36 Burst results for "hamburg"

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:40 min | 5 hrs ago

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"To the John Hamburg shop, and we do this every Sunday starting at two o'clock, and we have a good time. Come on. It's like being in my living room with friends, family people that you want to meet. And this week. We really I said that every week, but it's true. We're having one of the great scientists in the country. Michael Oscar home. The guy is brilliant. In fact, this is the man that a decade ago Predicted a viral pandemic. But, he said, would literally have hospitals on their knees would kill millions of people devastate the economy. And he did that in front of Congress, and he is a disease detective and a fascinating guy, and he has some really startling information. That he revealed when I asked him with all the dire news, and he definitely talks about. We're not done with this yet. Is there something we can do? Something that we think about. But guess what, Guys? It isn't those mass that you slip on under your nose and think that you're protected. So you've got to listen to him and then 90 year old William Shatner, Star Trek, Shatner. You should hear this guy he is, so he's such a good thinker, and he's so alert. He rides horses every day. He goes in the ocean and plays with sharks. I mean, he is a fascinating guy, and he's coming to visit today to we've got a lot of gas and you go to our podcast, too. You. We took you to Tokyo to the Olympics. You're going to hear the story. It's deserted. Even Tokyo busy bustling one of my favorite cities in the whole world, bustling dad. Because they have that pandemic is rearing its head and everyone is locked at home, so, but I'm fascinating Look at the Olympics. What's going to be the heartbreak of so many stars? Getting diagnosed positive. With the virus and this is the end. You know how many years it takes to put on an Olympics, So they're finished, But we've got a lot of great stuff and we'll give you the inside on restaurant week. We're going to tell you about some of the great bargains that you can take advantage of. Hey, it's the Joan Hamburg show, so all you have to do is relaxed and listen. And by the way, if you're coming out to the Hamptons, one of the great events are live concerts that take place Sundays. At the Bridge, Hampton Presbyterian Church, and it's the BCM Festival Bridge Champion Chamber Music Festival 38 season and it's absolutely Happening, so go check it out. Take a look. It's something you should do on Sundays. They usually have them five and seven o'clock. Don't forget there at the church right in the middle of the bridge. Hampton, you can go online. You can find their number and call them but it's a fun thing to do, and a lot of us do it. On the Sunday night and then go out for dinner. Or just relax. It's beautiful. So anyway, I'm gonna relax now. And you and I are going to talk to my guests and enjoy them. So stay tuned. So glad you're part of the Joan Hamburg Show The first lady of New York radio. This is Joan..

William Shatner Tokyo Congress two o'clock five Hamptons Michael Oscar Olympics this week Star Trek Sunday night today Joan Hamburg seven o'clock Shatner a decade ago BCM Festival Bridge Champion C John Hamburg Sundays Joan
Fresh update on "hamburg" discussed on The Joan Hamburg Show

The Joan Hamburg Show

00:10 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh update on "hamburg" discussed on The Joan Hamburg Show

"To the John Hamburg shop, and we do this every Sunday starting at two o'clock, and we have a good time. Come on. It's like being in my living room with friends, family people that you want to meet. And this week. We really I said that every week, but it's true. We're having one of the great scientists in the country. Michael Oscar home. The guy is brilliant. In fact, this is the man that a decade ago Predicted a viral pandemic. But, he said, would literally have hospitals on their knees would kill millions of people devastate the economy. And he did that in front of Congress, and he is a disease detective and a fascinating guy, and he has some really startling information. That he revealed when I asked him with all the dire news, and he definitely talks about. We're not done with this yet. Is there something we can do? Something that we think about. But guess what, Guys? It isn't those mass that you slip on under your nose and think that you're protected. So you've got to listen to him and then 90 year old William Shatner, Star Trek, Shatner. You should hear this guy he is, so he's such a good thinker, and he's so alert. He rides horses every day. He goes in the ocean and plays with sharks. I mean, he is a fascinating guy, and he's coming to visit today to we've got a lot of gas and you go to our podcast, too. You. We took you to Tokyo to the Olympics. You're going to hear the story. It's deserted. Even Tokyo busy bustling one of my favorite cities in the whole world, bustling dad. Because they have that pandemic is rearing its head and everyone is locked at home, so, but I'm fascinating Look at the Olympics. What's going to be the heartbreak of so many stars? Getting diagnosed positive. With the virus and this is the end. You know how many years it takes to put on an Olympics, So they're finished, But we've got a lot of great stuff and we'll give you the inside on restaurant week. We're going to tell you about some of the great bargains that you can take advantage of. Hey, it's the Joan Hamburg show, so all you have to do is relaxed and listen. And by the way, if you're coming out to the Hamptons, one of the great events are live concerts that take place Sundays. At the Bridge, Hampton Presbyterian Church, and it's the BCM Festival Bridge Champion Chamber Music Festival 38 season and it's absolutely Happening, so go check it out. Take a look. It's something you should do on Sundays. They usually have them five and seven o'clock. Don't forget there at the church right in the middle of the bridge. Hampton, you can go online. You can find their number and call them but it's a fun thing to do, and a lot of us do it. On the Sunday night and then go out for dinner. Or just relax. It's beautiful. So anyway, I'm gonna relax now. And you and I are going to talk to my guests and enjoy them. So stay tuned. So glad you're part of the Joan Hamburg Show The first lady of New York radio. This is Joan..

William Shatner Tokyo Congress Two O'clock Five Hamptons Michael Oscar Olympics This Week Star Trek Sunday Night Today Joan Hamburg Seven O'clock Shatner A Decade Ago Bcm Festival Bridge Champion C John Hamburg Sundays Joan
Joey Chestnut Beats Own Record at Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest

The Joan Hamburg Show

00:34 sec | 3 weeks ago

Joey Chestnut Beats Own Record at Nathan's Hot Dog Eating Contest

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

07:10 min | Last month

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Welcome to the Joan Hamburg show, and I want to introduce you to one of the busiest women who does absolutely everything. The one and only Tova felt you who is a six time Emmy and Tony nominee. She has more degrees. Drama Desk awards out of critics Circle Awards, You name it Obese. Lucille Lortel. I can't even tell you all of them Broadway off Broadway television and books, and she has been doing performing this amazing becoming Dr Ruth at Bay Street Theater in Santa Barbara. And I just mentioned to TOBA. It's one of the big successes. Add Bay Street as only TOBA and because she doesn't have enough to do with theater and being on stage all the time. Her memoir Lilly Ville about her relationship with her late mother. Also, TOBA just wrote that book and working from home had a lot of virtues as well as a lot of anguish. Things, too. So you've got the play two different productions of the play becoming Dr Ruth, the public Mission of the memoir and with you Who knows how many other things are on your plate. You're not even tired because I do what I love like you do. I do what I love and you love a lot of things. Well, let's start first with the life that you brought to life of our one and only Ruth Westheimer, who many of you know from radio television, the world's famous sex therapists and this play. A huge hit has been at base tree as well as other things. So Tova does not one, but she does, too. So how did Dr Ruth come into being? This marvelous artistic director at the North Coast Repertory Theater in Solana Beach, California, which is just a northern suburb of San Diego, called me and said there's this play by Marc ST Germain that I would like to do, but I will not do it without you that's called becoming Dr Ruth. It's about the life of Ruth Westheimer. And we will film you and the minute, he said. We will film you for our subscribers in the tristate area there. Arizona, California and and whatever is nearby, I said, I'm on I'm on board, and, um, I asked my marvelous assistant Oliver Show Olson, my other assistant, Christina Jackson, to start testing the online and God bless the North Coast Theatre Day paid those young people to help me hone my skills with the text. I arrived in California on April 30th. We were Hurst for 18 days with days off. It was only two really two weeks And in the third week we filmed for three days, which is now being streamed. For all those that can't get to Bay Street for the last five performances, and we are starting to sell out or can't get a ticket can always stream it through North Coast. Rep dot org. But that's an earlier excavation of the play. That's the play that I That's the becoming Dr Ruth By Marc ST Germain. I did before I got a second director. Besides the wonderful Mr Ellen Stein Scott Schwartz, and as you know, Scott Schwartz and I did go oldest balcony on Broadway together, so we applied certain principles that we knew worked in that played by William Gibson to this play, and I have to say it's the joy of my life playing Westheimer because she is 11 up tune. She is one positive mental attitude on steroids and then this woman Right Size is your life. How can we get upset about rain on our roof that impedes the hearing of the show, which happened? We had almost a hurricane a few nights ago on on a very wonderfully noisy roof at Bay Street Theater, or how can you get upset about your wife? By not working. When you think of what this woman has done with her, right? You cannot. You cannot rewrite history. Jones. But you can rewrite your story. And she is a living example of sta test no matter what, and and not by breaking any federal or state laws. She's no criminals. She's just one big rainbow that spirals up towards what she calls Tikkun olam repairing of the world. And she does that to sex therapy. No, she you know Tova many, many, many years ago, my program director at a station I was on was Rushing around like a crazy guy, and I said, What's the matter? He said. I've got to fill a spot on another station late night, and I'm looking for a sex therapist. And he said, and I went and he named a hospital and the head of the sex therapy. A very prominent educator. He couldn't do it. So, she said, I'm sending my assistant associate and the only problem is she has a thick accent and It turned out. That was Dr Ruth and we all gathered around our radio just because you know he was our boss. And we heard this absolute force of nature out of nowhere in that world, and they found almost blew out. It was so enormous. And that was the beginning of Dr Ruth. And her story, As you said, is incredible, You know? Her parents who later were exterminated by the Nazis take this little child and put her on a train to bring her to safety in an orphanage. So it's an amazing story, and you're amazing doing it and she's been your friend like a family friend. Not just someone you say. Oh, I really admire her. She's been part of your life. She she has. She was at my Children's weddings. Both Amanda and Brandon. She remembers Amanda's, particularly which is seven years ago because at 12 midnight, I hired a surprise Brazilians samba band and Ruth just danced up a storm. With all these women in in, you know, G string bikinis and some other feather chandeliers on their head, you know? With a feather headdresses. It was a riot. She just, um, the the reason the play works so well and God Bless Mark Saint Germain. First of all, He's a great collaborator, that when I want to tweak a line, change the line, The man has never said no to me. He has really had faith in me as a performer to make sure that this piece is Custom made to the way she speaks. I've studied her heavily. I spent four Wednesdays with her and had her go through the entire manuscript with me the entire script to read the line not to imitate her reading, but to make sure I had down her speech patterns and I also worked with the great great Dialect coach Timothy Monarch. To check this speech pattern.

