37 Burst results for "harlem"

Fresh update on "harlem" discussed on 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:06 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "harlem" discussed on 10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

"Brooklyn. The allegations are contained in federal court papers obtained by the Staten Island Advance. The court papers say Trap meant a confidential police source. At an anti police protest in front of the Brooklyn Criminal Courthouse in a series of conversations from July 13 to the 15th trap, also allegedly said he wanted to cut the brakes of police cars and burned down NYPD station houses. Court documents say that on July 17th trap, actually crawled under a police van in Brooklyn and cut the antilock brake line trap was originally arrested on state charges and released without bail. But then on August 5th, the court papers say multiple FBI agents arrested trap and he's now being held without bail on federal charges. Carol D'Auria, 10 10 wins news President Trump says he is against more funding for the Postal Service, he says without the money there can't be Malin voted. Democrats are pushing for a virus relief package to contain billions of dollars to boost election security and to help postal workers process what's expected to be a flood of mail in ballots during the virus pandemic. The president's against that if they don't get those two items, that means you can't have universal mail in voting because they're not equipped, tohave it After his comments on Fox business Networks mornings with Maria Democratic Congressman Jerry Connolly said the president's admitting he wants to hold up postal service funding to hinder Americans from voting. Abiding campaigns, accusing him of sabotage. Soccer Megane Washington. There has been an arrest in connection with the story we told you about last night. About that argument of the Bronx, where a guy pulled a knife and stabbed the other and then doused him with gasoline and set him on fire. The victim, 18 year old Winston Ortiz died at Harlem Hospital. Cops track Down the suspect, 22 year old had Donna's Betances. He's charged with murder. Investigators say, But chances was angry that Artis was dating his 15 year old sister. Peace agreement between the United Arab Emirates and Israel. Among other things, they have agreed to establish full diplomatic ties. President and Trump was involved and said the deal includes Israel, agreeing to table plans to annex parts of the West Bank, uniting two of America's closest and most capable partners in the region, something which said could not be done. This deal is a significant step towards building a more peaceful, secure and prosperous Middle East. President Trump's National security advisor says he deserves the Nobel. He meaning Mr Trump deserves the Nobel Peace Prize for the agreement. Hailing the Israel Youe Agreement to normalize relations, National Security Adviser Robert O'Brien says President Trump should be a front runner for the Nobel Peace Prize. Really remarkable. I think when you when you step back and.

President Trump Malin Brooklyn Criminal Courthouse Staten Island Advance Israel Youe Agreement Brooklyn Israel Postal Service Maria Democratic Congressman J National Security Brooklyn. United Arab Emirates Winston Ortiz FBI Harlem Hospital Carol D'auria Murder Artis
Teen set on fire in the Bronx, New York, suspect on the run

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 1 d ago

Teen set on fire in the Bronx, New York, suspect on the run

"One poured gasoline on the other and set him on fire happen to the hybrid section on 165th Street in a building on the fifth floor. The 18 year old victim was taken to Harlem Hospital in critical condition. This neighbor lives down the hall and tells NBC for she came running when she heard the victim's screams screaming climb in the floor. Suspect took off on foot. There are

Harlem Hospital NBC
Fresh "harlem" from Moose And Maggie

Moose And Maggie

00:32 min | 9 hrs ago

Fresh "harlem" from Moose And Maggie

"Radio dot com Or your favorite smart speakers and connected devices. Center. I'm Greg Rice with the supply house dot com Fan Highway Patrol Trouble in Brooklyn Inbound Go one. It's just before the prospect to left Lane shut down with the crash involving an empty bus. The standstill from the belt merge westbound beat We loaded from the slide down to Hamilton Avenue. That's where a broken down sprinter van has the right lane shot on the bell to crawl either way to sunrise Highway because of an eastbound mess, the jam from the van Wyk westbound Southern States South Cross Island. There are all sorts of slow Getting onto the westbound built with a ll That'll rubbernecking inbound. George, You're fine Cross, Bronx North Bend, Egan and Harlem River Drive the worst of it out. Lincoln's about 10 in 30 to 45 out the worst of it from 11th Avenue, Holland, 10 in 30 to 40 minutes. Outbound from every single approach. I'm Greg Rice with the supply house dot com Fan Highway Patrol. There's no part of our bodies that put in more work than our feet. We save big money with our progressive home and auto bundle and used the cash to take a family vacation or what? He was up for a loan. This is north of Realty s. Timoney. All sure customers can save big money with progressive but not enough to go to Hawaii. They'll probably use it for things like the mortgage and groceries or even a travel magazines, so at least.

Greg Rice Realty S. Timoney South Cross Island WYK VAN Brooklyn Hawaii Egan Lincoln George Holland
18-Year-Old Dead After Being Stabbed, Set On Fire In The Bronx, New York

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:17 sec | 1 d ago

18-Year-Old Dead After Being Stabbed, Set On Fire In The Bronx, New York

"Guys got into it in the Bronx. One poured gasoline on the other and set him on fire happened the hybrid section on 165th Street, The 18 year old victim was taken to Harlem Hospital in critical condition The suspect took off on foot.

Harlem Hospital
A Democracy at Risk

In The Thick

04:30 min | 2 d ago

A Democracy at Risk

"Welcome to the this is a podcast about politics race and culture from a PC perspective I Medina wholesome and I'm. And today we have to Itt all-stars, call you their homes in quarantine. Yes. Yes. From Winston Salem North Carolina is Tina Vazquez but she's a senior reporter with prism and a twenty twenty I to be wells fellow with type investigations. Welcome back. Tina. High for happy ache and joining us from Atlanta Georgia is the fabulous Russia. Brown Co founder of black voters matter what's up? I'm so happy to be back. All is well and we're so. We're so happy to have you back to. so it's been. Intense that's kind of. An understatement in China. Living here has been intense in this country from the pandemic to racist police violence I mean even this Sunday, there was a five point one earthquake in North Carolina where you Live apparently the largest and over a century. Right. Here in Harlem trees fell down last week because of the storm. So this is just a very first question to ask you how you doing. So Tino, we're going to start with you how you feeling I am tired all the time like I can't complain really too much everything is. Fine but I'm very tired. Okay. Yeah. Short and sweet the TASHA. Who would be a podcast in itself I told you I. Felt. New podcast. How feeling? Is. What. I am I'm having actually every human emotion you can have, and I'm having an all at the same downtime. I'm angry, sad, scared frustrated hopeful fired up every motion human emotion. You can have I'm having and this moment of few weeks ago I myself actually tested positive for covert Nineteen Latasha. It. was the most nerve wrecking name Sweetie. It so I'm here for you sweetie. Oh you understand. Thank you so much and I'm so glad that you are will I had a mild case of but I think more than anything. It's the worry because you don't know how it's going to respond to Matty and then I'm worried about people being around me and being around my family. So I am just petitioning for a twenty two over I was just like a lot of talk to about this. Talk to the manager I need to recite twenty. She's a woman by the way. Exactly I know. So listen. I know first of all, thank you for sharing that. Latasha and. My heart goes out to you for anyone has to go through that especially in this time but we do want to discuss the twenty twenty election. It's less than eighty five days away. As if we're not on edge enough this year and honestly I'm going to come in as the Puerto Rican reporter. I have news to share with everyone in the world. What are we just had a primary election on Sunday complete Shicho. Alison show up two pressings. There's calls of. Delaying. It and moving into next Sunday and it's just it is complete. Chaos down in my home island colony, and I'm very worried now that this is just a prelude to what's going to happen in the united. States on election day November but we want to talk about the power of voters of color and the issues of voting rights. The backdrop of this election season is the coronavirus pandemic. There are now five million confirmed covid nineteen cases in this country, and the number of those infected has doubled since the end of June and then we still have to mention. Joe Biden's comments last. Thursday during a joint. National Association of Black Journalists and a BJ and the National Association of Hispanic Journalists which was an h j of what he said. What you all know. But most people don't know unlike the African American community with notable exceptions. The Latino community is incredibly diverse community. With incredibly different attitudes about different things. This completely overlooks sees issues of race identity ideology, intersectional communities, I honestly think that this kind of statement, the trump campaign's like bring it on because it's just GonNa be used to divide and conquer Democratic voters.

Tina Vazquez North Carolina National Association Of Black National Association Of Hispan Medina Winston Salem Joe Biden Matty Harlem Russia Brown Co Tino Atlanta China Puerto Rican Founder Alison Shicho Reporter
Jimi Hendrix’s ‘60s Japanese sunburst guitar sells for over £160,000 at auction

Doug Stephan

02:15 min | 3 d ago

Jimi Hendrix’s ‘60s Japanese sunburst guitar sells for over £160,000 at auction

"Watchtower, Jimi Hendrix that guitar that he played in the early sixties, sold at auction with 216 K boys and girls. He was a young Morocco in York City four times the pre auction estimate. They said, 50 to 60 right We talked about this the last time. Hendricks began playing this sunburst electric guitar made in Japan after he was discharged from the Army in 62 that he was even in the army. After leaving Fort Campbell. He moved to Clarksville, Tennessee. For a short time, man. They must have thought he was something else in Clarksville, Tennessee. He played on the chitlin circuit with Wilson Pickett, Slim Harpo, Sam Cooke, I Cantina and Jackie Wilson. I didn't know you played Jackie Wilson for he moved into Harlem. In 1964 where he stayed until 1966 playing venues such a cafe Wah and the Cheetah Club. Hendricks remained in possession of the guitar through his brief tenure with the Eiseley Brose and his own Jimmy James at the blue Flames in the blue plate when he went to England. Guitar was left in New York at the apartment of his friend might quite shy. What is it that it was named? Question provided watching, he pried a notarized letter of Providence for the instrument prior to its own prior to his death. You get tired at a pre auction estimate has said 50 60 reached a high bid of 180 when factoring and fees the total bill was 216,000. Other notable music related items. From this auction, artifacts of Hollywood and music events 14,014 carat Cole. A gold ring on by Elvis went for 20 to 5. A pair of princes, custom made purple boots went 13,000 before they were sold. One of Michael Jackson's sequined black jackets went for 20 Okay, people, low spending a lot of money in auctions people by and that's where they get it

Hendricks Jimi Hendrix Jackie Wilson Clarksville Guitar Tennessee Sam Cooke Wilson Pickett Fort Campbell Army Jimmy James Eiseley Brose York City Cheetah Club Harlem Slim Harpo Michael Jackson Elvis New York Hollywood
At least six shot – one fatally – in New York City early Sunday

Purity Products

00:33 sec | 4 d ago

At least six shot – one fatally – in New York City early Sunday

"At least six people shot in New York City, one of them fatally. During the early morning hours. The New York Post reports that a 23 year old man was fatally shot in the chest. Around 3:30 a.m. In Long Island City, a double shooting in Elmhurst left to men in their twenties, both wounded and one in the Bronx, left a 51 year old man and a 48 year old man with gunshot wounds. In Harlem, a 29 year old man was also shot. All five victims suffered non life threatening injuries. So far this week, there have been 38 shootings, compared to 16 for the same period last

New York City Long Island City The New York Post Harlem Elmhurst Bronx
Power outages hit parts of Manhattan

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:30 sec | 6 d ago

Power outages hit parts of Manhattan

"There was a power failure in parts of Manhattan this morning, but you may have slept right through it. The power went out around 5 15 in Harlem and on the Upper East Side and Upper West Side. It was restored in less than an hour. Con Ed blames its transmission system. And then there were also having outages in Queens in the Middle Village area. That is still the problem to go along with all the outages from Tropical storm is Sai Ius earlier this

Upper West Side Con Ed Harlem Middle Village Manhattan Queens
Power outage hits large portions of Manhattan in New York City

Squawk Pod

00:11 sec | 6 d ago

Power outage hits large portions of Manhattan in New York City

"Con Edison investigating widespread power outages throughout New York City including Harlem, the Upper East side central park and I can tell you as an upper west sider no power there as

Con Edison New York City Harlem
Upper Manhattan New York Goes Dark Overnight; Con Ed Says Outage Unrelated To Storm

Midday News

00:17 sec | 6 d ago

Upper Manhattan New York Goes Dark Overnight; Con Ed Says Outage Unrelated To Storm

"Over to contents is three networks were hit by the Manhattan blackout that lasted almost 1/2 an hour from the upper west of the Upper East Side in Harlem. The vague explanation is that a problem in the transmission system is to blame for those three networks going down, and they were new outages in Queens this morning, including around middle Village that they're still

Middle Village Harlem Manhattan Queens
Massive power outage hits Manhattan, New York

Bernie and Sid in the Morning

00:43 sec | 6 d ago

Massive power outage hits Manhattan, New York

"Outage Now Being reported by Con Edison following this morning's huge outage in Upper Manhattan. Now the second outages in the Middle Village Loop section of Queens, affecting approximately 5100 customers. Now some type of sonic boom was reported being heard, resulting in a huge power outage in Upper Manhattan. This happened about 5:15 a.m. That 25 minute outage affecting the upper West Side. The Obree side in Harlem power did come back after about 25 minutes, however. There continue to be major transit disruptions and also red lights out as well. Now, Con Edison has not yet pinpointed the cause of these outages, but they are investigating a problem in their transmission system.

Con Edison Upper Manhattan Middle Village Loop West Side Queens Harlem
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

07:59 min | Last week

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal. I one hundred percent agree into because of that I think about what the solutions, all the problem. I always come back to equity. And that's ultimately I think about risk driving for and I think what makes this time so ready Angry special in many ways, is that the asking leadership to support us with? Of. Traditional tax. Supporting. Mental. Internships I think already doing now is we're actually asking our structures like quite literally reopen is themselves to include us and then from where all collectively dying today. Tearing structures, things I. think that's really the only way that detained from a call out that house structure best is the Cha I'm. Deploying mechanisms to. Erase. Racism, I I think it is about equity. Entering do you have anything to add to that? Now I think this are. Really great points. I. It's definitely. A lot of things that Lindsey and my style and the executive or have been working on in terms of. What our goals out of its in having a long term strategy with friends is really essential. There's no way you can teach someone to unlearn something that was you know systematically in place for all of this time. So it's essential for us to not only educate work alongside people who are really willing and ready to make those changes. Over time in for us, it's a three to five year period with benchmarks and timelines and touch points. To see where are in how they are evolving

Founder Black Fashion Council Harlem Sandrine Charles Salting Sandrine Charles Charles Henrietta Galina Brandon Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay United States Brandis Daniel Chief Executive NBA Consultant Lindsay People Chairman Executive Editor Branston
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

06:11 min | Last week

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal.

