37 Burst results for "harlem"

Fresh "harlem" from Bob Sirott

Bob Sirott

00:31 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh "harlem" from Bob Sirott

"Orthopedic institute. You will find treatment for all bone and joint conditions tailored to you. That's whole care. Learn more at a meta health dot org slash Ortho. I mean a health in sickness and in help, C T a yellow line right now is temporarily suspended due to reports of a tree on the track. So just be aware if you are traveling on the CT this morning to check your line also out on your roadways very busy so far on the outbound side of the Stevenson we have reports of flooding. That's from California to Pulaski was reported as a crash. But now we have a little bit more information. That's causing delays. Also on the inbound side from Harlem, southbound Tri state getting a little bit better. We have a crash at route 1 73 that's now blocking the two right lanes. I'm Vicky Conclusion. WGN Traffic Central 35 year old man is in critical condition this morning after being shot during an attempted Carjacking. It happened late last night in the Gold Coast neighborhood. WGN's Judy Wang is following developments this morning from Northwestern Memorial Hospital. The incident happened at about 10 20, Chicago Police say the man was on the sidewalk with his girlfriend at East Chestnut and North Wall Bash. A man approached the couple with a gun and demanded the keys to the victim's car. He did not end up taking the car. He shot the victim in the neck, then got into.

Pulaski Harlem California Gold Coast Judy Wang East Chestnut Chicago Police Northwestern Memorial Hospital Stevenson CT North Wall Bash WGN Two Right Lanes Vicky This Morning 35 Year Old Late Last Night Couple Orthopedic Institute Tri State
Fresh update on "harlem" discussed on Minority Korner

Minority Korner

00:26 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "harlem" discussed on Minority Korner

"Just couldn't so i do have my limit literally lower than you're listening. There's somebody else who's listening right now and it's like julia is speaking my love language which has got talk about teen shows. It's her new spinoff podcasts. All now that's minority corner like csi is going to have spin-offs and you'll do early corner teen drama you know not Okay so we would be remiss if we didn't jump into don't know if we call it color isn't gate or in the heights gate. What seems more. Ramon color is them in the heights gate. yes. I think it's more color. Ism is something that's been coming up for me personally and family members so it is it is broader than in the heights but yet in the heights is definitely the topical example. It is yes. And it's it's i want so in. The heights just chemo. On in in your. Maybe you went to the theater to see it jealous. I sat home. Hbo aside at home watching it through. Hbo movies come out year ago but the pond two replay just affected everything and so there was no movies being played because of the pandemic and so we sat on this like. I've been waiting for this movie. Trailer already makes me cry it. This is the first broadway musical the oversaw on broadway. This was the first one. I was in new york. I was like twenty five. And i was like it was the thing that i said. I'm gonna come to new york. Because i could see myself on broadway. Because they were black and brown folks look like meaning hip hop dance or rapping singing. And i was like this is amazing. I'm coming here so this musical as a spa. Show place in my heart written by lin. Manuel miranda follows. A caribbean takes in wash- washington heights in apollo caribbean. The caribbean diaspora community in new york. City so you know it's it's it's it's everybody that makes up the caribbean. It's the caribbean. It's it's Central america south. America is all that i lived in west harlem like fourth street. And so if you go up to lake ten fifteen th six up in washington heights anyways fiftieth street. It's been a while folks. So i know what that neighborhood. I know what it looks like. And i had to say and i'm seeing seeing flashes already of lake. You know different articles. Who sometimes like. I know how people just like to hate on things. Sometimes right and i'm like you know we do not or bring out. No one enjoy something and already. There was an article that was written on the rue..

Julia New York America Washington HBO Lin. Manuel Miranda CSI West Harlem First One Central America South Lake Ten Fifteen Th Wash- Washington First Broadway Apollo Caribbean Fiftieth Street Two Replay Caribbean Fourth Street Year Ramon
Allyship Fundamentals - Mike Moskowitz

Judaism Unbound

02:29 min | 3 weeks ago

Allyship Fundamentals - Mike Moskowitz

"Moskowitz welcome to judaism unbounded so great to have you. He's still for so. I'd love to start with a question that i'm sure you've been asked a million times. But basically how did an ultra orthodox rabbi come to be the scholar and residence for trans and queer studies at a progressive judaism synagogue that is actually the largest lgbt synagogue in the world. And i think what are the first so how did that happen. Rabbi hyman and i met in the back of a police wagon where we both got arrested for civil disobedience over daca. It was in dc about three and a half years ago and in the back of this police wagon. We are all in handcuffs. And there's five melded a vying folks on one side makita a metal partition in the middle of this police. Dan and then five defying rabat's on the other side and rabbi climate says you know bunch of to share toronto share and it's a captive audience role in hand and i just read an article in gender and clothing and so i share these thoughts with her and through the course of the afternoon where we were massive warehouse in also separated by gender. She a little bit of my story. How is a rabbi in harlem at columbia and was now working at a deli lakewood new jersey. I've taken off the day to get arrested. And she got together and created this position for me. Because i wasn't able to find a job in the radio world anymore because of the positions taken very publicly Those positions for me came about As it does most people as a function of proximity someone in my family transitions at a student. Congregation who had transitioned really wasn't kind of authority and also works representation within the rabbinate to create a sacred space for people to be who they are without having to choose between a gender identity and religious identity. In so i kind of started the occupying that space void and cdc showed up as as my ally to give me the platform in the agency to able to do that. It's been a fantastic relationship. That's i think has been surprisingly simple. It actually lacks the complexity of what i think. Most people would assume would be awkwardness of being in both of those spaces. Because i think. Cbs team particular frames. Judaism as being in relationship with tradition. And god it really allows for the commonality of individuality where we're all struggling were journeying. Were also exploring And that way were all equal

Rabbi Hyman Daca Moskowitz Rabat DC Harlem DAN Lakewood Toronto Columbia New Jersey CDC CBS
Suspect Arrested in Attack on Chinese American Man in NYC

AP News Radio

00:41 sec | Last month

Suspect Arrested in Attack on Chinese American Man in NYC

"Police in New York City arrested man in an attack on a Chinese American who was kicked repeatedly after being knocked to the ground the NYPD says Jared Powell was charged with two counts of felony assault in Friday's attack on yelp town mall the sixty one year old had lost his job and was out on the street in Harlem collecting cans to get by when police say how old viciously attacked him including kicking him in the head and act caught on surveillance camera the police department's hate crimes task force is investigating the attack which appeared to be among the latest in a troubling rise in anti Asian hate crimes Julie Walker New York

Jared Powell Yelp Town Mall Nypd New York City Harlem Police Department Julie Walker New York
NYPD Investigates Violent Attack On 61-Year-Old Asian Man

Reveal

00:30 sec | Last month

NYPD Investigates Violent Attack On 61-Year-Old Asian Man

"The NYPD is hate Crimes Task Force is investigating the attack on a 61 year old Asian American man who was attacked in Harlem late Friday as a possible hate crime. It's the latest in a string of assaults against people of Asian descent across the city. The attack happened on Friday night at 125th Street and Third Avenue. Police say the victim was hit from behind and surveillance video shows him on the ground as the suspect repeatedly kicks him. After the attack, the suspect walks away. The victim was hospitalized in critical

Crimes Task Force Nypd Harlem
Police Officer, Driver Wounded in Chicago Area's Oak Park

Anna Davlantes

00:51 sec | 2 months ago

Police Officer, Driver Wounded in Chicago Area's Oak Park

"State, police say at Oak Park police officer is hospitalized in serious but stable condition after being shot this morning during a traffic stop. The suspect in the shooting is in stable condition. Police say the Oak Park officer was assisting Forest Park police during that traffic stop. It happened in about seven this morning on Harlem Avenir near the I 2 90 Expressway and no Park. Gentleman need was at a nearby a car dealership on the shooting happened. We pulled into the lie, and we just heard a lot of like. Noises, So we were like, what's going on and sort of like firecrackers, and we just saw a lot of emotions on the bridge. The driver of the stat Vo Koa reportedly got out of his car and began firing shots He offered officer returned fire. And shot the suspect

Oak Park Police Forest Park Police Oak Park Vo Koa
New York PD Seeks Suspects Targeting E-Bike Riders

BBC World Service

00:29 sec | 2 months ago

New York PD Seeks Suspects Targeting E-Bike Riders

"Electric bike robberies in Manhattan. The NYPD says six victims in separate cases during February March all have their e bike stolen by two suspects who threatened them with knives somewhere delivering food. At the time. All six incidents took place around Harlem. Authorities say the suspects are using what appears to be the same black motorcycle with orange wheels. Police say thefts of electric bikes double during the first year of the pandemic. Police say one person was killed and

Nypd Manhattan Harlem
Wrong-Way Drivers On Eisenhower Expressway Cause Crashes Leaving 5 Dead In Chicago

Chicago's Afternoon News

00:35 sec | 2 months ago

Wrong-Way Drivers On Eisenhower Expressway Cause Crashes Leaving 5 Dead In Chicago

"Cold little bit, but I think we should all we probably seen the pictures from these fatal accidents that occurred on the Eisenhower overnight. Oh, my gosh. It was just terrible. And I was really happy. Wasn't working mornings today because I probably wouldn't have gotten to know into work. I mean, these occurred like 15 minutes apart, and they were it like about 1 15 1 30 this morning when it displays in Harlem, Two people died in that they were both wrong way drivers that hit other drivers than 15. Minutes later, Another one occurred right at the Jane Byrne interchange, heading inbound because of a Driver that was facing West bound going the wrong way. We were

Harlem Jane Byrne Interchange
Pandemic Has Many Small Museums At Risk Of Closing Permanently

Morning Edition

01:02 min | 2 months ago

Pandemic Has Many Small Museums At Risk Of Closing Permanently

"Has devastated the art sector and hundreds of small museums are trying to keep from having to close forever. Here's NPR's Nina Kravinsky. One of the largest collections of paintings from Harlem. Renaissance artist Palmer C. Hayden is on the third floor of a Macy's and alleys. Crenshaw District We are pretty small, Museum Micro Museum, hyper local and community based museum. That's key should do, Miss Heath. The director of the African American Art Museum that's tucked away on the top floor of the department store. Their doors have been closed for over a year, even though the Macy's has been open for most of that time. Because it's classified is retail under Al is reopening plan, but the museum is an entertainment space. So that means no gift shop sales, no events and no visitors wandering up and leaving a donation while they're there. In the usual year that money fuels a lot of their programming, and we don't run very well on empty this past year, they've had to rely on grants and donations to keep from closing their doors for good. They're not

Nina Kravinsky Palmer C. Hayden Crenshaw District Museum Micro Museum Miss Heath African American Art Museum Macy NPR Harlem AL
Yaphet Kotto of 'Live and Let Die,' 'Alien,' dies at 81

America First with Sebastian Gorka

00:58 sec | 3 months ago

Yaphet Kotto of 'Live and Let Die,' 'Alien,' dies at 81

"Fail heroin for money. My apologies. I'm sure you're simply give it away. Excellent, Mr Park. Precisely what I intend to two tons of it to be exact. When entering into a fast the competitive field, one finds it advisable to give away free samples. The menacing Mr Big from James Bond, reinvented in live and let die with the ever suave or Roger Moore in Harlem. R I P rest in peace. Yaphet Coto, who passed Age 20 aged 81 Whether he was playing Mr Big the villain in James Bond's live and let Die Know whether it was Parker The space trucker in the movie aliens and imposing man, a man who always wanted to sit down and have a beer with Arrest yourself.