Marc ST Germain Amanda William Gibson Christina Jackson Brandon Ruth Westheimer Lucille Lortel Timothy Monarch April 30th 18 days Tova Mark Saint Germain Lilly Ville San Diego Santa Barbara North Coast Theatre Day six time three days Joan Hamburg Jones
Germany finds huge cocaine shipment; Dutch discover 2nd one

Mike Gallagher

00:36 sec | 5 months ago

Germany finds huge cocaine shipment; Dutch discover 2nd one

"Customs authorities in Germany and Belgium of sees the record haul more than 23 tons of cocaine into raids this month in the German city of Hamburg. More than 16 tons of cocaine was concealed in tins of wall filler, which had entered Europe on a container ship from Paraguay. The rest was discovered in the Belgian port of Antwerp, hidden in a container filled with wood blocks from Panama. It follows one of the largest ever heroin seizures in Europe. Officials at the port of Rotterdam impounded more than 1.5 tons of the class a drug detected in a batch of Himalayan sea salt the BBC's Anna

Belgium Hamburg Germany Paraguay Europe Antwerp Panama Seizures Rotterdam Himalayan Sea BBC
Decentralized Information Gathering

Data Skeptic

04:13 min | 5 months ago

Decentralized Information Gathering

"My name is speak glory. And i'm a postdoctoral researcher at the university of hamburg in germany. My research interests focused on mulligan systems and in particular the aspect of decision making in those systems so interested in particular in information-gathering tasks. So you can think of like a team of robots trying to find out something about the world and doing this in a collaborative fashion. So that's the kind of task climbing just end especially the decision making aspects of that a while ago when there were some mars missions being planned we ended up sending curiosity and forget the other one maybe opportunity there was some discussion of. Hey maybe instead of sending two rovers the cost a lot like million dollars we should send a million rovers. That cost one dollars. Something like this didn't happen but is that the kind of case that would be interesting to a researcher like you so my interest are maybe more so decided to to agent case so at least. That's the situation for now. Do the computational complexity of the problems that i'm involved in cardiff did they are the practical limitations that usually means that the more than a handful of agencies steel beyond the reach of kearns state of the art mittens. Ya the fact that your work has heuristic involved is what actually i attracted me to it. So maybe we should talk about the elephant. In the room a computational complexity what would it be like to try and solve one of these problems in a sort of a rigorous complete surly brute force but in exacting method. Maybe conceptual it's Quite instructive to think about how you could actually solve this kind of problems in this brute force manner typically have you have your set of agents than each of the agents has some possible actions that they can take and as a result of taking some of these actions. They're going to perceive that in some observations from the world or or the environment. You can kind of see the when you have multiple agents acting simultaneously of course their sudden exponential number of possible combinations of actions that the agents take so. This is already an indication that it's going to be quite complicated so then when you consider that depending on the observation or feedback that beach of the agents get then they have obviously a choice like what to do for each of these possible observation. You could improve simple employees that okay. I'm i come to take a particular action. And then if i received some feedback then conditional that feedback. These is going to be my next action. You then basically have such a police for each of the agents and in principle. If you want to solve this very exactly you should look for or look at all the possible combinations of all the policies for all the agents so it really quickly get into this domain of financial complexity that makes it really challenging confrontationally. And do the agents communicated all can they may be share information is that within scope of the problem is one of the factors that i wanted to specifically consider because i think that the law of the previous state of the art work in like information gathering for multi agent teams. They tend to make this assumption that there is some communication during the task. So what what i could do. If i don't have the luxury of communicating during the task. What what i decided to do is kind of split this task into two phases. So you have this kind of offline. Phase the takes part before the test execution Are planning what they should do during the task. But once the task execution starts so deploy a robot sore or whatever your agents are then you're not allowed to communicate anymore so you have to kind of make plans beforehand decide. How are you going to act in each of the possible situation arises could we zoom in on an information gathering task. Are there real world. Examples of where your sorts of Research areas might be deployed for industrial or practical applications. Maybe one of the Kind of running examples that used in several of my papers relating to search rescue robotics. So you might want to deploy a team of robots to survey a disaster sized and maybe locate. Some of the victims might still be out there so this one example of the potential application for my research work.

Mulligan Systems University Of Hamburg Kearns Cardiff Germany
German Woman, 95, Charged With Complicity In More Than 10000 Murders During WWII

Not Too Shabby

00:46 sec | 6 months ago

German Woman, 95, Charged With Complicity In More Than 10000 Murders During WWII

"Have charged a woman with complicity in the murders of 10,000 people in the Nazi concentration camp of stood half in Gdansk, Poland. Woman who hasn't been named, was a secretary in the camp, Damon McGinest reports. The 95 year old woman has been living in a nursing home near Hamburg for the past few years. But between 1943 and 1945, she worked his personal secretary to the concentration camps commander. He was sentenced to prison in 1957. But she has always claimed that she never knew people were being gassed in the camp. She's now being charged with complicity in murder. This is an unusual case very few women have ever been tried for concentration camp atrocities. Most cases have focused on camp guards, not secretaries. BBC

Damon Mcginest Gdansk Poland Hamburg BBC
"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

03:37 min | 6 months ago

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Ahead on the one and only Joan Hamburg show right here on W A. B C. The first lady of New York radio. This is Joanie eats. Wow. Yes, indeed. Joan does eat and all the sudden I'm telling you, I'm channeling Martha Stewart. I'm baking enough already. But I can't stop the other night. I was feeling very lonely. I was wandering around my apartment and thinking what was May I can't take this anymore. So I decided to treat myself to the perfect dinner, Strawberry ice cream and my favorite sweet Allen's a tart. What could be better, and they cheered me up. Enormously, But I have to tell you that my friend Arlene, who also has she never base. She doesn't even like sweets. She's been making her mother and grandmother's apple cake very easy, and I make it from her recipe using whatever fruit is available the other day. I made it using Two apples and too sweet, delicious pairs. The original recipe Arlington Apple cake for apples and you can get whatever you get. I do not use Granny Smith for it, but I use my kun's or max or sweet apples, three quarters of a cup of sugar. One cup of all purpose flour, ah, half teaspoon of salt and a teaspoon of baking powder A teaspoon of vanilla and it's it now I want you to put the flower The sugar the salt all the dry ingredients in a bowl, cut up your fruit and mix it with the flower that package so that everything is coded and then in a separate bowl Add vanilla, a teaspoon of vanilla and a quarter of a cup of a neutral oil, and that could be canola oil. Someone told me they made it even using a light olive oil, but that has a taste. I used to canola oil and one egg and beat it up. I put parchment in a lo pan or you can grease it. I mixed the liquid with the dry and I used no mixer. Just a fork to start around. It's heavy, but you stir it around till every Thing is mixed on over mixed and pour it in below. Pan 3 53 75 oven depending upon how hot your oven gets and check it after about 45 minutes, 50 minutes. That's it. It's the easiest Cape. It's three quarters cup sugar one cup of flour and a teaspoon of baking powder. That's all little bit of salt to half a teaspoon of salt, and just put the fruit in that till it's all coded. Beat an egg with a quarter of a cup of a neutral oil mix at all together, Pour it in the baking pan and you have it's delicious. And it's low in calories and it makes you very happy. WNBC. My producer. Jan likes to have a little glass of wine every now and then, although she denies it. But her carpet tells the real story. Our carpets has Jen's filled this red wine all over me. So one night she calls me hysterical. What can I do? I said, breathe. Relax. I'm sending you to all clean carpet. No one in the world has the quality. The service. The experience that red wine is vibe I.

Joan Hamburg Arlene Martha Stewart Jen Joanie Apple Granny Smith New York Allen producer Cape
On this day: Karl M. Baer legally recognized as male

This Day in History Class

04:09 min | 7 months ago

On this day: Karl M. Baer legally recognized as male

"Hello and welcome to the podcast. I'm tracy wilson and it's january eighth. Carl m bear was legally recognized as mail on the stay in one thousand nine hundred. Seven bear was born to a german jewish family in eighteen eighty five and after his delivery the midwife said to his mother something along the lines of congratulations on the birth of your lovely daughter but the midwife had a different conversation with carl's father saying that this newborn babies body was ambiguous and that it wasn't clear whether she should call the baby male or female today we might have described him as intersex so the family went to see a doctor and added that when they registered carl's birth they would register him as a girl and give him girls name. But as carl grew up he had a very clear sense of his own self. He later described himself as a boy who was being raised as girl and his own writing he said quote one may raise a healthy boy in a womanish manner as one wishes and a female creature as manish never will. This caused their senses to remain forever reversed and his growing up was not easy at all. He was expected to play with girls but he didn't feel like a girl and the girls also seemed to suspect. Somehow he wasn't one of them not only did he not like most of the pastimes that were considered to be appropriate for girls but the girls in his community excluded him from playing with them his behavior and his interests and as he grew into a teenager his appearance and voice were more in line with what was expected of boys than what was expected of girls in one thousand nine hundred four at the age of nineteen he moved to hamburg. He studied sociology. He started working as a social worker and was also part of feminist organisations including campaigning against the trafficking of women he was also active in the jewish service organization beneath breath that same year. He started introducing himself to people as a man. He changed stress and no longer tried to hide his more masculine physical features and then in the midst of all this. He was injured in a tram accident when he was taken to the hospital. Doctors immediately noticed that his i d did not match the name or the gender that he gave to them. When he was admitted they ultimately contacted magnus hirschfeld of the institute for sexual science which was a research institute medical facility and an advocacy organization for what we would describe. Today as lgbt rights hirschfeld described bear as a case of quote erroneous sexual attribution. He and other doctors at the institute felt that bear would benefit from having surgery. It's what we would today describe as gender affirmation surgery after receiving hormone treatments bear had a series of surgery is starting in one thousand nine hundred six and this made him one of the first people to have surgery for this reason on january eighth of one thousand nine hundred seven. He was legally recognized as mail and was issued a new birth certificate that same year. He published a semi-fictional autobiography called memoirs of a man's maiden years and he published that under the pseudonym nfo body but it was widely known that he was the author of this work on october tenth of that year he got married although his wife died of pneumonia about a year and a half later and he got remarried later on bear continued to work as a social activist in berlin until nineteen thirty seven including becoming the director of the berlin lodges of buzney breath but then in nineteen thirty seven. He was captured by nazis and tortured after settling his affairs as quickly as he could. He fled germany and moved. To what would later become israel. He lived a quiet life there as an insurance agent and he died in nineteen fifty-six

Carl Tracy Wilson Carl M Bear Manish Magnus Hirschfeld Institute For Sexual Science Hamburg Hirschfeld Berlin Pneumonia Germany Israel
Voice Developer Year in Review 2020: The Convergence of Voice and Chat

The Voicebot Podcast

04:16 min | 7 months ago

Voice Developer Year in Review 2020: The Convergence of Voice and Chat

"That might actually be an interesting place to start. I was going to start with sort of the rise of mobile but it with We see this. Looks like a convergence of voice and text voice chat This year that seems just a little starker in fact sort of last holdout Or maybe one of the key holdouts has been amazon and they just introduced the chat feature within the alexa app. The mobile app and you know we. We had this idea for a long time that the conversation there's conversation could be taxed or could be voiced but we also i think all recognize that there are significant differences between the two. We did an extensive piece on that. I don't know about two two and a half years ago in an e book. Just around design but mike. Maybe i'll start with you. Just talk about this idea because you started out one hundred percent voice and have a lot of chat since joining more and more. I mean do you see this as convergence and if so. How's that going to be different than what we've seen in the past in terms of how people adopt both on the consumer side and the enterprise. Yeah absolutely see. There's a convergence. And i think at the end of the day. Let's say let's go back to customer support use case you wanna be wherever your customers are in your customers are going to be either using what's app or some kind of message or application. On their phone there can be using facebook messenger or they could have a smart speaker on their desk. They can have a smart speaker in their kitchen. And you wanna be able to be wherever they are So that if they have a question for you you're it's friction lists to get to you regardless of the channel and the medium so yes From technology point of view there are differences. But nothing that can't be handled with good tooling and design As far as bringing those together. What are some of those tech differences. So you know as you were. Starting to incorporate chat into was written a voice. I actually in many cases of voice only type of application stack that you're developing for people. What different types of technical tools did you have to do. Are you talking about microsoft bob framework incorporating that is back in and just talk talk about the the logical architecture the stack behind it and how. That's different yeah. So luckily google thought of this from the beginning. Where like they were. Both on the google assistant mobile and on the smart speaker. So if you wanted to be on google you would support and the way. It manifests itself is you have. You can do the sol. You can do the display tech's and for most cases they are going to be pretty much the same and you can just do simple like speak tag wrapper around display text But what you and this is where there is opportunity for tooling is like there are nuances in. And i i do see some tool start to emerge that are gonna make it easier. We're like how do you pronounce the date better and easier and more consistently Especially when you are going from different Text to speech engines to make sure that you can control that. So opportunity there for like Let's call it like preprocessing before you send it out to the actual text to speech injure the platform that's gonna take care of it for you. There's some good features out there existing for things like I know that Aws polly. They support things like lexicon and lexicon of been in the industry for a long time in that was an object or a that was required for telephony and it makes you pronounce the same thing consistently all the time so you actually define how things were pronounced hamburg. You don't see those supported in things like alexa yet or google assistant. They don't support these global pronunciation guide which elects economies