Black Fashion Council Founder Henrietta Galina Brandon Sandrine Charles Sandrine Charles Salting Harlem Charles Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay Brandis Daniel United States Chief Executive NBA Consultant Chairman Lindsay People Executive Editor CEO
Obituary: Herman Cain

TIME's Top Stories

05:52 min | Last week

Obituary: Herman Cain

"Herman Cain helped define the American black conservative movement. He also set the stage for trump by Philip Elliott. Herman. CAIN remembered the nineteen ninety-six moment that changed his political trajectory as clearly as any in his life. The businessman was advising Jack Kemp's vice presidential campaign and accompanied the boss to the iconic Sylvia's soul food restaurant in Harlem for an event a man in the crowd shouted out to Kane and colleagues Black Republicans, there's no such thing. The. Same Man in canes telling called them Uncle Toms. The episode. So angered Kane that when he got home from that campaign swing, he switched from a registered independent to a card carrying member of the Republican. Party and over the next quarter century, the child of the segregated south became one of the best known black Republicans in the country briefly rising to be his party's presidential front runner for the two thousand twelve nomination and remaining one of the most quotable stars in conservative media. So committed to his party's stick it in the I e host was Cain that he flew to Tulsa. Oklahoma for President Donald, trump's first return to the campaign trail after one hundred thousand US corona virus deaths despite dire warnings from public health experts at that endure rally on June twentieth the stage four colon cancer survivor posed for pictures without wearing a mask and sat in the packed stands with fellow fans of the president on June twenty-ninth Cain tested positive for the corona virus. On July second, his aides announced he had been hospitalized while fighting the disease his twitter account continued to criticize mask wearing and to promote unproven endorsements of hydroxy. On. July. Thirtieth CAIN aides announced he had died from the White House trump attributed the death to the thing called the virus cain among the most prominent Americans to die during this pandemic who was seventy four In many ways, Kane and trump were cut from the same cloth neither had been elected to any political post before running for the White House, both delighted in needling the Republican Party's establishment and the mainstream press they shot from the hip campaigned in slogans and didn't much care to learn the details. Both men were dogged by allegations of sexual affairs and inappropriate behavior, and both denied the allegations they proved disqualifying for Kane who ended his bid in December twenty eleven under intense scrutiny. But they did not derail trump just one election cycle. Later, they were also both savvy exploiters of the media. In saying things they knew would provoke outrage and thus amplify the celebrity at the core of their bids indifference toward if not hostility against what had come before was a cornerstone of their strategy, not a flaw. CAIN was born in Memphis in nineteen forty-five to a domestic worker mother and a janitor father when his dad was hired to be the chauffeur for the head of coca-cola, the family moved to Atlanta where cain would graduate from Morehouse College. He then completed his graduate studies at Purdue University after civilian service in the navy from there Kane moved from engineer to executive with Pillsbury and its subsidiaries of Burger King and Godfather's pizza where he would be its CEO. In nineteen, Eighty Eight, he oversaw Godfather's. From, Pillsbury throughout the same time yelled positions with the Federal Reserve Bank of Kansas City. That part of his resume lead trump to consider cane for a position in his administration a move that drew dissent from fellow Republicans who were not eager to revisit the allegations against Kane for three years. Kane led the national. Restaurant Association a lobbying arm for the industry that paid settlements to at least two women who detailed canes unwanted advances. His was not a typical career in his post. CEO Years Cain became a sought after motivational speaker and unsuccessful presidential candidate in two thousand and a Senate one in two thousand four. As, the tea party movement started to organize after Barack Obama's election to the White House. Kane emerged as one of its strongest spokespeople when the twenty twelve election cycle began kane decided to run the scrappy est of campaigns focused on untrue additional travel schedule that often seemed more like a book tour than an organizing effort. His novel nine, nine nine tax plan proposing a nine percent corporate business flat tax, a nine percent personal income flat tax and a nine percent national sales tax drew I rolls from economists but curiosity from voters. Antipathy toward front runner Mitt Romney proved sufficient to give cain a chance to rise in the late summer and fall of twenty eleven until his personal life just proved too much. But he didn't shrink from podcast life. Instead he became a ubiquitous voice and reliable critic of Democrats

Ceo Years Cain Kane Donald Trump Cain White House Mitt Romney Jack Kemp Pillsbury Philip Elliott Republican Party Godfather Oklahoma Twitter Harlem Barack Obama United States Tulsa
Arielle Korman, Mira Rivera

Judaism Unbound

04:58 min | 2 weeks ago

Arielle Korman, Mira Rivera

"Reo is the CO founder and executive director of a mood. She's a Jewish educator performer and perpetual student who is a former Fulbright research fellow and has taught at the national hoverer institute door to door tutoring and was the two thousand nine. Hundred thousand feature teacher at the Jewish singing retreat. Let my people sing Mirror Rivera is a board member of a mood where she also serves as resident rabbi. She has rabbinic ordination from the Jewish, theological seminary and services a rabbi at New York's Roman Nu- She has also board certified Chaplain Mirror. Rivera is also co chair of the Rabbinical Council of Jews for racial and economic justice. Jay. Fridge. And the CO founder with Rene L. Hill of Harlem. Have Ruta a brave space for Jews of Color Allies and co-conspirators in partnership with the Community of Saint Mary's Episcopal Church a professional dancer with the Martha Graham Dance Company before rabbinical school she taught hundreds of New York City Public School children through the National Dance Institute Arielle Cormon Mirror Rivera, welcome to Judaism unbounded. So great to have you. Here, thank you. We're really excited to talk about a mood. It's such an interesting and important project. I'll give a little bias in that. I'm really interested in this in particular because I've been on the board of Sfar for many years, which is the issue of the Torah Academy, the Talmud Academy for lgbtq folks are that comes out of the Experience Lgbtq Q. Folks. It's probably a better way to say it and. When I first heard about a mood I was so excited to hear that there was something that seemed similar from edge use of color perspective. So it's something that I've really wanted to explore for a long time that both of us have and and we're really thrilled to finally have this opportunity. So Mirror I was wondering if we could start with a little bit of the origin story of a mood. In, two, thousand, eighteen, I was invited to be in the Selah Cohort fifteen of bend the arc four juice of color by Jews of color and there I met Ya McCoy will meet her the year previously. And part of that training. Was a study that we that she called. J O C. Tour Academy. And it was several afternoons where we would look text from an anti oppression lands, and at the end of that hurt I was sitting with you who the webster was hard the cohurt. We looked at each other and I said, why does this have to be only part of this training? We need this to be real, and so we started talking with start talking about that. So that was may of two, thousand eighteen. By June or July. Are Corman had come back from Israel at, pass it to you. I did a fulbright year in Israel I live in. Jerusalem and when it came back, I became involved in. J. Fridge which is to cherish on economic justice. And Colored. Caucus. Part of my involvement. J.. Fridge I was connected to Huda Webster An. I approached you Huta saying that I wanted to teach a small class on the politics of Hebrew pronunciation and I wanted to teach it for Jews of color of an Alexi that you're smiling because acid is immensely nerdy deeply nerdy. Added belts deeply important but you huda one up to me and he said what if instead of just having your class, we actually create a container for this kind of learning to happen more often. and. So that really launched the idea of. Jesus, Colored Tour Academy, which became a mood colored tour academy and we started out by a every other week having a person in the community, a Jewish person of color in a community teach whatever they wanted and we we started her first Beta run I'm really got to see what what kinds of topics were interesting. How did the groups of people showed up for different topics differ in and we basically got to conduct all this research We launched our first full year after the high holidays. This past fall in two thousand nineteen. And we just completed our first full year of classes. We got here because for as long as there have been Jewish. People color navigating predominantly white Jewish space the roots have been growing and deepening. People like you. Huda. Myself were able to found something like this because of all that work that had been happening. JESSOP. Color entering wet Jewish is being Jewish spaces and also getting to know one another.

Mirror Rivera Co Founder Arielle Cormon Mirror Rivera Colored Tour Academy Israel Rabbinical Council Of Jews Ya Mccoy Huda Webster J O C. Tour Academy National Hoverer Institute Research Fellow Alexi REO New York Huta Martha Graham Dance Company Harlem Torah Academy Jerusalem JAY
Leading Ladies: Evelyn Preer

Encyclopedia Womannica

03:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Leading Ladies: Evelyn Preer

"Today's leading lady was one of the first black actresses to earn celebrity status. She was known as the First Lady of the screen. Let's talk about Evelyn prayer. Evelyn Jarvis was born in eighteen, ninety six in Vicksburg Mississippi after her father died. Evelyn's family moved to Chicago where she performed in Vaudeville shows and practice street, preaching to raise funds to build church. In Nineteen fifteen, when she was nineteen years old Evelyn married her first husband Frank Career. In Nineteen Eighteen Evelyn met author and director Oscar me show who'd become a highly influential African American filmmaker. We show made films for a predominantly black audience and was able to avoid stereotypes that Hollywood Films Inc... Evelyn made her film debut in me. Shows film The homesteaders where she played a woman who's evil, overbearing father causes her husband to abandon her. Michaud Evelyn, his goto leading actress, and in Nineteen Twenty, she started within our gates. She played a teacher who fights to save a school for Black Children. It's the only feature film Evelyn made that survive to this day. As her career blossomed, Evelyn played dramatic characters and was known for her versatility. In between films, Evelyn joined the Lafayette players a black, the actual stock company since theaters were segregated by law in the South and by practice in the north. The Lafayette players brought traditional theater to black audiences throughout the US. Evelyn married her second husband fellow actor Edward Thompson while on tour. In nineteen twenty one, Evelyn performed in the chip woman's fortune. The first drama written by a black playwright to appear on Broadway. The show only ran for two weeks, but W E. B deploys said that dramatically and spiritually it was one of the greatest successes. This country has ever seen. In nineteen twenty six, Evelyn landed a role in the successful Broadway Production Blue Bell. She understudied and played the role of a Harlem Prostitute. She then appeared in the West Coast Revival of Sadie Thompson. We're her performance garnered critical acclaim. In addition to being a talented actor Evelyn was a gifted vocalist. She thrived cabaret and theater, and was occasionally accompanied by a young duke. Ellington and Red Nichols. Up. L.! Y.. Evelyn start in sixteen films. She easily transition from silent films to talkies in the nineteen thirties, musical Georgia rose, which was about a black family migrating north. In nineteen thirty-one Evelyn performed in the film. Ladies of the big house alongside Sylvia Sidney. WHO's one of the most famous entertainers at the time? Her final role was in blonde. Venus which starred Marlene Dietrich and cary grant. Evelyn's performance was credited. Evelyn refused roles that attempted to typecast her, and instead continued acting in challenging roles. Many black actors at the time were not permitted to play. In nineteen, thirty, two Evelyn gave birth to her daughter Adiv Evelyn suffered from postpartum complications, and soon after died of double pneumonia, she was thirty six years old. Though, her career ended prematurely. Evelyn left her mark on Hollywood and on history. She's remembered as pioneering actor and

Michaud Evelyn Evelyn Jarvis Nineteen Twenty Black Children Hollywood Films Inc Frank Career Vicksburg Mississippi United States Sadie Thompson Sylvia Sidney Harlem Chicago Marlene Dietrich Edward Thompson Oscar Lafayette Director Hollywood Pneumonia W E. B
Moderna Starts Phase 3 Trial For Its Coronavirus Vaccine

Squawk Pod

02:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Moderna Starts Phase 3 Trial For Its Coronavirus Vaccine

"Corona, virus cases continue to rise hot spots across the country Madonna Therapeutics is racing to find a vaccine, and as of this weekend it has four hundred seventy two million dollars in government support today marks the launch of Maderna's phase three Cova vaccine study conducted in collaboration with the NIH and the Anti Madeira Develops. Drugs based on what's called. MESSENGER or a these genetic molecules carry instructions from your DNA to other parts of the body to develop certain healthy proteins. The race for a vaccine is moving at an unprecedented pace. There are nearly two hundred candidates development with twenty seven, being tested in humans, the goal getting some kind of. Of FDA nod of approval by next year, although the first vaccine likely won't solve all of our corona virus problems, it's a start and every time markets catch wind of a vaccine approval on the twenty twenty one horizon they respond, which has meant for some Pharma executives big prophets at Madeira Multiple exacts including the CEO you'll hear from in a moment changed their stock. Sale plans this year. Yielding hefty payouts after Cohen, nineteen vaccine trials showed positive results. There are no current allegations of insider trading at Medina, although since news of these stock sales came to light SEC chairman. Jay Clayton joined TV broadcast with a suggestion for companies like modern. I encourage companies to get out there. Disclose where they stand. And limit the amount of sense now it's not possible to limit all touched information. You've got to be negotiations, but limited speculation as to where your company stands. As we move forward and then with respect to things like financing Possible changes in operations, material changes in the way. You do your. Business Practice, good corporate hygiene announce them as soon as you can and before you're able to announce them. Keep that information as tight as possible. The News of Maderna's phase three trial, and it's fresh infusion of government. Cash is a good thing for vaccine hopes,

Maderna Anti Madeira Madonna Therapeutics Jay Clayton NIH FDA Cohen Medina CEO Chairman SEC
How One Covid-19 Victim Was Lost in the Chaos

WSJ What's News

12:06 min | 2 weeks ago

How One Covid-19 Victim Was Lost in the Chaos

"Images and stories from the pandemic that will be seared into many people's memories forever. One of them was the discovery in April of rental trucks, holding dozens of dead bodies out a funeral home in New York City. The people found that day were victims not just of the coronavirus, but of a system overwhelmed one of them was seventy two year old nathaniel hallman. He lived in the Bronx with his wife Mitzi. They were married for forty two years. He repaired whirlpool appliances and in retirement he and his wife or a Deacon and deaconess at the Church of the Meek Baptist. Harlem they visited. visited the sick and shut ins in early April at the height of the pandemic and New York City home in was at a Rehab Center in the Bronx, where he was diagnosed with nineteen, the sent him to the hospital next door where a few weeks later he succumbed to the disease, but that's not where the story ends. It's where it begins our reporter Michael Phillips. He died on April Seventeenth, at Saint Louis Hospital and his goddaughter hope who is a very astute person. decided she would take responsibility for making sure that he was cremated and taking care of and and so his wife is widow. mitzi wouldn't have to do it. And so hope was under the impression that she had only seven days to get his body in the hands of funeral director, or the hospital would give the body to the city, and the city would bury him in a mass grave on Hart Island, which is a the Potter's field for New York City. One hundred and fifty years that the people have been left behind have been buried on on heard island. And, so she thought okay I've got a week to find somebody to take care of the body, and she started calling funeral homes, and they were all full. This was the height of the epidemic of hundreds and of New Yorkers were dying at a day on the day that that Daniel died three hundred eighty four New Yorkers died. And so the funeral homes would just overloaded. She called something like twenty funeral homes, and they all said we can't take him. Her Middle Son was even doing an internship at a Newark New Jersey funeral home and they were full to take Nathanielsz bodies. So she grew more and more panicky over the course of the week, and she contacted a family friend Reverend up in Connecticut, Marshall, Morton and Reverend Morton being in the you know the business of of being a clergyman new number of funeral home directors called up an old contact that he had named James Robinson. Mr Robinson worked out of a funeral home in Neptune City New Jersey as well as one in Brooklyn. And so he said, according to Reverend Morton I'll take care of this for you. I've got it and please. Please take the body down to my funeral home in Neptune. So the Reverend and hope son managed to find a funeral director, who would could drive the body out of New York to Neptune New Jersey Neptune city. And deliver it just before the what hope thought was the deadline at the hospital. They get the body out of there, so they took the bodies of Neptune city Mr Robinson the funeral director was not there. A person who was there said I'm sorry. I can't accept this body. They called up. Mr Robinson the funeral director. And this is where there's a lot of disagreement about what took place, but from the point of view of the family and Reverend Morton. What happened was Robinson said. I didn't mean for you to take it to. New Jersey Take my place in Brooklyn, this is something that that Mr Robinson disputes. He says he never said such a thing. The driver took the body up to Brooklyn to a funeral home called likely funeral services on UTICA avenue in Brooklyn. He dropped the body off there with the people who were there. They put it in. A refrigerated truck was parked on the street. And the family assumed everything was OK at that point. The body was supposed to be cremated on the twenty ninth so a few days later. And when hope called the the crematory to ask whether or not or godfather had been had been cremated, she got an answering. Machine were closed for maintenance the next day. She got answering machine message, but Never received confirmation he had been cremated. During this time news broke about all these bodies in Brooklyn in U. Haul trucks, and that was the same address where they had dropped off Mr Hallman. So hope began to panic and put things together. She called up the Reverend. The Reverend put things together. They all started to worry and at that point they tried to get Mr Robinson to explain where the body was. They tried to get a funeral home to explain where the body was tried to get the city. Medical Examiner explain where the body was, and they just couldn't find. It took until the fifth of May until. Finally learned that her godfather's bodied Nathaniel Hamad's body had actually been in the back of an unrefrigerated u-haul truck left on the street in Brooklyn, just a horrible horrible discovery, and it wasn't the end for Nathaniel. Family, who then spent several weeks trying to get his body and arranged for his final resting. What happened after this? There was another misstep when the bodies were discovered at the funeral home. In the U.. Haul trucks hope called the city medical examiner's office. They had come over. You know when the when the police got there and the after nine one one call reporting bodies and trucks on the street. You know hope called everybody. She could find the governor's offices. The attorneys general of the State of New Jersey and New York. You know. Where's My Godfather? And when she called the medical examiner's office, they had already collected sixty one bodies from the trucks and from clerk. Lee's funeral home itself, including many that would simply on the floor in various states of undress, and on the floor of the Chapel at the funeral homes just loaded with bodies. And so she when she called the medical examiner's office, they went through the list of all the bodies. They retrieved from the funeral home from the trucks. And Nathaniel Holman's name was not on the list, so for days and days she couldn't find out where he was. She even went over with Reverend Morton to the funeral home. Mr Clearly was not there at the time. Mr Robinson was not there at the time and she said. My father was here. Where is he and couldn't couldn't get an answer? And, what happened was and the fifth of May. That medical examiner's office discovered that the name on his paperwork had been reversed as hallman nathaniel so when they had looked up the bodies they had. When hope it call then they looked in their record, says he will what bodies we have. Do we have in home? It came up as a negative. The only had a home in faneuil. And by the fifth of May, they figured this out, and now remember he died on the seventeenth of April, so we're no weeks into this, and only then does hope discover that. In fact, her godfather had been in one of trucks and was now in the care of Medical Examiner's office. At that point, the the medical examiner said look. We have him safe. He's in. You know in cooled unit, so he's he won't decay. To be blunt about it. You can leave them here until you find a funeral director. WHO's able to cremate him? which is what the family wanted to do, so they held onto him and it wasn't until five weeks after his death. I think thirty nine days exactly after his death that they were able to get him cremated, and now his ashes are in an urn that his his widow Mitzi keeps at her bedside Michael. What else did you hear from city officials in response to this as well as from the quickly funeral home. The state authorities suspended Mr Claes. Licensed to act as a funeral director, and then held a series of hearings online hearings to decide whether to permanently revoked his license for you know poor practices, the ruling has not yet come out. They've had three hearings and the lawyers have submitted final closing statements, but the administrative law judge has not yet ruled on whether to revoke his license in listening to the at least one of those hearings, and in talking to Mr.. Claes attorney, he's basically the the argument is they were holding the bodies in the U. Haul trucks as they were moving them from the refrigerated truck which was. Recognized waited two whole bodies into the funeral home to be packaged up four cremation. And so he said we would keep them in the in the U. Haul trucks for a while and then move them. It was hard I think for the prosecuting attorney. I guess he'd be called the prosecuting attorney. Understand that because the argument is why not just move them from the refrigerated truck all the way into funeral home instead of stopping. This is just a matter of a few yards, so stopping and putting them in a truck. Mr Quickly. That's Mr Clarke's defense as well as his lawyer said to me. Look the whole city was inundated with bodies. Just wasn't enough. Space to handle the mall and so things happen. And he said that he thought it was unfair that his client Mr clinically was being singled out when so many other funeral homes were also overcrowded in his in his argument. So, that that is his defense Mister Robinson's defense. He has not been charged with any anything by the state. He has not been his has not been suspended, but in talking to him, his argument is. I never had that body. I never signed any paperwork saying that that body was under my control so everyone who says that I did agree to take control of Mr. Hammond's body is line. That is his argument. There are text messages back and forth in which he says that he would take care of the body, but he also said and give me the paperwork, so there's now a lawsuit underway Msci Hallman and hope dukes. Who is the the Goddaughter of Daniel? Hallman have filed suit against the he quickly home as well as Mr. Robinson And are seeking damages for what they describe of course as mistreatment of Nathaniel remains. Michael as you say, and as you've heard from many of the people in this story, Nathanielsz body was one of dozens discovered in rental trucks during the height of the pandemic. What did reporting out the story and what happened in this one case? Tell you about what happened here in New York at the height of this. So, what are your takeaways from this tragic story? This won't come as a surprise to anybody but. When the pandemic really hits and went really hit New York. Hardest I. At least in the United States of course. It just overwhelmed the system. The city and the people who who manage these things would just not ready for overwhelming the doctor. Was Internal Internist resident at Saint Barnabas Hospital. Who took? Mitzi up to see Nathaniel before he died is she would cry constantly into her. into a mask and goggles because there's just so much misery. All around her. And the same situation occurred with with the body's. Just the city. Wasn't prepared for the awfulness that that's that hit it. I can't judge whether they should have been more prepared. Or there was some mistake making made made at some point. That's not really within my capacity to judge. But, certainly, it was overwhelmed. And that meant that there are a lot of a lot of collateral damage and. Michi and hope, and of course Nathaniel himself were part of that collateral damage, and now I think. Between lawsuits and historians and journalists looking back at what happened. We'll start to peel that apart and figure out. Who did what who could have done things that were you know could have done things better and who who? Who did the best they could?

