24 Burst results for "guo"

"guo" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:05 min | 2 months ago

"guo" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

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"guo" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

09:03 min | 2 months ago

"guo" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Between two companies. Today you can kind of like have one company purchased shares from another company. And that creates some alignment but presumably. There's like more liquid ways of doing that. yeah. I would agree with you here. Where i i look at. That is its external party. Trust right and so. I think like companies. There's definitely a world where i can imagine smart contracts in between businesses right and that could look like business. Could he could even be something as boring as like if you have that. Trust than you do away with things. Like worrying about your dea. So as a company or you don't worry about having like deposits at a different company right or like sales base financing. Looks totally different right. There's there's so many things that you could have in terms of innovation that depends on trust between two parties. Like i was saying i don't i can't picture like the internal workflow yet but i think there are versions that will reduce friction between businesses as an investor. Digits look at two out of the corner of your eye and k kinda keep track on it but sort of stay in the lane that you know really well and like as a firm. I'm also curious like gray. Lauck think of it as an opportunity. They should allocate resources to do. They say no look. We're going to draw a line in the sand. Say we're going to really. Maybe we'll look at it. Out of the corner of our word is going to focus on the core competency. Yeah i'd say like being approach investing from like probably a few different lenses right because it's it's not just one person writes a collection of individuals with individual tastes and points of view on what the future looks like. I'd say as a group like coin basis a significant investment for us and. That's as much a consumer. It's a consumer business as it is a crypto business right if this is a massive asset asset class as i believe it to be and if i believe that there are going to be huge parts of the existing financial infrastructure that replaced with more dynamic. Safer cheaper crypto infra than quinn base is very important company. It already is right. But i actually think you don't need to have a point of view on like precision of exactly what dow to be like point base is going to be a great company. We made the investment. Or at least maybe that was how it felt. Internally i think then there's like the strove what's going to be a fundamental platform perspective and so we've made multiple investments and both of these buckets right crypto companies that basically look like consumer companies. Were like. oh like we get the application or the application already has traction. Then that could be could be a wall could be a broker could be game right and then we've also made that are largely unannounced but are like could be core platforms in crypto. Right so think of this. As more like striped level infrastructure in the ecosystem and new low level chain companies versus these consumer application company. So we we've really barbells belted into what could be fundamental and then what is working on the consumer side where we see the engagement dynamics the interest or the speculation right. I've not seen a lot of so. It's definitely not like corner of the eye. But these are the two buckets today that we are paying attention to and then obviously consumer attentions very engaged in an teas and the potential for nf at say like i haven't seen as many opportunities that feel real and not yet over engineered on the bbc side. But it's not for lack of looking the rise of the solo capitalist. There are these individuals these days that are raising really big funds and deploying the capital essentially just under their own name. You could do this if you wanted to. You could go and raise a fifty million dollar one hundred million dollar fund and just start deploying capital but presumably you get something out of working at a firm like gray lock. What's the decision tree. When you think about the potential and direction of your career as an investor because i talked to a lot of investors that are kind of like mapping out where they wanna go in their career and this is like a major question. Do you go work with a team or do you go. Strike it out on your own. So part of this is an orientation question right like i am an intensely embiid and competitive person but also a team oriented person right like i want to be part of building an organization that is larger than just me right. I you know. I think the economics of venture are good scoreboard. But that is not what i'm here for right. I want to play in the big leagues. Help my team win and then win individually. And so. That's very different than i think the calculus and and for that as being part of a team i'd like to think i could raise more than five hundred million dollars like go play that game. I was just being modest. I agree with you. But i don't choose to right so i think that there's just a set of positives and there's a set of cost to being part of a team and so our job is always to like invest in the positives which i think there are many and squash the cost as hard as we can and so i mean the biggest positives are like an. It's different when you think about a so low capitalist that has like. I'm an entrepreneur running my company. Which as far as i can tell is one hundred ten hour a week. Job right. Hopefully less than like. Something more sustainable. But i've seen kurt like you work a lot right. I've been there. And so i spent a hundred hours a week on my companies and like this is the thing that i focus on all the time like helping us win and helping our companies when and so one is just like. What is somebody here to do. I think the second piece is like the people say like do you learn more from success or failure. I think you learn more from success right. And so being able to look to a community and then the tribal knowledge of a set of successful companies is very helpful. Because if we've done well by those entrepreneurs than they want to give back to our community right and our network goes beyond just our portfolio. So it's like the individual versus the team behind you. And i think that is a real value prop and i value also like especially the support in the recruiting that we do early on because the the ability to build a great company i think is hugely dependent on the quality of the i thirty people and the company which is like really where i spend my time and your ability to get world-class customers who are going to teach you and work with you in terms of like what you build an advocating for you and so i think that's a differentiated value prop of like building a small team with a trustworthy partner. Who can i mean. Trust is earned right but a trustworthy partner who is pulling resources behind them. And so i think that is like the reason to go with team and i think we have like a differentiated view there but i'd also say like we work with their are individuals who are incredibly useful to companies. Right like a solo. Gp just came in alongside a seat investment. I made and i'm really excited to work with them on this company because they are relevant to the company multiple solar. Gp's right because they have influence in their communities they know something from their company journeys but like. Do you really want to choose that instead of like the full package. I don't think so. And so i'm more making the case for like any great small team versus the individual. I think there's a lot that is really beneficial to founders about having that support the other piece here is really on decision ing right and so i guess like the psychology research and the organizational design research would say like the wisdom of crowds reduces the noise of decision making and then we have shared context which is useful. Not if it destroys your imagination as you said. And you're just like pattern matching or spreadsheet jockeying or whatever but knowing what could work in the past and looking for some of those signals is very useful. I think if you now go to the con side of being in a partnership and the last one. I m team oriented. It's really fun to work with. Smart people together in a boat and try to like be really valuable to the ecosystem and win right. I think the con side are like any team requires coordination and any team has differing opinions. And if you don't manage it well then you can have all sorts of decision making biopsies right and like cascading bat opinions and influences and like that sort of thing. But i think if you're actively working to manage it i think it's a it's a great trade to work with great companies. Can if.

Lauck dea quinn bbc squash kurt ing
"guo" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

08:27 min | 2 months ago

"guo" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"A the product was not in a place where it was easy to imagine it becoming an entire platform company. Like it's become and i was actually talking to another of your portfolio companies yesterday. I don't think he worked on the steel. Maybe you did but pratima the gaming engine some company. Yeah yes and i was talking to him and within the first few minutes i said look i have no idea. If there's any way i can get into your series b if i can put some money into your company but what you're doing is right where you're doing is correct and it almost doesn't matter that you're pre product team is insanely good. The vision is right. The strategy is right. I know the market well enough to know that you have zero other competitors. It's just a simple extrapolation exercise but it seems like that idea of the extrapolation. Exercise is still not widely understood by even some of the best investors. That i talked to so i think that there are different styles right and i love the way you described it which is imagination. I'm gonna steal that but it's it's like it's intelligent like risk adjusted imagination right and i think when i say it's hard to private the early stage part of the business. We have the most success with the most valuable companies when they are building companies. That do not look exactly like some other company like there's a very old school way to think about software markets is like well they're sierra and there's european and there's like epic right there's like a. There's an existing company that you go displace there's a market that you displace but i think the immagination that is required or that we like really have a philosophy around is mostly invested in b. two b. and sas and developer platforms right and so the best like simplest. Visual explanation is just the one that you know. The pie is getting a lot bigger right. So if you focus on like which slice of the pie does my. New company correspond to your. You're just not gonna have a lot of confidence and imagination and conviction for the future. Because you're like all the slices like they get divided the same way they used to be right but we think that there are thousands of slices and every slice of that pie is suddenly more relevant like the bigger because you have more customers more buyer personas like more addressable problems and then more value because of that and as an entrepreneur you actually have path dependent. Depends on where you start but you actually have so much more free will in terms of if you execute you can draw the lines of those markets differently than they have existed in the past. And so i think there's actually a piece of venture that's a lot less like pattern matching and a lot more like first principles imagination and there are many great investors who have different styles. But like that one is mine and like you instinctively are like. Oh i can see this but like there's not a company that looks exactly like proxima so you're imagining something that doesn't exist yet. Yeah and i guess a lot of it comes down to do you enjoy. Do you feel comfortable in models that you can build in spreadsheets relative to the imagination exercise if you're really really good at making those spreadsheets then maybe you should be like a private equity company as you said or be a very very late stage company where you can actually have a little bit of both a little bit of spreadsheets and a little bit of imagination. Yeah i think it's incredibly useful to understand the business quality of later stage companies. Because then you know what you are aiming for like you know what levers matter as you are helping somebody to build a business or as you identify like major decisions over but one of the cool things about like sas companies for a significant period of. I've been adventure for eight years so at least that period of time is like fundamentally. There's not a lot that makes a software company a weaker business right. You can have inefficient good market right. That's the major one that's very bad Right and if you look at the gross margin line like as a spreadsheet person. You're like okay. Like am. I doing a lot of compute right as a super data intensive company or does not that many that superstar intensive but is this a really compute intensive company. And then there's like basically like how much human labor is it gonna take to get something deployed right like support and sales engineering and all that but like software companies you build something and then you improve it but it is somewhat fixed cost amortization business and so like being good at like financial discipline and spreadsheets like it just doesn't matter as much as in some amazing operational businesses. I think those mixed mode businesses like an amazon for example or an uber like they're incredibly interesting and there will be more of them as like technology eats more industries. But there's this huge segment of businesses where like besides understanding like a couple of those elements i described. I just don't think being a great financials percent helps you an awful lot. And even the great gross stage investors like there as much market imagination and problem understanding like people evaluation. As i think financials coming back to a specific product category where you've invested to clubhouse the project management tool i see clubhouse in an interesting contrast to the newer categories of work productivity like. You've click up watch monday. Dot com might be actually older than clubhouse. But if you look at something like click up click up his interesting because they're trying to basically do everything like rather than just be project management. They're trying to do everything which is kind of a dangerous strategy but also kind of a crazy interesting strategy and then you see companies like some companies just manage their projects in different capacities. So i wonder on this category specifically this sort of project management and productivity tooling category. How do you see that unfolding in the future. And how does it change your investment strategy. Yeah so start again with like the pie is larger. I believe the pie is very large. And it's larger than many other people may be believe right and so if you ask me if the problem matters the problem is how do you as a team. That needs to deliver technology products organized. Like that's a super hard problem and more and more people are going to have that problem and with enormous respect people are not thrilled like a lot of people including me in a former life. We're not thrilled with like jira. And the solutions available to me right but let's go again to the spreadsheets. Like if you look at what public market investors believe even beyond me. They think that company is going to be like five to ten times. Bigger right over the next decade atlassian atlassian right and so In real quick what do you know. What percentage of revenue is jira to atlassian. I do not recall. I would guess more than half but they have. They have a good portfolio. Mix confluence as a super high attach rate. And so i'd say like that's an amazing business. But if you look at the growth of asana and monday and click up and clubhouse and then like more generic productivity tools. Even that people are using to solve these problems like clearly. The problem is not fully solved right and so then. The question is what happens in the landscape clubhouses. Rather i mean you've met. Kurt clubhouses rather focused perspective. That we want to both focus on software engineering teams who care about velocity quality collaboration. And that means that we're not serving many use cases that you might use a all in one management application for right like our entry point into teams is not gonna be like. I do marketing for a consumer packaged goods. Company don't use clubhouse for that right. And so i think what you can do is make a lot. If that is your focus you can make a lot of really magical experiences for that specific team and so i think that is much more similar to the original atlassian strategy than some of these new players. I do think that this is a market that will support multiple players. Because do you think about large companies that are becoming more technology. Centric right if.