Mr Park Mr Big James Bond Yaphet Coto Roger Moore Harlem Parker
2 Injured After Car Crashes Into Porch In Chicago

Bob Sirott

00:20 sec | 3 months ago

2 Injured After Car Crashes Into Porch In Chicago

"We're dealing with a new crash on the outbound side of the Stevens and approaching Harlem that's blocking the left lane look like a car hit of one of the ditches and actually rolled over. So crews and police are there trying to get that cleaned up for you. Also at Wentworth and 102nd. We had a car that hit a front porch of the house. I'm

Stevens Wentworth
Stepfather Arrested In Death Of 10-Year-Old New York Boy In Harlem Apartment Building

710 WOR Programming

00:29 sec | 3 months ago

Stepfather Arrested In Death Of 10-Year-Old New York Boy In Harlem Apartment Building

"Victim's stepfather, 34 year old Ryan Kato, is accused of causing the bruises all over 10 year old age and Wolf's body, ultimately resulting in the boy's death. Just after 2 P.m. Saturday, cops responded to an assault call of the fourth floor apartment inside the Saint Nicholas houses on one 31st Street. Authorities say someone was trying to revive the boy. When they arrived. The victim was pronounced dead at Harlem Hospital Governor Cuomo reiterating he will not resign over allegations of misconduct, saying to do so would be

Ryan Kato Saint Nicholas Houses Wolf Harlem Hospital Cuomo
New York City boy, 10, dies after found hurt in Harlem home

Financial Quarterback

00:30 sec | 3 months ago

New York City boy, 10, dies after found hurt in Harlem home

"A child is dead after being found unresponsive. In a nature building in Harlem. It happened at the ST Nicholas Houses on 131st Street. Cops responded to an assault call at the fourth floor apartment just after two o'clock on Saturday afternoon. Authorities say someone was trying to revive the 10 year old boy. When they arrived. The NYPD says they're questioning to family members of the victim, who was visibly bruised with lacerations and puncture wounds. He was pronounced dead at Harlem Hospital. No arrests have been made as the investigation's underway

St Nicholas Houses Harlem Nypd Harlem Hospital
Mother Raises Money For Laptops for Students Without Access

Wisconsin's Morning News with Gene Mueller

00:41 sec | 3 months ago

Mother Raises Money For Laptops for Students Without Access

"NEWS London, An estimated 4.4 million households with students don't have consistent access to a computer you should grant is closing Harlem's digital divide for school Children one computer at a time. Her group Parents supporting parents and Y. C has helped raise money to get new laptops into the hands of Children lacking the essentials for remote learning. Grant has helped give away more than 100 laptops since the school year began to kids like eight year old Catalina. I don't like I was the only one that did I have loved because new laptop I guess so happy and I just special Vladimir's you chip

Y. C London News Grant Catalina Vladimir
A dark picture emerges: atrocities in Ethiopia

The Economist: The Intelligence

05:37 min | 3 months ago

A dark picture emerges: atrocities in Ethiopia

"Rumors and scattered reports of atrocities in ethiopia's northern region of tigray have been swirling for months amid a media blackout. But the picture is now starting to become clearer and evidence for war. Crimes and crimes against humanity are stacking up on sunday. America's secretary of state anthony blinken condemned the killings sexual assaults and forced removals said to have taken place in tigray and called for troops to be withdrawn. The conflict began late last year. When the region's ruling party the tigray people's liberation front or tps aleph was booted out of the federal government where it had dominated for decades has to be off. Matt has announced quote final military operation against the defiant gripe province in coming days and a statement. Mr abiy said there was a catholic devise strategy to defeat the grand people's liberation front in the regional capital makaay without harming civilians late in november. Mr abi declared victory. Over the tb l. f. An armed resistance has continued yesterday. If government rejected america's demands describing. Mr lincoln's comments as regrettable. Thousands are known to have died in the conflict and more than two million people have been displaced. The growing civil war has drawn in fighters from neighboring regions and troops from eritrea which borders tigray to the north. I'm gonna stay. International has just released a report detailing its investigation into this incident that took place in late november an accident which is one of the oldest and most famous holy cities. Tom gardner addis. ababa correspondent. Ever soldiers killed hundreds of civilians over two days. And what i'm going to stay says was retaliation for an attack by local youth on their military camp now. Amnesty says the soldiers roams around the streets of the city picking out on young men and killing them on the spot then proceeded to plunder the city essentially of everything of value survivors said that all they could see on the streets with bodies and people crying this systematic slaughter civilians and axiom may amount to crimes against humanity according to amnesty. And you say the main players in this incident or allegedly airtran soldiers right just to remind people. This conflict has drawn in a few other parties. In addition to the ethiopian federal army and two grand forces loyal to the tps laugh you also have militia security forces from may bring regional state of. Im hara which has a rivalry with the laugh and disputed territories along their border and then and this is really controversial element. You have troops from eritrea. Which since the beginning of the conflict has been fighting alongside the ethiopian army against the which has a long rivalry with as well as to whether all these parties are committing atrocities. I think based on everything we know so far. Yes but i think. Eritrean soldiers are the most widely and extensively implicated and there are allegations of other atrocities beyond. What's happened in axiom. Ever since the war began in late november we've been hearing accounts trickling out which beginners rumor clearer. Picture is slowly started to emerge. We've seen several videos that appear to show ethiopian soldiers. Standing among the bodies of civilians. They've murdered there was an investigation by human rights. Watch found. European army had shelled towns including the capital of tigray mckelway killing at least eight hundred civilians including women and children and winding back to the beginning of the war the very first atrocity we heard about was this massacre in the town of my tatra which is in western tigray near the border with the neighboring regional state. I'm harlem according to a report that amnesty published at the time most of the victims were. I'm horrors murdered by militia. Sure the ousted rulers of tigray the epl f. That was then confirmed by day. State appointed human rights commission. Here however take ryan's reflect across the border to saddam tell of attacks on civilians by them militiamen an by government soldiers in the same area for its part. What is the european government saying about all these reports so that is an important question on february. The twenty six th the ethiopian rights commission which is a state appointed or body released a statement saying that it had also conduct an investigation. And that it's key. Findings brutally corroborated those of amnesty. That's quite a significant step forward by the commission which tried two to three years ago would never have come out with a statement like that. The question though moving forward is whether the government decides to accept its findings and act on them. We have heard a lot from the prime minister's office the attorney general's office and other government agencies about accountability but so far very little indication that the government is willing to hold anyone but members of the tepe accountable for crimes committed during this conflict. More makes it even more. Complicated of course is the fact that the prime culprits in this case were eritrean. Troops can be very politically difficult for the government. Addis ababa which has been relying on these troops from eritrea relying on its relationship with the eritrean government to conduct its military operations in

Tigray Anthony Blinken Mr Abiy Mr Abi Mr Lincoln Tom Gardner Addis Eritrea Ethiopian Federal Army Im Hara Ethiopian Army America Ethiopia Ababa European Army TB Federal Government Airtran Matt State Appointed Human Rights C European Government
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo under pressure in harassment probe

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 3 months ago

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo under pressure in harassment probe

"Harlem, is growing on where Andrew the kitchen Cuomo is busy. after a Even second if the front woman accused is empty, the Democratic This'll New York governor tiny of restaurant sexual has harassment. always relied heavily One former on deliveries. Cuomo adviser had previously But a couple of accused years ago, him of kissing Ding got her without tired consent. of the high fees The second on third woman party told APS The New York Times and that complaints when she was a from Cuomo customers aid, the governor about meals asked being intrusive late. questions So currently about her you sex see these life, orders hear including whether she it, slept but I didn't with order. older Ding men. chose to channel The governor most issued of his an apology deliveries on through Sunday a and service gave New York called State's Relay. attorney general Leticia This James, way. the power He to pays appoint grubhub an outside just investigator. for an order, not New a delivery. York State Senator He shows Alessandro me on his Biagi phone. And is then a fellow once Democrat I'm finished and with longtime this order, critic of Cuomo, and I she would joins just us now press welcome. it and drag it Thank to you for having ready me. and You were then one of the first a driver state Democrats is automatically to calm the governor assigned. to resign. You called Come him and pick a monster it up on really Twitter and also have said lawmakers lets him track should be removed the driver from office. so If they Ding don't can hold answer him questions accountable. from customers wondering Why not when wait to their see food what an is investigation coming. uncovers He can't first? do that on Grubhub So and other it's a APS. great place to start. I mean, Being I want pays I want to be really very a percentage clear about on where each order, I'm coming from. but estimates I it am cost a survivor 35% of sexual abuse. less I'm during a legislator, the pandemic a New Yorker than Grub like many hubs delivery chair of service. the ethics and Internal I think Governance I was just Committee, lucky that I found really and I also Before the am pandemic. someone who has a zero tolerance Ding also policy included for leaflets and each Sexual delivery, harassment in the urging workplace. customers It's one of the to most help him important save money issues by ordering to me. directly It's what I from ran his on. Web site. That's what I've been Overall, fighting for. It's the he legislation says, the we hand pass pulled in 2018 noodle not only survived Andre. 2020 Thank Lee. You know, It it's made part about of 5% why Albany more money has than in 2019. been calcified with the A number secrets of city of eateries abuse using that have relay really like lying jumped the 70% halls and so last in year, order according to to be Alex able Bluhm, to not only CEO rid Albany and of sexual founder harassment of the something New York the sexual based company. harassment working We group had like record Was created numbers of restaurants to do signing up We the have to only have but a zero tolerance is policy these restaurants and so that the are way signing that I'm up looking our restaurant at this that set typically of circumstances have never done is delivery, by and the totality those new clients of information didn't do that a lot I know of volume. about the governor's behavior, Bluhm says relays his revenues behavior declined and what's been described by 20% and also what I know last year from my own experience door working Dash there, and also others that offers I am. delivery You know, only you worked now, in his for office restaurants before looking you were an to elected lower their official fees. yourself. We should note. The delivery That's right. sector That's is right. one That's of very right. So I few was I city worked in industries his counsel's office. that hired more For roughly workers eight months during in 2017 the pandemic, It s would not O. I mean, be this unthinkable. is part of a pattern All of abusive the and manipulative behavior total numbers from him and now it's are It's also around part of a 80,000. bigger culture of fear that is Maria pervasive Figueroa throughout is director his administration. of labor You're and policy saying you speak research from first at hand the experience, Worker Institute But wouldn't there at be Cornell value University's in having a School thorough, of Industrial exhaustive and investigation Labor relations. so that you get things She's on basing the record that and find 80,000 out how widespread figure this on is the number and give of commercial the truth cyclists an opportunity who to were be registered aired? before Absolutely. the pandemic, Yes, plus Absolutely. an estimated Yes, I do increase. support an independent investigation. Like the restaurants. I believe that we're These going workers to be able to have needed that now, the APS since to survive, there will be a special and prosecutor they appointed felt by exploited. the attorney general, so They we include could many be thankful low for income that. immigrants But and people when of I color look at at the the greatest words that risk the governor of contracting used and the Cove. questions It that he asked You seen? Charlotte Aviano Bennett says she spent Which hundreds the governor of has dollars not denied on equipment things to deliver like food Do you on have her sex e with bike older men? company Do you and have sex not the outside of your mother, relationship, she and he repeated says the companies to her over don't and over pay again, for knowing anything. she was a sexual She abuse bought her survivor. own delivery bag, You helmet were raped and and winter abused gear. and attacked Deano and assaulted. lives in Washington Heights These are things and used to that work in a not restaurant. only did he say She to her switched personally to running deliveries and alone, but for he door said them dash while he and relay they were in a couple his of years office ago because in the Capitol she's got a young child in Albany, and wanted and more he flexible mentioned hours. that But you know, she as says his the work response got to this, harder it was meant in the to be pandemic. playful. Yeah, There is when no an gray abandoned area. me in Have you heard A from your Gemma constituents Donati about this? What the are hand they saying and Calvin to you? you, she I think that says there are restaurants people who won't are let her really use shocked their bathrooms that and she this has is to take you breaks know, coming outside in the cold. to the surface. Why? The workers Because justice ah project lot of people has been know organizing the governor delivery from drivers what they see on and television, its lobbying Right? Go the back city to Council last for March a law in April requiring and May and bathroom June and July breaks, the whole summer sick when pay the governor and was protective doing his press equipment. conferences about covert, Its which executive Provided director, a lot of Lee safety Hia Wolpe for people. It calls made them feel the apse really like disruptors. they were like, They're like not the governor really had paying their backs. minimum wage, The which problem is in New here York is that that's $15 the perception an hour. What that's the persona. they're offering is Behind opportunities the scenes, to especially work with Charlotte without Bennett, right. She describes a weight this happening and without during the essential, peak of Corbett. right. Because We these only workers have a minute are left, independent but I'm curious. contractors. You know, as a Democrat, Gord Cuomo Ash, is Grubhub your party's defacto and the others leader pay for in the state. each He's delivery been governor item for a decade, plus tips. and there's a gubernatorial Drivers say election they can make in New York $20 next year. an hour So what or more does when they're this busy, mean for but your party there's no in the state? guarantee I mean, I Relay think the most is unique important and thing paying that we a fixed can do as hourly legislators wage and as of members 12 of 50 any political plus party tips is collectively a few years ago have relay a zero settled tolerance a lawsuit policy after for being abuse. accused And of I think not that paying when we overtime. are confronted with these When kinds asked of whether issues it's independent we should contractors not should be To be classified thinking about as employees. party. We should be thinking Bluhm, about the people the CEO, who have been harmed said. They and usually how we're don't going want to get full them justice time hours, and also how right, So I think we will there's hold a huge accountable flexibility the people that who is actually overlooked caused these that harms. So frankly, for me, this it is would not be a political impossible issue. I know for it's being us seen to that keep way. if But I would have The the same reaction, employee no matter model who it was. got inserted. I