Mister Robinson New York City Nathaniel Hallman Reverend Morton Nathaniel Director Brooklyn Mitzi New Jersey Funeral Michael Phillips Neptune New Jersey Neptune Cit Mr Robinson Neptune City New Jersey Bronx Mr Claes Mr Clearly Mr Quickly
Well in Brooklyn. We've still - Gal Test 5

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

08:22 min | 3 weeks ago

Well in Brooklyn. We've still - Gal Test 5

"The the world's world's biggest biggest companies companies are are joining joining forces forces to to cut cut carbon carbon emissions emissions and and a a double double punch punch of of the the movie movie industry industry from from the the Corona Corona virus. virus. Wednesdays Wednesdays one. one. Let's Let's get get a a check check of of traffic traffic in in transit transit on on the the ones ones now now from from Karen Karen Stewart. Stewart. Well Well in in Brooklyn. Brooklyn. We've We've still still got got a a full full closure closure of of the the Bhagwan Bhagwan is is Ram Ram to to the the Brooklyn Brooklyn Battery Battery Tunnel. Tunnel. We're We're dealing dealing with with the the debris debris spilled spilled that's that's been been out out there there since since before before five this morning. All lanes are blocked. They have reopened the H O V lane. The trouble of traffic squeaked by it is working very, very slowly. We are jammed in the guano is from back in the Verrazano Bridge. Bell Parkway is jammed onto the guan US from back of Bay Ridge Avenue on the Prospect Expressway delayed up to the go honest now starts back at Seely Street almost on Ocean Parkway. So in New Jersey. The good news is the North bound Turnpike Express lines are open and 71 The delays are easing out enormously. The delight of the inbound UW birds. Charles from the 80 95 Express is now only about 10 15 minutes. We are heavy across the spam into the city over the Alexander Hamilton on the eastbound cross Bronx will stay heavy until you get to Grand concourse. Upper East Side still bumper to bumper on the South Harlem River from 132nd Street Down East Harlem 114th. It stays heavy down the FDR but earlier problems in the seventies gone, and so things were starting to look up in the world. There is a need to know about the bridges and tunnels, 59th Street Bridge, absolutely packed from Queens Boulevard and Northern Boulevard. What? Throgs Throgs Neck Neck and and Whitestone Whitestone are are still still in in very very good good condition condition and and on on on Long Long Long Long Island, Island, Island, Island, Island, the the the the the westbound westbound westbound westbound westbound ally. ally. ally. ally. ally. He He He He He has has has has has delays delays delays delays delays now. now. now. now. now. Not Not Not Not Not too too too too too bad, bad, bad, bad, bad, though. though. though. though. though. Out Out Out Out Out into into into into into Asian Asian Asian Asian Asian 39 39 39 39 39 for for for for for Glen Glen Glen Glen Glen Cove Cove Cove Cove Cove Road. Road. Road. Road. Road. I'm I'm I'm I'm I'm Karen Karen Karen Karen Karen Stewart Stewart Stewart Stewart Stewart on on on on on 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 10 wins. wins. wins. wins. wins. No No No No No New New New New New York York York York York City City City City City is is is is now now now now officially officially officially officially in in in in a a a a heat heat heat heat wave. wave. wave. wave. But But But But on on on on the the the the upside, upside, upside, upside, it it it it should should should should be be be be a a a a relatively relatively relatively relatively short short short short heatwave. heatwave. heatwave. heatwave. Let's Let's Let's Let's get get get get specifics specifics specifics specifics from from from from digging digging digging digging divorce. divorce. divorce. divorce. Thank Thank Thank you you you Other Other Other Dane? Dane? Dane? Yeah, Yeah, Yeah, we we we hit hit hit 90 90 90 plus plus plus third day in a row yesterday. The brutal nous of that heat and humidity really evident the last couple of days. One thing you'll notice those you're out the door this morning is the dew point or the amount of humidity in the air is down a bit, so it'll still be hot today, not quite as human. We'll still get above 90 and real fields in the upper nineties with mostly sunny skies. Humanity searches back tonight and there could be a thunderstorm towards daybreak. We get close to 90 the next couple of days tomorrow Thursday, but the humidities backup so real fields will be in the low to mid nineties. So while we may ease out of the heat wave specifically, it's still going to be pretty rotten till we get towards the end of the week in terms of lesser humidity, arriving for the weekend itself will keep you up to date as we go through this He wait continuing today on New York's weather station 10 10 wins. Okay, 80 right now, now, with with a a real real feel feel of of 85. 85. Resident Resident trumps trumps been been sending sending in in federal federal agents agents to to deal deal with with unrest unrest in in Portland, Portland, Oregon, Oregon, has has been been threatening threatening to to do do so. so. Another Another city city is is run run by by Democrats Democrats of the local authority. Don't get the violence in those cities under control, but Merida, Blasio says it's not going to happen. Here is Glenn Shock reports from Midtown this morning, Glenn Federal police like Homeland Security agents are said to be going into Chicago unless legal action stops it Now. The president wants to go further blaming liberal Democrats for crime and unrest in other cities like Philadelphia, Detroit and New York. And that Federal help is needed here is well. New York won last night, the mayor, calling the president's threats all politics and rejects any federal cop plan. He's trying to send an outside presence. It's not because it's needed to protect those buildings again. The same way he's used ice. He uses ice as an extension of his reelection campaign, not protect people. In fact, the mayor says, they'll take legal action that the president does send in federal law enforcement. Every time we've seen the president do things that are illegal and unconstitutional. We've challenged him in court overwhelmingly beat him, and he's had to retreat. But on Monday, the president saying New York City's police are Restricted from doing anything and that federal help may be needed. One shot 10 10 wins here in Midtown rowing. Dan Hollander, the men's rights lawyer suspected of killing the son of federal judge Esther Solace and wounding her husband may also have been responsible for the murder of another men's rights attorney in California. Mark Angelucci was shot by somebody disguised as a FedEx delivery man, the same M O that was used in the killing of the judge's son, Daniel, and dairy and the wounding of her husband, Mark and dearie. Neighbor, Marion Costanza, says Daniel, who was 20 years old was a hero. I'm thinking making another kid would hide in the closet. I mean, you had gunshot. You get scared. You don't know what to do. This kid just ran to help his dad. I really can't believe that they were very close. Investigators say Roy Dan Hollander may have been hunting down enemies after being diagnosed with terminal cancer. He had once argued a case before Judge Solace he was found dead. From a self inflicted gunshot wound in his car in Liberty, New York yesterday. A deadly collision at a marina in the Bronx. Last night, two Jet skis collided, killing two men. The victims were rushed to Jacoby Medical Center but could not be saved. Officer is still working on identifying the men who were not carrying ID. New York City's and face for every opening, then supposed to be the final phase. But as you may have noticed, a lot of stuff still isn't open, notably bars and restaurants, at least for indoor purposes. The governor says the city is just not ready for that, even if many of the people who live in the city already As evidenced by crowds gathering outside restaurants and bars to the parties who come out. I understand the frustration. I understand you've been inside for a long time. I understand it's your young. I understand people like to socialize. I get that It's the summer I get that. Has to stop. He says. Cops need to enforce the law. The mayor and the governor are in a court of least on that one with the blonde CEO, saying troubling overcrowding at restaurants will not be tolerated. New Jersey governor, Murphy says parents will have the option to keep their kids out of school this fall. The Department of Education will be releasing guidance, allowing for parents to choose all remote learning. For their Children. The details will be coming out later this week, but we wanted everyone to know that we will allow for the step. Open a Murphy, adding It's just not possible for school to resume on a normal schedule this fall. Long Beach is now banning non residents not just from the beach on the weekends, but also banning everyone from the boardwalk residents to at night. This after lots of young people crowded onto the boardwalk last Saturday night. It was insanity there. There was no way they can put it under control Long Beach resident in favor of the nightly boardwalk shut down, which will begin nine PM Thursday. The move comes after Governor Cuomo said that revelers flouting his executive orders mandating social distancing. Are behaving in ways that could undo the state's progress against the pandemic. This gentleman, however, disagrees reaches for everybody, and they should all enjoy it. Long Beach Boardwalk will reopen at dawn. Sadie. Degrees mostly sunny. We're going up to 92 Yankee, whether real field 85 Alvez Geico, 15 minutes could save you 15% or more on car insurance. Is a wedding coming up in a few weeks and you are invited. We're going to hold it right here on sense and wins. As John Montalbano is here to explain this morning, John. Theirs is a love in the time of Cove it Ashley Isaacs is a nurse at New York Presbyterian Israel Wretches played in a band. She liked them, but he was not the type of guy to commit. Until I met the girl. I met the girl and I felt I felt differently about it. Every time I spoke to her, I had butterflies. Every time he saw her. I had butterflies, Then two punches to the gut. He was diagnosed with stage four Hodgkin's lymphoma. And she was caring for Corona virus patients. I'm putting myself in danger. I'm goingto possibly put my fiance in danger and you kind of have this fight with yourself and it's hard. It's definitely hard at the end of the day. Takes a toll on you. Israel is in remission. But as to their big wedding plans crazy to say the

Karen Karen Karen Karen Karen New York City Glen Glen Glen Glen Glen Cove President Trump New York York York York York Brooklyn New Jersey Long Beach Asian Asian Asian Asian Asian Long Long Long Long Island Esther Solace Verrazano Bridge Midtown Bhagwan Bhagwan Dan Hollander New York Dane Throgs Throgs Neck Neck Long Beach Boardwalk
Journalists of Color