pratima sas amazon Kurt
"guo" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

08:54 min | 2 months ago

"guo" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"Happy to be here. The pandemic has changed the world of business. What are the biggest new markets that were created as a result of the pandemic. So luckily for me. I feel like a lot of the areas. I was already interested. In or focused on just really came to the forefront so there are certainly winners and losers in the post pandemic world. But i think the obvious ones that. I have interest in our tools that enable us to work together differently in a digital first way e commerce infrastructure and just as it s sort of ancillary thing to that like fintech infrastructure for businesses. And if you think about more. Broadly like every business. Snb to enterprise becoming digital and then collaboration through digital that touches every category of software right. I think that not not just the things that we traditionally think of as collaboration. So you know video meetings or documentation or get hub but all of the cross-departmental or less technical departments. They also need to work in ways. That are more digital first. And so i think that's a multi decade change. That's going to happen. A few iconic examples of that in your portfolio are fig mma and clubhouse clubhouse the project management tool how has the growth in those products and the rapid product iteration in both those companies. Now has it represented a proxy on the overall knowledge economy. You know it's hard and you talk to a lot of companies that are early stage in growing. It's hard to disentangle the million things that are going on and say like this was the thing right. We did see a huge wave at both these companies and others that are very collaboration focused in terms of new company interest and usage growing at the beginning of the pandemic. Right if you think about your opportunity like the most basic example would of course be your opportunity to manage aboard of post. Its is challenged if you're all at home and so people were very willing to think about the new ways of managing that workflow and so i think it's certainly been a driver for both companies but i think one of the things that i'm most excited about is it's gone from. We have to do this to. This is better. And that i think shows in the growth of both companies the pandemic affected venture capital markets by moving everything to zoom there was also a concurrent defect of growing software markets. That were attracting. The larger players like tiger. And as you said it's it's hard to disentangle these sorts of things. But i love to get an impression for how that's been on the ground starting to compete with these really really big firms that move really really quickly in the world of zoom where you can take jillian meetings every day. How has it changed your investment cadence. So i'd say we already operated as a distributed team before the pandemics so there wasn't a lot that changed insert of how we made our decisions except that now we were looking at each other food. Zoom it was already happening before the pandemic right because even if you think about this is one of the original theses when i was making investments in sort of like hybrid and remote work tools like the bay area is not one easily commutable place as you would know yourself right and so we would do a partnership meeting with an entrepreneur and like the nice experience for the entrepreneur is not like drive down to menlo park right for a one hour meeting. It's if you want to do a meeting in person in the city at your office at our office in menlo park will do that if you want to a resume because that's convenient for you we'll do that. And so that clearly became the norm during the pandemic in terms of the competition from larger firms. Like the tigers of the world. I think what's happened. Intertwined with the pandemic and the growth of like digital businesses versus. Everything else is. Everybody has realized a much. Larger set of asset managers has realized in the public markets and the private equity fields. That technology businesses are amazing businesses. And basically everything is going to be a technology business eventually right in terms of the the largest value creators and it's just a massive advantage and so of course there's a huge influx of capital from larger players from different asset classes. I think the question is like where we play it. You know we are mostly an early stage focused firm right so five percent of our initial investments at gray lock our series companies these days and like even scrolling. I've been a girl out for eight years so five years back. There's not a lot of data that you're looking at at a seed or series as stage company when we invested in sigma. it was pre- product. Right it was pre beta and so your ability. I think like that part of the business is still differentiated. Because you have entrepreneurs who are choosing partners for a very long time and you have companies where the level of uncertainty in decision making is extremely high in the level of of data that you can outsource to a consulting firm to analyze very low right and i mean data and botha qualitative and quantitative fence. Right like it's very hard to make a series a investment based on twenty calls done by bain to an expert network. Because what are they going to say right. They're gonna come back to you with estimates of like you know there's x. numbers of designers in the world and like sketch in and vision and adobe or popular products right and so. I think like what we don't actually end up competing a lot with some of the very good investors that come from other asset classes because they are still most relevant at the growth stage. I think there's more that's happening with. People trying to move earlier and earlier but i think that is the toughest judgment piece of the business and then winning winning's a totally different thing. But if you just think about like our point of view on how you make money in early stage software investing. It's like okay. I believe that a problem is more important than others. Believe right design or project management for software right. I believe that a founder is going to grow and is going to win that others. Don't i believe that. A product is sufficiently differentiated to capture. Like time and dollars. Attention that others don't and i believe in opportunities where the higher price than others right i'd say like there's a lot more competition on this last dimension of higher price than we used to see but i think those other dimensions like i think the game is still pretty hard. I'm less concerned that the like skills and judgment of a very different style of technology investing that is an amazing asset class of its own are going to apply like basically like early stage venture of two guys gal dog and a laptop and a garage is very hard to private equity that there seems to be this element of imagination. That is really important at probably up to series. Be at least at this point. Where if you actually want to get into into one of these really really good companies at series air or seed. Either you have to have the best deal flow in the universe or you have to have really really good imagination like as you said with sigma even at series. A the product was not in a place where it was easy to imagine it becoming an entire platform company. Like it's become and i was actually talking to another of your portfolio companies yesterday. I don't think he worked on this deal. Maybe you did but pratima the gaming engine some company. Yeah yes and i was talking to him and within the first few minutes i said look i have no idea. If there's any way i can get into your series b. If i can put some money into your company but what you're doing is right where you're doing is correct. And it almost doesn't matter that you're pre product team is insanely good. The vision is right. The strategy is right. I know the market well enough to know that you have zero other competitors. It's just a simple extrapolation exercise but it seems like that idea of the extrapolation. Exercise is still not widely understood by even some of the best investors. That i talked to so i think that there are different styles right and i love the way you described it which is imagination. I'm gonna steal that but it's it's like it's intelligent like risk adjusted imagination right and i think when i say it's hard to private the early stage part of the business. We have the most success with the most valuable companies when they are building companies. That do not look exactly like some other company like there's a very old school way to think about software markets is like well you know they're sierra and there's a european and there's like epic right there's like.

menlo park Snb jillian bain pratima adobe
"guo" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