Amazon Google Mike Facebook Microsoft Aws Polly Hamburg Alexa
Diabetes Mellitus with Dr. Dennis Bruemmer

Cardionerds

05:21 min | 7 months ago

Diabetes Mellitus with Dr. Dennis Bruemmer

"Take hardy and hurts summit clear so excited for this installment of our cardiovascular prevention series with the deep dive into diabetes. Which i think you'll learn by the end of the episode is so important for us. Be attention to. We're joined by a phenomenal and true. Genuine in the field. Dr dennis brumer hughes. The director of the center for cardia met about health in the section of preventive cardiology and rehabilitation. At the cleveland clinic. Dr boomer earned his md and degrees from the university of hamburg in germany following residency training in internal medicine and cardiology in berlin docker boomer completed a research fellowship as the diabetes center fellow in the department at ucla. He is board certified in internal medicine and chronology hardy vascular disease and cardiac graffiti quite a unique combination. Dr boomers research is focused on mechanisms of atherosclerosis and risk factor intervention for the prevention of coronary artery disease soccer. It's such a pleasure to invite you to the show success. have you on. And as i invite you. I'm going to just reflect on your unique training path and we were just discussing before we started recording. Here that there's going to be a probably a lot of interest. In pursuing some sort of combined die batali cardiovascular education for court in the future. But would you mind just telling us how you got interested in really devoting yourself to cardio metabolic disease and diabetes in general. Absolutely am so first of all i. I'm super thrilled to be here. And i i'm so excited to be talking to the nerds here tonight so i. I think it's phenomenal. What you guys are doing and again. I very much appreciate the opportunity here so so i was. I'm kind of bridge between endocrinology in cardiology back in germany. I did my thesis. Actually in endocrinology lie protein metabolism. And that kind of got me interested in cardiology. I went to pursue cardiology training back in germany and then research fellowship at ucla. I was supposed to go back after that to germany. But i decided to stay and then obviously being a foreign Repeated training and i was always torn between the endocrine in preventive cardiology aspect than truecar ideologies. So i ultimately decided. I'm just gonna do both so. I did endocrinology fellowship and cardiologist fellowship by the university of kentucky. I had a phenomenal time. There and kind of still even now much of what we do in cardiology is really prevention. And that much of it. This endocrinology so i think these sub specialties really are complementary in or very closely together but let me say on behalf of everyone here at the clinic. How glad we are that. You decided not to go back and stayed here. Join us over here as a faculty because you've just added tremendous value to the program and you've been such an incredible resource for all of us. Thank you for being here. Yes dr burin. And i extend that thank you. Because you know you've stayed here. We are talking to the nerds. I think this is a totally fortunate. And i am really happy to benefit from your stay here now. We are very excited to dive into cardio dive tallahassee which begs the question dr boomer we are cardio nerds why should cardiologists focus on diabetes. I mean why not. Just refer are diabetic patients to endocrinologist or leave the to their primary care doctors. Yeah i think. I think that's kind of the common theme and that is the current care. We leave it to others in cardiology. Now i think that is sub optimal. I think we as cardiologists we see these patients all the time i mean when is ever a patient. In the cath. Lab that presents with an semi or stemming that doesn't have diabetes so we do see the far spectrum of this disease of cardiovascular complications that arise of having ama- diagnosis of diabetes. So i think we have to be involved in managing this. I think to a minimum. We should referred patients to primary care or make sure that the diabetes is. What managed or console endocrinology now as as we all know as physicians quite frequently. Not even that happens so and there's good evidence for that if you look at registries just about six percent of diabetic patients with cardiovascular disease actually get appropriate care for their diabetes and cardiovascular conditions as you know that vitas says associated with the two to four fold increase in risk it is a cardiovascular risk equivalent termed many many years ago seventy percent of our acute coronary syndrome patients have diabetes. So you you could argue. Yes we leave it to primary care but or the endocrinologist but keep in mind that endocrinologists currently see about five percent of the patient population with diabetes.

Diabetes Dr Dennis Brumer Hughes Center For Cardia Dr Boomer Germany Cardio Metabolic Disease Ucla University Of Hamburg Cleveland Clinic Vascular Disease Batali Hardy Atherosclerosis Coronary Artery Dr Burin Berlin Soccer University Of Kentucky Cardiovascular Complications Tallahassee
Atlanta-based Delta avoids US tariffs by sending new Airbus jets on a world tour

Marketplace

03:16 min | 8 months ago

Atlanta-based Delta avoids US tariffs by sending new Airbus jets on a world tour

"Yeah, they're still happening. China, Of course. Also we have put import taxes on a bunch of European goods. French wine Scotch whisky, Also Airbus airplanes. But Delta Airlines, a buyer of the aforementioned Airbus's has been reading the tariff, fine print and it has been paying off, said Philip wrote the story for Bloomberg. Welcome to the program. Thank you, Kay. So in in layman's terms here if you could. What is Delta doing with these new planes? Yes. Oh, does that's doing something really interesting with the new plans and instead of usually flying them to the U. S, as they have in the past. What they've done instead is fly these planes overseas. Essentially if the plane has any hours and flight, aside from the delivery to the U. S, and testing that would make it a use plan and no longer subject of tariffs because the tariffs only applied new planes. Very tricky. You gotta know the laws. So give me an example. They Delta plunks down. However much money. It is for a new Airbus And it takes off and flies to wear and does what Sure. So take one plane example. The A 3 21. Delta bought a plane from ever US, which was built in Hamburg. The plane flew from Hamburg to El Salvador. It stayed there for over two weeks. And then from there, it flew to the Cayman Islands and then a chance. Atlanta and, most recently, that plane's been flying between Atlanta and Montego Bay, and it has shaved the company. How much money would you guess? So based on the list prices of the aircraft it could have saved as much as 270 million, although airlines don't actually pay the list price for planes, and so the true savings could be much smaller than that, given that most airlines get massive discounts on new plane purchases, But still, Delta has decided it's worth it to go through this goat rope just to not have to pay. However many millions even single digit millions of dollars. It isn't Paris. Absolutely. I mean, the U. S. Has collected over $55 million in tariffs in the last one year or source and said Arabs came in what I hear you saying is that other airlines are not doing what Delta is doing. And they are paying that there's Yeah, that would seem like it. It would seem like those airlines are being charged with tariffs. We should be clear to. This is 100% legal, right? I mean Delta's going by the letter of the law. Absolutely. I mean, the entire strategy rests on the language that classifies the plane as you was once they've flown for any reason other than for testing and delivery. Even as clever as it might be. And as money saving, as it might be. There is some institutional inertia and some inefficiencies that Delta is dealing with here, right? Absolutely. I mean, the fact that they wouldn't really be able to import those plane directly into the US and obviously, that means you have to sort of find places for those planes. In the meantime, it does have some impact on the efficiency. But then remember that you have the covert crisis of the moment. And that sort of helps because you don't need so many plans at the moment, given the fact that there's so many plans that on the ground at the moment, and airlines are trying everything that they can to save money, so this is one sort of tool in the arsenal. Said.

Delta Airbus U. Hamburg Atlanta Bloomberg KAY Philip Montego Bay El Salvador Cayman Islands China United States Paris
Biden administration could implement lockdown as Covid cases surge

The Armor Men's Health Hour

00:26 sec | 9 months ago

Biden administration could implement lockdown as Covid cases surge

"Whatever 1 may think about the covert restrictions, we surely don't want them to become a recurring feature after the pandemic has passed. This is the incoming Biden administration considers pushing for more locked out with cases surging the justice, adding. It's an indisputable statement of fact that we have never before seen restrictions as severe, extensive and prolonged, the Federalist Society is holding its annual convention virtually due to the pandemic. Hamburg. Adi Fox News,

Biden Administration Federalist Society Hamburg Adi Fox News
Episode 138 The Yarn Wall - burst 15

The Moratorium

01:23 min | 9 months ago

Episode 138 The Yarn Wall - burst 15

"Knicks. Suck ass hamburg. I'm very good. No when terra's takeover to oil rigs and threatened to blow them up if their demands are not met and eccentric anti-terrorism expert volunteers his unique commando unit to stop them. The commando unit includes roger moore. Anthony perkins michael parks and james mason. Who's james mason. James mason's the guy from he was captain nemo nobody was captain. Kangaroo captain caveman. Oh it was captain nemo in got what. What is the movie. That i've know him the most i mean he was. I think i might get him in john. Houseman mixed up. Give me your best john houseman. He sounds just like james mason now. He's sounds different. I i can't do it right now. I have to have a certain level of like a throat. Bubble in the cross of iron no l. He plays striker in the salem slot. Tv movie from the seventies. how as the Yes he's like the the human face of

Imdb Celebrity TV Horror Funny 1980'S Cult Obscure Movie Review Comedy Captain Nemo John Houseman Josey Wells Michael Parks Daryl Hannah Michael Vincent Kim Basinger Salem Slot Tanny Tucker James Mason Clint Neil Young Knicks Anthony Perkins Hamburg Roger Moore Houseman John Salem
Founder of Dr. Sturm Skincare, Dr. Barbara Sturm