It's Been a Minute with Sam Sanders

37:15 min | Last month

Journalists of Color

"Before the interviews I wanNA share my theory. For why all of this exploded for journalists of Color Right now? It goes back a few years. So many of us went from covering the first black president to covering Donald Trump. And ever, since trump came down that escalator, announcing his campaign back in Twenty fifteen, when he denounced Mexicans as drug traffickers rapist. When he was that he would build a wall at the border and that Mexico will pay for it. Those journalists were told to avoid using words like racist or lie to describe some of trump's worse behavior. That kind of self censorship, especially on race for a lot of us, it became untenable after we had to cover the death of George Floyd and report on that video of a black man, being choked to death for eight minutes. On top of that we are now dealing with the coronavirus pandemic, which is laying bare racial inequities across this country. And Corinthian has given a lot of us time to sit and think. Notice what's going on in the world and in our lives and in our newsrooms? You have black journalists and other journalists of color who think of themselves as truth seekers in the same way that their white colleagues, too, but very often when they tell the truth about racism when they tell the truth about. Bright, white supremacy. They're labeled as activist. Highs! They dared to bring their blackness across the newsroom threshold. PSORIATIC McDonald's has been thinking a lot about race and the news. So I asked her as a black journalist in this moment. What does she want to see change so I would say what I want is actual structural change within newsroom leadership? I do not want the equivalent of painting black lives matter on a street in yellow letters, but in a newsroom. It's visible. By that doesn't really solve anything when it comes to pay discrepancies between. White male journalists and black female journalist who do the same job have the same level of experience and one is making thirty thousand dollars a year more than the other. The other thing is that. You cannot have. Newsroom leadership that is completely made up of six Cheddar straight white men. Even. Under straight white women. Zicklin or gender straight Whiteman that power needs to be distributed more equitably. You know the other thing died. I want to see I wanNA see US cover. Race honestly. right? Race isn't just something that black people, experience or something that non white experience, attempting that everyone experience and says and so. There needs to be a baseline of literacy rate when it comes to how we talk about race with an America how it operates within American history, and how that informs. President and what world. News media has played in that way. We have to consider that. The last time that we had a pandemic, the nineteen eighteen flu pandemic. We need to recognize that. The paper of record in Chicago the Chicago Tribune. Is Basically scapegoating black people who are fleeing the American south, basically saying Oh half a million darkies are basically invading Chicago. If that's objectivity as not the kind of objectivity that I want to participate in them. Yeah, yeah, I WANNA get personal a little bit You ended up being quoted in New York Times. Article about this reckoning talking about how you didn't have a great time at the Washington Post. You've tweeted about your experience as a black woman in newsrooms. What does this reckoning meant for you? And what have you been trying to get off your chest and this moment about your experience? In some of the newsroom's that we've been talking about my hope for this reckoning. is that. There is not one more class of you know young. Ernest! Twenty two year old coming out of journalism school I'm who basically have to go through this really damaging gauntlet. We're constantly sort of questioning yourself and your own worth and I think there are a lot of really talented journalists who have been driven from the field. Because at some point, they feel like they have to make a choice between their own mental health. Or being journalist. And they just self-preservation and I cannot blame them. and that is really a shame, because think about the people that those journalists now think about the stories that they could have told. The access they could have had picked the access to walk into certain spaces at their white colleagues cannot exactly and you know one of the ways, and this is not the only way that this is important, but one of the ways that this is important is. We need them to trust us. Our job is to tell their stories and to tell them accurately and to tell them fairly. And if people are are always getting pushed out the folks who might actually be able to empathize with them who know where they're coming from right I? There's a quote from their lake when I fall where she basically expresses the you know, she's probably the only person who covered public housing who's actually lived in public housing? That, yeah, that is. Expertise right that is. Valuable knowledge so I just I want us to be able to practice our profession with humanity. Yeah, and also it's like in this moment where it seems like more than ever before. At least in my lifetime, there is such a deficit of trust. Americans don't trust institutions. They don't trust journalism. They don't trust facts. Worst argument about whether or not mask can prevent the spread of Corona virus like in this environment if newsrooms don't act in fix some of this stuff. is going to create more mistrust in the media and these news outlets will become less relevant in a moment in which I would argue. They are needed more than ever before. Yes, and you know the thing is is and I've said this repeatedly at that American journalism does have a credibility crisis. The the credibility crisis that we have I think. Actually bears a lot of similarities to. Our current sort of Voter disenfranchisement problem. Being. In Journalism, we have not spent enough time. with the very same folks who are often disenfranchised when it comes to media coverage as well right. And when we think about the press and freedom of the press is an instrument of democracy we have to think about. enfranchising everyone, we have to think about making sure that they do find us credible. The folks. If they look at the newspaper, even look at a website or they listen to the radio and their conclusion is. That these entities are not telling the truth about them in their lives and held their lives are. For them yeah for them. That's a credibility issue for us. Yeah we can fix. It failed them. That means that. We have to develop far better relationships with folks who have historically been shunned or shut out of district of media coverage are only allowed to participate in very limited ways. You know I still very much believe in that adage, the journalism exist to comfort the afflicted and afflict comfortable. Thanks again to riot, not at McDonald's the culture writer for the undefeated and also this year. She was nominated a pilot sir. My mind. I wanted to hear from other journalists of color about their newsroom experiences. And they wrote in. Here if you, my name is Lavi Cima Guy side. I'm a naturalized citizen who came to this country as a young child. I worked at a bare he a newspaper for a long time and have fond memories of my time there. I had mostly white editors, and in fact, I've only had one non white supervisor in my over two decades in journalism. My name is John. Sepulvado, I mixed. I have Mexican Irish indigenous and Black Ancestry I worked in public media for fifteen years. There are tons of horror stories. There was the white woman editor who asked me if I like dog-fighting because she quote hurt. Might People like dogfighting? There was another white woman editor told me to smile more around the office because I quote have dark features and those dark features, scared herself and other white women around the office. One time a headline I, wrote for one of my own stories, led to a newsroom wide, meeting an emotional one, where a bunch of US had to persuade top editors to let us call the president's racism what it is! The most frustrating part was that I and others had to explain to our colleagues. Why our voices were important. And partly because they reflected the communities we covered. argued. Repeat, a thousand more stories like that. But at. A point I realized. That no matter what I did no matter how good I was no matter how hard I worked. I would always be seen. As something that is not. White. And my mobile was the leave the industry. All right time for a break. When we come back, we will hear from Latina, trailblazer who refused to leave the news business. Instead. She started her own media company to tell the stories that she wanted to tell. Hey another reminder asking you all to fill out that survey for us. Okay, it is anonymous. It is short and the link for it is NPR DOT org slash I B. A. M. Survey. All one word I BAM SURVEY NPR DOT Org. Slash IBM. Filled out I'll be really happy if he do thanks. This message comes from NPR sponsor discover. Sometimes, food is more than just food. It's an integral part of the community so this year discoveries, giving five million dollars to support black owned restaurants to places like Rodney Scott Barbecue in Charleston post office spies Birmingham back in the day bakery, and Savannah and hundreds more places in your local community all across the country. Learn how you can show your support at discover dot com. Whenever you face a choice. It helps to think like an economist and this week on Planet Lenny Summer. School will start off our course in economics within workout for your brain how to decide what something newly costs for? Planet money from, NPR. People still find it really interesting salmon like I'm like no. No I. I was the first Latina in the newsroom at NPR ever to step foot. WHO WASN'T CLEANING IT? That was me right that that was that. Was this Latina? That is Maria. She's had a long career in media, not just here NPR but also at CNN NPS in two thousand ten. She founded her own company for total media. And she has a memoir. It's called once. I was you that comes out in September, but most of you probably know Maria. As the host of a very long running public radio show turned podcast from NPR and through media. It's like new USA mighty. Hossack Latino USA has been around since the early nineties. It is attributed by NPR. which is why you hear NPR in the credits, but that will be changing USA is moving. As distributor. It means nothing's GonNa Change for you. Our listener that our audience is going to get way way way bigger. We're very excited. Announcement might have been confusing for listeners, but don't worry like. She said you'll still be able to hear the show. But the Journal of Color, especially in public radio that move meant that NPR was losing a hugely influential show dedicated to covering Latino stories in the US. And from its founding NPR has been well bad on race. More than seventy percent of NPR's newsroom is white and of the sources you here on NPR's air, those voices they are more than eighty percent white. People of Color who work in public media? We have been saying for years. Fix this including Maria Hosa. We're asking the question. Are you listening? Are you hearing? And that his own ready a power dynamic that is wrong. This notion is the assumption that they the they will always have the power I. Ask Maria what Latino USA leaving NPR means for this network, but I I asked her about blazing trails. One could see your path to be one of color who found her own company as a shining success, but one could also see your path as proving that the conventional spaces in media can accommodate of voice like you the way they should you know like. I'm so proud of what you're doing, but also the fact that you have to make your own production company shows at the NPR's and the PBS's and the CNN in many ways. Don't get it and can't help people like you tell the stories that you need to tell. I was thinking about that as I was thinking about our interview Sam because. My husband calls me Aguirre, a warrior, and then as I was thinking about our conversation, Sam. I was like well. That's great i. like that, but you know what I don't want. Journalists of color to have to be warriors at into order to be able to work as To work as journalists of Contians, who can bring their entire cells into the news room? Who are going to be seen who are going to not only be seen and heard but actually. Put into positions of power to be the ones who are listening and making the decisions about. Yeah, we want that story on the front page and the headline is going to say that exactly. I want you you know everyone has been using it. Everyone's been going to twitter sharing their reckoning story, the slight the knocked in that promotion. The being told you can't do this do that. Give me one of your reckoning stories from your career when I when I come to this country, I'm born in Mexico. My whole family's born in Mexico. We're raised on south side of Chicago. You know sixties and seventies, but as Mexican immigrants we also understood the essential nature of journalism and American independent journalism and so. My father was watching. Meet the press every Sunday and we were watching the today show and we watched sixty minutes, and because of the fact that it was so American in holding people accountable and I was like that's what journalism is so long. Story Short is many years later actually a decade ago go to sixty minutes when I'm out of work and needed a job actually and. They basically like look, can you Can you come back and talk to us? When one of the old white guys get secret is really and I, said and I just remember like. Like am I supposed to laugh? It's funny. Is that a joke as being? and. As we do in the media's people of Color, 'cause we're really good at laughing things off. Like. Yeah. Banter you know the the the the the we're so smart. On. Exactly Racism! Exactly. And I got into the subway at fifty ninth street onto my apartment in Harlem and I cried on the train. and. I was just like, but I am not. You know I'm knocking to let this take me down. And that was the moment that I decided to create food. Media Winds Rams history. Takes over Latino, USA. And Expands Latino USA grows the show and let the USA's audience twenty seven years in. Is in a continual upward trajectory. You love to see it. As I. Want to ask more about what needs to happen. We are in this moment now. Where so many journalists coming forward with their stories? But it's still unclear what newsroom leaders will actually do to fix this stuff you have been on all sides of media for profit nonprofit. Give me like a checklist of the big three or four things that mass media should do right now to effectively respond to the issues raised in this reckoning. Feel like this is a moment to be having that difficult conversation, which is pushing this reckoning that we're talking about to another level. I'm going. Give you an example, Sam it brings me joy, it brings me no joy to have to ask white men in senior editorial positions how they consider my role as a Mexican immigrant woman journalist. In relation to a president who insults every single one of those things that I do? And and And basis a lot of that on his white supremacy. Which is very challenging word to even use in our newsrooms right, but yeah. I don't feel comfortable saying it. I want you to feel uncomfortable having to answer that question. Because his white supremacy does not impact you in the way, it impacts me, and I am a journalist just like you. I am an equal journalist just like you so now. You helped me to figure out. Harmon handle that because that that impacts our might quote unquote objectively, you have to be able to recognize that you do not have an ownership of activity or an ownership of the media or an ownership of public media, or it's not yours to share yeah. Did any of the issues we've discussed about. In diversity and Unfair situations that journals of have to deal within this industry. Did those factor into your business decision. To leave NPR ex. Look I've had you know NPR's my family? IF NPR calls I'm going to say when you I was absolutely and Bureau Sam he's my family. You know we hung out once, but he's. He's my brother. Because we're digesting PR so NPR's my family Mi. Familia was my first job. But You know I started a company. And I have a team of very savvy business and media executives journalists. And when they said look, we have an opportunity here in in a competitive marketplace A. Somebody PR X.. Who wants to really go big? Yeah, I will say you know they are all of these. Underground email channels and slack channels and discussion boards were journalists of color are coming together to talk about all these issues and there's been a lot of chatter about your show. What says about NPR yeah? Why am I so disconnected? Oh my God. I thought I. Thought I was like connected because I'm on twitter and I got a fat. And what folks have been saying? People who love your show Oh my goodness. They're saying well. This speaks to the larger problems. NPR has always had with content may for people of Color. They don't market it enough. They don't support it enough. You have these program. Directors at various stations put a show like yours on at not great hours. This is the stuff that people are saying. Do you I mean like to the extent that you can elaborate on it, you know. Did you feel like NPR? Neglected or didn't promote enough your type of show. So of these issues at play with the race and diversity in space like NPR. Again. Let New USA right now is growing an audience at kind of extraordinary numbers I think we're one of the few public radio programs or previously distributed by NPR. That is growing an audience at these numbers. And so the fact that. We made this decision. Says everything about. WHAT NPR. Kind of thinks. About letting USA. Now having said that I don't know you know I. Don't know the internal finances at NPR. Maybe NPR's is is really facing a a real financial challenges that I'm not privy to. And so you know, but but when you're thinking about AH, show, that has this kind of. Audience Commitment There was a point not long ago. When one of your colleagues called me up, actually she works in. She's a Latina colleague at NPR in the newsroom, and she called me up and she said. Do you think that Latino USA has been this incredibly successful because of NPR or despite NPR. And no one had asked me that and I kind of like. ooh And I said well actually despite. Despite NPR, do you think you know 'cause? There are a lot of shows not produced by NPR. Distributed by NPR. Do, you think other shows like that in your same boat that were hosted by white people or felt to maybe India leadership more mainstream. Do you think they got more support than your show did pound for pound? Yeah How does that make you feel? Like I said, that's why. I didn't. See I've been feeling this for a long time, my love. News, so Gimme a word for the emotion. Well right now I'm glad that I'm with a partnership with Pr X.. That's not gonNA units not on the table so I'm like I'm looking to the future. That's why I'm like yeah I'm all about like? It's all about the dodge this morning, boxing teacher. was making us do the we've the. We've the constant, which by the way is really really hard, and that's just how I feel is a journalist of color in a survivor Mexican immigrant woman in this like it's always like whoo. Okay well and so. That stuff that you're saying like. How does it make me? That's rolled off me a long time ago, and it is a central part of what has moved me as a journalist as a woman of color in this country is that. Is like. Oh, you're going to try to silence me or tell me that I'm not objective or tell me that I have an agenda or tell me that is not going to be successful or tell me. Okay I might go home and cry. But I'm not GONNA give up. Thanks, again to Maria Hinojosa. She's the host of the Tino USA. We asked NPR for a response to what Maria told us and they gave us this statement. We have the highest respect and admiration for the Latino USA team and from Maria Hinojosa. We are proud. That Latino USA originated at NPR member station, K. U. T., and that since nineteen, ninety-four NPR has been the program's national distribution partner today, hundreds of NPR member stations bring the show to their listening communities. We are grateful. Maria entertain who are produced a consistently wonderful show and nurtured journalist who have gone on to work all over the public radio system. We are glad public radio listeners will continue to hear Latino. USA on their public radio stations across the nation. All right now. We're going to have a chat with someone who just began working with NPR Kelly. McBride NPR's newest public editor. I WanNa talk with her. About one particular part of this entire debate, the way in which we've been taught as journalists to do our jobs that most fundamental level leads to systemically racist outcomes. I am talking specifically about the idea of journalistic objectivity. This idea that reporters only report the facts. They keep themselves out of the story, and they eliminate all biased in their coverage. A lot of folks say well. That only works if you're man and straight. And White. I wanted to find out. Why are journalism so entrenched in objectivity and whether or not this standard is fair, so I went to one of the top journalism at experts in the country I am the senior vice president at the POYNTER institute. I am the chair of the Craig Newmark Center Ethics in leadership at the Poynter Institute and I am also the public editor for NPR that Kelly McBride. Kelly has advised newsrooms about difficult journalism ethics problems for years, so it made. Made, sense to begin by asking Kelly for her definition of objectivity in journalism, it really means that you will objectively pursue the facts in order to determine the truth, and there's all sorts of things that go into that right like there's how you frame the story how you identify who you're going to interview, and then really important is who else is involved in the story. So who edits it because that the the safety nets that are created in newsrooms are meant. To help an individual program against her own bias now the problem is if all the safety nets have the same biases that that doesn't happen right and that's. That's exactly what's been happier. Also objectivity has come to mean certain different things for different journalists. There are some. Who say well objectivity means that you have to. Pretend! That kind of you don't exist, and you have to just simply say what these powerful people are saying doing. You don't provide context you don't provide analysis. It's a kind of. Totally taking yourself all the way out of it to the point where you won't even tell people if you vote or not. And I think. This is the thing for me like there's so many different interpretations of what objectivity means, yet you know that's actually kind of a confederation of two different principals in journalism, so one is the principle of objectivity in this idea that that we are pursuing the truth in spite of our own biases, and that that we actually promised, swear to God that we're going to get it right because we have all these safeguards in place, even though they've failed numerous times in the past. But the other thing is is that in American journalism in particular? It was built on this business principle of aggregating A. Politically diverse audience, and then selling that audience to advertisers, so in in Europe you see much more you see much more of the journalism coming through a political lens because that's just how the business model grew up over there, but over here especially as in different markets, you went from multiple newspapers to a single newspaper. There was this motive that was really a business motive that you would bring in the entire political spectrum and if you were going to do that, you needed to convince that audience that you in the newsroom didn't have. Any particular biases it is refreshing to hear you as a leader in the industry acknowledged that some of this is about the principles and bedrocks of our journalism, and some of it's about business, and at the end of the day for whatever reason we have ended up with a definition of objectivity. That is as much about business as it is about telling the truth and I think what frustrates so many journalists, somebody younger journalists, journalists of color or women require journalists as at newsroom leaders are resistant to acknowledge that I read NPR's social media policy, and it's couched in terms of ethics and morality and idealism. But I also know that part of it is the bottom line is. Not Do anything of the public facing person at NPR. That would possibly damage NPR's revenue streams. And I mad. They don't just say that. Yeah? They don't mean to say that they. Don't I mean that's the thing is they? Don't. They really do believe, and I actually believe also that there is. That there is a line somewhere that we shouldn't cross, and maybe it is way up the continuum on just. If you're a political reporter. You can't help people who you're voting for. Maybe the line is all the way over there. Right, because of imagine that like if you were a political reporter in you were covering. Trump's campaign and you again. I'm voting for Biden though I was that guy. Did you tell people out loud. I didn't tell folks voting for in two thousand sixteen, and I wouldn't but I think gets. Those are the ones where I think everyone can agree, but there's there's there's other things like how much of me do I. Bring to a story when I'm covering police violence against black men. Am I allowed to say that's racist. Because I know what racism is experienced, it trust me and don't make me say racially tinged. Like those, and that's where it gets murkier well. You know you know where I. I experienced this. Yeah, so when gay marriage was was a hot hot issue, right? They were different cities or states that were making gay marriage legal. The Supreme Court hadn't yet decided in San Francisco the mayor of San Francisco. made it legal and a reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle on a Saturday after weeks of covering it, the City Hall reporter went down and got a marriage license, and she was taken off the beat. Wow, and as in as an ethicist, right is a journalism ethicist. I was like wait a second. That can't be right. because. She was exercising in San Francisco. What was a legal right? You don't mean you didn't tell people who'd been divorced. They couldn't cover this issue because they'd you know somehow. Defiled the sanctity of marriage by? Getting divorced. So that was, that was where realized that you cannot penalize people for who they are. That's not fair. Yeah, because you end up with the only people that are untainted enough to do all the work are people who are only straight are people who are only men are people who have only gone to college and has a certain pedigree people who are an the deaths a problem, so bias is to right. It's just that we don't well. That's the thing, but these leaders aren't seeing those. Yeah, because they look just like them. I think now what is required to speak to the Syria. Systemic issues being raised in this reckoning. Going to have to be an acknowledgement that the movement toward writing these wrongs. It's going to be in some ways painful and you should do it anyway. From your conversations with newsroom leaders across the country. Do you think they're ready to accept that idea that this might hurt that? It might not just be. A statement and everyone shakes hands, and says sure good now now I mean nobody wants to voluntarily sign up for something painful. You do it because you know that what comes on the other side is worth head. There's individuals in every single newsroom who are part of the problem. Then somebody has to tell those people that if they want to keep their jobs, they have to stop being part of the problem, and that means that they're either going to have to be quiet. Or they're going to have to change or leave. Just leave well. That's I mean if they want to keep their job right like. Yeah and I've seen people. Who are these problem, people? I don't think I've ever seen any of them. Actually chain, but I've seen some of them. Learn to be quiet and let other people lead. And then they actually become the beneficiary. Of what comes after yeah. And then I. Think also so many lessons of me too I. Think are applicable to this meteoroid. Me To kind of work. Because a lot of folks were just literally canceled and they had to go, they were shamed. They were fired. And you said you can't be here anymore. And it was painful for them, and probably all the folks that liked them in love them but like. Sometimes, it's just that yeah. So my last question for you back to these two ideals that butt heads this idea of objectivity. But also this business idea of needing to be somewhat neutral to appeal to a large audience. And reworking probably reassessing, what objectively means a newsroom? What advice would you give to newsroom leaders? Writing up that next ethics guideline for their journalist about quote, Unquote Objectivity Post reckoning. Yeah, so this is where I'm supposed to come through with something really profound and I mean I. I am I. Am humble enough to say. That I don't have the answer yet. But I'm also arrogant enough to say that I believe after working through lots of really really hard ethics problems with newsrooms that I think we are going to find the answer and I think it's going to start by. Recognizing that there is a difference between. Revealing political bias. and. Revealing lived experience. And we need to start there and say your lived. Experience should not count as political bias. Thanks again to Kelly McBride joining us and thanks to everyone who, over the last week or so shared very very personal stories about life as a person of color in the newsroom. I heard from colleagues as well. And one thing one of those colleagues told me about all of this. She said so much of this work is convincing journalist. who think they've been doing it right for so long that maybe in some ways they've been doing it wrong. And then she said to me. This phrase really stuck with me, she said. How do you argue with the fish about the water there's. I. Don't know just yet how to do that. It's pretty difficult. It seems frustrating,