07:20 min | 2 months ago

"guo" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"For me. I feel like a lot of the areas. I was already interested. In or focused on just really came to the forefront so there are certainly winners and losers in the post pandemic world. But i think the ones that i have interest in our tools that enable us to work together differently in a digital first way e commerce infrastructure. And just you know as it. S sort of ancillary thing to that like fintech infrastructure for businesses. And if you think about more. Broadly like every business. Smb to enterprise becoming digital and then collaboration through digital that touches every category of software right. I think that not not just the things that we traditionally think of. As collaboration you know video meetings or documentation or get hub but all of the cross-departmental or less technical departments. They also need to work in ways. That are more digital first. And so i think that's a multi decade change. That's going to happen. A few iconic examples of that in your portfolio are fig mma and clubhouse clubhouse the project management tool how has the growth in those products and the rapid product at ration- in both those companies. How has it represented a proxy on the overall knowledge economy. You know it's hard you talk to a lot of companies that are early stage and growing. It's hard to disentangle the million things that are going on and say like this was the thing right. We did see a huge wave at both these companies and others that are very collaboration focused in terms of new company interest and usage growing at the beginning of the pandemic right. But if you think about your opportunity like the most basic example would of course be your opportunity to manage aboard of post. Its is challenged if you're all at home and so people are very willing to think about the new ways of like managing that workflow and so i think it's certainly been a driver for both companies but i think one of the things that i'm most excited about is it's gone from. We have to do this to. This is better and like that. I think shows in the growth of both companies the pandemic affected venture capital markets by moving everything to zoom there was also a concurrent effect of growing software markets. That were attracting the large players like tiger. And as you said it's hard to disentangle these sorts of things. But i love to get an impression for how that's been on the ground starting to compete with these really really big firms that move really really quickly in the world of zoom where you can take jillian meetings every day. How has it changed your investment cadence. So i'd say we already operated as distributed team before the pandemic so there wasn't a lot that changed sort of how we made our decisions except that now we were looking at each other foods zoom. It was already happening before the pandemic right because even if you think about this is one of the original theses when i was making investments in of hybrid and remote work tools like the bay area is not one easily commutable place as you would know yourself right and so we would do a partnership meeting with an entrepreneur and like the nice experience for the entrepreneur is not like drive down to menlo park right for a one hour meeting. It's if you wanna do a meeting in person in the city at your office at our office in menlo park. We'll do that if you want to do it over. Zoom that's convenient for you. We'll do that. And so that clearly became the norm during the pandemic in terms of the competition from larger firms. Like the tigers of the world. I think what's happened. Intertwined with the pandemic and the growth of like digital businesses versus. Everything else is. Everybody has realized a much. Larger set of asset managers has realized in the public markets and the private equity field. That technology businesses are amazing businesses. And basically everything is going to be technology business eventually right in terms of the the largest value creators and it's just a massive advantage and so of course there's a huge influx of capital from larger players from different asset classes. I think the question is like where we play it. We are mostly an early stage focused for right. Seventy five percent of our initial investments at gridlock are in series. Hey companies these days and like even scrolling. I've been girl for eight years so five years back. There's not a lot of data that you're looking at at a seed or series stage company when we invested in fig mma it was pre product right it was pre beta and so your ability. I think like you know that part of the business is still differentiated. Because you have entrepreneurs who are choosing partners for a very long time and you have companies where the level of uncertainty in decision making is extremely high and the level of data that you can outsource to a consulting firm to analyze very low right and i mean data and both a qualitative and quantitative fence. Right like it's very hard to make a series a investment based on twenty calls done by bain to expert network. Because what are they going to say right. They're gonna come back to you with estimates of like you know there's x. numbers of designers in the world and like sketch in and vision and adobe or popular products right and so. I think like what we don't actually end up competing a lot with some of the very good investors that come from other asset classes because they are still most relevant at the growth stage. I think there's more that's happening with. People trying to move earlier and earlier but i think that is the toughest judgment piece of the business. An winning winning's a totally different thing. But if you just think about like our point of view on how you make money early stage software investing. It's like okay. I believe that a problem is more important than others. Believe right design or project management for software right. I believe that founder is going to grow and is going to win that others. Don't i believe that. A product is sufficiently differentiated to capture time and dollars and attention that others don't and i believe in opportunities where the higher price than others right i'd say like there's a lot more competition on this last dimension of higher price than we used to see but i think those other dimensions like i think the game is still pretty hard. I'm less concerned that the like skills and judgment of a very different style of technology investing that is an amazing asset class of its own are gonna apply like basically like early stage venture of two guys a gal dog and a laptop garage is very hard to private equity that there seems to be this element of imagination. That is really important at probably up to series. Be at least at this point. Where if you actually want to get into one of these really really good companies at series air or seed. Either you have to have the best deal flow in the universe or you have to have really really good imagination like as you said with sigma even at series..

menlo park jillian bain adobe
"guo" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

04:42 min | 3 months ago

"guo" Discussed on Getting Curious with Jonathan Van Ness

"What would go waxing moon crescent moon day be like chin king and his family like in just a typical piece. Timah like e that word that you said. But i couldn't remember. Yeah that's so. I think the point here is to imagine what a king's life daily life was like. And i would think i think i'd seen him. Probably a was a early riser. That this this particular each and that they really because Environmentally speaking were not as for instance the coastal area the area. They probably have a much more relaxing life because the environmental was ritchie enough to support. You know a really broad base of of economy and so But the one way speak up cheang. That's northwest that's already bordering tibetan plateau toe and the fire and the los plateau and so they're environmentally. Speaking was a little bit tough so that requires people work. Really hard and really. Interestingly had that reputation of being being tough they eventually unify china One of the theories was about. This is a very hard working and tough group of people and the also makes two ways nor mass further nor north and west of them so i would imagine a king probably also get up quite early and a when they began to think about of to to really try to invasion that how i can go further east. How i can't begin to unified around how i'm going to strengthen ourselves She had later very famous reform. And a famous strategist and talks about To to become a stronger country become a stronger state. You need to do two things one is to. He reached a state. The other is to strengthen the army so and reached a state part. They really focusing agriculture. And so so. So i think taking together i would think on the pearl. The king would have to set up a example to to let the ministers his subjects of work harder than the king would also need to extend play fi. Whoa was kind of the collective goal was but beyond that is really difficult to imagine. What a typical day would be. I would say probably more than kind of just getting up. Get ready for the day There must be for instance depending on the day that say if days the first day of the month you're laid there's a lot of rituals of failure dead wave the season and particularly for the king that not only you are to hide off the state but also the height of your leeann h So you have obligations to people but also to your ancestors so you need to fulfill obligations and to the ancestors a lot of times that involves making sacrifices going to per wide as or even pure article report to ancestor. That have what you have done and continue to receive blessing from them. Sell so so i would imagine that you know. Possibly those obligations would favouring into a king. Stay a kings schedule as well Then possibly this is. Also the time states has a lot of diplomatic relations as while sometimes we know our invoice being sent from the king and the king had to receive those invoice. Not so different from today that the president and the intern receive dignitaries from the other states..

Timah today One each first day one two ways china tibetan plateau one way two things theories king chin
"guo" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

03:26 min | 4 months ago

"guo" Discussed on DNA Today

"Actual genetic insights today to benefit your family of tomorrow so it's exciting just to see like understanding just how it works and then saying okay now that we understand how it works how we can start targeting this to then help fix that in people so instead of having that thick sticky mucus almost like trying to trudge through mud. Instead you wanna have that nice water. It's much easier to get through water than it is. Mud of the analogy. I'm thinking about as you're talking and describing how the sillier works to get that debris out of our lung and not have it sitting there right exactly and then of course doing back to your question. About what other drugs on the market forces fibrosis now and because he is a multi system disease reedy. The patients have a lot of treatment burden to follow a very pretty extensive treatment. Redmi airy day to manage. They are sometimes for example. The altaic regularly the pancreatic enzymes because they help Insufficiency then you to take a fat soluble vitamins because the hell mouth. Absorption of this vitamins. And as i just mentioned allowed disease is the most common cause of mortality so taken care of their they are loans is vital for patients. In addition to antibiotics anti inflammatory drugs the yearly use multiple ways. Try to clear their early way to make the thick mucus less tiki and Thick and to hydrate the way on average see patient spent two hours per day receiving treatment yet to be still suffer from upon or exacerbating and their functions your peeps declining so there is significant amazon. Need for cf lung disease but new recent years. The great news is very exciting. On new class of drugs called the cfd fdr modulators that has been approved including clydach. Call i or camby. And most recently tripe aperture this cfc. Modulators compassionately restore the cfd our function for certain seattle-area mediations therefore providing a rea- transforming therapy to improve lung functions for those patients who are eligible for this treatment. But not all the patients can benefit from them. So as you mentioned yeah. Back in the days before nineteen fifties the cf. Kit's barely rarely lived to pass eight fi but now we talking about expectancy in the forties. So we are really treating more than half the the patients are now those which is really a big achievement. However they're still allow me to be down there to improve their survival further and to improve their quality of life especially for the long z's we and own owners are developing exciting. New therapy to do. just this. And so i own is developing a new. Cystic fibrosis drug. How is this going to be different than the drugs we've mentioned with collided co and the other ones that patients are currently taking. How is this going to be a different approach. Yeah we have very exciting drugging coloma and is turning the epithelial sodium channel or enac for treatment of lung disease berg. Saudi avowed edge a very similar to c. t. r..