Breaking Beauty Podcast

05:04 min | 10 months ago

Founder of Dr. Sturm Skincare, Dr. Barbara Sturm

"So you grew up in East Germany like. Yes. Wow. How was that? What was that like? Does it seem like a distant memory now? Yeah. Because you know damned forty eight now but definitely you grew up in a in an environment where boggles matter friendship breeding matters inability matters no way that you can rely on on friends and. Thanks, you need a life. So I think it's a good upbringing. That's for sure. What do you think was most formative of childhood that you can kind of say that's why I am who I am today. You know I, think you entire life makes you the person you're obviously also what your parents teach you and what your parents live like and my parents from very much teaching ons too key both feet on the ground and. Always be kind respectful to other people no matter who they are and. That is something which you know. I think up to today by value by doing so. And I grew up like this and I guess out. So when you don't have a when you don't draw in extreme luxury, you know when you grow up just a few things, you become very creative and you resourceful intonations and. Keep. Going for the things you want I think that's also something. which gets less and less this society because the children for today pretty much everything from the board. I think it's a different generation. What is the most quintessentially? German thing about you I used to be always on time I'm pretty much on time still. One point it's very German, and so I think I'm sending for quantity and technology in science i. think that is something very German. I remember that Carly member we went on that navy press trip to Hamburg and it was to the second yeah. Yeah we were like Oh, my God, we gotta get to the lobby like. And then German. The wet lead you to get into medical school and you know decide you wanted to take that path. My mother was a lead doctor and she took me to the hospital. When I was a kid, you know to go on visit patients and stuff. So I got into this Medicare idea very early when it was four years already decided I won't be a doctor himself. And never changed. You know to score studied medicine. And I came Dr Early on i. read that when you were in medical school you you're also a young mum and a single mom at that time, and so that couldn't have been easy. Maybe not a lot of people know that part of your story. So was there a particular mantra at that time and you're juggling so much like what helped? You get through through that time. So I was mother was twenty three and I just had done my first big step in medical school and gratefully at that time as their had my mom to help me a lot with my kids but I, think it's just you know you go step by step I think one of my mantras really to take things. Don't look too much out what's going on in the future because then you definitely get around. So step by step and put a checkmark behind everything in Italic Sawed. So with having tried and going to school and do all these days are just doing them. Moving forward, I think that helps you know not stress about future. Just get it done and you become a manager yourself because you have to keep all the balls in the at the same time I'm really good at this now. and. So you became a medical doctor in the field of orthopedics. How did you meet the late great? Koby Bryant. So so I came into other pigs by chance originally wanted to get into pediatrician because at my chide I couldn't see the kids suffering. So I decided okay. 'cause also studied sports, parents, medicines. I win the peaks to do my doctor studied there and I like all the peaks but I was also interested in aesthetics and I had to wait for to get a place in the clinic I wanted to start working and I had to wait half year in this year I decided to go. clinic and then I loved you know working in science so much. Stayed there and didn't go to Tadic's pedic's than I did later but I stayed there pioneering this treatment, we the proteins from God's and decreed cometary proteins to stop the inflammation and the aging process in the joins and we had so many people coming for treatments from everywhere from the word courts, people and people with joint problems in Australia tried is in you know. So we got to meet a lot of people. Not just you know sports

East Germany Italic Sawed Koby Bryant Tadic Carly Hamburg Australia
Trump Expected To Nominate Amy Coney Barrett To The Supreme Court

Joan Hamburg

01:20 min | 10 months ago

Trump Expected To Nominate Amy Coney Barrett To The Supreme Court

"Sources tell Fox News that Judge Amy Cockney Barrett is President Trump's pick to replace Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who passed away last week and announcement is expected at 5 P.m. Eastern. After that, senators on both sides will prepare for a contentious confirmation process. This is going to be like the Brett Kavanaugh process on steroids. Republicans were willing to forge ahead once it was clear that they had at least 51 votes to do this. And the Senate Majority leader, Mitch McConnell is already criticizing Democrats for having made up their minds every single time, Madam president, no matter how upstanding no matter how qualified no matter their views, no matter their record, every nominee gets the same insane treatment. So long as the president who nominated them is not a Democrat, the Senate confirmed. Amy Cockney Barrett in 2017 for the seventh Circuit Court of Appeals. Fox's Chad program. Democrats call the confirmation effort a Republican power grab since the election is just 38 days away this as the Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden keeps his list of potential Supreme Court contenders under wraps. Biden's justification for refusing to name his Supreme Court list ahead of the election. He says it could subject a candidate to personal attacks. Judges on his leads to Mayfield influence in writing their opinions boxes, which Edson

Judge Amy Cockney Barrett Joe Biden President Trump Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg Senate Brett Kavanaugh Circuit Court Of Appeals Fox News Mitch Mcconnell Donald Trump FOX Edson Mayfield
Washington grappling with 'climate fires' not wildfires, says Gov. Inslee

News, Traffic and Weather

00:37 sec | 11 months ago

Washington grappling with 'climate fires' not wildfires, says Gov. Inslee

"Today on national TV. If we don't start making changes to deal with climate change, these wildfires are going to become more common. Come was Nick Pop on reports, Our air quality remains unhealthy. Here in Seattle, fires have been prevalent up and down the West Coast. Hensley says. Climate change takes different forms depending on where you live. It may not be fires in Midwest. It's floods in Hamburg, which washed away Hamburg, Iowa. If this is not a signal to the United States, I don't know what it will take as we wait for the smoke to clear. Hensley says. We need to take action on trying to prevent our climate's future from becoming a reality. Most of the scientists

Hensley Hamburg Nick Pop West Coast United States Seattle Midwest Iowa
Money for nothing: German university offers 'idleness grants'

Bloomberg Radio New York Show

00:39 sec | 1 year ago

Money for nothing: German university offers 'idleness grants'

"Grant sometimes takes a lot of work. But sometimes it doesn't the University of fine Arts in Hamburg, Germany, is offering idleness grants worth about $1900 each. All you have to do is abstain from activity and you get to decide your own period of in activity, the school said. Applicants are free to choose their own form of idleness and activity to abstain from And a panel of school officials will choose the best pitches. It's part of research for an exhibition on sustainability designed to answer the question. What can I refrain from so that my life has fewer negative consequences on the lives of others on Kevin

University Of Fine Arts Hamburg Germany Kevin
1 in 5 nursing homes experienced summer shortages in PPEs and staff

Derek Hunter

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

1 in 5 nursing homes experienced summer shortages in PPEs and staff

"Homes with new research out from health affairs, wanted five US nursing homes faced severe shortages of personal protective gear. That's according to a study released Thursday, which indicates there was no improvement from May to July and shortages of peopIe but also finds facilities in areas hard hit by covert 19 are struggling to keep staff the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services says Sponsor, the Trump Administration has provided nursing homes with the tools they need to stop the spread. Hamburg ADI

Hamburg Adi United States Trump Administration Centers For Medicare Sponsor Peopie
Alexius' Story

You Had Me At Black

06:29 min | 1 year ago

Alexius' Story

"I'm Martina. Abraham's Linga welcome back to NATO I have to be honest with you before we started the show I rarely thought about giving birth my indifference turned to fear and anger when I started to understand more about the American medical system and when I became aware of the Blackburn in crisis specifically like most people I assumed if and when my time came to have a baby, I'd go to the hospital I began to fear for mine and my future children's safety and grew angry at the idea that had have to settle for care that's less than I desire. Deserve. I started to question whether I wanted to have children at all the beautiful thing about my journey with natal is that I learned about an entire community that centers blackburn parents and their babies. I'm now more familiar with a network of midwives, dulas, providers, and healers who affirm the dignity and beauty in black breathing and intimately value black-eyed. Due to the history of anti-black blackness in the obstetrics and gynecology field. Much of their work happens outside of hospital I'd seen photos and videos of women all white giving birth in pools and at home. I assume all hippy dippy white people ship turns out. I was very wrong. In this episode, we leave the hospital and step into the world of home. Births. We also dive into the work of Dulas, like Charlie, Louis anderly the owner of Brooklyn based practice nor shing seats Dula. To begin to understand the role dualist play in pregnancy and childbirth. Let's start first with the story of Alexis Him. Some Alexi I am a Smith AC- native where my fiance and I live currently right now I'm training to become a Hamburg worker and I'm proud to say the coast model and this is my natal story. So that was pregnant was extremely interesting is so aware because. I keep up period Alabama foul and I'm looking at it like okay. Says on today's late this is not normal like mockery combs all the time in the night before at noticed the The second day late I was drinking I was having fun. Don't think I will up just like, okay. Today's is enough women is so I went to dollar tree The dollars as at the the tests that you put a little drop singing in wait for the line changes to it. So I dropped the little year in air in the I got one lot I'll say, okay, I'm not pregnant at this point I'm convinced that there is no baby in there. I'm in the one line was just mother -cation. I'm not pregnant sats to those once I got the one line I was the instructions clearly say that you have to wait I think about three minutes once I felt they line I was like, okay. Throw it away. So two more days game. And I'm like, okay. Until my boyfriend at the time like, okay four days is enough. I'm usually on copy now something is not right whale. I couldn't say that this was like something in my body changing or anything of that nature because I knew what took place prior to me semi period but also needed took a plan B. in our secure. This was everything that was a Mama. So. On the fourth day are caught. Another just like is not here. He's like you can come to my job stopping at apprentice in you can come here to take it I'm like, okay. Cool outcome there to do this. So I went into the restroom appeared on the State Ama- body like. It almost showdown at started shaking him. So like all my guy, it says positive if this point I'm scared I'm crying he was like you know go ahead and take the second one is at the second test in it said the same thing. So once I realized that he really decide positive I'm just like, what are we going to do? What do you mean we gotta do you know we're gonNA. Have a baby like it's Okay Hook. He gave me a hug AMC that was the in Twenty Sixteen Alexis was twenty three and still figuring out what you wanted to do in life. She was young and just having fun with her friends and now Fiance Cortez babies and parenthood weren't even a real thought even though she made up her mind Alexis didn't feel ready to share the news with her family little. Did she know they were already in on the secret? The funny thing about the stories that my sister knew that I was pregnant before I'd eat in that because. She was snooping garbage game. In those tested I thought were negative were actually reading positive, but I didn't wait for them to finish position. So how long they home to retrieve the man the garbage gain in Norberto they were definitely positive days. So they had sports as total. They revealed that I was pregnant and I didn't even know I can remember going at you mom if this. Already tell. In I'm just the one at the table this like awkwardly trying to not eat the. 'CAUSE I didn't want my mom to now that I was pregnant at the moment. I want to give her time. Alexis needed time to she hadn't fully wrapped her mind around what it meant to be pregnant. She recently started working as a receptionist choices a reproductive health services clinic choices provides everything from abortion to HIV, testing services to midwifery care. Alexis had options. So yeah. I had the choice to continue on my pregnancy abortion is something that I do think that it's easy choice I'm pro-choice. So you know but I knew my situation that it wasn't GonNa be something that I wanted to do basically because my boyfriend at the time we have been together for a while in knew that he wanted to Kate I was associated but I knew as speaking about abortion wasn't any wasn't a topic for us. actually when I told him, he was like on with whatever you want and I'm just like Ricky Ready. So although choices offer termination services in that wasn't something that I decided to do I was able to meet individuals that would still provide me prenatal

Alexis Him Dulas Twenty Sixteen Alexis Blackburn Abraham AMC Fiance Cortez Alabama Ricky Ready Norberto Kate I Hamburg Brooklyn Charlie Louis Anderly
German cruise ship sets sail, hopes short trip thwarts virus

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

German cruise ship sets sail, hopes short trip thwarts virus

"A German cruise ship has set sail for the first time since the industry was shut down because of the Corona virus with strict precautions. The T Y cruise ship set sail for the weekend cruise in the North Sea on Friday night. The DP, a news agency reported. Occupancy was limited to 60%. So that passengers can keep their distance. There were 1200 people onboard compared to the ship's normal 2900 capacity. The ship sailed from the port of Hamburg towards Norway, and passengers will spend the weekend at sea with no land stops before returning to Germany on

North Sea Hamburg Norway Germany
German court convicts former SS guard, 93, of being an accessory to murder at the Stutthof concentration camp

WTOP 24 Hour News

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

German court convicts former SS guard, 93, of being an accessory to murder at the Stutthof concentration camp

"Court has convicted a 93 year old SS former SS private of being an accessory to murder in the studio off concentration camp in Poland, where he served as a guard. In the final months of World War two Bruno Day was given a two year suspended sentence by the Hamburg state court. He was convicted of more than 5200 counts of accessory to murder equal to the number of people believed to have been killed at studio off during his service there in 1944

Murder Hamburg State Court Bruno Day Poland
"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