Cuomo Bluhm Aps The New York Times Attorney General Leticia This Grubhub Ding York State New York Albany Maria Pervasive Figueroa Worker Institute Cornell Value University Alessandro Charlotte Aviano Bennett Andrew Andre
Malcolm X's Family Push to Uncover the "Truth" behind His Death

Democracy Now! Audio

06:37 min | 3 months ago

Malcolm X's Family Push to Uncover the "Truth" behind His Death

"The. Fbi and new york. Police departments are facing new calls to finally open their records related to the assassination of malcolm x. Shocked at fifty six years ago at the audubon ballroom and harlem february twenty first nineteen sixty five. This comes after the release of a deathbed confession of a former undercover new york police officer who admitted to being part of a broad new york police and fbi conspiracy targeting malcolm in the confession the former officer. Raymond would who died last year admitted he entrapped to members of malcolm security team and another crime. A plot to blow up the statue of liberty just days before the assassination. On saturday ray woods cousin. Reggie would read the letter at a news conference at the shabazz center in harlem assignment to draw the two men into a felonious federal crime so that they could be arrested by the fbi and kept away from managing malcolm. X's audubon ballroom door security on february twenty first nineteen sixty five in his letter. Raymond would also revealed. He was inside the audubon ballroom. At the time of malcolm's assassination at least one other undercover new york police officer. Gene roberts was also inside after infiltrating the security team of the organization of afro american unity. The group malcolm founded after leaving the nation of islam. Both officers would and roberts were part of the bureau of special services and investigations or bossie. A secret of political intelligence unit of the nypd nicknamed the red squat welcomes assassination. Police arrested three members of the nation of islam. His murder but questions about the guilt of the men have lingered for decades in his letter. Raymond would openly says one of the men. Thomas johnson was innocent and was arrested to quote. Protect my cover and the secrets of the fbi and the nypd unquote ray woods letter. Echoes claims and recent books by manning marable and less pain that some of malcolm's actual assassins were never charged in a moment. We'll be joined by raymond. Woods cousin reggie would released his deathbed confession. But i i want to turn to the words of malcolm x. Himself speaking after his home in queens was firebomb just a week before his assassination february fourteenth. Nine thousand nine hundred sixty five by house was bombed. It was bound by the muslim movement. On the orders of aligned to mohammed. Now they hit come around so they had planned to do it from the front. End the back so that i couldn't get out. They had they. They covered the complete the door then they had come to the back but instead of getting directly in back of the house in this way they stood at a forty five degree angle and talk with the windows so it it glance and onto the ground and the fire hit the window woke up my second oldest baby and then the fire burn on the outside of the house but it had had that one going through that window it would have fallen on a six year old girl a four year old girl and a two year old girl. And i'm gonna tell you if it had done it. Taken my wrangling going to anybody insight. I would not wait. Goes in the senate because this the police know the criminal operation of the black muslim movement because they have thoroughly infiltrated because they have thoroughly infiltrated it. Those are the words of malcolm x. Right before his assassination right after his home was firebombed in february of nineteen sixty five just days later he was shot seconds after he took the stage at the ballroom. We're joined now by reggie. Would the cousin of raymond would author of the new book. The ray which story confessions of a black nypd cop in the assassination of malcolm x. Still with us. Civil rights attorney. Ben crump who attended that news conference with Reggie wooden at the audubon ballroom now. The shabazz center where malcolm x was assassinated fifty six years ago. Reggie thank you so much for joining us. Use read parts of the letter this weekend. Talk about your cousin. Ray would and what you understand happened the conspiracy. He alleges that he was a part of by the fbi. And the new york police department to assassinate malcolm x. Morning thank you for having me ray was was a complicated man I think be based on his past experiences he he lived with a lot of fear and caution on a daily basis which instilled in me over the past ten years but are ray was a person that lived as a lived. He lived as a as a very quiet and reserved person because of what he experienced he witnessed some horrible things firsthand and also realized that he was a part of it after the fact and so therefore ray was told by his handlers. That not to repeat anything that he had seen or heard or he would Join malcolm therefore for forty six years. Ray separated himself from the family and In fear that he will put us in danger out rey lived alone many years and he Finally in his final years when he realized that he was his cancer was a reoccurring. He wanted to reconnect with family. Because he didn't want to die alone. So i volunteered to move them to florida so that my wife and i take care of them and get them back and forth cancer treatments things of that nature and therefore he trusted me enough to reveal this information and asked me not to say anything until he passed away but at the same time knox allow them to take it to his grave.

Malcolm Ray Woods FBI Audubon Ballroom Raymond New York New York Police Department Shabazz Center Gene Roberts Organization Of Afro American Bureau Of Special Services And Bossie Malcolm X Manning Marable Woods Cousin Reggie Reggie Thomas Johnson Harlem
"harlem" Discussed on Into America

Into America

06:41 min | 4 months ago

"harlem" Discussed on Into America

"A hit running for five months and the aunt took off. He'll help jump start the careers of the black actors. He trained cast people lie sydney. Call me missteps ruby dee again of have yourself a paul for once in your to support the work. The and received grants from the rockefeller foundation. But they were also funded in part by membership model early on. There was a lot more attention to aunt from outside of harlem and so they did a very concerted effort to get more people directly from harlem by the third year. They were ninety percent supported by harlem audiences. And we're very very pleased with that and we had Quite an organization at its height we had about two hundred and fifty members and at our height we had about two thousand subscribers who paid us an annual fee of three dollars for three productions even with all success the finances of the end were always strained. We all worked free of charge and we have to pawn are typewriters. And whatever else we could sometime to raise the money to pay for the production as we had into nineteen forty four. A play called anna lou. Kosta bro questions of success and money to ahead. So it is originally written by a man named yordan about a prostitute from polish family. Abram hill rewrites it to focus on african americans before hills adaptation the plays writer philip. Yordan who was white had not been able to get any traction with they stage it in harlem. It ends up moving from harlem to broadway in one thousand nine hundred forty four and then just over the top success a two year run. That remains a record for a black cast. That isn't a musical cast. Alison alvin childress. Starred in the nineteen forty. Four broadway. Production sidney portier was cast in a second broadway run in nineteen forty seven so the success is extraordinary up making movies of it. One of the most sensationally daring plays of our time a hit all the world. I don't know custer comes to the screen with every shocking scene intact. So hill without question is the reason that anadolu casta in being a successful venture but the success was bittersweet. Sometimes success was outlook in one of those interviews. From the late seventies hill talks openly. About how the business arrangements for his role in the broadway production of anna lou custer the fell apart whereas i had a contract with your to get a percentage as cooper is collaborating off on the script. This contract was lost. My personal contract with you on was misplaced the american naval theatres contract with your and had been misplaced intentionally unintentionally. They were lost. We had left and legal to back us up and yard. And when i talked to him he says the producer is going to take care of you and the american league rookie. Don't worry no surprise here. Hill and the aunt or not taking care of they were left with pennies on the dollar making only two percents of the profits from the bro production. No movie rights radio rights. No other right. Just get two percent from the broadway production. That was his agreement and lou. Castor was a turning point for the and so the fact that he doesn't get properly paid and credited is a real problem and there's another reason hill had made big stars out of some of the actors he worked with and by the late nineteen forties. People like harry belafonte and cd. Portier started leaving. The ant to pursue other ambitions scholars definitely argue that it was the beginning of the end because of all of the downtown attention that aunt that get because once you had that attention the community focus especially from the actors. Point of view really got muddied. We were always depress the individual the good of the whole group. You see you will not disturb ans- you will just one of the aunts and none of us could rise in higher than the group out to build a real group that the lame american negro failure you saw that name that would have more meaning than any star. What but actors of course they want more and more opportunities and ultimately what lead to heal leaving and well. i do think we're back to that frustration and People were also trying to say that he wasn't very good at administrative things and so basically yes. These are human beings who ended up going at each other in various ways And this is when we're reminded that our heroes are human and he was finally in nineteen forty eight like i'm done. This is no longer worth it and walks away. Underhill the american negro theatre put on nineteen productions. Twelve of them originals. And they'd last a little bit longer after that but not much in nineteen fifty hills co founder. Frederick o'neal would also leave the end and in nineteen fifty one. The organization dissolved for awhile hill to dramatic alma mater lincoln university in pennsylvania. He eventually came back to new york and became public schoolteacher in nineteen seventy-four tape from the archives hills. Future comes up the interviewer asks. Would you like to get back into theatre. Well tell you the truth. The is a jealous mistress. Innovative sobbed you so completely in a such a hit and miss situation. It took me ten years to get it out of my sister. I did not undergo therapy. I just tried to work with myself. Until i could accept the fact and i was no longer in the data and i didn't really needed that that that i didn't have any contribution to make at this stage of my life quiet years that i'd like to relax and not be under so much.

Frederick o'neal new york Twelve harry belafonte five months pennsylvania Yordan ninety percent ten years harlem yordan two percent nineteen productions Hill Abram hill ruby dee one thousand One lincoln university three dollars
New York City to test no-police mental crisis response

Morning Edition

00:32 sec | 4 months ago

New York City to test no-police mental crisis response

"To mental health crisis calls normally handled by the police. The pilot program will dispatch teams of firefighters he empties and social workers. Instead of police officers. It will begin in three Harlem police precincts that together accounted for over 7400 mental health related 911 calls last year. Police will still respond to calls and calls involving a weapon or imminent risk of harm. Mental health advocates have hailed the idea but expressed some reservations about how the city is structuring it. Governor Phil Murphy will present

Harlem Police Phil Murphy
2 injured in shooting at bar in Summit, near Chicago

Anna Davlantes

00:17 sec | 4 months ago

2 injured in shooting at bar in Summit, near Chicago

"And suburban summit. The shooting happened overnight at the Fire station pub near 63rd in Harlem. Several shots were reportedly fired into the building. Two people were hit. The victims were taken to area hospitals with gunshot wounds. Their conditions are unknown at the moment. Police are investigating the incident. A vacant building in

Fire Station Pub Harlem
Portrait Of Jose Feliciano

Latino USA

04:51 min | 4 months ago

Portrait Of Jose Feliciano

"What i first met jose feliciano it was the year nineteen eighty six. It was a concert of his in california. And i was doing my first ever interviewed him now at that time was leon was one of the most famous latinos that i had ever met and what i remember the most was that he wasn't afraid to be himself. He was eccentric and a true bohemian artist. That was truly one incredible guitarist who couldn't get much padma five separate night. All oh and that air of confidence translates musically to everything hosts it touches. And if this is the first time you've heard of jose feliciano and you're not sure you know him. Well listen to this. Bobby bobby doc. That's what set feliciano's mega nineteen seventy. Christmas hit police one of the all time most famous christmas songs in the world but with a career that spans almost six decades ho says major milestones have come from him putting his own personal stamp a mix of soul folk latin and blues on well known songs whether that's of the past visa goddess. Zing zing on saying were classic rock songs three monks and even star spangled banner. Here's his iconic performance from a world series game in one thousand nine hundred sixty eight. Oh a that may sound like an average game day performance but it was a risk that then three year old. Jose took during the height of the vietnam. War with his soulful rendition. Jose open the door for other artists to perform the national anthem in their own unique ways there was born in nineteen forty five in lettuce puerto rico and has been blind since birth. He was five years old when he and his family migrated to spanish harlem and it was in new york city for. He developed his love for music and crafted his skills on the guitar. In the nineteen sixties or say went on to become an international sensation especially in latin america. And since then he's performed on themed stages around the world. He's recorded over sixty albums and has won multiple. Grammy awards was. If any see now in seventies join me in the studio to talk about how humor is one way. He has coping about his almost sixteen year career and to talk about one of his favourite relationships. The one he has with his guitar. I'm wondering ho said. When was the first time that you remember hearing the sound of the guitar and was in an instant was it. Just like Yes it was. You hit the nail on the head. How how did you did. You live with me have you. What are you just like. You just like telling jokes all the time. Is that where. I'm sorry to say that has been my way of accepting the fact that i was blind that i wasn't normal A what at least people around me thought normal should be because in latin family if you have some kind of disability they start thinking oh my god. What's going to happen which happened to me. I remember hearing my parents discussing my future. All poor jose. what are we gonna do about. 'em eat canned. Seize blind and. I heard that i made up my mind right then in there that i was going to be different.

Jose Feliciano Bobby Bobby Doc Feliciano Jose HO Leon California Puerto Rico Vietnam Grammy Awards Latin America New York City
"harlem" Discussed on Into America

Into America

03:27 min | 4 months ago

"harlem" Discussed on Into America

"Of the depth and breadth of blackness around the world. I'm tr- mainly and this is america. We're continuing our black history month series harlem when my mind following the interconnected lives of four figures from harlem and how they shaped a black identity for themselves and for future generations today. Part to arturo shamburg. It's the story of his search for black history for black heroes it. How eventually.

