36 Burst results for "greenland"

Fresh "greenland" from Joel Riley

Joel Riley

01:03 min | 5 hrs ago

Fresh "greenland" from Joel Riley

"10 W TV N I'm Scott Jennings. This news the service of Legacy Retirement group traffic and weather together from temp start heating and cooling products. And here's Johnny Hill. Trouble down near the German village area. Scott an accident scene south high at Greenland and Thurman, look south of the camera right now, Off Votes website. Not seeing a whole lot of the moment. But be careful if you're on high Street there, south of the brewery district were coming up here. Towards downtown freeway delays remained very light 71 about 10 minutes from Delaware's actually down to 70 South bound 23 7 minutes off, PAL rode down to 70 traffic sponsored by fresh time farmers Market. It's no surprise healthy living begins with what we eats fresh time Farmers market brings you Heart Healthy. Haas Avocados two for a dollar now through August 11th you can trust fresh thyme to bring you really food it really affordable prices. Traffic and weather together. Powered by temp star and starters, heating and cooling on Johnny Hill on NewsRadio. 16 W TVs, Maybe six. First warning. Meteorologist Indra Book, Michael Good Monday morning, Everyone We're back into the Heat and humidity 91 for the high today and then 89 tomorrow, with chance for scattered showers and thunderstorms.

Johnny Hill Scott Jennings Legacy Retirement Group Indra Book Thurman Haas Greenland Michael Good Delaware
US health agency relaxes travel advice for several countries

AP News Radio

00:49 sec | 3 d ago

US health agency relaxes travel advice for several countries

"The centers for disease control and prevention is relaxing its advisory for travel during the covert nineteen pandemic but just a little the CDC has been urging Americans to avoid all nonessential international travel now it says it's fine but only to about twenty locations Taiwan Greenland in Laos are among more than a dozen locations with the CDC mentions no particular precautions seven others including Thailand Fiji and New Zealand are in a low risk group older adults and those with certain underlying medical conditions should talk to their doctors first as for the rest of the world the CDC is suggesting you stay home and if you have the travel bug check with those countries authorities before making plans many have mandatory quarantines in place and some aren't accepting U. S. visitors at all Ben Thomas Washington

CDC Taiwan Greenland Laos Fiji New Zealand Ben Thomas Washington
How COVID-19 Decreases Weather Forecast Accuracy

60-Second Science

02:20 min | 2 weeks ago

How COVID-19 Decreases Weather Forecast Accuracy

"Are Two things that you probably didn't think were connected the Kobe, nineteen pandemic and weather forecasts, but there is a link. Commercial air travel as jetliners carry passengers around the world, they also collect vital weather measurements like air, temperature and wind speed during the pandemic. Air travel has come almost to a halt fabulous. Let's say we have one hundred percent and in March we go down by off the April go. On a half so currently possibly we just have one quarter of cloth learning, so you can imagine the gap off Observations Ying Chen I'm meteorologist at the University of Lancaster in England. To create weather forecasts meteorologist need to feed accurate information about current weather. Conditions into their models and planes are one of the best ways to get such info. Since they sample the atmosphere at different altitudes and locations, but with the coronavirus grounding flights around the world, meteorologists are feeling the loss I I don't nights three months of spring, which March April and May and I see temperature wind speed in the forecast accuracy off goes down forecast quality decline the most for long-range projections and over remote areas where planes are one of the few sources of data in Greenland. For example, the accuracy of temperature forecasts has decreased by as much as three point five degrees Fahrenheit. Areas with heavy air traffic like the US and China were also affected because fewer flights means less data. You're out better. Thanks to its dense network of ground based weather stations. The results are in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. subpar forecasts may sound like little more than a headache after all whether is notoriously unpredictable, but Chen says it could be a big problem for many industries like utilities which have to estimate household heating and cooling needs in order to meet electricity demand farmers also rely heavily on forecast to decide when to plant and harvest crops and Chen says lower quality forecasts could make it harder to provide early warning for extreme weather events. Now we are going to summer, so we have highly season or MC Soom Cezanne's. If so we can only hope that while Kobe keeps the skies quiet. The weather stays quiet to.

Ying Chen Mc Soom Cezanne Kobe University Of Lancaster Greenland England United States Geophysical Research Letters. China
How Many Continents Are There?

BrainStuff

04:20 min | Last month

How Many Continents Are There?