04:44 min | 2 years ago

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Hamburg, and we often talk about medical issues bad impact. You and I recently read a piece in the New York Times by Catherine van Americans need generic drugs, but can may trust them a shocking piece. Even if you don't know anything about pharmaceuticals, you know, about generic drugs, they make up the largest percentage of what people take in this country and even though generics are ninety percent are almost ninety percent of the supply here. Gas. What forty percent. At least more of these drugs are made in India and almost eighty percent of the active ingredients of all drugs are made overseas. Now is this bad enroll? We pay much less for a generic and. Insurance won't cover anything unless we use generics. We have an FDA apparently it's supposed to guarantee our safety. Well, if you've read Catherine's piece, if you read her latest book bottle of lies, the inside story of the generic drug boom, you know, bat what Katherine has talked about. Is really frightening. And we're in a bad situation so Catherine. I'm curious you've been covering this area for a while. But what really brought this on this is a major work and getting as it should attention all over the world. Thanks so much Joan. It's great to be on with you. I started reporting book in two thousand and eight because I was contacted actually by hint PR radio host Joe Graydon who runs the people, I know him for a long time. He contacted me he said his Email inbox with flooded with patients complaining about side effects when they were switched from brand to generic drugs. They were stable than they became unstable. Once they were switched. He felt needed serious attention. He didn't know what was wrong with the drug because the FDA wasn't being responsive. So that's how I began my reporting, and I'm sure even you were shocked at what you found out. Absolutely. I mean, first of all, you know, I began this project is a huge booster of generic drugs because everybody should be able to afford a cure. So I began reporting. I reported on the patients, I raised some questions about the FDA, and as I reported I began to get contacted by whistleblowers who through my attention to the overseas, plants that are making our drugs. So these are plants in India and China. They have to follow the same regulations as US companies do in order to make these drugs. However, there seven thousand miles away from FDA headquarters, the FDA's, an infrequent presence there. So what was really going on in those plants, and that is the question that I set out to answer in my book bottle of lies. And you didn't answer it. And I'm very you know. When I was just starting out in this business to kid years and years ago, a guy who used to work for the FDA called me because we were doing a lot of drug stuff and he said, was sodium nitrite. He said, you know, there's a big story there, everyone at the FDA knows that it's lethal. It's cancer causing, but we just eat a lot of vitamin C when we eat things like that, and he started talking then about covering up a lot of stuff that people knew, well, you know, van isn't like you're an incredible research. You probably would have taken men. With it. So to be FDA when you your book as come out when the peace came out in the times, have, they contacted you at all. They denying all this. Well. They are essentially denying it in the sense that they are saying Americans can take these drugs with confidence. There are no quality problems. But look, the FDA's own investigators had gone into these plants, and they have discovered shocking fraud. So, for example,.

FDA Catherine van Americans New York Times Joan India Hamburg Joe Graydon US Katherine fraud cancer China ninety percent eighty percent forty percent
"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

11:52 min | 2 years ago

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"All right, everyone. Welcome to the Joan Hamburg show, and we talked to a lot of people who do a lot of different things. And I've often wondered what does it take to be an astronaut? I mean, we don't have a lot of them. How does this even if it's a dream come true? So I was really excited when I heard that Dr Dave Williams who is really an MD isn't astronaut learned along the way had a pilot jet planes is a scientist runs all kind of things formerly director of space and life sciences. At NASA benches space, really twice done amazing. Thing things has the Canadian record for the longest walks in space, and he wrote a book called defying limits lessons from the edge of the universe. And when you read his story, you're going to go look at your kids and say what have I done here because it's six he already had dreams that one more than let's go to the toy store. How that happened? Was it a mother a father who focused? You know? I think my parents really fostered the sense of curiosity and built that. So when I watched Ellen shepherd liftoff to go into space in nineteen sixty one unbelievable when I said to my parents, I want to be an astronaut even though the point it a candidate didn't have astronauts in those days, he tried to fuel my passion for science and foster that dream. But you know, it's so interesting. It's like when you decided you wanted to scuba dive, you just a child if my kid came to me, and I still remember we were on vacation in Jamaica, and my son who was around the age when you started said, I wanna take lessons. I was like oh, no too dangerous. Unstained your father said that's a good idea. And he did the whole thing with you. I mean that was rather amazing. We I think I got that explorer. Gene from my father, the science and medicine, gene from my mother, but my father was an explorer at heart. So when I initially raised the idea at age twelve he initially looked at me like, I know if you're going to be able to pull this off, but he went to bat for me and negotiated with the instructors and was there throughout the whole training. And it was a remarkable experience and passing those tests. I mean, you just still a kid who still a kid and I'm learning about decompression sickness? Visit. Physics live, diving, etc. All of this would have surprised my elementary school teachers at the time, you really when you read as we did all of that. You're growing up your mom was inert. She would come home, bloodied and everything. Oh, no big deal. You know, let me get outta vantage. I would've called nine search or something. So they really taught you resilient. And my question was can you teach your kid resilience? Did you do this with yours? You know, we tried with our kids. I think my parents were very effective because they let us fail and you build resilience in small little steps, you know, in the failures that you have when you're a kid or not so big. But they learning how to deal with that helps prepare you for the bigger issues later in life, right? And also you or someone who didn't give up because when you met your wife, you get married and you say to her I'm going to apply to an astronaut program. And you were told you say in defying limits. No, we're not doing this. No Canadians yet. And it didn't stop. You think not giving up is really important, particularly one of the most challenging things. I had my life was being diagnosed with cancer as my second spaceflight. Yeah. It was fifty years old at the time. I lost all my medical certification as an astronaut and a pilot had to get it all back to be able to fly in my second spaceflight. And what was amazing was even really having it being diagnosed going through surgery, not easy, and recovering that you got your place back in this coveted almost hard to get area. You still were an astronaut. Yeah. That was very tough for me as you can imagine both dealing with the diagnosis getting to the gym going through rehabilitation to try and get back into shape to pass a medical to fly. Again. I remember starting at the gym lifting two pound weights. L shape Boeing. Yeah. There's no question who was tough and scary. So I wonder if going through when you have to think about the worst, even though you know, the best prognosis is within your reach. Did that help you when you're going through a program like becoming an astronaut there had to be fear connected with that? There's no question when you're sitting on top of essentially a controlled explosion going from being stationary to traveling twenty five times as feta sound in eight and a half minutes. That's pretty scary. And you know, they say courage comes from doing something despite the fear that you have for doing it. And what we do when we go into space. That's what we train years to do. That's what we love to do. But there are those moments that do get your attention without question. And when I'm reading about you tethered by your foot. How scary is that when we were outside? Doing the spacewalk. We have foot restraints we've put our boots into and that holds us from one position that the first spacewalk you're holding onto the handrail pretty tightly second spacewalk. You're looking a little bit more over your shoulder. Third spacewalk, you lock your tethered to a handrail you push way in your space. It's unbelievable how their confidence builds. So and it's also a collaborative thing too. I think you really got that that there are a lot of lessons to learn when you are suspended in space, but trust is one of them. Trust is absolutely critical. When you're going out, the airlock with someone and you're putting your life on the line and arguably your life is in their hands in their life is in your hands. Trust is paramount. And that's why we spent years training together to build that report is team members. And what was it that made you decide after two walks and breaking records and see? Gene, things that you said really changed you forever. Where you really understood what living in the moment is all about. Yeah. That was a very special time for me writing on the candidate on my second spacewalk as a physician years, many many years before my training. I've learned about Ted Rosenthal writes for the New York Post New York Times who passed away in his early thirties from leukemia. He talked about the opportunity we all have to live in the moment. And I tried my whole life to do that. I didn't fully get it until I was standing on the end of the candidate. I'm looking at this four and a half billion year old planet beneath me, it was incredible. And I've bet and you did all kinds of things where scuba diving really helped living under the sea. Explain what that was all about because most people had no clue. So, you know in the space program, we try and leverage innovation, and it's very expensive training to go into space and being in space. So we decided that we would evaluate using the Noah Aquarius undersea research habitat as a platform to do space science and train astronauts for the space station. So we did the first mission in two thousand one. Said this is fantastic and was great training environment. So the rest is history, and we're continuing to use Aquarius this day, actually and doing missions to Aquarius to train astronauts for the space station when you decided Dave I'm talking to Dr Dave Williams, a new book defying limits lessons from the edge of the universe. When you decided after the second walk that you were going to retire from the active astronaut program was that a huge adjustment. One of the special people. It was very tough leaving that program. You know, everybody that you fly in space with they become like your family at the astronaut corps is really our extended family. It was hard being able to say goodbye to that. But I've been in the program for sixteen years at that time could've stayed in for another few years to try for third flay. But I thought you know, what after two space k I had really been able to accomplish my dream. Let's open the door for the next generation of astronaut. So I retired. And we had to hire two more astronauts into the program at that time, which is really exciting. But you and your wife both early on made a decision that you had dreams, maybe they weren't practical your wife onto the be a pilot in her time, also very hard almost unheard of for women. And yet you both said, let's go for it. Yeah. I think I've been. Blessed to find a life partner where we both believe as passionately in each other's careers, as we believe in her own, and as such we were both able to succeed and fulfill our dreams, you know, today. My wife is flying a seven eight seven she's over in Paris right now. Back later this week. Yeah. And I wonder what people say could you? I was trying to think after reading your book. How often have I seen a woman in a cockpit? And I've traveled to like, you know, what never fortunately, it's becoming more frequent days. But you're right and female pilots Representative of five percent of the pilots street. So we need to try and encourage more women to go and TV station and follow careers in aviation, and you and your wife, also, you know, people think, oh, he's had it all, you know, doctor, and yes, you had a little cancer bite you overcame it. You also your first child, which is probably the most difficult for any parents was a special needs child. And yet you both took it in your stride and was going to be the best life possible. Yeah. Evan our son is a remarkable individual, you know, he's twenty four right now and enjoys playing basketball league goes to basketball, Monday evenings, he does yoga Wednesday evenings is is played his full. He's got all sorts of activities. But more importantly, I've been able to learn as much from Evan about life. And what's important as we've been able to share with him and an optimistic UTA, a joyful person, always always integrate mood, and we love shooting hoops together. And it's just fantastic going there. Watching him score, baskets and your daughter got to science bug. Yes. Our daughter is studying neuroscience at the university of wealth just outside of Toronto and our nephew came to live with us about. Six. Parents is that your brother or actually my sister? My sister in law and she passed away number of years ago. So THEO came to live with us. Yeah. It's very very sad. But. See a grown up. Now. He's thriving in high school and wants to go to McGill University. Yeah, he's doing very very well. So your family has grown. Yes. And no more, astronauts, we'll go, you know, my daughter's doing, her pilots licenses. Science. So you never know. Well, a fascinating look into space. You can almost feel it when Dave Williams steps out and.