"harlem" Discussed on Into America

Into America

06:20 min | 4 months ago

"harlem" Discussed on Into America

"I knew he wasn't from seattle. 'cause he seemed to be just better than most people from seattle and they said barbara. We'd like to introduce you to our newest professor. Assist jacob lawrence. I didn't know who he was. Didn't know you had like zero zero. No just a nice professor. And it was the seventies. It was during a time when they were really agitating through university to get professor educator administrator representations and he was part of that when she finally caught on the who jacob was she marched right into his office and i look at him and i said you've been holding out right he said barbara but you mean i said you're famous and now i know it i watch people. Just get totally over excited. When they would see him. So i look at him. And i look at them and i go like what are they seeing. But i wasn't seeing him through their eyes. I wasn't seeing him as a historical figure. I was seeing him as this person in my life. Barbara and jacob and jacob's wife gwen came close new yorkers through and through. They didn't drive so bar would drive them to the grocery store or run errands. She even took them out on the town every now and then i take. Let's go on a date. I said sweet honey in the rock is going to be here to take you on a date and they said what is that is going to take you and so go pick them up and we would go and just hanging out. Then i take them home and there didn't seem to be anything overly special about what i was doing. Accept it just seemed like the thing i was supposed to do. So it's what i did. Barbara saw that the burden of fame sometimes wait on jacob. He always said you know. I was not the only really talented person in that city. There are many counted people any said but he was the one that got selected. And i think there was a lot of pressure from being the one and You know he carried it with grace. But i think he was. He was fragile in certain kinds of ways that he was aware of until he he operated in his lane where he has strength was and that was making his work. Was he a good professor. Harvard professor was he stuff. Nursery hand was like just on. Your professor wasn't i think i mean i can only imagine that jacob gave to his students what he got. He never raised his voice. He was a very incredibly skilled drafts person. And anybody who worked with him even briefly got that right away we could see that there was some things and it was pretty good. I hadn't see that. I kind of was going somewhere. And so he just. Would you know gently saying you might want to try that i to do that. And so that was where. I developed my iconography looking at the way he did and going okay. So if i'm doing that what am i. Ships look like. And how can i define that and tell the story with that. His goal was to always help the person he was working with. Be the best of what they were trying to be. Not to make them into some small echo of jacob and that i think was his greatest gift to me if that sounds familiar. It's the same kind of relationship that jacob had with black artists who came before him in harlem people like charleston and augusta savage forty years later and thousands of miles from where he got his start. Jacob lawrence recreated the energy of the place that helped to define him barbara earl. Thomas is the third generation in his line of black creators. her style is nothing like jacobs. today she's a visual artist. Who works with mostly really large intricate cutouts. Some of the color of his black and white but like jacob her art till stories that center blackness. It's part of jacob's legacy and harland's legacy was one moment when we were doing this show in the mid eighties. We were going back and forth about is going to be jacob. Lawrence african american painter black painter is going to be jacob lawrence american painter and we finally settled on jacob lawrence american painter because he not only told a story of african americans and black people but he told part of history solit- everyone can look at that and say these are the things that we didn't know these are the things that are also part of the american experience american history that we don't know that belong to us in a way that have made us who we are but the has been absented from history. This idea that black history is somehow from american history as if our experience with silos somehow as opposed to a direct reaction response intertwined tangled right born from the same soil reaching towards this son connected. Jacob arts work speaks today your work is known for its its social message capturing the essence of race relations in this country. How much are you disappointed that. So much of what you've documented for so very long still winds up a a reality in modern day. America here is more than one thousand nine three interview with jacob on the today. Show how. I'm not disappointed. Know i'm seventy six years of age now and i really seen some. You'd have to go back fifty sixty years to really see. What has the people in general how they we're developed as people the capacity of people to to benefit from each other and being sawn in contact with each other.

Barbara Jacob lawrence jacobs jacob Thomas jacob lawrence seattle Jacob mid eighties harlem thousands of miles barbara earl forty years later fifty sixty years Lawrence Harvard seventy six years third generation gwen seventies
"harlem" Discussed on Into America

Into America

13:17 min | 4 months ago

"harlem" Discussed on Into America

"Resources of possibilities and opportunities that they never could have dreamed of or acquired in the places that they left. They left as part of the great migration. After reconstruction black people faced the constant threat of deadly. Racial violence. white southerners also passed racist. Decided to keep black people poor and disenfranchised so black families when looking for a better life the great migration stretched from nineteen ten to nineteen seventy in that time around six million black people move from mostly rural areas in the south to urban centers in the north and many settled in harlem when we think of harlem is haarlem exist without the great migration and immigration of all. Those folks myself no harlem was defined holland king to be a place of reckoning for the world very difficult for black people to pursue their aesthetic sensibilities within the small towns in rural cultures that they came from they needed to be in a place where the synergies of other like minded individuals who were experimenting and seeking the possibilities of what a new form of expression could be. These were in fact. The noon equals. They were new people. America never seen anything like this. America was not prepared for this. America was too busy. Suppressing them there was no way. The great migration could not have impacted jacob lawrence and ultimately gave rise to his migration series infect. Jacob lawrence said as much here he is in nineteen ninety-three interview with the phillips collection museum in washington. Dc at the very beginning of my understanding of communication. With words. i was very much aware This movement which took place starting right after world war one and continuing on through the late thirties. Before jacob lawrence became one of the most famous of the twentieth century he himself was just another child of the great migration. His father was from south carolina and his mother from virginia. They moved north after getting married and jacobs born in new jersey in nineteen seventeen. So there's a paradox. here the in close and yet far away because my culture although it's northern urban northern is southern because my background my family's background the friends of my family all southern in culture food everything else jacob's parents separated in nineteen twenty four so the mother laughs day and his two siblings a brother and a sister in foster care while she moved into new york into harlem worked save enough money and then moved her family into harlem. The harlem renaissance was in full swing. First of all thirteen year olds suffer from raging hormones. Okay and so. Everything was excitement to him okay. The people the streets the colors the movement the sounds there was nothing that was not a possibility for exploration experimentation excitement but jacob lawrence's mother knowing her child and being the mother that she was said okay. But i'm gonna put you in these. After school programs. I started going to school at at the expense of my own school work. I was anxious to get their after school. Art classes jacob began to attract attention from artisan the community. Here's jacob again talking about those programs. This time in one thousand nine hundred interview with the los angeles county museum of art known as lacrima. It's only in. Retrospect you realize how much it's meant to our lives into development and i think harlem generally was a community of hope by the time he turned sixteen he had dropped out of school was working odd. Jobs and taking classes with two harlem's great artists of the period painter charles austin and sculptor augusta savage but they didn't force their artistic sensibilities on him. That just wasn't the harlem way jacob head special. Talent jacob was aware beyond the youthfulness of his years he was an old spirit and so no. They didn't teach him. They didn't teach him how to draw. What they did. Was they nurtured. And they mentored him and they gave him tools and materials and showed him techniques so that he could figure out how he wanted to express what he was seeing what he was living and what he and experienced charles allston. He had a studio up three six. I think it was west. One hundred thirty forty third street and it became a mecca. It was the hot place to be was the place where artists hung out. Charles would say charles olson was say come on jay. You know we're gonna to be getting together over my studio come on over later. Jake said go. He said i would sit there. He said i would listen. He said also young. He said many times. I didn't even know what they were talking about her. He said by asset the end. I listened so that tells you something about what was happening to his consciousness while he was being nurtured in a way. Where if you had gone to college that would impart that kind of information for high tuition jacob. Lawrence was sitting in the living rooms of the university of harlem sculptor augusta savage got jacob job with the federal art project when he turned eighteen the year was nineteen thirty five and the program was part of the new deals works progress administration the wpa where the government injected money into the economy. During the great depression. Jacob was paid to paint. This is how intense the creative spirit was in that community. And this is how much they recognize and believe in each other and how they all worked towards a common goal. Jacob lawrence was a jewel jacob repay the support painting the place. He called home. As jacob began to exhibit. I in the harlem community at the ymca at shamburg. Even on the street corner on sidewalk shows and in lots open lattes they would have exhibitions the first people who supported jacob lawrence were teachers local workers laundry seamstresses all of the people who were the subjects of his work. I can never give the community enough credit. The encouragement that it gave me the teachers who purchased some of my works librarians. Were very very little You think in terms of almost giving it away but that five or ten dollars that they would pay for a small work. Matt morgan the five or ten dollars. It was the the idea of you doing something of words somebody else wants. In addition to help and jacob get his job augusta savage also introduced him to his future. Wife phil artis. Wendelin night literally says their love was the talk of the town. They are phenomena if not paradox. If not in an ema. She was artist in her own right and at times. She was a collaborator with him. Helping him with his series working with him protecting his reputation his image and everything that she understood it easily about the impact of his work in the larger art world. Don't downplay here's gwen. And jacob together in an interview with you might have not thought of yourself as an ambassador. But i think you are pleased that for instance the society would ask you to show your paintings to people who were your ancestors many ways so much. She was brilliant. She was not to be missed. She was like a michelle obama. Brilliant beautiful focused determine quiet but didn't want to mess with her. Okay only full do that. The two were married in nineteen forty one and that same year everything changed. Jacob lawrence unveiled his migration series sixty panels each twelve by eight inches painted mostly in primary colors telling the story of the great migration from the south. It was harlem story. It was his story. The series was an instant sensation. And jacob became a sensation. Two he was just twenty three years old. No other black artists ever had such recognition. He was in life magazine. It was picked up by gallery. He is a puffy in the art world. S a puppy okay. That's barely who's coming out of their third or fourth year of college. Can you describe his work. He tended to love primary colors all of the basics yellow red blue then there was white sometimes a little green but red was a color that he used to kind of like evoke emotion tension. So he didn't use it. Your stand rampantly. He used it with deliberation. I wanted to create a work. That was very space very You see immediately the dark. The light values very high. In contrast the warmth of the red could be a bus could be trained and it's a long arduous ride where these people came so in the migration series. Some of the panels have lots of people in them and they're moving and so you'll see train tracks which telling you. These people will go into a train station. And then jacob lawrence will have a scene of a black person sitting down coward and over his head to the right will be a tree very stark. No branches no signs of life on the tree which is giving you the message that this is not a healthy happy scene in from that tree. Hang a noose. His messages in his way of paring down the story to the essential components so that even a five-year-old can figure out what was going on and the workers the workers he loved the workers. Well it's it's a symbol and i like tools. I use tools as a painting doing still wipe would use fruits and vegetables and flora in a store live. This is from a nineteen ninety-three today show interview. I think tools are beautiful An i use them they. The people are tools. They they use it like a dance and you know the tool so perfect and hasn't changed over three or four hundred years the hand to exactly the same of. Don't listen to anything that they said about me. I wasn't a social realist. Now wasn't informed by cubism. I knew about the kosovo. I knew about all of these modernist. Painters i was working on. Harlem was.

charles olson new jersey five Charles virginia Jacob lawrence new york charles austin third Jake jacob lawrence Lawrence south carolina sixteen charles allston harlem los angeles jacob jacobs washington
"harlem" Discussed on 1A