amazon tomorrow today two hours before nineteen fifties collided co more than half Saudi eight fi Cystic fibrosis forties camby patients
"guo" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

04:25 min | 4 months ago

"guo" Discussed on DNA Today

"These are experts like genetic counselors researchers doctors and patient advocates to continue our cystic fibrosis series for the awareness month. We are joined by. Dr shula goes the of anti-sense drug discovery at iona pharmaceuticals which we heard from a few episodes ago veteran from pharmaceutical. So kind of tying it all together here and for those that may not have heard that episodes iona says the leader in a targeted drug discovery and development. Schilling is in charge of the drug discovery efforts in pulmonary cardio renal and metabolic areas. So thank you so much for coming on the show and sharing about cystic fibrosis with us. Think you'll Keira it's a pleasure to be here and for those that maybe didn't hear our first episode in the series. We talked about the book breath from salt. Which just give so much background information on. Cystic fibrosis i highly. Recommend it to anybody interested in genetics and medicine but for those that may just be tuning in that aren't as entrenched in genetics. And cystic fibrosis. What is bro says. How does it affect the body Cystic fibrosis all. Cf for sure is dallas being genetic disease. It's one of the most common life threatening inherited. Diseases affecting about seventy thousand people in the world and about half a witch in the united states have has been around for a long long time even in medieval times. They are were folklorist talking about if you kiss a childhood hey saudi. That child will soon die but it was not until the nineteen thirties that this disorder was recognized. Dr dorothy anderson who was a pathologist at that time working at a hospital in new york discovered any name. This disease cystic fibrosis. Since then there has been tremendous amount of research to understand the disease. develop diagnostic tools. And of course develop treatments for this disease when dr arnesen The disease he said something like fake on sticky mucus buildup in the lungs in the pancreas and auto owners leading to life threatening breathing and digestive problems so after so many years of research I think you made quite a bit breakthroughs. For example in nineteen fifty five. A sweat has to became available so this is to really measure the salt concentration in the sweat and this till today is still one of the gold standard for cf screening and then in nineteen eighty nine. The more likely cause of cf was discovered. It was found that it's the defect in the cfpb. G thou these two. Cf cfd are also known as cystic fibrosis. Trust member and conductors regulator Eighties gene to encode the protein again. See fdr this protein is a chloride channel sitting on the surface of the epithelial lining it regulates chloride and water transport to maintain the hydration of the epithelial surface. When the channel does not work or probably there will be mucus buildup That caused lung disease liver. Disease pancreatic insufficiency diabetes intestinal obstruction etcetera among this though the major cause of mortality and the mobility as lung disease. And with that. You're kind of talking about how the cf tr protein doesn't work so the ability for the mucus is not watery. So it's not easy to cough up so you end up instead having this thick sticky mucus that accumulates in the lungs and then can lead to. It's just a perfect breeding ground for bacteria which is often you know one of the most common health conditions that ends up happening for people that have cystic fibrosis of you know being hospitalized and treated for those infections and we were talking about that. There's just been so much development. Especially the last fifty years in terms of cystic fibrosis. As you said we've this has been a disease for as long as humans have probably existed or close to it..

new york Keira dorothy anderson shula first episode iona about seventy thousand people nineteen thirties today Eighties one united states arnesen about half a witch last fifty years two nineteen fifty five few episodes Dr nineteen eighty nine
"guo" Discussed on DNA Today

DNA Today

01:51 min | 4 months ago

"guo" Discussed on DNA Today

"What is bro says. How does it affect the body Cystic fibrosis all. Cf for sure is dallas being genetic disease. It's one of the most common life threatening inherited. Diseases affecting about seventy thousand people in the world and about half a witch in the united states have has been around for a long long time even in medieval times. They are were folklorist talking about if you kiss a childhood hey saudi. That child will soon die but it was not until the nineteen thirties that this disorder was recognized. Dr dorothy anderson who was a pathologist at that time working at a hospital in new york discovered any name. This disease cystic fibrosis. Since then there has been tremendous amount of research to understand the disease. develop diagnostic tools. And of course develop treatments for this disease when dr arnesen The disease he said something like fake on sticky mucus buildup in the lungs in the pancreas and auto owners leading to life threatening breathing and digestive problems so after so many years of research I think you made quite a bit breakthroughs. For example in nineteen fifty five. A sweat has to became available so this is to really measure the salt concentration in the sweat and this till today is still one of the gold standard for cf screening and then in nineteen eighty nine. The more likely cause of cf was discovered. It was found that it's the defect in the cfpb. G thou these two. Cf

sarah lawrence today sarah twenty five percent an hour and a half june second wednesday Lawrence june goto slc dot
Shuling Guo on Pharmaceuticals and Cystic Fibrosis

DNA Today

01:52 min | 4 months ago

Shuling Guo on Pharmaceuticals and Cystic Fibrosis

"What is bro says. How does it affect the body Cystic fibrosis all. Cf for sure is dallas being genetic disease. It's one of the most common life threatening inherited. Diseases affecting about seventy thousand people in the world and about half a witch in the united states have has been around for a long long time even in medieval times. They are were folklorist talking about if you kiss a childhood hey saudi. That child will soon die but it was not until the nineteen thirties that this disorder was recognized. Dr dorothy anderson who was a pathologist at that time working at a hospital in new york discovered any name. This disease cystic fibrosis. Since then there has been tremendous amount of research to understand the disease. develop diagnostic tools. And of course develop treatments for this disease when dr arnesen The disease he said something like fake on sticky mucus buildup in the lungs in the pancreas and auto owners leading to life threatening breathing and digestive problems so after so many years of research I think you made quite a bit breakthroughs. For example in nineteen fifty five. A sweat has to became available so this is to really measure the salt concentration in the sweat and this till today is still one of the gold standard for cf screening and then in nineteen eighty nine. The more likely cause of cf was discovered. It was found that it's the defect in the cfpb. G thou these two. Cf

Cystic Fibrosis Dr Dorothy Anderson BRO Dr Arnesen Dallas Saudi United States New York Cfpb
Virtual eviction hearings can make horrible situations even worse

Marketplace Tech with Molly Wood

03:15 min | 10 months ago

Virtual eviction hearings can make horrible situations even worse

"Millions of americans remain unemployed in this pandemic and can't pay their rent so people are being evicted. All over the country eviction hearings have moved to zoom or webex or even the phone to limit the spread of covid nineteen in courtrooms but some tenants advocates say. The virtual hearings violate people's rights. There aren't procedures in place for people who don't have broadband access for example translators that would be required in court aren't required online. Eileen guo is a senior reporter on tech policy ethics and social issues at mit tech review. She's been reporting on this and she described a hearing she attended in jackson county missouri. I listened in on a hearing where the person was the victim to end being affected by phone. The lawyer for the landlord was appearing. I video and the judge was by video and her call and her hearing was interrupted three times because the call was dropped she was trying to present evidence so paper documents that no one could see and on the other hand the landlord and the judge where referring to documents that have been submitted in advance that she couldn't see the judge herself recognized that this was such an issue that when she was scheduling the hearing for another ten. That was calling in. She suggested that she appear in person. Because appearing virtually disadvantage her. It seems like it's confusing and also like this feels like it's not a good way to do work in some cases right like it's not always even a good way to do a meeting let alone and addiction like how did it come to this so in theory courts moving to video conferencing could have been a good thing it was meant to be a public health measure so the cares act allowed for courts to to think about whether or not they wanted to allow more actions and more court procedures to be virtual to prevent the spread of covid nineteen in these small courtrooms as well as in the hallways by it kind of goes against the spirit of the cdc eviction moratorium which was passed in early september which specifically was looking to prevent evictions because there are clear links between housing instability and covid nineteen right but what if anything did courts due to accommodate people who don't have reliable internet or have no internet access at all. It's not really clear what courts have done to to make this process more accessible and it's really a court by core and in some case judged by judge decision there have been courts that have said that they are making greater accommodations for people with disability. That are appearing that they are providing interpreters that if as a tenant that is appearing in these courts you have some issue you can email the court in advance and express these issues to them but all of that kind of assumes that there's the space lied access to technology which in a lot of cases just is not the case that was eileen grow a senior reporter at mit tech review many statewide eviction moratorium sephardi past and unless lawmakers extended the federal eviction. Moratorium is set to expire december. Thirty first

Eileen Guo Mit Tech Review Jackson County Missouri CDC Mit Tech Eileen
Trump Fund-Raiser Elliott Broidy Charged in Lobbying Case