Dr Dave Williams Evan Joan Hamburg astronaut corps NASA Jamaica decompression sickness Ellen shepherd McGill University scientist director Boeing Ted Rosenthal Gene basketball partner Toronto Paris Representative
"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

12:37 min | 2 years ago

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Hamburg Seventy-seven WABC where New York comes to dog. Okay. Everyone. Welcome to the Joan Hamburg show. And you know, whether you need to know how to stimulate your rose bushes or your board, French bulldog. Whether you suddenly realize you're hosting a kids party or you've got to remove a stain on something you're wearing and can change you have to go to Martha Stewart, and Martha has the ultimate now, the Martha manual, how to do almost everything and the truth is Martha does almost everything it's sort of annoying for the rest of us who can't do any of that stuff. But Martha is good at it. And a great teacher, and she's written more than ninety books on everything. From this to cooking entertaining gardening. I still. Have her original Martha Stewart's wedding, and this manual is the perfect you're going to a bridal shower. Someone just bought a new home or moved into an apart-, whatever it's got everything. So Martha with all the stuff, you do and welcome. What made you decide to do this huge? Well, we've been on. We had a column in our magazine called called the ask Martha and we've had it in the magazine magazine now over twenty five years old, and we have had so many inquiries from our readers are millions of readers over the years that we thought well, it would be a very good subject for a book, and it's timely because all of a sudden people are paying attention to the clutter in their home. They make sure the there are a lot of popular TV programs dealing with orders. And and people who just have too much, and they don't know what to do with it. So so this book is not just about organizing rolling, your little balls and putting them into little boxes. This is actual real information about how to really take care of your home. Your surroundings your personal effects, your children's things your pets. And it's I don't know. I don't know if you remember John, but when we were growing up a long time ago. Used to be like the good housekeeping book, of course, the seal Vijay Reader's Digest had a book about everyone. And and all that came from the sort of a screeching halt for some reason when mom went off to work and let the kids at home fair for themselves, and nobody was paying attention to how do you keep your home in an orderly fashion? How do you fix things? How do you know he started to call in all the handyman doing all that stuff? But now people are really interested in really needy of of a like this. And you're right. It's back in many ways to basics my kids. Are they opposite of me? You know for over eleven years, we had a farm in Vermont. And what are you? Do you go in taking and go to auctions, and you accumulate? Oh, yeah. Oh my gosh. So much stuff and no one wants that stuff. Right. And so would you. What do you do with it? How do you dispose of it? Why dispose of it at your life? It's about more about editing. It's not about disposing of everything and living in a cold white box. I don't believe in that at all. I believe that that things should things that have meaning should stay with you. You should enjoy what you've collected. But there's ways to take care of them. There's ways to organize them. There's ways to to display them that makes great sense. Just recently. I for one I've had a I've collected a lot of kind of primitive American paintings, and I put them away when I moved to this farmhouse up in Bedford. I don't know why just put them away. And I've been taking them out little by little and hanging them on the walls, and people remarking how great are and how beautiful so I'm making a re finding new uses for some of my beautiful old things. Right. And you've had a lot of wonderful things. I'm talking to Martha Stewart who celebrating the Martha Manu. Literally, how to do almost everything? And and I thought that word almost in the title, the smart because my publisher sort of had that she wanted it to be how to do everything, and I don't I don't ever profess to know how to do everything. But you know, how to do a lot more than most people. I know, and it's really amazing. And I've known you a really long time. And you just even as a kid when you were starting you just knew how to make things look good and make things work once that your mother, I I have a very practical sense. And I can get that's practical sense across to the reader in the pages of a book like this, which is a beautiful book, by the way, my assistant in New York jury, and she made me sign a copy for like the first copy that came in because she said, she's read it from cover to cover loves it. And it's learned so much and here she is a single woman who has. Her own home and needs to know how to do things and how to take care of things, and she was she's ecstatic with it makes me so happy Joan, well, it has everything from what you should do at a dinner party or cocktails to had to fix the toilet. I mean, you literally how to paint a room and how to mount shades and blinds for your windows, how to hang curtains. But you know, if you want to recover a simple chair how to do that how to install shelves? I don't know if you caught me on Jimmy Fallon the other night installing shelves. He never got the shelf really hung very well. But but we had a lot of fun. I'm sure, but even from your early Connecticut days when you started catering. Oh, yes. You just got it. But a lot of people wouldn't have done what you did take chances. Do your own thing. If if the company or the corporation, or the TV thing said, I don't know you tell you. Okay. I'm going to do it anyway. Right. And and so this book this book is a really really well put together well-designed and clear manual for the homemaker, and we're working now on on book number two. Series. How to organize a little bit of nine. Tonight and organizing because I just got me I'm on my way to QVC right now to to sell some of my beautiful clothes and gardens things. And I'm in my basement trying to make sense of wardrobe. You know, it's it's a lot of wardrobe when you do TV shows, you know, radio TV magazine shoot. But you, but you've got it because you usually do simple and classic. You make me wanna get those white shirts. You wear. Oh, yeah. And the work shirts, and jeans, but but even close taking care of taking care and organizing, so we've turned one room into a closet in the basement. That's so great. We're hanging hanging racks from the ceiling just finding the hardware for those racks was so difficult took us about three weeks to find their correct hardware where did you find us online someplace horse? Yeah. And then beautiful steel rods. And and now, and now I'm going to have a very, and I'm doing the whole thing as a project for for either the magazine or for my blog, and and that so I learn while I'm doing so I'm always doing projects. So that once I learned how to do them. I can teach others how to do it. And that's Martha Stewart are most trusted lifestyle expert teacher, author grandma mother, you name it. Martha does the monster manual her brand new book, which is truly fantastic now with Martha. She just manages to get it done. Are you still getting up at five o'clock in the morning? Over. He was like four thirty. Addicted to my ipad. This is the worst addiction. I mean, I don't drink and I don't smoke. But boy, do I do I use that I've had. So I read the New York Times and whatever on the ipad the ipad before I get up. I do the crossword puzzle and the mini crossword puzzle then I get up and and take care of the animals. I have a lot of animals. Yeah. You have all kinds of dogs now and chickens, and then I meet with my assistant, and what time is that seven o'clock. Everybody comes to work know, I live on a farm. So by several urine Bedford now. Yeah. Okay. There's a there's a lotta lots to do before. I get in the car and go to work today. The morning is here because a first of all your interview. And I I get on a plane and go down to QVC in a little while. Appearances today. But the we've been, you know, the weather we've been having the polar vortex horrible. Everything's a sheet of ice outside. So my geese I got newbies. Beautiful the best of holes and prom Arrhenius and to lose the pomeranians. Oh, they're the guard. He's those are giant keys that really protect the chickens and the rest of the flock from hawks. All predators away and their feet were sticking into the guy. So what you do with? Well, I made I you know, I I have to be the practical one. And I I was in New York, and I got this frantic phone call what you have called feet frozen into the I know so what you do. Well, I told them to ship them out carefully and then put straw down all over the ice. So that they would have footing. Right. Well, that was smart and that made a whole difference and put a heat lamp in an outdoor shed for them. They could they could stay a little warm, and that's where they stayed all night long. It was like five below zero last night. And it's pretty cold today. Put that in a book. You see I know you what these books are meant to do for all of us is to train us to think clearly about solutions. How would you do to make it work better or how how can you fix it? How can you not have that problem again? These are the kinds of things that I want people to learn how to think for themselves. Don't we all have these challenges? I love when you told everyone how to move a cake, and that's a big deal. Oh, it's so impossible, but a stacks cake, especially moving in layers, and then assemble it at the at the site. Don't try to carry a whole big Hegel stacked on top of the you know, when you do what you do. And it's literally everything from the kitchen to the garden to the tool chair. Whatever do you ever get sick of being Martha and having too much thrown at you and having such expectations from the world. No. That's the fun part. And you never get tired. No, no, no. I had lot of energy. But you always had a longer Phanor. Jeff did. And I don't know if the audience knows how long we've known each other Joan we've known each other for a good long. Look we knew before you grew up to be Martha Stewart. Oh, yes. Yeah. Would. But it it's just incredible of the the wonderful career that you've built teach you teaching and bringing information to such a beautiful way. Martha we've all done it. And you know, I can credit our Barnard college, which definitely was a place that gave us a lot of go out and do what you can do it. Oh, yeah. But your mom did that to out your wonderful, mother and torch, you a lot and you were you listened. No. I did. And I and I continue to try to teach my grandchildren. I love having grandchildren. Joan now. Well, I liked kids were a little stingy in that range. Only one your daughter was smarter. I I have to. Still not not enough, but need a lot Irish. I have lots of great nieces and nephews, and they come and visit the farm, and and they're learning. They learn how to do everything to you are there. And by the way, Martha knowing does more enjoys that family more you take everyone on great trips..

Martha Martha Stewart Joan Hamburg New York Martha Manu QVC WABC the magazine Hamburg Barnard college Jimmy Fallon Vijay Reader publisher New York Times Bedford John Vermont Connecticut
"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

08:50 min | 2 years ago

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"The Joan Hamburg show. And I recently read a piece in the New York Times about exercise and how important being fit, and it was not describe what being means how important being fit is to your overall wellness to your longevity. So I reached out to one of the fit of the fittest. Dr Jordan, I met who is known as the athletes, Dr a famous sports medicine physician. Also, a bestselling author an enormous practise and his books are legends. By now, running strong, the exercise cure, the athletes book of home remedies. And a lot of other books. Also, contributes writes a column, and I was told that Dr Mitchell has a famous new high intensity workout that you can do in six minutes with practically no equipment. So welcome to you. Joe that is the best introduction. I guess like I can't even say anything now price, you get off the phone because you're so awesome. That's even better than my mother would do Honey once you're a mother, you know, everyone son is flawless. It's good. Listen. I always still tell people your secret to being able to get off the floor to see if you're really fit your no hands. No one pulling you up. No hanging onto a chair. So tell me Banou high intensity workout. Yup. Well, first, let's talk about this study you reference because I think that's been a really interesting when it was published for those who might wanna find it. It was published in JAMA the journal of the American Medical Association last week. And it looked at the association between cardiorespiratory fitness just how fit somebody is at any decade of life, and what kinds of things they would do what kind of medicines they were on what kind of illnesses, they might get and how they dealt with the almost they had an interesting either a couple of things not surprisingly, the more fit people were on a treadmill test the less medicines they needed but also the less diseases. They had an even if they had things like, diabetes or heart disease. It seemed like being fit and active was more important than having disease. And so the best exercise the best medicine is movement. And so that's not to say that you're not going to get any kind of problem like cancer God forbid or heart disease, if you are active, but it is to say that if you are active every single day you. You definitely reduce your risk of having disease, and you definitely reduce the risk of that disease. Changing your health and your activity profile. So we want people to move every single day of their life. That's the main take home from from that study. Now when we talk about hit or high intensity interval training, that's one of the different ways that people can move. And so we put together actually the thing. I think you saw was on the today show, and we put together a six minute workout to teach people how to be active in six minutes. So what are some things you can do in six minutes, and that kind of tied into the last book, we did call the workout prescription, which was all about making hit workouts at home, and you can do these things in your living room, and they're valuable at any age. There have been studies looking people in their eighties looking at short bursts of activity for a minute. And what's the benefit of that versus, you know, just walking? And it seems like if you do short bursts of activity for a small period of time. There's a lot of value for that. In terms of what you do. So. Explain to me when they say fit fit for people can be different. What to you is being fit? Let's say we and we have a large audience. Maybe a lot of them. Do not do a lot of stuff. So if they start what does it really mean if you don't do high intensity? Does it mean that an exercise bike? What is it? It's whatever you like to do the studies on exercise compliance show that the number one reason why people will stick with a fitness program is fun. They're having fun. And that's followed by community number two. So, but we tell people is find a community that makes you smile. What makes you smile when you're active is doing, you know, biking class going for a walk going for a swim doing yoga, whatever makes you smile, if you do that consistently playing golf walking in the golf course, you're much more likely to stick with it and fit means not only what you do how frequently you do it. And also how intense you do it. So what I tell my people is it's it's so great to go for a walk. But if you can go for a walk and do some squats at a red light, or you know, every fifteen twenty minutes do a little bit of something higher intensity. That's better for you than just, you know, doing a slow walk which is better than sitting on the couch. And here's the question that I get often every time we do a segment like this. If I've never done anything, and I'm in my sixties or seventies. Or whatever is it too late to start if I've had years of being inactive. Not at all the data strongly says that at any age you start a fitness program. It will be beneficial. Even if you're completely inactive in your seventies eighties. So there is no excuse for anybody. Not to get out and start moving making, listen, you're awesome show. And they can listen to you know, they can listen to their to their radio while they're walking along they can put in their headphones and start moving. So there is no reason why they cannot start doing something going walking in a mall or in their neighborhood or going for a swim there, so many terrific resources, and they tri-state area to get people moving everything from gyms to the YMCA, fitness club groups and activities find somebody you like to be within go do it. What do you think about lifting weights? I think it's terrific. And I think there's something called age related Sarko Pena, which means you lose muscle and muscle cells and muscle mass as you get older, and you know, weight training is very beneficial for people up into their eighties nineties. So we have people lifting weights at every age. And it's never too late to start. The thing is I always say to them don't do it. Unless someone shows you how because you don't want to end up with a problem. That's right. So you wanna make sure you get some guidance? And again, some of the places I talked about our great weightlifter doing that. But I don't want people to be afraid. I want them to think about you know, the the good Lord made our bodies to move, and we are designed to move. We are definitely built to move. And if you're just sitting around, you know, not being active, your your your decomposing by the minute. So get out there and get moving K, and everyone is always talking about on my hips hurt, my knees hurt and exercises. Like lunges? We've been told over the years not good for your knees true or false false. I mean, basically, you know, our goal is the stronger the muscles around at joint, which might have some arthritis. The better that joint is gonna feel. So I want people not to be afraid of using their muscle and building. Strength. The key is finding way that doesn't hurt. So maybe it's writing an exercise bike or something like that to start you really activating the muscles around the joints. But the more you start building strength around arthritic joints, the better they're gonna start feeling better. You're gonna start feeling I'm talking to Dr George Mitchell who is in practice here in New York City and deals with athletes from every range in every walk of life. Are you still running marathons Joni? I am walking around with a big smile today. Having just on the New York days ago, and I did it with three of my siblings. And there was a whole team metal contingency on the bus, and we all finished. And and thankfully, I didn't come in last place in the brother Ray. So that's all good. It's fantastic. Now, my family would come in. I in the eating race. That's their best sport. So. Yeah. That was right after the race. We had a great dinner afterwards. So wait all the siblings are like you everybody. Yes. Everybody starts to move. And we've move all the time. You bet what did your parents do to do that? They encouraged activity, and I grew up in Kansas City. So there were lots of lots of around up there about a lot of good barbecue to. Okay. I thank you so much Jordan. I think you have your new book ahead of you. Six-minute take care of yourself. Jordan mezzo who is one of the great sports medicine doctors in the country, a bestselling author people vied or be seen by him. And here he has it a six minute workout that you can do.