1A

06:14 min | 7 months ago

"harlem" Discussed on 1A

"This is one a. I'm jen wind in washington by now. You've probably seen it. The viral video dancing through harlem shows belly dancers leaping twirling in jumping in point shoes and sneakers through the streets of new york all to the sound of jesus spock's violin concerto in a minor but beyond his showing talented artists practicing their craft in invites questions about the pandemic's impact on life performance. And about who gets to do the performing with ballet alexandra hutchinson and derek brockton are both members of the dance theatre of harlem twenty twenty company. They co produced dancing through harlem in part to celebrate the theatre's fiftieth anniversary. And they join me now from caught spong in. New york's hudson valley alley derrick. Welcome to one a. Thanks for having us and alongside alley and derek. Is virginia johnson. She's the dance. Theater's artistic director. She was also a founding member and principal ballerina there for more than thirty years. She's also the founder of point magazine. Virginia welcome thank you. It's great to be with you. So allie because this is radio and we don't have visuals. Could you just describe a bit of what this video looks like for people who haven't seen it. S so there's eight dancers that we chose from the company and including derek. And i and we have them dancing throughout scenes of harlem. That people may not have seen if you don't live here so we had them go through the hundred thirty seven th street city college. We had them in one. Forty fifth Subway station and adam clayton powell junior mural in on so we wanted to show beautiful scenic historic iconic places of harlem with dancers in point shoes in one section and in sneakers and others on socially distanced with masks on and joyfully dancing. For the first time after six months away it is joy for. We're going to tweet it out now at one a. But how can people identify which dancers you are alley because both you and derek are in the video right So dare can. I are in the first scene that you see The two dancers coming in from Jumping into the frame. Rick where did the idea for this video. Come from this. Video came from We needed something to submit for harlem week which is a celebration that we would normally participate in person and we needed something that was going to represent harlem that was going to show off our dancers well but also reflect the times that we're in and talk about and mention masks and black lives matter. We wanted to have an impact on the people who walked virginia. This video was also made in part to celebrate. The theatre's fiftieth anniversary talk about. Its founding So yeah dense. It of how long was founded in nineteen sixty nine by arthur mitchell and call shook and arthur mitchell was the first african american to be a principal dancer with an american ballet company. he had quite quite an amazing career And he was asked by the us government to go down to brazil to start at about a company because we were trying to build stronger relations between the us and brazil and we all know that the arts bring people together. He was on his way to the airport on april fourth. Nineteen sixty eight When he learned about the assassination of doctor king and that stop diminish tracks he wanted to Do something as impactful. As what dr king done but he said i'm a ballet dancer. What can i do well. He looked around his home community of harlem and he saw a lot of devastation. The schools were terrible The housing was poor though. There was no good food and said you know what i'm gonna do. I'm gonna start a ballet school. Because i'm gonna teach these young people life skills that will change their lives through this art form of classical ballet so we started dance theatre of harlem as a as a school and he knew that by giving them lessons and ballet he would be giving them lessons and focus and self discipline and perseverance. was very successful right from the start. Arthur mitchell was tremendously charismatic individual. He had about four hundred kids right away And he looked around at these kids and you said well you know what they need role models. They need something to aspire to. And so he invented the dance theatre of harlem company In the basement of a church and we have been In harlem the whole time we have our own building on one hundred fifty second street This has been our home since nineteen seventy two. You were one of the theater's founding members brought you to the dance theatre. Well i started off just so many. Young kids in america do looking at bali and dreaming of being about arena and i studied quite extensively in washington dc. My home And was very fortunate to study with an amazing woman. Thorough smith and then i went to the washington school of ballet and i had a really sterling training there and when i graduated The director called me into her office. She said you know you're going to have a career. You're very talented. But nobody's ever going to hire a black dancer to be a ballerina so you need to think of something else. I mean here. You've been training for years to have that message. Come from someone in authority. What what does it mean for you. So you know what i think. The thing about being a dancer is that it gives you steal on the inside. And i think that it's only in this time and people are asking me but it makes you feel like that. I've wondered if it hurt me or if it made me discouraged. I think it just made me more determined. I just knew this thing. I loved more than anything else. And i would find a way to do it. So i got to new york in the fall of nineteen sixty eight..

harlem derek brockton harlem twenty twenty Virginia new york arthur mitchell director jen wind spong washington school of ballet principal hudson valley alley washington alexandra hutchinson adam clayton powell dr king alley founding member point magazine allie
"harlem" Discussed on The Trip

The Trip

08:48 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on The Trip

"My Dad's name was Charles Wesley Hall. He came here to the states and when he was. Oh Gosh may be fourteen years old and his Fa- my grandmother my grandparents they lows in Harlem so he pretty much grew up in Harlem. My grandfather was born in Cuba. Hop to Jamaica from Jamaica. They came to the states are seen. You've you've made pilgrimages down to Cuba. Yeah so in the middle of all of this. I returned on March the ten right when all of this started happening. And I had to self quarantine because I was on an international flight. So it's really just crazy. How all of this kind of came together. Because I was down there and I were there at the same time. Allie actually. You know what I came back on the twenty eighth of February. I'm Ray at the end where we left out on March. The seven and we can extend the trip but as you know why there's a little crazy trying to find a park with a little card and having to go to a. Texan the morning to get a new card and all cash. I left my passport at the. Yeah it was. That's a whole other experience if I never darkened the door of an Texoma office worldwide card again in my life. I'll be happy man but I still have my Wifi card in the back of my phone like I'm like I have to go look for the park though I will call home and check in with my mom and she be like. There's going to be a travel ban. Every time I called it was some next elevated news in. I'm just like we weren't hearing any of this when we were over there like I didn't. We've heard nothing about the virus when we got to the airport like I was wearing a mask and some people in customs wearing a mask and the airport. Workers were wearing masks and that was it like no took my temperature. No one was checking to see if I was sick but it was the same way coming back there like. Do you have anything in your suitcase? Did you bring anything back and I was like no. Meanwhile my luggage was like fifty pounds of Yeah Right. Don't worry about the rum and think about the virus. Yeah I I feel like. They are connected. If I didn't have this two bottles of Santiago on say did I brought back with me. This would be a much darker moment in my life and I brought office. I brought office from my office was already closed and the stashes here and it's slowly depleting. I'm just by DOT. I got next time when I go back. I'll bring more. I promise well as you know as a as a Santiago rooted person you will appreciate that this Santiago on say is taking the island by storm and I think he was telling Maria for mind. Who's a singer told me that you know? It's like a revelation to all of them because the weather is different out there. The sugar taste sweeter. The rum is richer. And they're all going crazy for this stuff. They're putting their their Havana club to the side and going with Santiago. Eleven and I'm on board. I'm on the train with her. All right so we're getting back. You come back to New York and all hell is about to break loose just to give you a little insight from the beginning. My Dad was diagnosed in early. Two thousand eighteen with stage for gastric cancer and we knew it was terminal. He went through Palette of Chemo. And you know sort of a palliative care regimen and when he outgrew that we knew that it was time for hospice so fast forward to January. Twenty twenty after we did a short stint in and out of hospitals. We decided that we would just. It was time to go to hospice route. So I come back. And that's when The hospice we started getting the hospice people work in order and just trying to develop schedule and so while I was home. Just trying to make sure that. I didn't bring the virus in 'cause I didn't WanNa bring it to my dad that next week like the schools had closed Or it was the week after that but as that's happening we noticed that there was a shift in even trying to get home health aides to come in so crazy you would. You would think that in home hospice would be somewhat immune from this but I guess right when when this really just kicked off everything shut well. My thing is what I realized is. There's no contingency plan when something like this does happen. Like across the board because hospitals are unprepared These type of agencies aren't prepared and people are afraid to do their job because they're not adequately covered so I mean I get it like I understand the reason for people not wanting to do it but it's just. What's the contingency plan here? Because there there wasn't one so gradually. This hospice service started shrinking. Down in front of your eyes up until it became that There were no more. They weren't coming into the home anymore. It was just virtual visits and he would have to quote unquote manage his own care in. I was thinking what's so now. I'm like okay okay okay. So now has a think Mike. So what am I supposed to do so while that's happening My Mom's aunt who actually is like my grandmother because my grandmother died when I was young. And it's my grandmother's sister. She was eighty nine years old and now now was the very active senior citizens shoes in the casino twice a week. Probably our senior center every day. You know hanging out with her friend like doing her thing independently. She didn't have any pictures in conditions. She lives out in Long Island now. She's shooting in rockaway. Which is the virus. She's living on her own rockaway and then my mom spoke to her. Maybe two weeks and to give or take two weeks into the self quarantine. She kept saying she was tired. She didn't feel well which isn't like her. Because you know she's pretty active and then just notice the steady decline in how she sounded on the phone so my mom's first instinct was like I'm going to go there and I had to tell her. No you can't go there because we don't know what's on so we were talking to her son trying to get some headway and he was just saying you know she's not responding. She's just fleeing here you know. She stopped breathing. Well I was just like Oh my God. It sounds like she might have it so now I called her daughter who lives in California and I told her she needs to come like ace so she got a flight she came next. Stay we go to the House. And she definitely was not well so now. I'm like I'm here again in this situation so I quickly backs out of the house and I just kind of talk to them like from the door so you were out in. Rockaway came came back. And then we're trying to kind of work the phones and get the doctor to get some kind of Hilton. Here that's another thing that kind of weighs on me because I'm like I should have stayed like you think of should've could've would've but it really wouldn't have changed the outcome at the end of the day. So you're like you can't put yourself through that ringer because it wouldn't have changed anything. We later found out that her senior center was largely infected and four of her friends also past positive from the virus to at home too. I think at home to wrap medical facilities one was at a Rehab Center. So that's five. Actually it was a few quite a few so all these things that made her. You know so remarkable in life like her active social schedule her independence or seeking out company of others that would that would end ended up costing life Catholic. Some it just feels like the the story of this city. You know it's like it is a very sociable city whether by choice or by force everybody's with each other and that is that has proven our undoing. You know. Yeah Yeah.

Santiago Harlem Cuba Jamaica Charles Wesley Hall Fa Long Island Havana club Allie Twenty twenty rockaway Texoma Ray Rockaway Rehab Center
"harlem" Discussed on 1A

1A

06:34 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on 1A

"Above. It hired a singing of the Mississippi. When Abe Lincoln went down to New Orleans and I've seen its muddy bosom turn turn all golden in the sunset that was Langston Hughes reading? Probably one of his most famous poems. The Negro speaks of Rivers Morgan. Jerkins Erkin is here. Autumn Womack is here and William Maxwell of Washington University in Saint. Louis is here as well in twenty eighteen Hearst INS book bear coon about one of the last Africans to be brought over to America through the illegal slave trade was published for the very first time almost almost a century after it was written. Now Professor Womack Zora Neale Hurston. She really struggled with the story. That would become Beira. Koon Wai was writing this story. Such a such a hard time for her so she began to write the story That would become Barracuda in one thousand nine hundred eighty seven So that was the first time that she had gone down. South on a research trip sponsored by Carter G Woodson and Franz Boas who was her professor at Columbia Columbia University where she was studying anthropology as a student at Barnard So she began to write it in nineteen twenty seven. She returned in Nineteen Twenty eight twenty nine to to spend more time with him to create more full length. Version immense. She moved across different genres so she in her letters to various folks including on one of her patriots. CHARLOTTE osgood Mason. And she said. I'm going to try my hand at putting his story in a series of parables He tried recording him right. So maybe film would be the medium. Am that would best tell this story. So one of the things about. This is very characteristic of her sentence. She was always looking for the right form to tell the story of black life right and in particular this subject of slavery it seems posed a particular challenge for her and she was trying to figure out a form that would tell this story about a thing. That's supposed in the past right but that's still ongoing so there's this temporal kind of tangle that she was struggling within grappling with and I think it's really beautiful in her movement of men across these forms we really be impossibility of ever telling the story of slavery as something that's in the past right and that's something that I mean. Contemporary Scholars talk about in terms of the astrolabe from slavery. But she was theorizing this. I think in her movement across forms and trying to get it right and struggling to tell the story in a way that conveys the complexity. And you've Britain you've written about how she struggled almost from a scientific perspective. Her background as an anthropologist and wanting to give of her subject his voice in telling his story not being too emotionally involved in it at the same time how. How can you not be an insert of that that at that history telling narrative writing but scientific approach is a tough one to navigate right and I mean the thing? That's so brilliant about Hurston is that she figured out her our own way to do it right so she was. There is no way that I can be totally detached objective observer of this cultural life that I am a part of So she totally rejected this idea of scientific objectivity right And she also spent so much time with this man I mean. She went to his house in her. She talks about how she he brought him fruit. How they became friends how she took photographs of him right And so really refusing that binary of subject and researcher And I'm thinking holistically. About how do I approach this as a human right and has a story that we all need to hear as opposed to an object objective knowledge. Morgan Jerk I want to ask you about Jesse Redmond. FA- set again you. You mentioned that she wrote about the black middle class. She wrote about upwardly mobile black people during the Harlem Renaissance and she caught a lot of criticism from other black artists for focusing on this slice slice of black life. Now now Professor Maxwell made it clear to Claude. McKay was nice to her and despite the fact he was a communist she was nicer to. Oh so she spent more money on anyway no she was very kind to younger writers. Even those who were politically artistically oppose. Well Morgan Jerkins. What about Out Jesse for set and this writing about the black middle class. Did she catch a lot of heat for it. how did she navigate that. I mean it was hard. I mean you the historian at the Harlem Renaissance. Even though there was a lot of black people creating at the time there were a lot of opinions oftentimes controversial ones about how to to write about black people So as Professor Womack talked about with just with Zorno Hurston she wrote about black southern people with regards to their dialect in their vibrancy and she often caught flat from other people. Like Richard Ryan were example for Jesse Faucet you have to understand. She was from South Jersey Jersey. She was Ivy League educated. She came from. I would say like black intelligence. ooh People South Jersey Philadelphia so she wrote of these people often the style of. Would someone consider today like Jane Austen for example. Some people like in There's confusion to Jane Austen's work and some people had a problem with that because he said you know that doesn't really represent black people as a whole and now we have this time. We're in the spotlight now. Why aren't you speaking to a larger swath north of black people but she wanted to write about what she knew and explore the complexities right there? Can I. Can I leap in and please something. That common is really productive interesting to the one thing that we can say about the Harlem Renaissance which is really difficult to define is that. It's a moment when African American artists make it very clear that there isn't a singular black identity. Exactly right that you know. African Americans indeed people from the African diaspora come from every kind of region from every three kind of sociological position. Every kind of ethnicity speak every kind of language you can imagine. It's you can't define the central all style the Harlem Renaissance Right it sponsors working all these different modes fascinating. Well we heard a little bit from Langston Hughes at the very top and I did that for a reason because I want to get back to Langston Hughes in his relationships with some of the artists that we're talking about here we go now commits here. Everybody's excited let's let's Let's hear from again.