The Daily Beans

00:45 sec | 1 year ago

Trump Fund-Raiser Elliott Broidy Charged in Lobbying Case

"The DC District Court has charged former deputy RNC finance chair Elliott Brady with conspiracy to act as a foreign agent today in connection to the Jolo and Pros Michelle One MD be case we've been following for over a year now. He lobbied the trump administration on behalf of Malaysian Chinese interests an indication he is likely to soon plead guilty in the case to resolve the allegations against him looks like he's going to cooperate. Prosecutors unsealed thirty one page information against Brady on Thursday outlining how they believe he took millions in undisclosed money to end a US investigation into Malaysian corruption and separately to return outspoken Chinese exile Guo one way to his home country. A criminal criminal information is a type of charging document typically reserved for those who've agreed to plead guilty. In

Elliott Brady Malaysian Chinese Michelle One Md Dc District Court RNC GUO United States
Faking IAB-compliant downloads

podnews

03:06 min | 1 year ago

Faking IAB-compliant downloads

"Can Be compliant download numbers. The faked Antony Guo thinks. So indeed he's built contraption for about two hundred and ten dollars. Theoretically. Fake thirty thousand downloads a month. If you're really determined and quite technical, he's documented how he did it and how podcast hosts can detect. We've linked to its today from show notes and Dr Newsletter. It's a national podcast day September thirtieth, but it's already September thirtieth in some parts of the world. So bunch of live presentations happening right now, you can watch for free at international PODCAST Day Dot Com Hindenburg is planning a set of free workshops and a forty percent discount for Hindenburg products that's on now and tomorrow the match talk podcast network and founder Jason Bryant will be hosting a fourteen hour. Wa. livestream interviewing and showcasing wrestling podcasters from around the US. College High School in Olympic style of wrestling the drama that is sports entertainment were told a livestream starts at nine. AM central time. Love the podcast you're listening to Daniel J Lewis has added a new feature to my podcast reviews cold, love the podcast and it'll help your listeners give reviews for your podcast linking to the right platform for their device. If you'd like to see an example, thank go to love the podcasts dot com slash news because you. Apple spending money on podcast advertising McClellan I has published list of US podcast advertisers who increase spend the most in August. Apple spent three hundred eleven thousand dollars on advertising according to the company all for that Apple News plus products. The twenty two thousand discover pods awards are open nominations the fourth annual awards fan nominated fan voted without a paywall. We've only got two weeks to nominate your favorites though Pushkin Industries has a nice new website that like you to know another podcast APP in India Kuku FM has a number of podcasts as well as live radio and music and congratulations to the podcast global summit who set a Guinness World Record in August for the largest attendance for virtual podcasting conference. In one week, we're told Guinness, wanted at least five thousand attendees to set the record and they achieved five, thousand and three. Well. And pocano Kaczynski's it's fine to hit from millionaires financial whiz kids about what to do with money. But better the hear from real experience small change money stories from the neighborhood highlights smarts practical and collaborative money skills develops by people living with lower an unstable incomes new from NPR news in Minnesota. Horror Narration podcast creepy is launching their thirty one days of horror series beginning on October. The first series will new chilling tale each day of the month culminating in a special episode on Halloween against more than a million downloads a month we're told,

Antony Guo Apple United States Pocano Kaczynski Guinness NPR College High School Daniel J Lewis Founder Dr Newsletter Jason Bryant Pushkin Industries India Kuku Fm WA. Minnesota
"guo" Discussed on Inspirado Projecto

Inspirado Projecto

12:00 min | 1 year ago

"guo" Discussed on Inspirado Projecto

"Pick up those kind of lighting effects of those kinds of color. Palettes choose Yeah so I want to do the same same. I Game Now. I have my Chelsom. I rather scruff this trump. It's so cool to be able to add those kinds of things in there. For instance I I was just reminded of in In the Game Thimble Weed Park. They The first time you've played it. They they had an arcade there that was closed but As as the game was out there esteem. I guess you can do updates which I didn't know so. They will do these. Updates to the games of the game was ever evolving so to speak they would add extra little levels and stuff will one of the things that they added was. They opened up the arcade. So then you could actually go into the arcade and play. Play the Games within the GAME RIGHT RIGHT. But the post like what? A satisfying is just a satisfying thing. Like it really gives you the opportunity to live in that world. I think that's what's so great is like when you're when you're in a world that you really enjoy exploring and you just WanNa live in there like I remember playing Gosh which one was Corinna of time the Zelda on I think it's an intangible sixty four or something Corinna time. Oh my God I love just running around. And that world running around in that world as as link in just happened on the horse and just going up into the mountains and it was so satisfying like Red Dead Redemption. Like those kind of games. Where you just get on the horse and off you go off you go and you just want off the game because the detail of just the Horse Riding on saga it can make a game out of his own. Yeah Yeah just that aspect like you could just do that. And that's just you know. Go off go off and do that and you can do a mission if you want. You don't have to do mission. We could just ride ours and Yeah I think that's what holds me in a lot of these players to continue playing some of these video games where it just. It's that world that I just do not want to come out of and It must be so satisfying for you to see your. I mean to see your art loot around the people can move your your your little characters around yes. I think this is one of the researchers to study animation. When I I in the university I I like joining since I was young but able to turn your joining into like moving images. It's it's even such as fine. It's like in creating like you are God. You're creating a new beings Just by you know repeating this rains so it it comes to life. He started working so I I find the idea of being Like you have total control. But you also you are not Part of it so Yeah Yeah what. What if it come alive it kinds of has its own will so you just do whatever it tells you to do? Yeah I loved it I loved it. I it's I mean you must just get such a kick out of seeing these different minds utilizing your little characters that you've created in there just to have them climb up the ladder or having a push this button. Pull this lever. It's a lot of work. Yes but the mall on animation said we crate for the character. The more vivid The Celtic become almost feels like He or she has been living in the word really let the nipped in the world and we just has this opportunity to to get to know them. Yeah like the whole. I love that whole Library Room you guys have such unique levels and I just love how the fact that it just keeps growing. It keeps climbing climbing and climbing and climbing. You're going holy cow and then next thing you know you're like in this little spaceship thing going between little floating rock planets. That was like once you figured out the behavior that that was fun. And Oh man you just you just provide so so much Fun Exploration of their. Thank you I. I have to give the credit to My teammate and also so many other Games we've played as player because we learn all these Game Design language cinematic language from all the previous Film and animation. We ever watched a without those studies. All those experienced relatives pulse twenty something years that we were not be able to come up with ideas like this. So I as I say that There's nothing truly original our say of butts because it's also a game that designed by us so it's unique in a way that It has our four of US unique stem to it Now for Luna the shadow does to are the other if you could just state their names again in what their what. Their jobs jobs are on this. Your fellow teammates Fox as our project manager. Along Guan is our program as Susie is our Muse Component. This is stoning that it's just that's just a few of you there who put together this entire video game. I mean that's that's just like you gotTa really feel astounded about that. 'cause you see you see some of these games and there's just lists and lists lists of all these of all these people in a craft it your own way you all. Did it your own way I. This is sometimes we find is unbelievable to to achieve this much off of work in in the end Also I have to say that we also had a lot of help from from our friends and families and Our publisher and our like marketing expert George and Like Suzy's husband. He kind of just voluntarily help us so so much on the coding side and point out the bugs to us so Yeah it's not only have four people but the people behind us I think there's hugeness also kickstarter. We had a kick starter in two thousand sixteen. There's one thousand and attempt Bekker's nouns. That's that's their first Does their funding and trusting us to to make lunar have this I to be kickstarted our say otherwise without a phone day in the beginning we won't be able to make a game in this scale like this. Wow I mean this is just So such such an awesome undertaking. You've done here and I mean Gosh Beatty. This is just so cool that that we got a chance to talk. I mean is there anything else that you'd like to promote or tell folks about or you know maybe you've got projects in the past that you want to point point people towards our let me think So if if no one was listening of Luneta shadow does You can find find his game on multiple platforms you can find among final steam on. Gawk DOT com a humble style MAC APP stall and window Staw Also this game as available for Windows Mac and Olympics so I heard there are not many games made available for the Knicks so we had some requests things very beginning and we saw yes. If we have the opportunity we would like to make this available gray. Wherever using the Knicks as well Josh at school. They're going to be very appreciative of that. That's awesome as many platforms as possible. Our next task will be tried to cover the council over the the mobile bit Yeah so I we really appreciate because there's so much so many help we we received Surrou- The years from everywhere so this is only weekends. We can contribute back to the society and the we are really blessed to be able to finish. This game is already a success to the team so if people like it and people like you who love to discuss the detail of with us like a. We feel like this is our culture. This is so cool. Well thank you so much for taking time out of your out of your busy schedule. Now especially now that you have a whole new level. You know that you're that you're entering into here. Yes that's right. That's right that's right. We feel well. I can't speak for others but I feel saw unqualified to call myself a game designer. This is only our first game. I know it. It takes four years but it is only still the hour. I can and I can. I know fully aware of their lot of Bits in the game that we could make it better and We either because of our technique. Our ability is not a strong enough so we really appreciate all sorts of kind of criticism that people sensu US and Yeah and we will take from there. We trying to improve ourselves and probably offended future. We'RE GONNA make another game we're GONNA definitely learn from experience like this was such a valuable journey while I look forward to seeing. What other kinds of interesting in crazy things come out of you know both this game in all the games the future off? I'm I'm looking forward to our. Apd Will I'm going to Save this and I'll put this out in a two parts so be a two part podcast and I really looking forward to listen to that and will share his podcast to everyone our social media. I love it. Thank you so much I will too and you you take care. Have a great day in and hello to everybody on the team and This is just Such a blast and I'm going to go back and replay this game so I could find that that secret room. You're talking about. Just send us a message where we'll help you love it. Okay good okay yes it's At the my pleasure to be on your show thank you so much for talking to big you take care again by by to there you go folks. That was beatty. Guo the animator of Luna the shadow. Dust my gosh. What a good game would good game this black beans and you're listening to Inspir- auto project though..