Jordan mezzo Dr George Mitchell JAMA New York Times Joan Hamburg Joe Kansas City Sarko Pena New York City New York Joni Ray six minutes six minute fifteen twenty minutes Six-minute
"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

13:10 min | 2 years ago

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"To the Joan Hamburg show. And I want you to meet rabbi Angelo bucco. And you may have met her with me. A long time ago. But the rabbi is the senior rabbi of central synagogue, one of the most important synagogues, not only in our great city, but one of the most important in the country and Angela the rabbis the first woman to head this congregation and its history goes back one hundred and seventy five years, she started as cantor here and was chosen by the congregation to be the senior rabbi, and you have seen her. In fact, I just caught her the other day on the today show. She is also the first Asian American to be ordained as cantor or rabbi in North America. So well, one important I get to be your rabbi. Yes. You too. Had. It's all well, let's start with you had something rather amazing at central synagogue via the night, which was open to the community every community, and which featured not only the archbishop and the governor. But religious leaders from every denomination across the city. It was extraordinary. And you know, I couldn't be there but I- streamed it which is something else that you started. So this congregation is now worldwide. That's right. We feel really grateful that we have the ability to send our message out very widely into the world reviewed viewed by over one hundred countries and also to be able to amplify amplify the voices of faith. And and some of the leadership that we want to put out into the world. So we were so grateful that you know, these things were this thing was pulled together and twenty four hour vigil. And I asked some of our most important and busiest clergy people in the city if they would join us and without his attention. They all said, yes. And we had over a dozen face leaders there on the Bima and even more in the car Gatien and the governor really shared a message that I think we all truly needed to hear from our elected officials, which was a unequivocal denunciation of of all kinds and a celebration of diversity and that. That being what makes this nation? Great. And to hear the highest official in our state say that from our Bima to me, I didn't even realize how important that would that would feel to hear him say that. And I I wish it was something I was hearing from all levels of our elected leadership. Right. No, I agree with you. He was really impressive. And it wasn't a political thing. Right. It was right from the heart. And it was almost like a challenge to everyone, and I can tell you because my daughter was there. She said the line was blocks long with people not only from the NAT, and but from all over who had come in to be part of this. But you know, I heard you awhile ago sounding the alert about anti-semitism, and what is happening. And it was like a wakeup call because we live in this. Great city. Maybe we've been too comfortable. We we have. And I don't want us to live in fear that being said, I think that it's it's pretty clear to me that the actions of this man, while he acted, you know, alone. I don't think there's a conspiracy behind him. He was enabled and fed and incited to this hatred by an environment with many factors that that many people have contributed to and they definitely our cause for alarm for not just using this country. But really all Americans should be on the alert when their kind of hatred, and and we're seeing an uptick in obviously incitement and hatred towards Jews, but we're also seeing it towards Muslims and towards immigrants and refugees. And. People have different than transgender when there's a tolerance for anti-semitism. There's also always inevitably a tolerance for other kinds of hatred as well. And so I think that this should be an alarm for all Americans that we need to change the way we're having discourse. With each other. We need to think differently about how we view people across the other side of the table, and and watch the incredibly kind of dangerously tribal polarization that's happening in our country on the on the two sides of the aisle, but bene- question. One sounds an alert that all Americans not just Jews or Muslims or whatever. But the entire country should open is what can the message be to people that will really take hold. What should people do? You're there are the enormous egregious acts of anti-semitism that and hate that. You're seeing you know, Saturday's shooting was the pitted me of that. But you know, for the common person, we don't we don't touch that kind of hatred. So close every day, but we probably come up against the kind of more insidious slightly less explicit kind of hate and comments all the time. And we let it slide and it's easy. Also to point fingers on the other side of the island say that other side that I disagree with their really the big cause of the problem. But actually, we're seeing that on both sides of the aisle, there's incitement and hate and dehumanisation and demonization happening, you know, the last is dehumanizing. They might not be human. I think immigrants, but there are dehumanizing in talking in terms of people who might be really, pro-zionist and pro Israel. There's sometimes demonizing. The Christian evangelical we might disagree. But when we start to talk about people that way, it's horrible. And of course on the right? You're seeing a demonization of you know, liberals immigrants who are coming after us in a caravan and and transgender and people who have different sexual orientation. So it's it's definitely happening on both sides. And we every American sees this at some level or another, and we need to call it out when we see it we need to call it out with people who are on our side of the aisle because actually were more able to listen to people who with whom we generally agree that some of those comments slide, and I think we have to build more bridges. I think that one of the most encouraging outcomes of this horrific shooting is the way that people have come together. And you know, we had a line wrapping out the door. But that was the story of every vigil. I heard about DC had four thousand people that couldn't they to turn people away at the door on the west side. They had a thousand people outside their filled sanctuary. I heard the most beautiful story of in Nebraska. This rabbi who brought together his faith leaders. People offered to drive eight hours from the rural parts of their estates to come and be with them. And they have fifteen hundred people in this service in the middle of the where they're almost no Jews at all. So I think stories like that to to me give me heart and helped me understand that you know, what he doesn't get a win on this one. We might have lost a tremendous amount in our community and as Americans with this shooting. But I don't think that hate gets the chalk up a win. And that's rabbi Angela tell who's the senior rabbi of central synagogue, which and you can tell me if I'm wrong, I think it's the largest Jewish congregation in North America. And definitely in New York. I don't know about North America. But it's it's a place that where we welcome everyone. And we would welcome everyone to join us for Chabad services. This Friday in particular in solidarity at six o'clock. Doc. Thank you and a and a most beautiful service. But ran by your story is such a fabulous American story too. Because your mother. A Korean woman married, a Jewish American father mother was a Buddhist and you grew up. I remember you once telling your father singing Jewish lullabies to you as a little child. That's right. I, you know, I myself am an an immigrant. I came here at the age of five. My mother is an immigrant, and I grew up with his wonderful mix of, you know, hearing Korean lullabies and Jewish lullabies when I went to sleep. And my mother telling me that it was so great that I could live in America where I could take the best of all the cultures that I had and become something completely new. And frankly, it wasn't something that would have been nearly as possible in Korea, which in many ways was so you know of one actually as a mixed race child. I was not accepted in the same way. So I do think it's a particular American story. That's what we want to celebrate about this country. Right. And you, sir. You didn't grow up in New York City. Very Jewish community in a beautiful city called Tacoma, Washington. A beautiful place. So when you went this way was your mother accepting of it. She was she made that decision with my father and wanted us to be raised in a faith tradition and in in a in a community, and so she was supportive of it from day one. I think what I told her. I wanted to be a rabbi she was quite surprised, but I would say that she quickly came around. When I when it became clear that I was serious. She didn't take quite a seriously when I was sixteen years old and said it, but by the time, I was twenty and was still saying it she came around. And I think she now expresses her great cry that this is what I have chosen to do now. And Angela I have to tell you was blessed, and is blessed with one of the most beautiful voices you ever heard, and it's a musical tradition because I heard your sister too. Of musical person was your path from where you grew up to where you are now complicated where you accepted along the way. I I look back at my childhood is extremely happy. And and I had lots of friends, and I always felt proud of my diversity as a Jew in a community that had no Jews and proud of myself as a Korean community that had a few more Koreans but still with not particularly Korean. And I I was fortunate that my parents raised me to see that as something to celebrate. And I I think that that was that was a gift that my parents gave me, and you have always been despite what we have seen what America's going through been an optimist always able to see that. There is light. And there is hope and we just have to accept the fact that we've been to the gift to of being Americans, and that we have to make it work. Right. I mean, despite what we're seeing now and the alarm that I feel for what we see is rising hatred. Not just of Jews, but others despite all that I still think that this is one of the best times and countries to be a Jew in all of Jewish history. And so we need to keep that in mind and not lose sight of that. Despite the things that are concerning that we I think have to take seriously. And and I think if all Americans take this seriously as I have some hope to believe that's going to happen. We will turn the tide on this this hatred that we are seeing in our country. Thank you so much for taking the time to be with us rabbi Angela CTO, the senior rabbi at central synagogue synagogue, like synagogues in our city. But one of the great synagogues, you are all welcome anything. Anyone is welcome in. If you've never been to a Friday night service there. It's a treat and it's particularly special during these times. You're very welcome. Take care Joan Hamburg. You're listening to WABC more ahead. Science fiction,.

central synagogue Joan Hamburg Angela I North America New York City rabbi Angela CTO America rabbi Angela Angelo bucco central synagogue synagogue cantor DC Israel official Gatien WABC Korea Tacoma Nebraska
"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"The Joan Hamburg show where together every Saturday. We have such a good show Chio. We have wonderful writer. Mitch albom. We have one of the most interesting women rabbi Angela bucked Bucknell. So I hope you join us in great information and what a weekend and hopefully tomorrow, the weather's going to be as predicted because it's the New York City marathon, the world's biggest the world's most popular. Do you know that last year, and I don't know the count for this year yet over fifty thousand people finished the race twenty six point two miles. It's not so easy. It starts in Staten Island. It finishes in central park. If you can't get there. A w ABC TV is going to carry it. So you can do it. When you go to the finish line at sixty seventh street on west drive in the park. I'm telling you, you can just cry because it's so moving and so exciting and don't forget a reminder. We are going to have a fabulous holiday show on November twenty nine live audience you're invited. If you can get a ticket. It's at the Empire State house right on west fifty four street near the Christmas tree near Madison Square Garden near everything. And our show is going to begin around noon, and it will end sometime around two or two ish. The best the city has to.