Harlem Renaissance Langston Hughes Womack Zora Neale Hurston black middle class Professor Womack Professor Maxwell professor Jane Austen Jerkins Erkin Rivers Morgan Harlem Abe Lincoln Mississippi New Orleans Morgan Jerkins Koon Wai Louis America Carter G Woodson
"harlem" Discussed on 1A

1A

11:58 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on 1A

"Cannot tell the city how much I love. I have not enough kisses in my mouth for the avid lips of the city. I become dizzy dancing. To The jazz tune nights ecstasy wearied in the tire days the fascination of the city is upon me burning the five in the book that was one eight producer. Morgan givens reading Langston Hughes description of New York's Harlem Neighborhood Hood in the Mid Nineteen Twenty S. It's been nearly a century since the Harlem Renaissance and while artists like Louis Armstrong Langston Hughes and Zora. Neale hurston still endure dozens. If not hundreds of works from that period have been lost or forgotten or in some cases never even published will now. Many many of those are coming to life for the very first time this week a never before published novel by Jamaican born poet Claude McKay was published ninety years. I think it was written and another novel by writer. Jesse Faucet was also republished this week for the first time in nearly a hundred years will why are these forgotten works resurfacing now and how did they change our understanding of this cultural movement. Joining me from Saint Louis. Public Radio is William Maxwell professor of English Russian African American Studies at Washington University in St. Louis Professor Maxwell great to have you good day. This is a presser maxwell and from the city in which Langston us was inspired to write the Negro speaks of rivers about one hundred years ago actually wonderful and so great to have you joining us from that place lace as we talk about the Harlem Renaissance in joining from NPR in that very city of New York. Is Morgan. Jenkins author of this will be my undoing living at the intersection of black female and feminist in White America senior editor of Zora magazine. Morgan welcome to you. Thank you so much. Hits Morgan Jerkins Jergen Party. Thank you I appreciate it. Thank you so much also joining from NPR. New York's autumn Womack Assistant Professor of Nineteenth and and Twentieth Century African American literature at Princeton University. Professor Womack welcome to you. Thanks for having me Morgan. Jerkins you wrote in the introduction. To Jesse cassettes novel. There is confusion which was republished. Just yesterday who was Jesse for set and why has she largely disappeared from a conversation about the Harlem Renaissance. Yes so Jesse Faucet I would say it was just a a multi hyphen it artists and she was a poet. She was an essay as she. He was literary editor of the Crisis Between Nineteen Thousand Nine Hundred Nineteen Twenty Six Under the stewardship of WBZ boys and She also was a mentor. I mean she cheap. She published Langston Hughes first home. The Negro speaks of rivers. She mentored county Colon Jean toomer Claude McKay and it's fascinating remaining also said in a sense that she was lost to a public imagination I would say For many different factors and I think one of it is because it was a woman a black woman and she often was overshadowed by her black no counterparts. Well Morgan in a piece that you wrote for for the New Yorker you talk about a dinner that took place in downtown New York nineteen twenty four now. This dinner largely considered to be the event that led to the beginning the spawning of the Harlem Renaissance take a minute. Take US inside that dinner. Tell me who was there who was around the table blend. Also what happened. That was pivotal for Jesse Facet. Oh man so that dinner was legendary in a sense that it was just a WHO's who oh black luminaries and also white people there as well but anyone you can think of that. You know they were at that dinner to celebrate black back office but the word was that that dinner was supposed to be in celebration of Jesse Faucets debut novel there is confusion and she was told by Charles. Johnson who at that time was leading opportunity magazine that it was going to be an honor of her will. The problem got what happened was because because Elaine lock who was also considered one of the midwives of the Harlem Renaissance By Langston Hughes words he was the master of ceremonies and he did not at like Jesse Faucet to this day. I don't not sure why because they were both very educated black people the kate himself in a certain way. Hey Jesse Faucet I just want that known. Yes yes we we different. She was really kind to him. Took them out to dinner which he desperately needed so yes yes he did not like her. It was a very sharp disdain. So because he was the master of ceremonies Monet's instead of centering Jesse Faucet he made it just a general celebration of black writers and it wasn't until years later that faucet actually wrote a scathing letter to lock about how the party was actually intended for her. So this sort of overlooked aspect I I would say. In retrospect was a harbinger of things to come. Even in the afterlife. This was her party and in a way he didn't even invite her. She was there Elsa no she I know she was there but she wasn't. Honored is what I mean to say. She wasn't invited into the circle. I mean she was excluded. Yeah yes well Professor Fester Maxwell you've already put in your vote for Claude McKay. And the way he treated Jesse FA- set shock. I know I have someone else. We could indeed my favorite. I want you to talk about Claude. McKay because you're the CO editor of romance in Marseille. That's a novel by Claude. McKay was published for the first time. Also yesterday they now McCain is maybe another lesser-known writer of the Harlem Renaissance. So who is he. And why was Claude McKay import. Well the first thing I'd like to say is that the reason other than the fact that Claude McKay wrote this book between Nineteen Twenty Nine and nineteen thirty. Three that we have today is because of my co editor Gary Holcomb who for this is not an exaggeration about twenty years. Press to get this into publication. But who was Claude McKay I think it's fair to say he is if not the most radical writer of the Harlem Renaissance Certainly one of them and you can measure that on traditional political spectrum. The one that we inherit from the a French National Assembly he's the furthest to the left of all the Harlem Writers He's a very important early black communist And he would be important in the history of twentieth century ideology political life if he never wrote a sonnet So he's quite radical politically also becomes one of the first black anti Stalinists so he breaks with the Soviet version of communism in advance of the generation of Richard Wright and Ralph Ellison who are more famous for that break who wrote major novels around it. he's radically international He's born in the Clarendon hills of Jamaica in eighteen eighty nine migrates greats to the United States pretty much. The first moment he can winds up at the Tuskegee institute hates what he sees. As the militarized culture. There moves to Harlem but significantly leaves Harlem Justice. The Harlem Renaissance is really taking off and this might be one reason for his relative marginality though. He's very much back back. In Vogue in the best ways so nineteen twenty-three comes around. He's just written the first significant book of Poetry from the Harlem Renaissance which is called Harlem shadows and he gets on a boat and he works as a stoker and he's trying to get himself to Europe and then eventually to Moscow for a meeting of the common tern. Why why why did he leave? Just when things in Harlem for an artist were really starting to harm was he over at all. Was it not for him or did he just have travel. And he's over for it all I. I think that he would have been invited to the famous nineteen twenty four dinner that we were just talking about but I think he probably would have felt pretty badly Afterwards on May not have attended in in the first place I mean he was a hard core Bohemian Wanted a renaissance that was based on both absolute truth telling and on the UNMEDIATED culture of black working class people themselves where he always located wisdom so he was always skeptical of the desire to use the Harlem Renaissance essentially a form of black middle-class uplift politics which is not to say that everyone else in the Harlem Renaissance was interested in that but some of the grandees some of the Great Entrepreneurs Land Lock W. E. B. Two boys James Weldon Johnson and others were certainly in that camp and he was a communist best so maybe also look a Harlem. Renaissance also meant a certain degree for some writers commercial success. I might guess he Disapproved of that Well he wanted more commercial success than than he found believe me but he does argue in public and private With two boys about both both ideological and aesthetic matters And you know. Deploys writes the most scathing review of Mackay's career in which he talks about the novel that was published in Nineteen Twenty eight home to Harlem probably McKay's most notable work at least in Contemporary Times And says after reading it's pages I I feel distinctly like taking a bath. McKay wrote him a very scathing personal after that. So there's a lot of back and forth. It's not just political that's important but they're also aesthetic matters that separate them artists Having their debates in there and their conflicts Especially back then we've talked about some of these lesser known writers Jesse FA- set Claude McKay. But here's a writer that Alice. Here's here writer Alice Walker by the way talking about a Harlem Renaissance figure that many people probably have heard of I think my junior year in school in high school. That was the year that Zora died and I had no idea she had ever lived. I had it never heard absorbable Hurston. I had no idea none that there were black women writers. There's Alice Walker talking about Zora Neale L.. Hurston a writer who Alice Walker helped revitalize in the nineteen seventies Professor Womack Zorno Hurston is an interesting figure gear because most people have heard of her now but she died largely in obscurity. Until as I said Alice Walker kind of revived her legacy in the seventies seventy. So why did she receive so little acclaim while she was alive. And then why did that change so. She actually received quite a bit acclaim while she was alive in the earlier. Part of the What we think of as the Harlem Renaissance so the late nineteen twenty s and the nineteen thirties? I mean she was quite a well. Well known and Prominent Person Artists Anthropologist Personality in the Harlem Renaissance There's a couple of different reasons. I think why she died in obscurity. I mean the one one of the reasons is that she ran out of money And so she. She claims that in many people did too that the onset of the Great Depression a lot of the patronage dried up that was driving and funding these black writers and the Harlem Renaissance She also wrote in a style that was not entirely conventional right so she was really dedicated to capturing during the vibrancy and the pulse and the dynamism of black southern culture performance voice sound so many writers in this time period. We're turning their attention to in New York into urban centers..

Harlem Renaissance Jean toomer Claude McKay Harlem Jesse Faucet writer New York Langston Hughes Claude McKay Harlem Neighborhood Hood Professor Womack Zorno Hurston Morgan Louis Armstrong Langston Hughe Jesse FA Jesse Alice Walker Jesse Facet Zora US James Weldon Johnson editor
"harlem" Discussed on 27 Club