NPR United States President Trump Maria Chicago Donald Trump Mexico Mcbride Npr George Floyd Washington Post New York Times Kelly Mcbride FLU Bureau Sam Chicago Tribune Scapegoating Mcdonald
"harlem" Discussed on The Trip

The Trip

03:25 min | 3 months ago

"harlem" Discussed on The Trip

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Rodriguez <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> executive <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> producers <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are me in that <Speech_Music_Male> Goulding also of <Speech_Music_Male> roads and Kingdoms <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> as a reminder <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for the first time <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> in a long time we <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> are free and available <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> on <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Apple Stitcher <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> spotify wherever <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you get your podcast. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> That means that <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> your ratings and <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> reviews mean more <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> than ever. <Speech_Music_Male> Please leave a review. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> If you haven't yet <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I've been <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> getting great suggestions <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> from everyone about <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> future guests thank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> you. I'm <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> technically keep <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> them coming at the trip. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Podcast on instagram. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Contact at Rhodes <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and CAIMANS DOT <Music> <Advertisement> com. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> You will meet you there. <Music>

"harlem" Discussed on The Trip

The Trip

11:18 min | 3 months ago

"harlem" Discussed on The Trip

"So now. I had to backtrack to my dad and that Tuesday. I made the decision to go and take care of him like round the clock because now no one's coming in the nursing supervisor was like let's try to get him into a facility so that he can get adequate care round the clock care We they wouldn't take him. Because of the virus he had he had ran fever which is part of the transition out phase and part also part of the cancer because the tumor is like an infection so the body will start to try to fight it. Which is where the fever comes from. But then also it's a symptom apparently of end of life so all these things I learned from this little pamphlet. They gave me which is crazy by the way they gave you a pamphlet. That's literally yeah. They came to meet me. They're like okay. We're GONNA come to the House on Mike. Okay good. They're like but we're not coming upstairs. That like you have to meet US downstairs. I was like okay so I'm laughing but it's really not funny like that's just an adverse reaction to other but What else can you die out there? And right on the corner of one hundred. Forty second and Frederick Douglass Boulevard. It's myself the nursing supervisor. The other nurse that was with him on the phone was the social worker for the four of us are having this conversation on the corner and they basically pulled out this book and I think it's called Gone from sight or something and it basically maps out. How the next month to two weeks to few hours. They're going to play out. And so it gives you all the details of how the person you're paying for is going to transition into death well and they just handed to you. They're like here's the book there's like you know. Look through it. It'll give you an idea of what you're dealing with their like. Start MAKING ARRANGEMENTS. Start calling funeral homes and see what you can do as far as getting that covered and you know we'll call you later and I was like okay. Goodness just on the street cornered dropped off like a like a package. Well let me ask you about the the you know that process. That would have been in this little strange handbook that they'd you you started calling funeral homes trying to figure out how to deal with with arrangements. What was that like in in the middle of this pandemic so we had A. We had a funeral home that we were scheduled to work with already so called and I said Hey. I think it's time you know. My Dad is nearing the end. They're giving him. You know maybe a week to a couple of days and so that was the first conversation and this particular funeral home. Venter's they also cared for my grandparents when the past so it's sort of like a family go to And so the initial conversation was we are at capacity. We don't we just don't have the space and I was like wait. What is that me? I don't wait. What do you mean other capacity? I don't like it didn't compute because I'm like a funeral home at capacity. What does that mean? So they're like you know we don't have any space for storage and the alternative to storage for a lot of these places was the city morgue don't know if you've seen the city morgue lately no. Ma'am it's now extended into the parking lot and there are several big giant tractor. Trailer freezers that they're using to store bodies so the ideal situation. Is You WanNa have a funeral home? Pick up your loved one and be responsible for their body until they you know either are cremated or there's a funeral but right now there are no funerals ten person situation with the funeral and I think you're not allowed to accompany them to the burial site. I think they take the bodies and they bury it for you and this is at a time when articles were coming out about Hartfield Yeah the Potter's field. The being the mass being the mass burial site for unclaimed bodies and bodies that couldn't be picked up or bodies that couldn't be processed Or couldn't be held at a funeral home. That's the alternative. Like a friend of mine. Right now is trying to get her mom out and they gave. They've given her a may first date there. Like you haven't told me I to retrieve your person arrows we're gonNA take them to her her island and she's just like I don't understand what that means she's like I don't. I can't find anyone to take their like well. Like that's they're just like all right. Well this will be to do. And that's right now just part of the process and I was like Hell No. This is not what we're doing their first of all my dad would be mad as shit if he knew that he was with all these people all over the place in a mass grave. I said no I live. We literally called maybe fifty funeral home. Fifty different funeral homes. I spoke to people in New Jersey. I call some in Connecticut. I called random places in New York City and everyone has the same story that their capacity and this was before they relaxed. Like the crossing state lines for cremation so I was also getting. We don't take bodies from New York City so I was getting that commentary to as I was calling off. State my goodness. How do you even mean putting fifty calls on anything is is something else? Got Exhausting just got exhausting boyfriends Alco for you because I I it was it was so triggering here the same thing over and over because now. I'm like what the hell are we supposed to do? If he dies here like are they even GonNa come pick him up? Who's picking him up. And where's he going to go so now aside from when is it's going to happen? It's what's GonNa happen after it happens so we ended up. We kept calling them every day because they were like. We really can't tell you until the day that it happens so we were just call every day and because benches neighborhood funeral home. We kind of focused on them the most because we figured since he's from the neighborhood and they knew my grandparents they would do the best to accommodate us so we just kinda put all our eggs in that basket and which is hoping for the best and so we happened to call them the day before and they were like you know. It's very possible that we could do this. And you know we went through the cost and what the process. It's going to be and they're like okay. You know give us a call and we should be okay some Mike. Okay and and just happened. The next day was when he passed that night he spiked a fever of like at almost one hundred six and I started to panic a little bit. Because I'm like I don't even know what to do like I don't know what this means. What does something else is going to start happening and called the visiting nurse service and I started spicing on the phone because I was like. I don't even know what I'm doing I was like. I'm not a nurse. Like what am I looking for? What's happening? I don't know what's happening so finally. She's like okay. We're going to have a visit. I'll call you back though they call you back on face time and you have to show them. You know the patient and you have to do things that they're telling you to do like it's very strange to me. Do It's bizarre. Sob Did die. And then she's explaining to me. You know the time is coming near you know. Make sure you do this you know. Make sure to continue to give him as morphine. She's like we're gonNA pull back these meds and we're going to up the time on these meds. Now have to make adjustments in the log book so. I know that we're not giving him these meds anymore. It's just this And then I didn't really sleep that night. I took a light now because I felt like I had to sleep with one eye open. Like I really didn't sleep that much because you're constantly with one eye open in case you missed something. You don't hear something on my quitting he's choking I don't know you just there's no comfort in any of it And then like five o'clock that morning he was like a little restless so then I just started you know telling him I say you know like okay you know just giving him the okay talk and it's fine and like okay ago. You know because I feel like he was waiting there and I'm telling him you know I'm going to be okay. The girls are okay and just like showing him pictures in China you know. Just come for him into the idea of. It's okay for you to go. Go give him his morphine settled down a little bit and then it was time for the virtual call as I was on the phone giving him. His virtual visit is at the exact moment that he passed from a spiritual aspect. He lives in my grandmother's old apartment. And I felt like my grandmother was there like I could smell her a couple of days before. I know it sounds bizarre but I know she was definitely in the house like I could smell her like I was in the kitchen and I went to walk out and it made me turn back around and look and I was like okay so mike. It's probably going to happen soon. Like from a spiritual aspect. Because I feel like she definitely was present when this was happening and so my parents used to say a prayer with me when I was little and so I said that period may died. And you know I'm not a go to church person at all because while the church is the last place for judgment. That's the first place you go when people judge the shit out of you regardless of what you come with that as well put this talk. You gave to him about it. Being okay to go was that just from the gut was I like instincts on your part were was that part of the handbook that they had given you that this would be something tells you that the ham tells you that but the only thing I really took from the handbook is that the person can still here you to the very last moment. So you have to be mindful of what you're saying in their presence and be just keep talking to them. You know giving them reassurance so in this this kind of duet between you and him and and as you're you're watching these final moments come. How quickly did you Mind HAVE TO SWITCH. To all of the strange particulars of this moment of of the fact that he had died in the middle of the pandemic. And now what were you going to do? Well during the As we're on the call we established that this is what happened has saw the nurse said to me. Okay now you have to prepare the body..

fever supervisor New York City morphine Frederick Douglass Boulevard New Jersey Venter Mike Connecticut China
"harlem" Discussed on The Trip

The Trip

08:48 min | 3 months ago

"harlem" Discussed on The Trip

"My Dad's name was Charles Wesley Hall. He came here to the states and when he was. Oh Gosh may be fourteen years old and his Fa- my grandmother my grandparents they lows in Harlem so he pretty much grew up in Harlem. My grandfather was born in Cuba. Hop to Jamaica from Jamaica. They came to the states are seen. You've you've made pilgrimages down to Cuba. Yeah so in the middle of all of this. I returned on March the ten right when all of this started happening. And I had to self quarantine because I was on an international flight. So it's really just crazy. How all of this kind of came together. Because I was down there and I were there at the same time. Allie actually. You know what I came back on the twenty eighth of February. I'm Ray at the end where we left out on March. The seven and we can extend the trip but as you know why there's a little crazy trying to find a park with a little card and having to go to a. Texan the morning to get a new card and all cash. I left my passport at the. Yeah it was. That's a whole other experience if I never darkened the door of an Texoma office worldwide card again in my life. I'll be happy man but I still have my Wifi card in the back of my phone like I'm like I have to go look for the park though I will call home and check in with my mom and she be like. There's going to be a travel ban. Every time I called it was some next elevated news in. I'm just like we weren't hearing any of this when we were over there like I didn't. We've heard nothing about the virus when we got to the airport like I was wearing a mask and some people in customs wearing a mask and the airport. Workers were wearing masks and that was it like no took my temperature. No one was checking to see if I was sick but it was the same way coming back there like. Do you have anything in your suitcase? Did you bring anything back and I was like no. Meanwhile my luggage was like fifty pounds of Yeah Right. Don't worry about the rum and think about the virus. Yeah I I feel like. They are connected. If I didn't have this two bottles of Santiago on say did I brought back with me. This would be a much darker moment in my life and I brought office. I brought office from my office was already closed and the stashes here and it's slowly depleting. I'm just by DOT. I got next time when I go back. I'll bring more. I promise well as you know as a as a Santiago rooted person you will appreciate that this Santiago on say is taking the island by storm and I think he was telling Maria for mind. Who's a singer told me that you know? It's like a revelation to all of them because the weather is different out there. The sugar taste sweeter. The rum is richer. And they're all going crazy for this stuff. They're putting their their Havana club to the side and going with Santiago. Eleven and I'm on board. I'm on the train with her. All right so we're getting back. You come back to New York and all hell is about to break loose just to give you a little insight from the beginning. My Dad was diagnosed in early. Two thousand eighteen with stage for gastric cancer and we knew it was terminal. He went through Palette of Chemo. And you know sort of a palliative care regimen and when he outgrew that we knew that it was time for hospice so fast forward to January. Twenty twenty after we did a short stint in and out of hospitals. We decided that we would just. It was time to go to hospice route. So I come back. And that's when The hospice we started getting the hospice people work in order and just trying to develop schedule and so while I was home. Just trying to make sure that. I didn't bring the virus in 'cause I didn't WanNa bring it to my dad that next week like the schools had closed Or it was the week after that but as that's happening we noticed that there was a shift in even trying to get home health aides to come in so crazy you would. You would think that in home hospice would be somewhat immune from this but I guess right when when this really just kicked off everything shut well. My thing is what I realized is. There's no contingency plan when something like this does happen. Like across the board because hospitals are unprepared These type of agencies aren't prepared and people are afraid to do their job because they're not adequately covered so I mean I get it like I understand the reason for people not wanting to do it but it's just. What's the contingency plan here? Because there there wasn't one so gradually. This hospice service started shrinking. Down in front of your eyes up until it became that There were no more. They weren't coming into the home anymore. It was just virtual visits and he would have to quote unquote manage his own care in. I was thinking what's so now. I'm like okay okay okay. So now has a think Mike. So what am I supposed to do so while that's happening My Mom's aunt who actually is like my grandmother because my grandmother died when I was young. And it's my grandmother's sister. She was eighty nine years old and now now was the very active senior citizens shoes in the casino twice a week. Probably our senior center every day. You know hanging out with her friend like doing her thing independently. She didn't have any pictures in conditions. She lives out in Long Island now. She's shooting in rockaway. Which is the virus. She's living on her own rockaway and then my mom spoke to her. Maybe two weeks and to give or take two weeks into the self quarantine. She kept saying she was tired. She didn't feel well which isn't like her. Because you know she's pretty active and then just notice the steady decline in how she sounded on the phone so my mom's first instinct was like I'm going to go there and I had to tell her. No you can't go there because we don't know what's on so we were talking to her son trying to get some headway and he was just saying you know she's not responding. She's just fleeing here you know. She stopped breathing. Well I was just like Oh my God. It sounds like she might have it so now I called her daughter who lives in California and I told her she needs to come like ace so she got a flight she came next. Stay we go to the House. And she definitely was not well so now. I'm like I'm here again in this situation so I quickly backs out of the house and I just kind of talk to them like from the door so you were out in. Rockaway came came back. And then we're trying to kind of work the phones and get the doctor to get some kind of Hilton. Here that's another thing that kind of weighs on me because I'm like I should have stayed like you think of should've could've would've but it really wouldn't have changed the outcome at the end of the day. So you're like you can't put yourself through that ringer because it wouldn't have changed anything. We later found out that her senior center was largely infected and four of her friends also past positive from the virus to at home too. I think at home to wrap medical facilities one was at a Rehab Center. So that's five. Actually it was a few quite a few so all these things that made her. You know so remarkable in life like her active social schedule her independence or seeking out company of others that would that would end ended up costing life Catholic. Some it just feels like the the story of this city. You know it's like it is a very sociable city whether by choice or by force everybody's with each other and that is that has proven our undoing. You know. Yeah Yeah.

