheets you'd be wrong the atlas manages to bring all that data to life through interactive visuals ations that for me at least often turn into rabbit holes of esoteric fascination of course the visuals ations aren't just a novelty near illustrations of complexity economics a field pioneered in part by ricardo hausmann that has proven and reliable predictor of future economic growth hello and welcome to the harvard kennedy school policy cast i'm your host knack had waller in this week in honor of the atlas his 20 launch we're pulling from the archives to feature an interview i conducted with professor housman in 2013 where he explains what economic complexity is and how both investors and makers can use it to better inform their decisionmaking thanks for joining us thank you for having me can you describe what exactly economic complexity is and why it's an important measure for countries around the world well essentially economic complexities related to how much does a city a state a country knows how to do in the essential ideas that the the fundamental ingredient to be able to do something is to know how to do it and an economy is characterized by what it knows how to do a and then in poor countries than to know how to do fuel simple things and rich countries dental know how to do more things and among them more complicated things you we've sometimes used the metaphor over scrabble so the economies like a game of scrabble and the if you have very fuel letters you can make very few words and short words and the more letters you have a the bigger the variety of the words that you could cook up and the long were those words so the variety and complexity of the things that come on economies able to make is a measure of their productive knowledge of their knowhow saudi measure those specific god scrabble pieces well.

kennedy school center ricardo hausmann waller scrabble harvard kennedy school professor
"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

01:30 min | 3 years ago

"harvard" Discussed on Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast

"When we identify with the protagonist of a story we're not just learning about what happened we're are actually getting some of the experience of what did him and so the moral that history teaches is to the heart much more so than to the head beck when he is a graduate student at the university chicago famed author kurt vonnegut it submitted a thesis pausing that stories had shapes and could be plotted like sign waves on graft paper going one step further he also claimed that most stories followed just a handful of shapes giving each schori a name boymeetsgirl man in whole old testament and cinderella the thesis was rejected of course monte gets shapes are now cited often by storytellers which is in and of itself an example of a man in whole story and not least in part because there's a wide recognition of both the power of storytelling in simplicity at the heart of our stories hello and welcome the harvard kennedy school policy cast i'm your host mac had water in joining us today's h a senior lecturer marshall guns under legendary grassroots organizer who cut his teeth in the civil rights movement before becoming an integral part of cesar chavez successful campaign to unionize farmworkers in california today he teaches organizing and leadership peered kennedy school fesser thanks so much for joining us this morning so when you speak about organizing you often emphasize the importance of narrative the concept of public narrative he why is that.

graduate student kurt vonnegut schori old testament monte cesar chavez california harvard kennedy school senior lecturer civil rights kennedy school