27 Club

11:55 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on 27 Club

"What's the matter to players show wallflower with the pork pie hat? Atas calm but definitely fended too good for the show too good for you shut your big shot Jimi Hendrix big fucking shot the L.. Lean twins knew. These guys knew these thugs by site. The one with the pork pie hat was moody. Harlem gangster bad dude but they could reason with them the other two tabby tabby in good doctor Hitman Detroit tabby and good doctor had drawn little revolvers held tied at decides not to attract too much attention. And we're pointing right at Jimmy. Jimmy idea he just kept on preaching the injustices at this fucked up situation. KANDARA called A. Where'd you get that hat? And Tundra felt around in his pocket for his piece. Put his hand on it just to know it was there and ready and Jimmy had no the idea. The twins were packing at all times. It was how the game was played. It was adapting. The twins appealed to their history with MUCCI. mookie adjusted Jimmy. He didn't give two shits about him or anybody else but the show was happening whether or not he wanted to be there and this was a direct order from fat. Jack Taylor the Fatman Harlem Drug Kingpin No Shit. The twins worked for the fat man to kind of her at the fat man would do like that but their allegiance with Jimmy. The Fat Batman wants to show in Harlem. We'll we'll do a show in Harlem but not like this. There's another way she me. Let the twins clean up the mess instead. A few feet away as the arguing negotiating initiating continued. He'd been in and out of Harlem a lot over. The last few years felt the connection to the neighborhood into the twins in moments. Like this though hard-boiled hard-boiled street. Tough he felt like he didn't belong like he was pushed around taking advantage of made to feel less than this wasn't the Harlem that he thought he knew the fake ass. Poster would come down the buildings wall but he didn't feel victorious. Turkish shot at glance over Jimmy motion with his is that everything would be okay. Jimmy's fees and return was dejected. He had that face that face it summoned strangers. That face made fast friends. His guard was always down on. He had no guard a child of poverty and neglect a true wanderer. Jimmy broadcast the desire to belong to his face. A glimpse of optimism dash trustworthiness over the course of his twenty seven short years. That face would attract a legion of admirers confidants users hangers on girlfriends. BANDMATES druggies hippies dreamers managers mafiosos and prostitutes some true friends. Two friends like the leaves to Harka Tundra. When Jimmy met the twins career was on hold so they could pursue a faster easier means of making ends meet like slinging dope for Jack Fat? Jack owned music clubs fast food joint called fat. Jack's Chipman House and Record Labels Road Jack and taste among others. He never heard of in Harlem Rola. Music went hand in hand with Vice Drugs and prostitution funded the music clubs or Jimmy will play drugs and prostitution paid the rent of the twins apartment. The Jimmy would crash drugs and prostitution pass the time where Jimmy would otherwise be idle vice ruled everything around Jimi Hendrix in the autumn of nineteen. Sixty nine the twins were there to guide through Harlem in the nineteen sixties was decades removed from its creative renaissance earlier in the century. The black middle class was leaving for Brooklyn Queens in the Bronx and most of the white population left years earlier. Crime was on the rise in housing conditions had deteriorated dramatically in nineteen sixty eight alone. The city's Department of buildings received five hundred calls a day about rats and busted heaters and backed up toilets. This riots broke out in nineteen sixty four after a black kid was shot by a white cop and then again in nineteen sixty eight. When Martin Luther King Junior was assassinated waited throughout the twentieth century crime had a grip on Harlem as conditions worsened in the sixty s gangsters? Black local some enterprising out on their own and others sticking to the longstanding mostly peaceful tradition of working for the Italian men downtown no matter the type they all exploited the most vulnerable of their neighbors with drugs drugs prostitution numbers whatever flimflam fat. Jack was the enterprising local type of gangster. He approached Jimmy after seeing him hanging around the twins. People like you told Jimmy you should slinging dope with Harken Tundra. Jimmy refused no big boss man. You ain't pig you just tall. That's about all. He was loyal to the music and nothing else partly because he just wasn't that good at good anything else give him a broom and ask them to sweep the floor and he'd fuck it up. Give him a paper hat and ask them to take lunch. Orders Burger giant eat. Fuck that up. Give Him a guitar Qatar. He would fuck that up too but in a completely different way in the best way possible that guitar for Jimi Hendrix. It was nearly everything and it handled nearly everything forum ninety percent of it anyway. He had that face to ensure that the other ten percent would fall into place of course the downfall the having thing that face and that trustworthiness that everyone wants a piece everyone comes calling especially when you're the most famous black musician on the planet Jimmy. Qatar God a sex symbol of child a certified card carrying member of the Freak Flag Movement. A psychedelic visionary and the most recognized black performer. There was I as an ex pat in England and then in his native. US bigger than sly bigger than Marvin bigger than the hardest working man in show business. Harlem's adopted Georgia. Repeat Mr. Please please please the original shape e James Brown so a bunch of African American organizations. Want Jimmy the play for them fat Jack Among them they wanted Jimi to be their poster. Boy Fat check wasn't alone. The Black Panthers came calling Jimmy politically ambivalent army. That always declined. This trip was his and he was about to get a nodded up and some other trip but it was bothered by the accusations from the black community that he was making white music for white people. You even the historic Apollo Theater. Turned him down when he tried to book show there and they didn't need them a white people hanging around. Meanwhile the underworld in Harlem would do just about anything to get Jimmy on this. Show bill even if it meant sending out. Mookie and his Detroit tournament brings artists into the fold. A Free Street Fair in Harlem seemed like the perfect compromise. The all day festival would benefit the United Block Association a Community Engagement Organization helping underprivileged youth. Jimmy and the Dan would not get paid for playing the idea was he giving back to the neighborhood and getting the goons off his back. In the process the event would feature an ECLECTIC roster Ester of acts that while not as world renowned as Jimmy represented a particular slice of the black musical landscape in nineteen sixty nine particular acts from fat. Jack's EX RECORD LABELS LIKE R&B Singer Big Mabel and chocolate Jimmy would be the headliner. Jimmy could bring some of that peace love and music vibe to the mean streets of New York. He could attempt to be all things to all people play for them. Mug It up for them from the Stage Ninety Percent Guitar and ten percents mile something like that breath when Jimmy Gypsy Sun and rainbows got ready to take the UBA outdoor stage at the intersection of Lennox Avenue. One hundred and thirty nine th street on September fifth fifth nineteen sixty nine. It was midnight big Maryville just wrapped up percents. People hung out of the tenement windows surrounding the concert area and hollered for more. She refused on the stage sat. Empty the crowd Mitch Mitchell. Jimmy's drummer filled the void of the empty stage. I and sat down behind his Kim. The blackout took one. Look at this white dude with the massive Afro and booed loudly. They want Junfa himself. He was Harlem's hounded needs some white drummer with wannabe. Black Afro. Patronizing get other own street festival without any help from the white man. Thank you very much. Jimmy's Abe's longest strat around shoulder fog. Dim thought about his hero. Bob Dylan in the crowd and England. Booing him calling him juice. Jimmy was only two chords into the opening number when the first glass bottle soared past his head exploded in defiant crash on the stage. We'll be right back back after this word were were the New Year is upon us. which resolutions do you plan to conquer in twenty twenty become more mindful or create a healthier your lifestyle through diet exercise and of course improved? Sleep the sleep number. Three sixty smart bed helps everyone the proven quality sleep that will change their life. Use The sleep. IQ APP to help create a routine. The sleep number three sixty smart but is the smartest choice for better sleep and the best fed for couples. It allows you to adjust on each side of your ideal firmness comfort and support. Its senses your movements and automatically adjusted. Keep you sleeping comfortably through the night with sleep. IQ technology inside the bed. It tracks. How your sleeping and gives you personalized insights for your best sleep? Discover proven quality sleep with a sleep number three sixty smart bed. Save one thousand dollars on a queen in special edition smart bed during the January sale. Only at a sleep number store or sleepnumber dot com slash iheart that sleepnumber dot com slash. IHEART sleepnumber a number of the official sleep and wellness partner of the NFL. Hey guys if you're a music fan which you obviously are. If you're listening to this show and you should know about Cyrus media they create podcast and events the deepen your connection to the music you love. David shows that wanted to tell you about one is freak flag flying featuring David Crosby in conversation with his friend author Steve Silverman. David opens up about his colorful prolific tumultuous career. It is collaborations Wiz crosby stills Nash Young Bob Dylan and more another is after midnight. The story of fishes legendary festival over New Year's Eve nineteen ninety nine nine told in the everglades. They ended the festival with a seven hour. Set that stretched from just before midnight into the little dawn of the twenty-first century in the last one is called thirty six from the vault a series celebrating the grateful dead's live release hosted by music journalists podcasters Steven Hyden in fellow music. Journalist analyst Rob Mitchum this series dives deep into the dead's live shows bringing reflections beyond just the music itself check out. All of these shows that Cyrus pod pod dot com slash twenty seven. Oh Cyrus pod dot com slash twenty-seven. Jimmy was I little Miss Strange. From the stage. She was a couple of rows back and impossible to ignore which was why Jimmy had his eyes. Wide Open it was a good thing because without being open he never would have seen the glass bottle. Hurling straight out of fucking. I'm really he's one of the biggest black entertainers on the planet and he was getting Shit in Harlem places. The bottle smashed flat against glass. Shards shot all over the stage. Sweaty is to be harder than you thought. Then the eggs came and they smashed against the front of the stage the sloppy egg. Inner slowly ran down the field and wooden structure structure eggs eggs. That's how this is going to go. Jimmy Hendrix fresh from blowing minds of woodstock getting pelted with eggs and hull. The Gypsy Sun.

Jimmy Hendrix Harlem Jack Harlem Rola Bob Dylan Jack Fat prostitution England Jack Taylor Black Panthers Harka Tundra MUCCI. Department of buildings Martin Luther King US James Brown Apollo Theater UBA Mitch Mitchell Brooklyn
"harlem" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

04:13 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on The Slowdown

"Today's poem is a city symphony. A little cinematic street scene bustling with the life of a place place. It guides me zoom in on one person in particular and to see many things in him at once history necessity acidy and a wellspring of contagious joy. Outside my Harlem Window by Lauren. Whitehead on the brick. Red Stoop of the Brownstone next door is a steady rock. Black man selling harps to the neighbors by blowing blow and Blues. riff like it's nobody's business except it is his to remind us. The potential impromptu music music on a Tuesday on top of sugarhill has to make you wanna wear your church shoes and creased slacks for no reason other then to give up joy. This man with two hands full of harp having church on the stoop of the Brownstone next door is is with his right hand blowing this which he called black magic slow into a soprano note on the far side of the harp I sliding low as he can go then catching each and every note in between and ride and high the riff back again to the peak which pierce clean like the call of some sacred steel winged blackbird. Ain't no fear ear. Filled trill on the stoop not this Tuesday. Not This Harlem broke open early like popping into an August Bell L. Pepper with your fingers and all the seed and fruit inside of you is exposed now and yellow or green and red and black black magic and he is wide nosed and he is pinky ringed. He is my grandfather this man old time in Swag and all grey gray leaning over the back of a barbershop chair saying something of how the Sun sets in the south. Come in colors. You Ain't never seen like the rural rural read on an Alabama backyard. The White Peach Pink of cuticle peeled back to the flesh from Poland cotton from the the whole and sometimes he'll push his left hand out to show you exactly where and sometimes he'll get to. Jingling jingling the coins in his pocket. And sometimes he'll get to lean on his back leg. Poke his breast out. Pull a heart from his chest pocket and get to blow in like a yellow headed blackbird. All his unrest and scar and laughter building its own backbeat on Blues Harp for three thousand people at Tuskegee jubilee. He is four H.. Hog reason heart blowing handsome handsome. And somehow you know your Granddad is James. Cotton is junior wells. Broke and black is Alabama Emma. Ever and trouble man. y'All don't even hear me. He'll stop to say. But I do. Hear you grandad all the way out here in Harlem Harlem where the steady rock black man make a mimic of you sell an old spice and wisdom holding church on a Tuesday on a stoop for the other men who gather double park unroll their windows unfurl for a minute. Listen if he didn't have his other hand full of wanting of his wanted work to sell. He would put both hands on his harp smile. His lips over the harp he would lean back like my granddad like an old tree. Let the wind blow through him and make a miraculous and joyful noise..

Harlem Harlem Harlem Alabama James Tuskegee jubilee Lauren Whitehead Bell L. Pepper Poland
"harlem" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

05:29 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on Latino USA

"Man call eight savage and the reason why he decided to create a team is because he wanted to give african unamerican <hes> basketball players a chance to play for money because they're not allowed to play professional basketball in n._b._a. Back in nineteen twenties so he we went to a place called the savoy ballroom and chicago illinois and picked out the best african american basketball players can find. I i the name of the team with the the superbowl five but then he decided to change the name to harlem because something happened here in harlem new york called the harlem renaissance off so it was a lot of famous musicians famous artists coming out of harlem so he decided to change inch named joe harland's irony we think we've famous and then he put globetrotters on the jersey so everybody would think we were traveling around the world beginning basketball we played today is influenced a lot by the harlem globetrotters three point line. We've been alex for the the alleyoop done. Here's the the razzle dazzle driven that you guys love to see now switzer deepest doing since nineteen the first i am. I saw the harlem globetrotter super interesting because it was one of those regular days that i was ready to go home and get ready to go play basketball and i turned the t._v. On and saw the episode when harlem globetrotters met shaggy and scooby globetrotters legitimize with a basket boy scooby doo and shaggy could make food disappear wash delicious but i thought the harlem globetrotters or cartoons for longtime batman was a cartoon supervisor cartoon and the next time i saw them was once i became gloat job. I grew up in small town. Call one eighty s and south of the island of puerto rico the it was a heel you oversee the town and you can hear the bells <hes> catholic church on every hour as a beautiful beautiful place to grow and to have family and everybody's reporting everybody. Nobody baseball was part of a daily routine for us. You know people love baseball because we have so many superstars blame professional baseball in the major leagues for us us so they're always encouraged kids to play baseball but they know anything about basketball and that's the thing that i fell in love with every single day. I wake up. Sometimes i go to sleep which is like playing with the basketball and my bad looking up shooting my dad be like hey gotta go to bed and take the ball away from me. The next morning i wake up the balls right data game and it's just repeated that over and over and over the way i got into the globetrotters was being the right place right time so i'm finishing my contract as a competitive basketball player so the exact day i'm i'm calling my agent saying hey we gotta work on a new contract and new team and i'm coming out of my apartment and coach samoyed loyd than who happened to be a professional coach than i knew. Growing up in puerto rico was coming my way. We kind of bumped each other. We talk and find out he's he's working for the harlem globetrotters organization and he asked me do you wanna be globetrotter and i'm like yeah and like three days later i get the call oh and then i did a really really going to try out and here i am seven years later so now well so i'm a globetrotter now and i'm sending down the bank watching this guy's doing all this amazing tricks inches i kind of stepped back from having having the uniform on and feel like a little kid like this is amazing this amazing the things this guy can do and then you realize i can do thinks that all the things that happened in the world and we ask rotana's. We'd do something special. We do something positive life and we just create memory that people don't want to forget. That's why i love what i do. The orlando mendez continues to play and entertain with the harlem globetrotters. You can catch.