Santiago Harlem Cuba Jamaica Charles Wesley Hall Fa Long Island Havana club Allie Twenty twenty rockaway Texoma Ray Rockaway Rehab Center
"harlem" Discussed on 1A

1A

11:58 min | 6 months ago

"harlem" Discussed on 1A

"Cannot tell the city how much I love. I have not enough kisses in my mouth for the avid lips of the city. I become dizzy dancing. To The jazz tune nights ecstasy wearied in the tire days the fascination of the city is upon me burning the five in the book that was one eight producer. Morgan givens reading Langston Hughes description of New York's Harlem Neighborhood Hood in the Mid Nineteen Twenty S. It's been nearly a century since the Harlem Renaissance and while artists like Louis Armstrong Langston Hughes and Zora. Neale hurston still endure dozens. If not hundreds of works from that period have been lost or forgotten or in some cases never even published will now. Many many of those are coming to life for the very first time this week a never before published novel by Jamaican born poet Claude McKay was published ninety years. I think it was written and another novel by writer. Jesse Faucet was also republished this week for the first time in nearly a hundred years will why are these forgotten works resurfacing now and how did they change our understanding of this cultural movement. Joining me from Saint Louis. Public Radio is William Maxwell professor of English Russian African American Studies at Washington University in St. Louis Professor Maxwell great to have you good day. This is a presser maxwell and from the city in which Langston us was inspired to write the Negro speaks of rivers about one hundred years ago actually wonderful and so great to have you joining us from that place lace as we talk about the Harlem Renaissance in joining from NPR in that very city of New York. Is Morgan. Jenkins author of this will be my undoing living at the intersection of black female and feminist in White America senior editor of Zora magazine. Morgan welcome to you. Thank you so much. Hits Morgan Jerkins Jergen Party. Thank you I appreciate it. Thank you so much also joining from NPR. New York's autumn Womack Assistant Professor of Nineteenth and and Twentieth Century African American literature at Princeton University. Professor Womack welcome to you. Thanks for having me Morgan. Jerkins you wrote in the introduction. To Jesse cassettes novel. There is confusion which was republished. Just yesterday who was Jesse for set and why has she largely disappeared from a conversation about the Harlem Renaissance. Yes so Jesse Faucet I would say it was just a a multi hyphen it artists and she was a poet. She was an essay as she. He was literary editor of the Crisis Between Nineteen Thousand Nine Hundred Nineteen Twenty Six Under the stewardship of WBZ boys and She also was a mentor. I mean she cheap. She published Langston Hughes first home. The Negro speaks of rivers. She mentored county Colon Jean toomer Claude McKay and it's fascinating remaining also said in a sense that she was lost to a public imagination I would say For many different factors and I think one of it is because it was a woman a black woman and she often was overshadowed by her black no counterparts. Well Morgan in a piece that you wrote for for the New Yorker you talk about a dinner that took place in downtown New York nineteen twenty four now. This dinner largely considered to be the event that led to the beginning the spawning of the Harlem Renaissance take a minute. Take US inside that dinner. Tell me who was there who was around the table blend. Also what happened. That was pivotal for Jesse Facet. Oh man so that dinner was legendary in a sense that it was just a WHO's who oh black luminaries and also white people there as well but anyone you can think of that. You know they were at that dinner to celebrate black back office but the word was that that dinner was supposed to be in celebration of Jesse Faucets debut novel there is confusion and she was told by Charles. Johnson who at that time was leading opportunity magazine that it was going to be an honor of her will. The problem got what happened was because because Elaine lock who was also considered one of the midwives of the Harlem Renaissance By Langston Hughes words he was the master of ceremonies and he did not at like Jesse Faucet to this day. I don't not sure why because they were both very educated black people the kate himself in a certain way. Hey Jesse Faucet I just want that known. Yes yes we we different. She was really kind to him. Took them out to dinner which he desperately needed so yes yes he did not like her. It was a very sharp disdain. So because he was the master of ceremonies Monet's instead of centering Jesse Faucet he made it just a general celebration of black writers and it wasn't until years later that faucet actually wrote a scathing letter to lock about how the party was actually intended for her. So this sort of overlooked aspect I I would say. In retrospect was a harbinger of things to come. Even in the afterlife. This was her party and in a way he didn't even invite her. She was there Elsa no she I know she was there but she wasn't. Honored is what I mean to say. She wasn't invited into the circle. I mean she was excluded. Yeah yes well Professor Fester Maxwell you've already put in your vote for Claude McKay. And the way he treated Jesse FA- set shock. I know I have someone else. We could indeed my favorite. I want you to talk about Claude. McKay because you're the CO editor of romance in Marseille. That's a novel by Claude. McKay was published for the first time. Also yesterday they now McCain is maybe another lesser-known writer of the Harlem Renaissance. So who is he. And why was Claude McKay import. Well the first thing I'd like to say is that the reason other than the fact that Claude McKay wrote this book between Nineteen Twenty Nine and nineteen thirty. Three that we have today is because of my co editor Gary Holcomb who for this is not an exaggeration about twenty years. Press to get this into publication. But who was Claude McKay I think it's fair to say he is if not the most radical writer of the Harlem Renaissance Certainly one of them and you can measure that on traditional political spectrum. The one that we inherit from the a French National Assembly he's the furthest to the left of all the Harlem Writers He's a very important early black communist And he would be important in the history of twentieth century ideology political life if he never wrote a sonnet So he's quite radical politically also becomes one of the first black anti Stalinists so he breaks with the Soviet version of communism in advance of the generation of Richard Wright and Ralph Ellison who are more famous for that break who wrote major novels around it. he's radically international He's born in the Clarendon hills of Jamaica in eighteen eighty nine migrates greats to the United States pretty much. The first moment he can winds up at the Tuskegee institute hates what he sees. As the militarized culture. There moves to Harlem but significantly leaves Harlem Justice. The Harlem Renaissance is really taking off and this might be one reason for his relative marginality though. He's very much back back. In Vogue in the best ways so nineteen twenty-three comes around. He's just written the first significant book of Poetry from the Harlem Renaissance which is called Harlem shadows and he gets on a boat and he works as a stoker and he's trying to get himself to Europe and then eventually to Moscow for a meeting of the common tern. Why why why did he leave? Just when things in Harlem for an artist were really starting to harm was he over at all. Was it not for him or did he just have travel. And he's over for it all I. I think that he would have been invited to the famous nineteen twenty four dinner that we were just talking about but I think he probably would have felt pretty badly Afterwards on May not have attended in in the first place I mean he was a hard core Bohemian Wanted a renaissance that was based on both absolute truth telling and on the UNMEDIATED culture of black working class people themselves where he always located wisdom so he was always skeptical of the desire to use the Harlem Renaissance essentially a form of black middle-class uplift politics which is not to say that everyone else in the Harlem Renaissance was interested in that but some of the grandees some of the Great Entrepreneurs Land Lock W. E. B. Two boys James Weldon Johnson and others were certainly in that camp and he was a communist best so maybe also look a Harlem. Renaissance also meant a certain degree for some writers commercial success. I might guess he Disapproved of that Well he wanted more commercial success than than he found believe me but he does argue in public and private With two boys about both both ideological and aesthetic matters And you know. Deploys writes the most scathing review of Mackay's career in which he talks about the novel that was published in Nineteen Twenty eight home to Harlem probably McKay's most notable work at least in Contemporary Times And says after reading it's pages I I feel distinctly like taking a bath. McKay wrote him a very scathing personal after that. So there's a lot of back and forth. It's not just political that's important but they're also aesthetic matters that separate them artists Having their debates in there and their conflicts Especially back then we've talked about some of these lesser known writers Jesse FA- set Claude McKay. But here's a writer that Alice. Here's here writer Alice Walker by the way talking about a Harlem Renaissance figure that many people probably have heard of I think my junior year in school in high school. That was the year that Zora died and I had no idea she had ever lived. I had it never heard absorbable Hurston. I had no idea none that there were black women writers. There's Alice Walker talking about Zora Neale L.. Hurston a writer who Alice Walker helped revitalize in the nineteen seventies Professor Womack Zorno Hurston is an interesting figure gear because most people have heard of her now but she died largely in obscurity. Until as I said Alice Walker kind of revived her legacy in the seventies seventy. So why did she receive so little acclaim while she was alive. And then why did that change so. She actually received quite a bit acclaim while she was alive in the earlier. Part of the What we think of as the Harlem Renaissance so the late nineteen twenty s and the nineteen thirties? I mean she was quite a well. Well known and Prominent Person Artists Anthropologist Personality in the Harlem Renaissance There's a couple of different reasons. I think why she died in obscurity. I mean the one one of the reasons is that she ran out of money And so she. She claims that in many people did too that the onset of the Great Depression a lot of the patronage dried up that was driving and funding these black writers and the Harlem Renaissance She also wrote in a style that was not entirely conventional right so she was really dedicated to capturing during the vibrancy and the pulse and the dynamism of black southern culture performance voice sound so many writers in this time period. We're turning their attention to in New York into urban centers..

Harlem Renaissance Jean toomer Claude McKay Harlem Jesse Faucet writer New York Langston Hughes Claude McKay Harlem Neighborhood Hood Professor Womack Zorno Hurston Morgan Louis Armstrong Langston Hughe Jesse FA Jesse Alice Walker Jesse Facet Zora US James Weldon Johnson editor
"harlem" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

10 10 WINS

03:15 min | 6 months ago

"harlem" Discussed on 10 10 WINS

"The F. T. are off the Harlem river down the ninety second street is going to start to get heavier alternate side parking it is an effective day I'm Karen Stewart Mister portal of in thirty one on ten ten wins an agent of the immigration and customs enforcement agency shot a man this morning in graves had broke I graves and the Brooklyn while trying to serve a warrant our son your ring Conn is there and has a live report we're looking for one man and ended up shooting his girlfriend twenty six year old son I spoke with a woman the other son who says his brother is in the hospital in stable condition with a gunshot wound to the face now this all unfolded at around seven thirty this morning but mom's boyfriend was apparently on ice is radar despite having been in the U. S. for many years and it's not clear why this man was being sought by ice exactly blight and arrested two days ago for affords license plate this arrest a by the NYPD may have helped learn I help I learned where this man was now the younger brother of the shooting victims says his mother's boyfriend panicked and ran because he didn't know who these men were or why they were looking for hand he claims that the ice agents did not properly identified themselves and that his mother's boyfriend perhaps what have cooperated had he understood what was going on and he is obviously very upset that this happened and that his brother is in the hospital his brother's immigration status is not an issue he sat on your ring Conn ten ten wins live in grades and Brooklyn center Cromwell's office says it's reviewing its legal options after the federal government singled out New York state for exclusion from homeland security's global entry program another trusted traveler programs New York residents may no longer in role in global entry or re apply for the program that allows swift passage through customs when returning from an overseas trip the TSA precheck program is not affected acting DHS secretary Chad wolf says New York was singled out because of a New York law that bars immigration officials from accessing motor vehicle records after New York allowed illegal immigrants in the state to apply for driver's licenses authorities in Salem county New Jersey of identified the woman and two children found dead in an apartment in pan Grove on Wednesday they are thirty year old Ruth ray as Sandor children five year old Yuri ani and two year old Yuri they say the bodies were discovered after the body of ray as husband Eugenios Severino was found in a wooded area nearby they say he died by suicide medical examiner will determine how the mother and children died an intense manhunt is under way in Anna Rundle county Maryland for the gunman who shot and wounded two police officers during a car stopped last night as they investigated the shooting death of a man in Baltimore this is police chief Tim I'll to mayor we will treat you with the respect due a human being you will be safe and we will respect your rights but.