Game Thimble Weed Park Knicks US Chelsom Gosh Beatty Inspir Guo Apd Susie Bekker Fox publisher project manager Josh George Suzy
"guo" Discussed on Inspirado Projecto

Inspirado Projecto

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"guo" Discussed on Inspirado Projecto

"Good Day to you folks the interview. You're about to you here here here here about the interview. You're about to hear here is part two of an interview that I started. Maybe about a month ago before all this craziness started with the pandemic this is Betty Guo. She is an art director of this Amazing Video Game Luna the shadow dust. You can find it on steam very cool. It's one of those great point and Click Adventure Games. The art is fantastic. It's mesmerizing the music phenomenal. Accompanies the mood perfectly. The concept awesome so this woman is going to explain the creation process. As you know this podcast is all about creation process which I absolutely love away finding out the seeds that are planted and how it grows into a forest so this this will give you some insight will in addition to the creative process. You also find out what it's like to make a video game what goes into it and a lot of us play these video games but very rarely do we really think about what the heck goes into making this thing took them five years to put this this a phenomenal little creature together. Now it's out there in the world for for people to play into enjoy and without further ADO. Here we go. You know this I think with with this game here Lunar the shadow dust. I think what this game. It is going to become one of those things as you know. Throughout the years as people continue to look at it more and more as as kids play it early on their associated little kid you know but then as they grow older and they go back to play it again. They're going to start really looking at the symbols and really looking deepen into Yeah it's it's so amazing like just what? I was looking on the ceiling there when I was trying to do the seasons. An showing me like the little hints and clues started going. Oh and I started matching up in my brain. Oh I got a match. You know the flower to this thing or that thing you know and then it helped me understand. Oh dance what's going on. Oh that's what they're asking me to do. And it felt that reward only came from having to study the the awesome art that you got in there. You know that's you can only have that victory when you look deep into that and go. Hey wait a second. There's a pattern emerging and it just feels so great. I think everyone no matter. What are your adult already. All your your kids. There's always a sentence faction when you discover something has a pattern to follow. Yes yes because this if everything is out of older our award it's kind of it's a chaos and cost us to panic so as a human being we naturally join towards anything or that you have patently follow so I guess this is one of the main reason people like play puzzle to to prove them to prove to themselves that the way of thinking is shared with design. Wow it's it's so interesting just to think of all the brainstorming That had gone into creating this and all the minds that took to put this together and all the you know the hours of drawing it out there and then put music in there and just all of that and just to think that all of those great vibes are stamped into the game and when people go to play that game they feel those vibes. They feel that mysterious and that intrigue and it draws them in closer and I really hope that people like you. So like talking to player like you feel strove a rewarding.

Betty Guo
Better Late Than Never? Big Companies Scramble To Make Lofty Climate Promises

NPR's Business Story of the Day

04:40 min | 1 year ago

Better Late Than Never? Big Companies Scramble To Make Lofty Climate Promises

"A growing number of companies have announced plans to tackle climate change and it is not just companies with eco-friendly reputations. Npr's Camilla Domino reports that. These companies are responding to pressure on multiple fronts. Helping the planet is good for business. That's what Elizabeth Sirkin. The Environmental Defense Fund has been telling corporate leaders. We can't exist as people and we can exist as businesses without clean air clean water a stable climate. She started delivering that message. Twenty years ago it was so fundamentally obvious to me. I really felt like business would just get this. She figured CEO's would cut emissions governments would set new climate policies and she didn't need to get a new job. I never thought that this many years later I would still be doing. This turns out helping. The planet did not seem like the obvious move too many. Ceo's but there are signs of a shift. More companies are now promising to cut more carbon and to do it more quickly. And there's an acceleration in the number of companies setting so-called science based targets in line with the global agreement. The Paris Accord Kevin. Moss runs the Center for Business Sustainability at the World Resources Institute. It's a small fraction of the overall proportion of businesses. But it's lodge impactful companies like Guo. Mott's Light Target Light Hilton Hotels. So what changed while the effects of climate change are becoming clearer not as a future risk but something happening right now at the same time solar and wind energy keep getting cheaper and there's more pressure from investors and from customers from some governments. There might be some more surprising sources of pressure to like kids. Here's Elizabeth Sirkin again. I hear from business leaders all the time today that you know their kids come home and say what are you doing dad? This makes a difference. Employees are increasingly influential to Cam. Kim runs an APP. Called Blind. Tech workers can talk to each other about their workplaces and he says they're increasingly discussing issues like climate change. People talk a lot of compensation of course and the work culture but I think this is a whole new segment in a survey half. His users said companies climate policy affects whether or not they want to work their employees investors customers science. All of that played a role in Microsoft's recent decision to go beyond carbon neutral and pol more carbon dioxide out of the air then. The company admits but chief Sustainability Officer. Lucas Java says there's another factor too. He says it's helped to frame this as an accounting problem. And that really is what I see. Flip executives mindsets around is to just talk about this in terms that they understand talking about a carbon budget quantifying. Exactly how much companies emit and how much they'll need to cut at the end of the day. What companies are really good at doing is making decisions based on numbers of course setting carbon budget is one thing sticking to it is another and some experts say there could be a danger in relying on big corporations to drive the fight against climate change. Chilanga Baker is a professor at Northeastern University who studies the social justice dimensions of transition away from fossil fuels she says communities especially vulnerable and marginalized communities should have a say in the fight against climate change and feel the benefits of a switch to green energy. I'm just not sure if I have the faith given that you know. Corporations are very concerned about expenses and profits that they would really think about something that may add cost but that may be more just Baker says commitments from companies can definitely be powerful but she says government policy can make sure. Vulnerable populations are protected. She's not the only one who looks at these voluntary commitments and sees a need for regulation after all some companies taking action is nowhere near enough to stop climate change Elizabeth's Durkan who spent two decades urging companies to act. She's asking them to do more than just cut their own emissions. It's really critical to engage. The policymakers corporations from BP to Pepsico say they support a price on carbon sturgeon says companies. That really want to lead on climate need to put money towards advancing those policies Camille Domino ASCII NPR news.

Elizabeth Sirkin NPR CEO Lucas Java Camilla Domino Environmental Defense Fund Chief Sustainability Officer Chilanga Baker KIM Mott Center For Business Sustainabi Paris Microsoft Moss CAM Pepsico
"guo" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

16:33 min | 2 years ago

"guo" Discussed on Technovation with Peter High (CIO, CTO, CDO, CXO Interviews)