Mitch albom Joan Hamburg Madison Square Garden New York City Staten Island ABC TV Empire State house Angela writer
"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Welcome to the joan hamburg shell and of course it's saturday and we start our adventure together at two o'clock and we've really got interesting guests eight burroughs who was know wonderful comedian anna broadway person on a producer and a writer his daughter laurie burrows grad had a terrible thing happened to her she lost her beloved husband of many years those two were inseparable and she turned her experience into a really important blog and book with a lot of humor and because they were both foodies a lot of recipes so i think it's important to listen to her to learn to laugh a little bit and of course eat a little bit that's all great stuff and by the way through tomorrow if you love ice cream and certainly most people do there's an all you can eat ice cream festival in bryant park and it's sort of from the afternoon on it goes to charity and you have to buy a ticket but it's fun with a lot of good flavors i do think we're sold out but you know what in never know and they have a good bar to where you can sit and it's more reasonable as well and then when we have these interviews you can come stand up and see two one two six one three thirty eight forty eight for tickets and it's a great preview of almost every broadway show and i want to remind you that way due to podcasts we do our show and we podcast that and we do original podcasts where we have great guests who come on and sort of spill their insides and we talk about anything and everything and we do some of our feature material like how you get tickets for things where.

producer writer bryant park joan hamburg anna broadway laurie burrows
"hamburg" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

BizTalk Radio

02:07 min | 3 years ago

"hamburg" Discussed on BizTalk Radio

"You onboard today we are engaging in hamburg and friday we're celebrating our our first responders and honoring them as well disco party look at our disco ball gasoline as we do every friday here in the studio talk a little bit about you know we've been talking about being micro influencers we're talking about building your brand building your customer base and you'll go out there and doing it one on one on one out of time is very effective and yet it is incredibly time consuming you're going to get to a point where you need a microphone unido you need a bigger audience if you're going to do bigger things absolutely your your company survive on one or two conversations a week now absolutely are even bringing on a one or two you know having one or two conversations one or two new clients we're creating a strong base of one thousand customers in your business and as you become an influence your just you you recognize that you're going to need a one too many this is why radio is so so necessary for small business luli and so when we think about radio we think about it as big corporations the big companies and that's usually who you hear on on radio advertising on radio advertising two different sides of of what you typically hear on radio you hear the typically the host of the shows are employees of the radio networks at one point or another and then you've got the the advertisers who are almost categorically insurance lawyers car dealers dimensioned insurance get people with the big money it is the people with the big money but you have an incredible story to tell you are a micro influencers and your your story needs to be told in many cases there are podcasts that are looking for your story they're looking for.

hamburg
"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:40 min | 4 years ago

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"The joan hamburg show and we are always available via facebook or twitter and we love the hearing from you you know it's interesting the farms stands are absolutely filled with white wonderful things the pumpkin so there broccoli in cali flower just picked the peaches are still feeling the barrels the most delicious pizzas and yet it's apple picking season it's my favorite because i make tons of applesauce and put it in the freezer you know for you here's we went to a place called masscre orchards it's hundreds of acres in i think it's in warwick new york that it's a real happening you know i read that they have all the twenty thousand fruit trees and they do a big deal they have pony rides wei again rides they have a maze live music it's really fun and it's open from nine to five through november on not gonna guarantee you the prices but for i think half a bushel it's like under thirty dollars like twenty nine it's a lot of apple's but you can make sauce or ply or something like that dan on the east end of long island i'd go to one of my favorite places where the peaches come from two the milk pale they have a little lam's store and orchards in water male but they have so many a things 60 variety of a boards in all kinds of good things for this.

facebook warwick new york apple dan joan hamburg twitter masscre orchards thirty dollars milk
"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:16 min | 4 years ago

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"To the joan hamburg show and are you sick of talking about trump you are me to above the korean situation has raised new anxieties even though a lot of late night pundits are making fun of it saying where overreacting i was talking to my friend a political strategist and democratic television commentator you often see robert shimer men who also is involved with a very successful marketing firm zimmerman attleson and mr zimmermann to a democratic committee men and one of the experts on communications so we were talking and i thought it was really interesting to pick the brains of an expert and find out from that point of view is the way our president and president trump reacted to the north korean threats is that from my communication point of view the way to go and if so who's find all this was this just of the moment to all was this part of the strategy robert zimmerman welcome great to be with you i'm sick of talking about donald trump to joe right now we're talking about really are art our own national safety and security and the world safety and security so communication diplomacy how are how the different audiences around the world be it our allies in the region our adversaries of a region how our own military power establishment precedes with the president saying it's very very critical so it all work at were at all this technology to reflect upon this and think about the right strategy going forward but lemme ask you with president trump had often isn't strategy it's out of his mouth or that that what every one more bipartisan level is concerned about our allies me new zealand for example one of our our staunch allies in the region denounced president trump's war does not being how after senator mccain because you see many example where it shift out of.

mr zimmermann robert zimmerman donald trump president senator mccain joan hamburg robert shimer zimmerman attleson north korean joe
"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

02:35 min | 4 years ago

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Joan hamburg live local vaunted decelerating wabc you know i just read a book that a lot of you are going to want to know about it in fact one of our papers new york post a while ago did a terrific piece on dr john days the longevity plan and dr day and jane and day his wife collaborated on this and dr day who is it cardiologists and medical director of heart rhythm specialise ride in salt lake city utah this is not only his story but it's an amazing story of a little village in china and dr today reveals his own tail although aren't lennick and our runner and all the good things he sort of felt like his health was falling apart when he described daisy eating in return of looked at each other with guilt in our own radio station because that quick doughnut in the morning or everyone here is all excited because these cream cheese and bagels on friday which they're gone before you even look up and the little vending machines which de shout all kinds of candy bars and high fat salt crackers fear go and constantly so dr day woods involved and i want you to explain dr john day how trainer so far away from salt lake city how china became a part of your life and then the result of all of it the longevity plane so were you teaching were you reading studies about china for some reason or it just sort of fell interior lap epa that a great story barron manner craig lead in an found quite where he work if no different than the hospital that i work and and i thought that that would not normal diet epa people eight and it is unfortunately it it will then and i would remind empower my mid forty hunter later a catholic up without them now next thing i knew i was on five different prescription medication by had an auto it near the beit i go away at high blood pressure high cholesterol army i knew you were an athlete yep.

wabc jane medical director salt lake city utah china Joan hamburg york dr john salt lake barron craig beit i blood pressure
"hamburg" Discussed on AP News

AP News

02:34 min | 4 years ago

"hamburg" Discussed on AP News

"In hamburg police say nearly two hundred officers have been injured in violent clashes with antiglobalization groups of sixty civilians have also been hurts the nation's homeland security secretary blames drug users for much of the violence in the us and mexico pierce our jackie quinn secretary john kelly visiting mexico it midst that america's insatiable appetite for drugs is the cause of much of the turmoil on both sides of the border kelly says leaders from both countries agree to work to strengthen their security cooperation to battle organized crime since mexico declared a war on drugs at the end of two thousand six more than one hundred thousand people died with thirty thousand missing kelly says sixty thousand people died in the us last year from drug overdoses i'm jackie quinn a third missile at a case of a white warmer tulsa oklahoma police officer who fatally shot his daughters black boyfriend jurors deadlocked six six after deliberating only a few hours today is ap radio news uphold the rising writers suing is former publisher over brokered book deal worn levinson tells us why rightwing provocateur milo yannopoulos says simon schuster cancelled his book deal because each other authors didn't like he's politics sitting gets a break the deal on what i believe is a false pretexts because they came to political pressure novelist claims the publisher had praised the manuscript just a day before cancelling it february cancellation came after video clips surfaced in which you novelists appears to approve of sexual relationships between men and boys as young as thirteen simon schuster called suit a publicity stunt and says it will defend itself vigorously warren levinson new york actor and comedian phase young love pleads no contest to a misdemeanor assault charge for slamming a columbus ohio airport ballet on the ground into a desk back in march columbus dispatch reports at love was fined five hundred dollars and given a one hundred eighty days suspended sentence i'm tim mcguire ap radio news progressive presents mindfloness with flo you are a mighty fortress of supreme knowledge progressive direct has not only revealed their rates further thin can if you're any morning how unep drowning who now compare progressive direct rates with competitors' rates because knowledge is power visit progressivecom progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates comparison rates not available.

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"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:39 min | 4 years ago

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Hamburg or look for us on facebook or go to twitter where there and i love to keep me company earlier i mentioned this is a big are wake in new york city the armory on park avenue in the sixties has great art and of course the freeze aren't fair one of the best in the world that ten randall's island that's a great thing to do and the galleries are all having shows that are terrific and if you're a foodie and you'd rather jesse eat well it's not this weekend but mark your calendar is for a new taste of the upper west side on the nineteenth and the twentieth and all the great food people like april bloomfield frank burundi there there and some of the best restaurants it's going to be a ball it takes place in the school yard o'shea complex schoolyard columbus avenue at seventy six three and speaking of food i went to the new danny meyer union square cafe now on the corner of park avenue and nineteen street i have to tell you guys i had a truly delicious delicious meal get a reservation it's not easy but it worth it it wasn't the biggest rip off in town it was fair and i can't wait to go back so that's just a couple of things that go on all the time in the city wonderful second our pulitzer prizewinning play ride polo vogel journey why did it take so long for a talent like this to make it to broadway you're gonna hear from her post shave fritz coming by what's he been doing since letterman clothes shop paul is always entertaining and you're going to be happy to hear he.

Hamburg facebook randall paul twitter new york jesse danny meyer union square
"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

77WABC Radio

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"hamburg" Discussed on 77WABC Radio

"Show on seventy seven wabc our two of the john hamburg shell we'll be together until three o'clock by the way let me remind you we've already started getting too many calls but the sardine show is june first so i'd love you to be they were going to be on the main floor sardines it's going to be a celebration of theater of performers and of course of you so here's the magic number two one two six one three three aid for a two one two six one three three eight for eight that hopefully will get you a table and your keno a delicious lines you know his coming over in a little bit cheetah revere you know i marvel at this woman's choosing the most horrific accident awhile ago we thought she'd never walk again dancing performing has been on broadway many times she's unreal eighty for you so what is her secret can the rest of us learn from her i think we can plus a very famous doctor doctor afraid says speaking of secrets he has the secret to longevity to looking young to something that a lot of people feel is not the way to go this man this very successful doctor says i know how you can change your life so listen to me he's coming over we've got a great show and you're part of it stay tuned because it's happening right now.

john hamburg