Harlem river
"harlem" Discussed on 27 Club

27 Club

11:55 min | 6 months ago

"harlem" Discussed on 27 Club

"What's the matter to players show wallflower with the pork pie hat? Atas calm but definitely fended too good for the show too good for you shut your big shot Jimi Hendrix big fucking shot the L.. Lean twins knew. These guys knew these thugs by site. The one with the pork pie hat was moody. Harlem gangster bad dude but they could reason with them the other two tabby tabby in good doctor Hitman Detroit tabby and good doctor had drawn little revolvers held tied at decides not to attract too much attention. And we're pointing right at Jimmy. Jimmy idea he just kept on preaching the injustices at this fucked up situation. KANDARA called A. Where'd you get that hat? And Tundra felt around in his pocket for his piece. Put his hand on it just to know it was there and ready and Jimmy had no the idea. The twins were packing at all times. It was how the game was played. It was adapting. The twins appealed to their history with MUCCI. mookie adjusted Jimmy. He didn't give two shits about him or anybody else but the show was happening whether or not he wanted to be there and this was a direct order from fat. Jack Taylor the Fatman Harlem Drug Kingpin No Shit. The twins worked for the fat man to kind of her at the fat man would do like that but their allegiance with Jimmy. The Fat Batman wants to show in Harlem. We'll we'll do a show in Harlem but not like this. There's another way she me. Let the twins clean up the mess instead. A few feet away as the arguing negotiating initiating continued. He'd been in and out of Harlem a lot over. The last few years felt the connection to the neighborhood into the twins in moments. Like this though hard-boiled hard-boiled street. Tough he felt like he didn't belong like he was pushed around taking advantage of made to feel less than this wasn't the Harlem that he thought he knew the fake ass. Poster would come down the buildings wall but he didn't feel victorious. Turkish shot at glance over Jimmy motion with his is that everything would be okay. Jimmy's fees and return was dejected. He had that face that face it summoned strangers. That face made fast friends. His guard was always down on. He had no guard a child of poverty and neglect a true wanderer. Jimmy broadcast the desire to belong to his face. A glimpse of optimism dash trustworthiness over the course of his twenty seven short years. That face would attract a legion of admirers confidants users hangers on girlfriends. BANDMATES druggies hippies dreamers managers mafiosos and prostitutes some true friends. Two friends like the leaves to Harka Tundra. When Jimmy met the twins career was on hold so they could pursue a faster easier means of making ends meet like slinging dope for Jack Fat? Jack owned music clubs fast food joint called fat. Jack's Chipman House and Record Labels Road Jack and taste among others. He never heard of in Harlem Rola. Music went hand in hand with Vice Drugs and prostitution funded the music clubs or Jimmy will play drugs and prostitution paid the rent of the twins apartment. The Jimmy would crash drugs and prostitution pass the time where Jimmy would otherwise be idle vice ruled everything around Jimi Hendrix in the autumn of nineteen. Sixty nine the twins were there to guide through Harlem in the nineteen sixties was decades removed from its creative renaissance earlier in the century. The black middle class was leaving for Brooklyn Queens in the Bronx and most of the white population left years earlier. Crime was on the rise in housing conditions had deteriorated dramatically in nineteen sixty eight alone. The city's Department of buildings received five hundred calls a day about rats and busted heaters and backed up toilets. This riots broke out in nineteen sixty four after a black kid was shot by a white cop and then again in nineteen sixty eight. When Martin Luther King Junior was assassinated waited throughout the twentieth century crime had a grip on Harlem as conditions worsened in the sixty s gangsters? Black local some enterprising out on their own and others sticking to the longstanding mostly peaceful tradition of working for the Italian men downtown no matter the type they all exploited the most vulnerable of their neighbors with drugs drugs prostitution numbers whatever flimflam fat. Jack was the enterprising local type of gangster. He approached Jimmy after seeing him hanging around the twins. People like you told Jimmy you should slinging dope with Harken Tundra. Jimmy refused no big boss man. You ain't pig you just tall. That's about all. He was loyal to the music and nothing else partly because he just wasn't that good at good anything else give him a broom and ask them to sweep the floor and he'd fuck it up. Give him a paper hat and ask them to take lunch. Orders Burger giant eat. Fuck that up. Give Him a guitar Qatar. He would fuck that up too but in a completely different way in the best way possible that guitar for Jimi Hendrix. It was nearly everything and it handled nearly everything forum ninety percent of it anyway. He had that face to ensure that the other ten percent would fall into place of course the downfall the having thing that face and that trustworthiness that everyone wants a piece everyone comes calling especially when you're the most famous black musician on the planet Jimmy. Qatar God a sex symbol of child a certified card carrying member of the Freak Flag Movement. A psychedelic visionary and the most recognized black performer. There was I as an ex pat in England and then in his native. US bigger than sly bigger than Marvin bigger than the hardest working man in show business. Harlem's adopted Georgia. Repeat Mr. Please please please the original shape e James Brown so a bunch of African American organizations. Want Jimmy the play for them fat Jack Among them they wanted Jimi to be their poster. Boy Fat check wasn't alone. The Black Panthers came calling Jimmy politically ambivalent army. That always declined. This trip was his and he was about to get a nodded up and some other trip but it was bothered by the accusations from the black community that he was making white music for white people. You even the historic Apollo Theater. Turned him down when he tried to book show there and they didn't need them a white people hanging around. Meanwhile the underworld in Harlem would do just about anything to get Jimmy on this. Show bill even if it meant sending out. Mookie and his Detroit tournament brings artists into the fold. A Free Street Fair in Harlem seemed like the perfect compromise. The all day festival would benefit the United Block Association a Community Engagement Organization helping underprivileged youth. Jimmy and the Dan would not get paid for playing the idea was he giving back to the neighborhood and getting the goons off his back. In the process the event would feature an ECLECTIC roster Ester of acts that while not as world renowned as Jimmy represented a particular slice of the black musical landscape in nineteen sixty nine particular acts from fat. Jack's EX RECORD LABELS LIKE R&B Singer Big Mabel and chocolate Jimmy would be the headliner. Jimmy could bring some of that peace love and music vibe to the mean streets of New York. He could attempt to be all things to all people play for them. Mug It up for them from the Stage Ninety Percent Guitar and ten percents mile something like that breath when Jimmy Gypsy Sun and rainbows got ready to take the UBA outdoor stage at the intersection of Lennox Avenue. One hundred and thirty nine th street on September fifth fifth nineteen sixty nine. It was midnight big Maryville just wrapped up percents. People hung out of the tenement windows surrounding the concert area and hollered for more. She refused on the stage sat. Empty the crowd Mitch Mitchell. Jimmy's drummer filled the void of the empty stage. I and sat down behind his Kim. The blackout took one. Look at this white dude with the massive Afro and booed loudly. They want Junfa himself. He was Harlem's hounded needs some white drummer with wannabe. Black Afro. Patronizing get other own street festival without any help from the white man. Thank you very much. Jimmy's Abe's longest strat around shoulder fog. Dim thought about his hero. Bob Dylan in the crowd and England. Booing him calling him juice. Jimmy was only two chords into the opening number when the first glass bottle soared past his head exploded in defiant crash on the stage. We'll be right back back after this word were were the New Year is upon us. which resolutions do you plan to conquer in twenty twenty become more mindful or create a healthier your lifestyle through diet exercise and of course improved? Sleep the sleep number. Three sixty smart bed helps everyone the proven quality sleep that will change their life. Use The sleep. IQ APP to help create a routine. The sleep number three sixty smart but is the smartest choice for better sleep and the best fed for couples. It allows you to adjust on each side of your ideal firmness comfort and support. Its senses your movements and automatically adjusted. Keep you sleeping comfortably through the night with sleep. IQ technology inside the bed. It tracks. How your sleeping and gives you personalized insights for your best sleep? Discover proven quality sleep with a sleep number three sixty smart bed. Save one thousand dollars on a queen in special edition smart bed during the January sale. Only at a sleep number store or sleepnumber dot com slash iheart that sleepnumber dot com slash. IHEART sleepnumber a number of the official sleep and wellness partner of the NFL. Hey guys if you're a music fan which you obviously are. If you're listening to this show and you should know about Cyrus media they create podcast and events the deepen your connection to the music you love. David shows that wanted to tell you about one is freak flag flying featuring David Crosby in conversation with his friend author Steve Silverman. David opens up about his colorful prolific tumultuous career. It is collaborations Wiz crosby stills Nash Young Bob Dylan and more another is after midnight. The story of fishes legendary festival over New Year's Eve nineteen ninety nine nine told in the everglades. They ended the festival with a seven hour. Set that stretched from just before midnight into the little dawn of the twenty-first century in the last one is called thirty six from the vault a series celebrating the grateful dead's live release hosted by music journalists podcasters Steven Hyden in fellow music. Journalist analyst Rob Mitchum this series dives deep into the dead's live shows bringing reflections beyond just the music itself check out. All of these shows that Cyrus pod pod dot com slash twenty seven. Oh Cyrus pod dot com slash twenty-seven. Jimmy was I little Miss Strange. From the stage. She was a couple of rows back and impossible to ignore which was why Jimmy had his eyes. Wide Open it was a good thing because without being open he never would have seen the glass bottle. Hurling straight out of fucking. I'm really he's one of the biggest black entertainers on the planet and he was getting Shit in Harlem places. The bottle smashed flat against glass. Shards shot all over the stage. Sweaty is to be harder than you thought. Then the eggs came and they smashed against the front of the stage the sloppy egg. Inner slowly ran down the field and wooden structure structure eggs eggs. That's how this is going to go. Jimmy Hendrix fresh from blowing minds of woodstock getting pelted with eggs and hull. The Gypsy Sun.

Jimmy Hendrix Harlem Jack Harlem Rola Bob Dylan Jack Fat prostitution England Jack Taylor Black Panthers Harka Tundra MUCCI. Department of buildings Martin Luther King US James Brown Apollo Theater UBA Mitch Mitchell Brooklyn
"harlem" Discussed on 27 Club

27 Club

06:31 min | 6 months ago

"harlem" Discussed on 27 Club

"Six twenty seven mostly cloudy skies. Today more than three hundred and fifty thousand people showed the Jimi Hendrix slit his dope money through the slot at the top of the door to the blown out five story building on one hundred Twenty Fifth Street in Harlem. The slot had a rusty metal flap that squeaked twenty stuck the cash through and felt the hand on the other side grab it on mark slots unmarked building. He waited for what seemed like an eternity. It lasted all the fifteen seconds. When the time was up the slot was pulled back violently and Apopka declawed hand? And do we took the small bag of cocaine from the anonymous dealer inside and was quickly on his way. Harlem's open frontier early ahead tenements with to gather in varying shades of nineteen. Sixty-nine drab the fire escapes like existential urban sculptures clinging to the brick facades. What's trash collecting on the recesses of curb corners and overflowing in the cans and the wide sidewalks for every building occupied by a small Bodega? There were three more shackleton gates plagued by peeling paint. Make sure signs left by someone who spotted the opportunity dope is death in times like these Christ raced heroin. Hey seuss what was the difference. Do Hendrix wondered this to himself as he shuffled down one hundred in twenty fifth flanked by his friends to Har Lee and his twin brother Tom. They're off two of the first people. He met when he arrived in Harlem five years earlier in nineteen sixty for this did watch while Jimmy is transaction at the slot in the door everyone called the twins they called themselves to ghetto fighters their parents parents called them Arthur. Our Valentine's Day babies they were born and raised in Harlem. The twins were hard core musicians drug dealers scenes. There's as has teenagers they joined Robert. Iron Bradley's gladiators bodybuilding crew and. They got big quick. They knew how the streets were how the game works how the game was played and how to adapt to stay alive. That's the body is all about adapting and they were helpful to have around especially in Harlem. Jimmy was once again about to be reminded the trio made their way up one hundred twenty fifth the unofficial thoroughfare of Harlem and came upon a kid hanging uh-huh poster with Jimmy's face on it bay. Teens tops haphazardly pasting. The sheep with broad disaffected strokes. The poster was promoting show that you was who is playing the following week. It's small's paradise over on Seventh Avenue. This was news to Jimi Hendrix. Jimmy was playing a show at smalls next week. The Hell Jimmy me. Thought sky hanging posters up and down the street with my face on them the show next week at smalls I am playing. No show it smalls Jimmy and the twin stood there. They're analyzing this on the wall. The kid turned and saw Jimmy back coaster back to put two and two together smirked then mm-hmm Bolton drops it sloppy posted brushing hit the pavement in a sprint. She'd be hollered after. Stop without missing a beat tour after the kid. The kid was fast and Jimmy with two pack a day long struggle to keep yellow cabs. Pepper the middle of the street is Iran a constant stream of yellow and Jimmy's peripheral vision. Vision the sidewalk was cruel needs to feed. As they slammed down payment the twins kept pace monitored obstructions gave directions out of the way motherfucker fucker. Watch out for that car. He's GonNa turn here no shit he's going straight down down the one to five dirt it in and around small crowds of people pooled throughout the long stretch of one hundred twenty only fifth long jeans. FLAT CAPS hands in pockets waiting for a bus waiting for the man. All you do is slow me down and I'm trying to get to the other side of town crosstown. Traffic Ethic Chin. True help pays them. The kid passed the old lump stanfield past wilburs wigs and big brother Grocery Fatman hung out of tenement window shirtless bliss a toddler in a new white dress puncture mothers purple bell bottoms and the chase did not face any of them. The kid hit across three just as a blue station. Issue is turning off the main drag. He caught the hood of the car flipped over on the other side stumbles. He tried to regain his footing and fell disease. It was all Jimmy. The twins needed the catch up. Tone Jimmy grab the kids arm and held them against the wall dilapidated storefront the twins flanked. Jimmy the kid habit. What's this all about man? He struggled for his breath. The kid did not. He just sat there smirking. His Chuck Taylors were so scuffed. Up and St warn. They weren't even a shade of white anymore the laces frayed at the top where they had been haphazardly nodded. He wrote his hands over his jeans to get the residual post or glue off. Shook his head as if she may Hendrix was intruding on him holding him from getting his work done kid didn't even know who the Jimi Hendrix was. Jimmy try it again again. I play in smalls next week. You did take that shit down off the wall back their kids not say were wouldn't dignify. Jimmy's curbside outrage. The twins weren't focused on Jimmy squabble. Instead their focus was on the three dude standing nearby backs up against the wall. Aw suddenly just there. And one was all kinds of devenir. The other two and turtlenecks red black militant not quite panthers more sheep sheet and scary. The Debonair wanted skewed that revolution Jive for Pool Hall. Tough striped blue short sleeved button up in a pork pie hat. The three of them were furnace away to plead ignorance but close enough to definitely be aware. Jimmy kept calling up the kids. Bullshit the kid just stood there. Still smirking saying nothing. The true wallflowers came to life and walked right up to the CFPB turtlenecks fall behind I had as they approached slowly slowly confidently. Jimmy realized how screening us. He'd acted impulsively. This kid wasn't just kid he was mobbed up and these wallflowers lower walking towards. We're ball to bring this whole seat to the next level..

Jimmy Jimi Hendrix Harlem smalls Apopka cocaine CFPB seuss heroin Iron Bradley Robert Iran Har Lee St warn Grocery Fatman Chuck Taylors Pool Hall wilburs Arthur Bolton
"harlem" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on Latino USA

"Man call eight savage and the reason why he decided to create a team is because he wanted to give african unamerican <hes> basketball players a chance to play for money because they're not allowed to play professional basketball in n._b._a. Back in nineteen twenties so he we went to a place called the savoy ballroom and chicago illinois and picked out the best african american basketball players can find. I i the name of the team with the the superbowl five but then he decided to change the name to harlem because something happened here in harlem new york called the harlem renaissance off so it was a lot of famous musicians famous artists coming out of harlem so he decided to change inch named joe harland's irony we think we've famous and then he put globetrotters on the jersey so everybody would think we were traveling around the world beginning basketball we played today is influenced a lot by the harlem globetrotters three point line. We've been alex for the the alleyoop done. Here's the the razzle dazzle driven that you guys love to see now switzer deepest doing since nineteen the first i am. I saw the harlem globetrotter super interesting because it was one of those regular days that i was ready to go home and get ready to go play basketball and i turned the t._v. On and saw the episode when harlem globetrotters met shaggy and scooby globetrotters legitimize with a basket boy scooby doo and shaggy could make food disappear wash delicious but i thought the harlem globetrotters or cartoons for longtime batman was a cartoon supervisor cartoon and the next time i saw them was once i became gloat job. I grew up in small town. Call one eighty s and south of the island of puerto rico the it was a heel you oversee the town and you can hear the bells <hes> catholic church on every hour as a beautiful beautiful place to grow and to have family and everybody's reporting everybody. Nobody baseball was part of a daily routine for us. You know people love baseball because we have so many superstars blame professional baseball in the major leagues for us us so they're always encouraged kids to play baseball but they know anything about basketball and that's the thing that i fell in love with every single day. I wake up. Sometimes i go to sleep which is like playing with the basketball and my bad looking up shooting my dad be like hey gotta go to bed and take the ball away from me. The next morning i wake up the balls right data game and it's just repeated that over and over and over the way i got into the globetrotters was being the right place right time so i'm finishing my contract as a competitive basketball player so the exact day i'm i'm calling my agent saying hey we gotta work on a new contract and new team and i'm coming out of my apartment and coach samoyed loyd than who happened to be a professional coach than i knew. Growing up in puerto rico was coming my way. We kind of bumped each other. We talk and find out he's he's working for the harlem globetrotters organization and he asked me do you wanna be globetrotter and i'm like yeah and like three days later i get the call oh and then i did a really really going to try out and here i am seven years later so now well so i'm a globetrotter now and i'm sending down the bank watching this guy's doing all this amazing tricks inches i kind of stepped back from having having the uniform on and feel like a little kid like this is amazing this amazing the things this guy can do and then you realize i can do thinks that all the things that happened in the world and we ask rotana's. We'd do something special. We do something positive life and we just create memory that people don't want to forget. That's why i love what i do. The orlando mendez continues to play and entertain with the harlem globetrotters. You can catch.

harlem globetrotters harlem basketball harlem globetrotters organizat baseball puerto rico savoy ballroom joe harland illinois chicago n._b._a switzer new york supervisor samoyed loyd batman rotana seven years three days
"harlem" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on Latino USA

"In this episode. We're going to bring you one of our. Oh how i made it segments. These are back stories about latinos in all sorts of walks of life orlando el gato million. This is the first and only puerto rican born player to be a member of the historic harlem globetrotters. The globetrotters are an exhibition and team that has been around since the nineteen twenties there accomplished athletes and they're known mostly for their theatrical and comedic routines on the court orlando got his nickname when he was still a teen in puerto rico when he used to run to the nearest courts to play pick up ball he said stray cats would follow him him as he ran and eventually the guys he played with started calling him. Ill got which is spanish for the cat. Uh got takes it from here down. I don't know but it sounds like the bone football. I love everybody uses orlando and i'm the first puerto rican benigni threes to be part of the great hall and globetrotters. They aren't gonna try to tell him no threat. There's the we are in basketball. Team started in nineteen eighteen twenty cents meet. The most comedy acting doesn't spoke harlem globetrotters idolized by twenty minute basketball fans in the u._s._a. They say they make a mockery of the game they come. They juggle a full house g._i. They've played seventy three games nine different countries last only one we were created by the white jewish.

orlando puerto rican harlem puerto rico basketball twenty minute
"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

"What does that mean a take it and make it better better but what what's missing with their distribution right distribution so if i take if i have an idea a great idea what happened to my great idea they took it all. I got nothing from it. I got rated and i got broke and they they ran with my idea so if you have a great idea and you don't have distribution you know you have a gift for those distribution. Do you follow my reasoning okay yeah. So why didn't i use local because they would've took my logo. Guys like who the real bootleggers not got to knock up us the knock office with took it and ran with it and you saw the major brands today. I'm the father of logo mania with this yeah. I'm the one that gave birth to yoga local mania right. If i didn't have this global presence now with gucci i would be getting nothing from that. I'm in museums around the world but i wouldn't be getting nothing for that if i didn't and have this global distribution that allows me to make money off this idea that created so if i'm still backing if i started a local out of them one crashed in bern like the phoenix what added to you talking about the suppression of the ego and i thought that was really brilliant beyond that what attitudes have most propelled you to success <hes> um everything everything that i've done has everything to do with going inside. What i mean by going is understanding spiritual principles and when i began to read always was like even i start now. I was in the holy ghost church and somehow well. I went on a study all like a lot of the major. Religions now is in the panther party nation islam and all of that but <hes> tom somehow you go back to something. That's inside of you that spontaneous that you can control that. I saw what happened what my friends who was part initiatives law and i learned from religion religion is like a wall and you can lean on it for support yet but if the structure structure that wall falls the new four with if you build infrastructure you can always stand on your own and so that's what i did. I let all almost almost studies focused on in a strength. You know denial of things that other people so fascinating what one thing happened to me right when i was locked up in aruba just had we had just left. You know i had this how long we went on this thing where we will over your way in aruba. Oh unlocked it well. That was maybe sixty nine seventy like that. The sixty nine no could six seventy nine some seventy nine like a year. No how long was incarcerated in nine months so anyway. There was a guy who's locked up the rain another guy habu prison and speaking of we really need to get <hes> rocky out of that place. 'cause that's what what you hearing them describe. That's all foreign prisons all but anyway go to a point where like what like hobble conditions you hear what i say he's cold and the food and in the sleeping facilities ability horrible horrible you describe what it's like okay. Can you imagine <hes> you wake up in the morning. I use three three three nacelle. An is like cell is like how can i describe it for people not looking at me. The soul is like maybe like four feet support. We know maybe seven feet above fourteen feet like that right and it's three guys in there right then as a shower right but when you not in there's a hole in the floor for the water to go out the show but when you're not taking the show that is also the toilet right right. That's a problem yeah. That's the real bad and so in the morning you get a cup of coffee and a loaf of bread nine in a role and for dinner you get a bowl with who knows what in nine months today you know and you get a visit like if you read what's going on with esat ruggie. Only state department can come to see so by.