"We're going to make this really easy for you to consume in the sea of other things you how we're just not a complete answer but I think is a good philosophical approach. and the last is just a gut explosion of innovation at the reality is that the innovation and German in security has for longtime been younger startups scenario of constant acquisition and it's just an area where the pace of changes changes so fast it was quite hard for large vendors to keep up in general in so. I actually would say it is I bet on a per head count basis security d teams deal with like more products than and other teams in technology and so I think it's actually going to be a competency for security teams to like be really good at dealing with a fragment landscape and constant innovation. I think that's true in the overall technology organization but it's especially acute insecurity and say like the promise of Dimiss del on what they could do for their customer base and now Powell. Does it really was like Oh we have to deal with the secondary effects of this rapid explosion in innovation because a big important concept D'Amato was like let's integrate all these products that you have tried to automate some of the workflow across them so your security team. It doesn't need to learn every new product that you interesting so sometimes we are directly address the problem that you're talking about too as a customer problem negative negative that means that I mean obviously there. There are some companies that have been particularly inquisitive space. There was something worse themselves security behemoths who continued to acquire the companies to fill in gaps in their over our portfolio there some companies that have security like Cisco for example has a security arm that is itself injury visited but I think I'm hearing you say that the pace of change need remain current the the need to to pick quickly as opportunities or threats for that matter the redressing that become opportunities to the security the company in some ways. It's it's more difficult for the behemoths that are growing these portfolio companies which theoretically ought to be the easiest or easier for four major enterprises to engage one stop shop for all your solutions insecurity. Yeah part of what you're saying is the problem with engaging with companies when he's like that is as they get larger their ability to have that entrepreneurial spirit to pivoted appropriately to seize opportunities to recognize changes in the landscape and so forth actually that size and scale actually works against their ability to do so perhaps more so than other areas and technology absolutely I. I think you know don't get me wrong. There are large security. Vendors are like really competent organizations that I have a ton of respect for but I'd also say security is is like is an area of technology where like fifty percent good enough doesn't do very much good right so oh you block fifty percent of attacks like how do you tell the board that right and so. I think a part is just these structural problem which is like if I think everybody deserves the best software at good value across the entire Technology Organization Inc but you can actually get by with you know twenty percent less usable software in some scenarios Orios if there is like really good benefits to centralization and integration of data in some software ecosystems insecurity. I think the challenges on some of the large security and systems vendors with a bunch of products. They haven't integrated them very well so you don't get the benefit of like Oh. This stuff works together magically and it's it's actually easier to handle because it's a bunch of products and to like if it only works fifty percent as well as we were talking about it. Just doesn't that's not good enough right. It's interesting image nerve gas and some of the way I think about our as it's in some cases these gateway to our. Ai I ultimately they are all the generally in a similar set of topics. I know is that as the biggest wraps of those three topics area you're getting more involved in your part of the Ai Ai Fund Andrew Meetings and fund and I'd be curious with your own perspectives on where we are in the state of artificial intelligence intelligence is adoption. It's sort of value creation. Obviously we're quite a ways MOS. Most people hypothesized runways from or visual general intelligence but there's a lot of there's a lot happening in the world today. I already created tremendous value for your presence in the region where you're where you're only on the opportunities related curly yeah I. I actually think we're just at the beginning of discovering like what the different bottlenecks to enterprise adoption are right and I do think. RPI Is is like an interesting entry point into broader automation within the enterprise but one belief that I have just from studying a little bit of like startup and business history in the technology field is that you you have air like you have eras of core took knowledgeable and infrastructure innovation and then like products and consumption gets absorbed after that right and so we've had this amazing airy very era of innovation in core machine learning and I think the the very large consumer internet companies who whose entire business could get boiled down to a single algorithm or two that really moved the bottom line so oh you know if I show you this photo instead of this other photo in your feed you are more likely to continue looking at the social network and I can show I will have more ad inventory inventory if I showed this ad versus this other add the click through rate is x versus x minus point. Oh one percent and that represents like tons of money to the bottom line of some of the consumer Internet companies and it was an area where these these consumer companies just had had a ton of data and a ton of relatively modern infrastructure great engineers a ton of financial incentive to go like get that algorithm to be as fast and adoptive and accurate as they could and so I think that's one of the reasons that they adopted machine learning faster than others. It's really complicated to boil down most businesses to that one algorithm and people's infrastructure isn't as unified as an internet company builds just last time for fifteen years general and so I think because this massive you've investment in machine learning and advancement from both the consumer Internet companies and the academic community has happened over the last five or six years now like the rest of the the rest of the business and technology ecosystem Kengo reap the benefits right so you have tensor flow and all these open source frameworks frameworks a research papers that are continually published about you know better and better model architectures discoveries in machine learning and and because people have realized how valuable Afield MLK could be and it's very inspirational. I mean there are secondary effects on the workforce as well as we were just talking about but just because it's an area of such high interest and you also get a broader and broader set of people both in the engineering community who now now understand how to work with machine learning and coming out of the education system who actually like the the number of people who have some sort of a m. L. Degree is a multiple higher than it was three years ago even right and I think like these resources the open source the research the amount of talented understands how that is going to open doors for the rest of the business community to take advantage of it and so now I think what we're seeing is okay so I think like what are the bottlenecks to enterprises actually getting value out out of machine learning. We're discovering that there's sort of an end to end developers stack for machine learning applications that is missing and the data that people have for machine learning is not exactly in the form that that they needed to be in right a and so you know just core supervised machine learning being able to take tagged input data and translate it into outputs is going to be applicable across a huge amount of different fields but people don't have that tagged they don't have that label data right and so. I think just zeroing in on where the bottlenecks are in developing machine. Learning applications is ruth the next up and I think a lot of that is like a see the the sort of different areas were gridlock could be investing is sort of machine learning native co-responsible applications that try to just do more work for US based on the data in those applications vertical machine learning native applications which pushes through the same thing but they get deeper into vertical workflow use different data understand different business problems and then the infrastructure to make this easier for people people who need to build custom models and I just think we're we're still early in all of it sent to which years of our PA L. were generally speaking. You talk about understandable the development of Algorithms in some cases to do what humans have traditionally done so taking the process for example all that is repetitive Arbeit essentially eliminating the need for that the algorithms themselves are were cert- developed by people and it's been a lot of of course about the inherent biases and someone of each of those and there are some who are who are hypothesis that as we're developing essentially virtual servers. I we also have a need for evaluations. Those virtual workers almost like we would do for our employees how doing which ones are improving making. It's better which ones are not firing of those as a result of of of just the quality of decisions are being the quality of the data. That's free presented to make decisions and I'm curious. If that's something you've you've thought into in terms of the extent to which this replicating taking place or some of the things that people would would typically could you think about those almost kind of part of your staff. If you will truly New Orleans yeah I think the I think the vendors like to use news on the robot as human replacement analogy I think holding some ways and in others right and wait hold is like you are off looting tasks from humans and so you know if you have a really good. RPI program that you can reduce headcount and re staff to other higher value tasks but I think the the bought what's that people have in RPA deployments. Today are really not very intelligent and so they don't learn very well so your evaluation one of them humans dealer very well right and so these bots that are the industry standard across any of the large vendors today. Hey there's nothing to measure yet. I do think that as as the products in this automation area progress it's a really interesting concept but I think what what people are really realizing as they go through. These efforts is hey. My accounts payable process that I think is eight. Steps is really a hundred and thirty four steps across these six different financial systems and like really twenty five percent of it is exceptions to what I think the core processes and the people people at have an accounts payable they are very good at handling all of those exceptions in so I can put a gun to offload the repetitive native work that they are doing and maybe that handles twenty thirty sixty percent of cases but they're just handling it in a really static way right right and so I think the way I would probably measure an RPI effort is like how much of the process can I get coverage love right. How many exceptions are there and how much maintenance is there. I think is a really of that is a way to measure like. Is it learning or not but my my belief is that these are not actually learning very much today. We're still I think they're definitely valuable to the business because as you said it's really a a forcing function to get to more future automation but I just don't think that they're very sophisticated today and their ability to adapt to application application change or process change so I hope five years from now what you're talking about. The management and visibility visibility into performance will be an interesting opportunity because we actually bought better things over time not yet I. Am. One of the underlying themes across the discussion is the dynamism technology how fast things are changing Tom and how best to seize the opportunities as they do. I'm curious how you remain informed in topics is dynamic ones. We're talking about how you get. Sharon reed on the changing landscape and texture hypotheses. I of course that begins with your colleagues and also it benefits. I'm sure tremendously I having a tidal wave of entrepreneurs coming across the desk from you sitting in Brussels desperately rather frequency in understanding their own sort of hypotheses Aziz and theses discussing with you but generally speaking honey so I'd say first I scoped the problem which you can't know enough off about everything right and so I think myself is rather t shaped where like I want to have a relatively comprehensive the framework of the macro of what's happening technology and especially what's happening in the enterprise landscape and within that then there are certain areas were on like really excited to dig deep with entrepreneurs and I spent a lot of time with customers practitioner so I think that the reality about the enterprise technology space is There actually isn't that much high quality content that you can just go consume is one of the reasons I love your podcast right because these are these are learning that you can't really just go and take you really have to get them from practitioners or from entrepreneurs for nurse from people who have lived in that environment because they're not written and talked about that much and so. I- anyone time probably have three or four your thesis areas where I think there's something missing in the market. I'd probably came to that original conclusion or the beginning of that conclusion by talking to do a Smart Practitioner entrepreneur about an area and getting to some adjacent idea or some problem that they're trying to solve them as one of the reasons. I actually really love working. Enterprise surprise technology like is basically problem solving right and so I think unlike the consumer side where I think you're more of both than anthropologist first and as of instinctual product percent on the enterprise side you're really just trying to understand different organizations like what's changing in the landscape and the technology practitioner listener and then saying like what are your most important problems right if you're in sales.