harlem globetrotters harlem basketball harlem globetrotters organizat baseball puerto rico savoy ballroom joe harland illinois chicago n._b._a switzer new york supervisor samoyed loyd batman rotana seven years three days
"harlem" Discussed on Latino USA

Latino USA

01:54 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on Latino USA

"In this episode. We're going to bring you one of our. Oh how i made it segments. These are back stories about latinos in all sorts of walks of life orlando el gato million. This is the first and only puerto rican born player to be a member of the historic harlem globetrotters. The globetrotters are an exhibition and team that has been around since the nineteen twenties there accomplished athletes and they're known mostly for their theatrical and comedic routines on the court orlando got his nickname when he was still a teen in puerto rico when he used to run to the nearest courts to play pick up ball he said stray cats would follow him him as he ran and eventually the guys he played with started calling him. Ill got which is spanish for the cat. Uh got takes it from here down. I don't know but it sounds like the bone football. I love everybody uses orlando and i'm the first puerto rican benigni threes to be part of the great hall and globetrotters. They aren't gonna try to tell him no threat. There's the we are in basketball. Team started in nineteen eighteen twenty cents meet. The most comedy acting doesn't spoke harlem globetrotters idolized by twenty minute basketball fans in the u._s._a. They say they make a mockery of the game they come. They juggle a full house g._i. They've played seventy three games nine different countries last only one we were created by the white jewish.

orlando puerto rican harlem puerto rico basketball twenty minute
"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

03:36 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

"All i'm not saying he wasn't a gentleman. I'm sayin' dan dead. He wasn't connected in a way that it was like in stable way. There's no one there was no older guys around saying then. You shouldn't do this or you shouldn't do that you know or what was he like. He was like he was and is <hes> joyful. Kinda playful ghana guy you know but <hes> you get to see certain side of them because when they come to you spend their money because they you know when nero somebody who is somebody who who people look up to then this you get a different kind of personality that works no matter where you are sir yeah so it was it was a lot you you were the spoils of of the victory go to dab apps money gets them closed. You know everybody's got to know. I'm the man no yes but it's more than that they know if they come to my stool and the legacy that i have in the store. Everybody knows me everybody so everybody wants to go to someplace where someone who everybody relates to. That's then as well as now so that's what that was about so if they had questions or somebody they wanted to meet. They know they can come. Tom asks me about or even if they had a beef. They actually make it a street and something else or you can connect anybody with anybody exactly clean if i'll choose to sure alan cheuse to elect times as far as i can tell there is not currently a a major figure like nikki for his era alpo and fat calf their era. It seems that it's different now yahoo. How big does an n._s. Direct results of <hes> the the unstable nece that develop as a result of anybody anybody can get enough drugs to be a boss now so kingpins lotta guys who sell drugs make glisten somebody with a job right. There's no kingpins anymore not not in harlem no more kingpin how did how did you know cool how to design. I'll look let me see if i can give you something comparable to that. If if if you never had something you had a great desire for would you see you say dad when i get the i know how i i wanted to look a new look. I wanted a new the things that i like and already had a reputation in harlem for dressing and i watched the old guys how they address. If you wanna know initially came from i think it came from the rat pack watching as my older brothers did sammy davis junior yeah yeah yes sinatra dean martin peel off it. I mean they they. They had miles davis and in you you know miles. Davis had a really unique style. I used to hear my brothers all talk about them but that they did. Those are the ones who set the trip. Uh we'll get back to the show at one second but these days a lot of workplaces offer really nice perks snack station fifteen.

sammy davis harlem dan alan cheuse Tom yahoo dean martin nikki one second
"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

04:39 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

"Advocated to the people who are known in all the gangsters in harlem new me from the streets so allocated to them and that was my clientele you know so nicky barnes yeah well from yeah. That's right. He's here's one of your one big. What'd you sell to him. I stuff like that yeah that was before the local mania yeah yeah in fact. I got some archives. I got we gave the biggest dance me and nikki bonds. Lieutenant gave the biggest dance in harlem at the time at the renaissance ballroom. Never forget that day yeah so it's amazing one thing about gays in home for today gates's everywhere everybody everybody who buys up in different cities they know no deke people in other cities and everybody who goes up in different neighborhoods in harlem they know the key he goes in the other neighborhoods. It works that way. They made this show up at the games you major events in answering game recognize mutual respect gone yeah so <hes> i'm catering to all the gangs and everything and then i draw game dynasty of the regular heroin and then crack came and then the whole complexion change that was like really hide it a business when when the crack epidemic hit and less when harlem was flooded with money and but that's but as you're saying that's different is the selling of heroin had a different impact on the community then the selling crack heroin gaza. Stay high all day steele button once a day crank. It was every fifteen minutes fifteen minutes. I've seen guys going to block with new timbaland new nikes on come out running with the feet going to smoke crack selling right off the back. I never isn't it is there's nothing that compares to crack. It's more intense high so so it makes you do more to get a man who's like on i think before it hit harlem on one of the major drug hussein say man yo you you know what's coming is what you're going to be chasing the dragon. I never knew what he's talking about until it hit because it started in california call tracing the grain and <hes> i used to hang out in n. Nikki bonds partners club called education on liz avenue and that's the first time i saw it man ah i saw these people go crazy man do crazy things what men assignment to animals yeah. What was the nikki like as a man a gentleman. I believe that in that a gentleman capable of being very dangerous. It amazes me. One time is up. I was parked and a guy had him double park. I'm gonna i see what happened and nikki walked up to the concert. So could you please you know. He was a gentleman everybody in harlem to who knows them. He's from my neighborhood so if you ask anybody my neighbor. They don't have nothing bad to say about nikki. He never did not need to do. If you didn't have no problem with them you know he didn't he didn't harass. He didn't swing his weight. Everybody liked him and you remember hustle. Dance was out nikki's to like get hot. Go to club club called. What was the name and club <hes> on fifty sixty eight there you go we go up there and hang out and he dancing him an image of him to be up there dancing hustle all night yeah <hes>. He's a regular guy but you know he made the transformation nikki was like oh. He used to be a drug addi before he went away. You know turn missile this woman there any when he came out dust when he was formidable he was dangerous. You know he was able to do what he did like them. I don't know no well. He didn't like her. You can't make it to the top of that pyramid. Just being nice takes more than just being nice. No man who had a myself out the best gambling and best hustle flynn harlem is joe jackson. They call them gentlemen joe jackson. You know everything about my hustle and skills the final things that i learned i learned from watching him his thing about being nice when you're powerful. You don't have to be other than nice. You know anybody who's mean and nasty in dirty. They are those who feel intimidated. Nikki is never been intimidated from day one. He was a stick up kid before before he would with the jail when the drug is this kid bread so he's come on his.

nikki bonds harlem nicky barnes nikki joe jackson heroin california hussein Dance fifteen minutes
"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

Toure Show

01:35 min | 1 year ago

"harlem" Discussed on Toure Show

"What is it that allowed you to go from being the man all these workers three floors that too. I got a table thumbs still going for two main. Things one is when you were born. Poor you automatically acquire the ability to live with doing bear comes natural for you right and the other one was something you have to develop the suppression of the eagle <hes> so once suppress my ego and instead instead. I'm gonna go back on one hundred and fifty with lou table. Sell t-shirts and people might laugh or they might say look what happened up you know and and that happened but when you have a purpose in your heart you ain't gonna be. I knew what i was going to be able to do so everybody knows how to do good but everybody. It's an ego they not that you have to suppress the then you can get out of a bad situation. You can give us a little bit with situated ego that kills us dapper. Dan is hip hop personified. He's harlem personified. He's hustling personified. He's a fashion legend who had a three floor custom tailoring business in harlem in the eighties where he could make you anything you wanted. Louis vitton suits fendi car seats gucci bags stuffed the labels didn't make it wouldn't touch but dab knew how to get that fabric with those high falutin labels all over it slice that stuff up designed something.

harlem Dan Louis vitton lou
"harlem" Discussed on This Day in History Class

This Day in History Class

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"harlem" Discussed on This Day in History Class

"But Lino resisted he grabbed onto a column in the store and he bit the hands of the two employees who are trying to hold him back soon enough though he gave in and stopped struggling by the time. Police officers arrived at the store people in the area had noticed. The scuffle and began crowding around the store the shopkeeper decided not to press charges against Lino and to avoid the crowd. The officers escorted him out of the building through the basement and out of a back door onto one hundred and twenty four th street. But at this point, the crowd had become more hostile as rumors spread that the officers had be in Lino up, and that fire was still even more when an ambulance arrived to see to the employee's, but enhance and a her schedule to pick up a body from the funeral parlor next door. Parked in one of the store's parking spaces the false word of Lino death spread through Harlem Harlem was primarily black and African American culture thrived in the neighborhood, though. The Harlem renaissance was nearing its end still black people in Harlem felt the facts of legal, segregation, institutional racism and police brutality and Harlem was largely neglected by the New York City government, distrust of government and law enforcement was rampant and justified at the time the country was in the midst of the great depression Harlem, specifically was plagued by rising poverty as well as poor healthcare education on top of that black people faced racial discrimination. When it came to employment business ownership and housing and the crest store where the incident happened was known for discriminating against black people in employments all. All of these factors came to a head when Lena was rumored to be dead. Police attempted to squash the rumors that Lino with be killed by officers, but were unsuccessful the crowds turned rowdy the Kress door closed for the day as throngs of people began setting fire to buildings smashing windows and stealing and destroying property. Some people who attempted to hold a public meeting to protest police brutality were arrested in charge with unlawful assembly. At one point officer fired a gun into a crowd of rioters and shot a man who died a few days later in a hospital several thousand people joined the riot to protest police brutality stores put up signs that said phrases like we employ black people in their windows to keep people from looting and destroying their property officers who tried to disperse the crowds only met resisted the writing went on through the night and into the next day. All in all more than one hundred people were arrested. Dozens of people were injured a couple hundred businesses had damaged property and four people died from injuries sustained during the riot. Estimates for the property damage totaled about two million dollars. The next day. Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia said the riot was instigated an artificially stimulated by a few irresponsible. Individuals. District Attorney William c dodge said that he would launch an investigation into the communist motivations for the riot. But LaGuardia was convinced racial tensions caused the riots and months later created a BI racial commission to investigate the riot and the factors that led to it. The commission included people like sociologist, e Franklin Frazier and writer Alain lock the report that came out of that investigation was released a little over a year later, it was called the negro in Harlem, a report on social and economic conditions responsible for the outbreak of March nineteenth nineteen thirty five and it recommended antidiscrimination efforts in employment housing education and law enforcement, yet the mayor suppressed the report because it revealed the true living conditions of black New Yorkers. After the riots the city did work to make some social and infrastructure improvements. New York officers began receiving racial sensitivity training, Harlem hospital was enlarged. And there was a push to get more black people in city government, but discrimination did not just suddenly disappear in Harlem and another race fry..

Harlem Harlem Lino Harlem Harlem hospital Mayor Fiorello LaGuardia New York City New York Franklin Frazier Lena officer Alain writer William c dodge two million dollars
"harlem" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

02:42 min | 3 years ago

"harlem" Discussed on Studio 360 with Kurt Andersen

"They were able to generate that kind of heat and chemistry and that match with this song is this really just a beautiful moment honestly and in one of one of my favorite musical moments in the entire series trust you i know one house iraq the nightclub harlem's paradise is itself a character on the show episodes often end at the club and so many ki pot points happen there the performers onstage generally are huge recording artists and their songs are selected as much for their content as their mood becoming a part of the plot itself or eliminating or commenting on the conversations characters are having elsewhere when it comes to the club harlan's paradise is a nightclub in harlem and yes the nightclub but at the same time it's also a seat of power mariah dillard is the older cousin of of cornell caught him out stokes and together they haven't carried it the family business which is harlan's paradise every single character has a certain kind of musical since abilities whoever is standing on the cotton mouth perch controls the music in the club and also controls harlem so for exa sample a mariah's i ascension in at the end of season one is that sharon jones and the dab kings are performing one hundred days lem man and that song kind of is win mariah's crowned and so that's why they're performance because that's what mariah wants to the twelve more is musical tastes veer from nina simone and that kind of jazz to when she does listening to rb she listens to neo soul she she would listen to joy air do lauren hill those those modern singers that that have a certain old soul since ability for the second season the opening performer at harlem's paradise is a singer joy standing on stage and shimmery gown and feathery had peace her band behind her she sings three songs to a packed audience that can why now this i on lease we joy is no gray matter which is on her new album you don't really fully appreciate join two zero reform life she has this incredible presence.

harlem recording artists mariah dillard cornell stokes harlan sharon jones mariah nina simone iraq one hundred days