aruba tom bern phoenix nine months fourteen feet seven feet four feet
"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

"All i'm not saying he wasn't a gentleman. I'm sayin' dan dead. He wasn't connected in a way that it was like in stable way. There's no one there was no older guys around saying then. You shouldn't do this or you shouldn't do that you know or what was he like. He was like he was and is <hes> joyful. Kinda playful ghana guy you know but <hes> you get to see certain side of them because when they come to you spend their money because they you know when nero somebody who is somebody who who people look up to then this you get a different kind of personality that works no matter where you are sir yeah so it was it was a lot you you were the spoils of of the victory go to dab apps money gets them closed. You know everybody's got to know. I'm the man no yes but it's more than that they know if they come to my stool and the legacy that i have in the store. Everybody knows me everybody so everybody wants to go to someplace where someone who everybody relates to. That's then as well as now so that's what that was about so if they had questions or somebody they wanted to meet. They know they can come. Tom asks me about or even if they had a beef. They actually make it a street and something else or you can connect anybody with anybody exactly clean if i'll choose to sure alan cheuse to elect times as far as i can tell there is not currently a a major figure like nikki for his era alpo and fat calf their era. It seems that it's different now yahoo. How big does an n._s. Direct results of <hes> the the unstable nece that develop as a result of anybody anybody can get enough drugs to be a boss now so kingpins lotta guys who sell drugs make glisten somebody with a job right. There's no kingpins anymore not not in harlem no more kingpin how did how did you know cool how to design. I'll look let me see if i can give you something comparable to that. If if if you never had something you had a great desire for would you see you say dad when i get the i know how i i wanted to look a new look. I wanted a new the things that i like and already had a reputation in harlem for dressing and i watched the old guys how they address. If you wanna know initially came from i think it came from the rat pack watching as my older brothers did sammy davis junior yeah yeah yes sinatra dean martin peel off it. I mean they they. They had miles davis and in you you know miles. Davis had a really unique style. I used to hear my brothers all talk about them but that they did. Those are the ones who set the trip. Uh we'll get back to the show at one second but these days a lot of workplaces offer really nice perks snack station fifteen.

sammy davis harlem dan alan cheuse Tom yahoo dean martin nikki one second
"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

"Advocated to the people who are known in all the gangsters in harlem new me from the streets so allocated to them and that was my clientele you know so nicky barnes yeah well from yeah. That's right. He's here's one of your one big. What'd you sell to him. I stuff like that yeah that was before the local mania yeah yeah in fact. I got some archives. I got we gave the biggest dance me and nikki bonds. Lieutenant gave the biggest dance in harlem at the time at the renaissance ballroom. Never forget that day yeah so it's amazing one thing about gays in home for today gates's everywhere everybody everybody who buys up in different cities they know no deke people in other cities and everybody who goes up in different neighborhoods in harlem they know the key he goes in the other neighborhoods. It works that way. They made this show up at the games you major events in answering game recognize mutual respect gone yeah so <hes> i'm catering to all the gangs and everything and then i draw game dynasty of the regular heroin and then crack came and then the whole complexion change that was like really hide it a business when when the crack epidemic hit and less when harlem was flooded with money and but that's but as you're saying that's different is the selling of heroin had a different impact on the community then the selling crack heroin gaza. Stay high all day steele button once a day crank. It was every fifteen minutes fifteen minutes. I've seen guys going to block with new timbaland new nikes on come out running with the feet going to smoke crack selling right off the back. I never isn't it is there's nothing that compares to crack. It's more intense high so so it makes you do more to get a man who's like on i think before it hit harlem on one of the major drug hussein say man yo you you know what's coming is what you're going to be chasing the dragon. I never knew what he's talking about until it hit because it started in california call tracing the grain and <hes> i used to hang out in n. Nikki bonds partners club called education on liz avenue and that's the first time i saw it man ah i saw these people go crazy man do crazy things what men assignment to animals yeah. What was the nikki like as a man a gentleman. I believe that in that a gentleman capable of being very dangerous. It amazes me. One time is up. I was parked and a guy had him double park. I'm gonna i see what happened and nikki walked up to the concert. So could you please you know. He was a gentleman everybody in harlem to who knows them. He's from my neighborhood so if you ask anybody my neighbor. They don't have nothing bad to say about nikki. He never did not need to do. If you didn't have no problem with them you know he didn't he didn't harass. He didn't swing his weight. Everybody liked him and you remember hustle. Dance was out nikki's to like get hot. Go to club club called. What was the name and club <hes> on fifty sixty eight there you go we go up there and hang out and he dancing him an image of him to be up there dancing hustle all night yeah <hes>. He's a regular guy but you know he made the transformation nikki was like oh. He used to be a drug addi before he went away. You know turn missile this woman there any when he came out dust when he was formidable he was dangerous. You know he was able to do what he did like them. I don't know no well. He didn't like her. You can't make it to the top of that pyramid. Just being nice takes more than just being nice. No man who had a myself out the best gambling and best hustle flynn harlem is joe jackson. They call them gentlemen joe jackson. You know everything about my hustle and skills the final things that i learned i learned from watching him his thing about being nice when you're powerful. You don't have to be other than nice. You know anybody who's mean and nasty in dirty. They are those who feel intimidated. Nikki is never been intimidated from day one. He was a stick up kid before before he would with the jail when the drug is this kid bread so he's come on his.

nikki bonds harlem nicky barnes nikki joe jackson heroin california hussein Dance fifteen minutes
"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

04:35 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

"That's me gilani these pictures i had kept hidden for thirty years because because of the code in the street i never let the police. Anybody does okay all right. Okay okay okay so you start with the first pitch. I give you a break so mitch mitch screen you see him standing up there yeah that's when he enters the store store. Mitch greene enters the store right for a f- oy and mike tyson says to him matt shake my ham so that's when you see the next picture they shake hands but mitch green you see him when he's always say you know. You didn't beat me right. You know you beat me. You know don king cheated me out that money right so it's a man come on man with that day. He went to altercation so my got up got fed up with the argument got up walked outside right right yeah and then the picture you see mitch blood green. Mike's rose royce's parked outside. You see them by the rolls royce ray and the mitch blood green ripped decide mirror frontside mirror off the rolls royce and that's the next pitch you see mike deccan them. It took these pictures no my all. My nephew took them okay. He was my night manager. Okay we had a camera in still for every all we had stars. Let's come through all the time we make sure that we pitchers of all those so then so mike knocks him out but where where are you in all this. What what do you think i just went home. I had just left to wear no. I just love right but surely somebody called you. It was like you're absolutely going. When i came came back and <hes> was a mike had went to the hospital by that time mitch mitch mike rotunda hospital mitch green within the precent so i didn't go to either location did that incident create a level level of notoriety that then led to sonia soda my order and the government saying wait a minute we need to look at this and and and then awesome i think it was a really exploded on monday night football. I think that was like the biggest this part of it. It was in the newspapers and all that deal but monday night football was on and how to have that helicopter up there and so the the helicopter the guys who sports update helicopter in ages making fun of the incident is a year somewhere down is deputies twenty four hour boutique <unk> cracking up you know we're might go in and then from that point on just the publicity just kept sprint sprint spread but what ha what happened what led to them saying we gotta stop this all because you were operated for a good ten years right before the before the happened so what happened was was that you had. I had all the hip hop artists in so hip. Hop as a musical form is growing now huge you you know so and then mike tyson and all these guys showing up wearing stuff that you can't get in a store. Everybody knows coming from you and they're you know we're so ironic. People going announced gucci store accident for outfits that they so good the guys who all the rappers with on gucci so and so it was inevitable you know <music> so <hes> and that let's all attention in an extra male <hes> the the the the brands took out like <hes> emcee <hes> fendi muhtar they took out on cease and desist orders so to cease and desist orders kept coming kept raiding me kept me and every time they have the raid me. They have to write to take out anything has the brand's name on a trademark on issur so the last one they raped me was like <hes> and these rates are fendi rates are bad for business is hard. Yeah your whole bunch of your yet a product. That's yeah you gotta remember that. Oh jacobs was selling from three to five thousand sweatsuits cheaper sweatsuits thirteen twelve thirteen hundred you gotta justice in the eighties and you got a jacket that that costs three thousand dollars to purchase. What does that cost you to make at that time. All okay the three thousand dollar jacket..

mitch mitch mike Mitch greene mike tyson football Mike gilani rose royce don king jacobs matt three thousand dollars three thousand dollar twenty four hour thirty years ten years
"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

"What is it that allowed you to go from being the man all these workers three floors that too. I got a table thumbs still going for two main. Things one is when you were born. Poor you automatically acquire the ability to live with doing bear comes natural for you right and the other one was something you have to develop the suppression of the eagle <hes> so once suppress my ego and instead instead. I'm gonna go back on one hundred and fifty with lou table. Sell t-shirts and people might laugh or they might say look what happened up you know and and that happened but when you have a purpose in your heart you ain't gonna be. I knew what i was going to be able to do so everybody knows how to do good but everybody. It's an ego they not that you have to suppress the then you can get out of a bad situation. You can give us a little bit with situated ego that kills us dapper. Dan is hip hop personified. He's harlem personified. He's hustling personified. He's a fashion legend who had a three floor custom tailoring business in harlem in the eighties where he could make you anything you wanted. Louis vitton suits fendi car seats gucci bags stuffed the labels didn't make it wouldn't touch but dab knew how to get that fabric with those high falutin labels all over it slice that stuff up designed something.

harlem Dan Louis vitton lou
"harlem" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"But Lino resisted he grabbed onto a column in the store and he bit the hands of the two employees who are trying to hold him back soon enough though he gave in and stopped struggling by the time. Police officers arrived at the store people in the area had noticed. The scuffle and began crowding around the store the shopkeeper decided not to press charges against Lino and to avoid the crowd. The officers escorted him out of the building through the basement and out of a back door onto one hundred and twenty four th street. But at this point, the crowd had become more hostile as rumors spread that the officers had be in Lino up, and that fire was still even more when an ambulance arrived to see to the employee's, but enhance and a her schedule to pick up a body from the funeral parlor next door. Parked in one of the store's parking spaces the false word of Lino death spread through Harlem Harlem was primarily black and African American culture thrived in the neighborhood, though. The Harlem renaissance was nearing its end still black people in Harlem felt the facts of legal, segregation, institutional racism and police brutality and Harlem was largely neglected by the New York City government, distrust of government and law enforcement was rampant and justified at the time the country was in the midst of the great depression Harlem, specifically was plagued by rising poverty as well as poor healthcare education on top of that black people faced racial discrimination. When it came to employment business ownership and housing and the crest store where the incident happened was known for discriminating against black people in employments all. All of these factors came to a head when Lena was rumored to be dead. Police attempted to squash the rumors that Lino with be killed by officers, but were unsuccessful the crowds turned rowdy the Kress door closed for the day as throngs of people began setting fire to buildings smashing windows and stealing and destroying property. Some people who attempted to hold a public meeting to protest police brutality were arrested in charge with unlawful assembly. At one point officer fired a gun into a crowd of rioters and shot a man who died a few days later in a hospital several thousand people joined the riot to protest police brutality stores put up signs that said phrases like we employ black people in their windows to keep people from looting and destroying their property officers who tried to disperse the crowds only met resisted the writing went on through the night and into the next day. All in all more than one hundred people were arrested. Dozens of people were injured a couple hundred businesses had damaged property and four people died from injuries sustained during the riot. Estimates for the property damage totaled about two million dollars. The next day. Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia said the riot was instigated an artificially stimulated by a few irresponsible. Individuals. District Attorney William c dodge said that he would launch an investigation into the communist motivations for the riot. But LaGuardia was convinced racial tensions caused the riots and months later created a BI racial commission to investigate the riot and the factors that led to it. The commission included people like sociologist, e Franklin Frazier and writer Alain lock the report that came out of that investigation was released a little over a year later, it was called the negro in Harlem, a report on social and economic conditions responsible for the outbreak of March nineteenth nineteen thirty five and it recommended antidiscrimination efforts in employment housing education and law enforcement, yet the mayor suppressed the report because it revealed the true living conditions of black New Yorkers. After the riots the city did work to make some social and infrastructure improvements. New York officers began receiving racial sensitivity training, Harlem hospital was enlarged. And there was a push to get more black people in city government, but discrimination did not just suddenly disappear in Harlem and another race fry..

Harlem Harlem Lino Harlem Harlem hospital Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia New York City New York Franklin Frazier Lena officer Alain writer William c dodge two million dollars
"harlem" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:42 min | 2 years ago

"harlem" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"They were able to generate that kind of heat and chemistry and that match with this song is this really just a beautiful moment honestly and in one of one of my favorite musical moments in the entire series trust you i know one house iraq the nightclub harlem's paradise is itself a character on the show episodes often end at the club and so many ki pot points happen there the performers onstage generally are huge recording artists and their songs are selected as much for their content as their mood becoming a part of the plot itself or eliminating or commenting on the conversations characters are having elsewhere when it comes to the club harlan's paradise is a nightclub in harlem and yes the nightclub but at the same time it's also a seat of power mariah dillard is the older cousin of of cornell caught him out stokes and together they haven't carried it the family business which is harlan's paradise every single character has a certain kind of musical since abilities whoever is standing on the cotton mouth perch controls the music in the club and also controls harlem so for exa sample a mariah's i ascension in at the end of season one is that sharon jones and the dab kings are performing one hundred days lem man and that song kind of is win mariah's crowned and so that's why they're performance because that's what mariah wants to the twelve more is musical tastes veer from nina simone and that kind of jazz to when she does listening to rb she listens to neo soul she she would listen to joy air do lauren hill those those modern singers that that have a certain old soul since ability for the second season the opening performer at harlem's paradise is a singer joy standing on stage and shimmery gown and feathery had peace her band behind her she sings three songs to a packed audience that can why now this i on lease we joy is no gray matter which is on her new album you don't really fully appreciate join two zero reform life she has this incredible presence.

harlem recording artists mariah dillard cornell stokes harlan sharon jones mariah nina simone iraq one hundred days
"harlem" Discussed on WINS 1010

WINS 1010

01:59 min | 3 years ago

"harlem" Discussed on WINS 1010

"In harlem you will recall former suffolk county police chief james burke was sentenced in nearly four years in prison last year for beating a handcuffed man in an interrogation room wins news time 406 after yesterday's dramatic up at the white house ryan's priebus is out as chief of staff homeland security secretary retired general john kelly is taking over correspondent athena jones tells us this may be a sign of more changes to come this could be an opportunity for the white house right write this ship into and all this talk of chaos and turmoil within the white house but there are a lot of big questions about general john kelly at how empowered he won't be now word yet on who will replace general kelly as homeland security secretary today the president has been tweeting criticism of senate rules requiring sixty votes to overcome the filibuster north korea appears to be advancing its missile technology with is most sophisticated launch yet last night for hispanic gloria riviera has more from washington north korea ignoring warnings from around the world to launch its eleventh missile test this test far more successful than any prior and the missile flew for approximately forty five minutes sharing twenty the three hundred miles straight into space and landings six hundred and twenty miles horizontally into the sea of japan but the north koreans how the ability to angle that trajectory potentially expanding the distance to reach as far as the east coast of the united states analysts say the distance it could reach could also depend on what the missile is carrying there's no way too no how heavy that one was the white house issued a statement saying threatening the world these weapons in tests further isolate north korea weaken its economy and two five it's people meanwhile south korea says it plans to hold talks with the us on increasing the warhead limit for its missiles south korean president today said the us has agreed to talk about lifting a bilateral guy line that limits the development of south korean missiles wins news time four eight.

japan south korea washington senate chief of staff white house police chief suffolk county united states harlem north korea president secretary white house athena jones john kelly ryan james burke forty five minutes four years