RPI D'Amato Powell Technology Organization Inc Ai Ai Fund Smart Practitioner entrepreneu Cisco US Sharon reed Brussels ruth New Orleans Aziz Tom RPA fifty percent
"guo" Discussed on The TryPod

The TryPod

03:30 min | 2 years ago

"guo" Discussed on The TryPod

"Oh hell, yeah. With the spit valve, there's if there's a Tina Guo who does cello. And she like fucking goes, she's the sexiest cellist famous jealous. She is someone from your high school famous cellist, and she is just so sexy when she plays she's in it into it, and it's like so passionate interest an extension of her pays a packing your Mark and get it too. Yeah. Yeah. Yeah. Mozart in the jungle they cast the lead actress, as an oboe player that was a curious choice. The least sexiest duck. Yeah. Work hard, generate a sex appeal. What's your in Connecticut? Oh, I guess I like people that, that I can laugh with, you know, your turn on my all of us all of you. Oh, yeah. I mean I like going out to dinners like candle restaurants and just laughing. Like romance, romance. You'd like watching fifty shades of grey, you like romantic cheese. Yeah. I'm into the. Yeah. Is fifty shades romantic or is it just like? Romance is. You know. Whole movie fuck and seen a lot of like. Wow. Oh my God. Touching sexy early on just out of frame a little more. More. This is an audio experience, not even the videos, capturing that, but yeah, I'm turned on get it. What's the sexiest are real like kinks, just things that we find attractive, I when people's hands tied behind him? Yeah. We could get into bedroom kings. But this was a more fun PG. I'll give one that's like a borderline. And I've been very quiet do what is in formation? We'll see how steak on top of naked. I have this. I have like these old ratty pairs of underwear they're like these, like, super baggy boxers. And to me, like, in my mind there, my sexy underwear. I just like him. They're like, they're the ugliest things I owned, they like have holes in them because I've had them for like a decade now. But I just they make me feel nice. They turn you on. They don't turn me on that way. But they're like they're my sexy underwear. What I call them. And so I think of them miles Notting said you know what I mean? I've got some sexy underwears. I wear. They're usually like tight around me pretty basic. But if I whether the newer, I feel very confident for mine's the opposite old ratty one, maybe like the office of the fabric. The hottest wearing is sweat pants with. No underwear. Oh, that's in fact, I can't wear sweatpants, anywhere. Like I'm too naked. No. I to me is like, there's, there's no separation. That's the fun. That's what's great too risky. To read outside. That's what I mean. I can't do it. I was this office once and I'm like this is a fucking time. I'd never wear you guys. You guys know that I match my underwear and socks every day, I get like OCD about it. What are we wear in? I. Match. My undoing remember, wait. Let me see what today..

Tina Guo Mozart Connecticut Notting
The Billionaire and the Mayor Disrupting Taiwan's Elections

The Economist: The Intelligence

00:20 sec | 2 years ago

The Billionaire and the Mayor Disrupting Taiwan's Elections

"Taiwan's richest man has joined the country's presidential race Terry Guo founded Foxconn, a manufacturing giant that makes phones and lots more but much Mr. blows business is based in China, his rags to riches story may charm some, but he'll struggle to shake the perception that he's cozy with Taiwan's biggest geopolitical threat.

Taiwan Terry Guo Foxconn MR. China
"guo" Discussed on The Queen's Court

The Queen's Court

03:44 min | 2 years ago

"guo" Discussed on The Queen's Court

"Like about sleep with. I'm not one of those girls, right because it's been no my sex life that no my my social media presence doesn't interfere with my six life at all. So I get out of cake and other holiday, it may it may be perceived that you are I can't top every booth that I wanted to. But that doesn't from topping. Good. I mean, but it doesn't stop me from doing what I do. Way. This about I this is going to be about you. You're the guests so way. Wait a minute here. All right into me. So there's people have perceived to be about him. And then you went through their word aimlessly out or they are out. I will never get the opportunity because of my social media because you also should meet at your some people are little aperture. Here's the deal you give dead online. So how you trying to get this person? You know what I'm saying? So their own from that'd be working. Oh, so you trying to. My thing. This is the thing for me. This is the problem that I have with with with hetero normative idea. Allergy? I Couldn't Spell it backwards. But here's the thing. The problem that I have with those situations is we're we're rainbow. We're gay these things we don't have to subscribe to any of that bullshit. Okay. But you have what appear heels bitching a big motherfucking did. 'cause I'm one of the girls has a pair of heels in a big. Trace few fleet tire Korea warned trades out. This is the thing like I've got black because you know, I use my piece like what makes the woman like like a woman is a woman, regardless if she uses herpes if if my makeup artist identifies as what baby she's she identifies as a lesbian and. She has a scrap. She likes crap she may use threat. She made you hold on. This thing is heels. My Marcus don't have this conversation. But you have to have to every week when you come over here like grow Shelby Guo all you'll call me go you'd be now today. So. My my megabucks identifies as lesbian. No No. that lasts. Live beyond beyond hold on for years. They create with this. This. Yes. Who is this is? This. It's mike. Okay. Hi, baby. I quit. Let them in your life here. This is a you put holes if he posted my address on motherfucking lab bitch know, that I see you. Rich. I see you say is role. By the puck. So don't you get new ideas bits? And if you come in the backyard. Hey, hey, ya all these MIA'S company here. Hey, wait a minute. Did you come to love? Did you? Well. Well..

Shelby Guo Korea Marcus
"guo" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

04:32 min | 3 years ago

"guo" Discussed on From the Top with Host Christopher O'Riley

"From chicago thence listening bonus content podcast to hear the full episode featuring andrew guo download from the top show three three nine miami and we'd love to hear from you you can leave us a message on our facebook page facebook dot com slash from the top fans or on twitter at classical kid.

chicago miami twitter andrew guo facebook
Kevin Durant leads fourth-quarter comeback

CBS Sports Radio

01:58 min | 3 years ago

Kevin Durant leads fourth-quarter comeback

"Row for k d in the fourth quarter he ends up with 37 points eleven rebounds and this is according to warriors pr this is a six thirty point and rebound game of the year and he had fifteen of those 37 points in the final seven minutes i saw good tweet from on the warriors outsiders cameras a grant or driven goes drew it said people actually said that kevin durant to the wears is a bad idea could you imagine i mean it's going to disrupt the chemistry it's not get a word give me a break and you know we've now had katie here in the bay area for coming up on two seasons now and in a while is appreciated what he was able to do in oklahoma city to watch his game evolve here and golden state to watch the way he spaces out the floor to watch him use his size and his athleticism and that long stride that gazelle like stride to his advantage and he's such a factor on both ends of the floor matter of fact 2 blocks tonight for kd new career high for blocks hundred and six on the year his previous was 105 back in 2012 and that block on bertrand's where he came back and and honored him down i reach we did that at ryan kobe that's the it's the the camera shot from behind the goal and so you just see kd and mike foale predator mode hunting down bird transit just gobbling up so good to see and nice to see kevin durant stepping up in in staffs absence and picking up the w because you know it's a shorthanded crude night spurs or a desperate basketball team and you know a great popovich team is always going to play its off so for the warriors to kinda rally in the fourth quarter yeah this is a game they should win but no way guo dhaleh no curry for 46 minutes in this game no david west you still without jordan bell no patrick mccaw so this is just a good win man and.

Kevin Durant Katie Oklahoma City Bertrand Ryan Kobe David West Jordan Bell Patrick Mccaw Basketball Popovich Seven Minutes 46 Minutes
"guo" Discussed on The Point Of It All

The Point Of It All

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"guo" Discussed on The Point Of It All

"News wrong good bob odenkirk would you l i i was named you're not alone while i fisher uh anything else that roads those happy valley inaugural slate is don't fails from fifa away if you say guo obama says no no no i leave it at the crime but dole why is as all of the you know like don't be looking at people's pitchers all in all social media reunions of tags on not that long mobs the life online revolves learn the lessons away yellow say stay off waste is agreeing i am a one day of your turn so not to say if you depress lump was list of the weeping people let's go along azazel roundly jeered bernie sanders so we just at your leisure the only route martin marietta obviously or even is mojo she won mojo that's how siegel people sleeping god has built up lee peaceful seal people happy about sounds name for those of a companies in whatnot kuna ghazni mix sneaked grilled workshops so mongrel geir foul on our are always an easy to those so she's a banner answers regarding will be let's listen so sal us appreciate yet again really really yeah i'll actually model uh we'll see khadamova coddle calling alicia actual person you are listening or satin hope you it's a listen this aspagren innocent lives and so i said that tells seoul eyes all good argue on a flag app al note so far.

bob odenkirk guo obama dole bernie sanders martin marietta alicia seoul siegel ghazni geir one day
"guo" Discussed on The Friend Zone

The Friend Zone

01:50 min | 4 years ago

"guo" Discussed on The Friend Zone

"A you come in here making me look crazy and he went should because the episode before that will not is when he brought his wife out to the other artists and was like this is my wife she guo until you y k work with chu was not quite as you know what i got the issue this is made me the go one last question oh nilaweli we've onto the wound and segment do you think that you can stay with someone until they get over those fears and this goes both ways i if you have those fears yourself because we rob who fucked over do you think someone can stay with you in almost say he'll you out of it and vice versa do you think as possible and how so i think that overtime people understand the consistency equates to kind character some weather relationships is so as people are consistently patient and consistent willing to offer of certain types of explanation sometimes you can kind of quiet that fire with does no no no x y z whatever nawaz will take the patience of literally shoal in the bible but it is possible i do i believe is possible do about you i think it's possible know how likely i am to come across search i'm not entirely sure but i believe it's possible there's possibilities how likely that someone would be patient with are likely the you'd find someone you'd be patient with both definitely both because uh that's for you to destin as on grow older i feel like when i was younger be lie way more patient then i am now like now i just don't really want to deal with an if i feel like i have to deal with the then i'm not going to after like we should just leave because it.

chu nawaz guo destin