"Two plus two equals four the world's Brown. There are seven continents on earth. But that last one isn't quite so cut and dried here. In the United States students learned that there are seven continents North, America. South America Europe Asia. Africa, Australia and Arctic. But that's hardly the last word on the matter and much of Europe students learn that there are six continents Africa. America Antarctica Asia Australia slash. And Europe. There's a five continent model which lists Africa. Europe Asia America and Oceana Slash Australia, and that's by the way why there are five rings on the Olympic, flag. And, some experts think that four is the way to go using as their criteria landmasses. Separated by water rather than manmade So Afro Eurasia America and Arca and. As recently as the eighteen hundreds, some people said there were just too. It's the old including Europe Africa and Asia and the new encompassing north and South America. So what really makes a continent continent? We spoke by email with Dan Montello. A geography professor at the University of California Santa Barbara he said nothing really determines a continent except historical convention, a bit of an overstatement, but mostly valid a certain factors make a landmass more or less likely to be called a continent at various times in history by various people, but nothing can be said to determine continent tally, a completely principled, non arbitrary way. Take for example, the vast country of Russia six point, six million square miles or seventeen million square kilometers a why has often been counted as part of Europe, rather than Asia Montello explained. The Euro Mountains are taken to separate Asia and Europe. But only because Russians wanted their great city of Moscow to be European, so the euros were a convenient marker for that arbitrary decision. Continents are mostly spatially contiguous collections of landmasses larger than countries, but smaller than hemispheres of course cotton's do not necessarily fit entirely within single earth hemispheres, and thus cannot be defined by ranges of latitude or longitude. Okay, so how about plate tectonics if certain landmasses are constrained to one of those massive shifting hulks? Can we safely call it? A continent Montello Says No. Quote Plate tectonics has nothing to do with it historically, and it certainly could not provide a principal basis for continents now. Nearly every continent includes parts of multiple plates. The. Same goes for climate after all continents contain multiple climates as evidenced by Alaska's Arctic. Chill compared with Florida's humid heat. They're both part of North, America. Mountain ranges and coastlines are useless to as our culture and politics. Montella said neither ethnicity race culture nor politics has ever defined continents except by conventional theories that were largely mythical such as old and fallacious ideas about correspondences between races and continents. Politically Hawaii is part of the US but is in Oceania rather than north. America Greenland is controlled by Denmark for now, but is considered part of the North American continent. So really it boils down to whom and when you ask Montello, said no one can say as a matter of principle fact, how many cotton's there are because the decisions are largely based on convention and convention that goes in and out of fashion over time, and is still debated today. He concedes these days. Many geographers would opt for a list of

Europe Dan Montello Asia Hawaii United States America Russia Asia Montello Africa South America Oceana Slash Australia Plate Tectonics Arca Moscow Euro Mountains Australia Alaska
Unicorns of the Sea Reveal Sound Activities

60-Second Science

02:56 min | Last month

Unicorns of the Sea Reveal Sound Activities

"In real life, Nar walls don't speak English. Like the one bidding farewell to will Ferrell's character in the movie. Elf instead they sound more like this. That's an audio clip recorded by scientists last summer under the icy waters of northwest, Greenland. We want to describe what animals are doing. We I better understand what sounds are telling us. If Guinea Podolsky. A geophysicist at Hokkaido University in Japan, but Alcee and his colleagues study the soundscape of glacial fjords. They're noisy places where icebergs crash into the ocean and air bubbles visit of melting ice. These yards are also home to Charles. The animals are sometimes called unicorns of the seat because of their single long spiral Tusk and they're shy, which makes them hard to study so Polski teamed up with local at hunters who snuck up on narrow walls in kayaks and captured audio. That's the sound of a Narwhal looking for food, using echo-location like a dolphin or a bat. and. That's an all closing in on its prey, which had vacuums up into its toothless mouth, so start sounding like to my ear like a chain source something wick. Since? It's so many little clique SOM- that Kennedy even. Them and this is recognized as a foraging related sound used those by other animals, for example, other dolphins or bats. They do the same trick, because when they approach the target, their prey which is phenomenal, so Arctic Greenland Halibut. The want to update their. Knowledge about the position of the target more frequently because the target is moving, and they need to suck it in and. That's why the interval is getting shorter and we even using some simple simple assumptions. A equation can know how far the animal is from the target. The whistles you heard earlier are thought to be social calls individuals communicating with other nar walls. The researchers reported these observations in the Journal of Geophysical Research. Oceans, bursts, deal sounds which we don't know what they mean. And there are several wicketless, but also says that listening to Nar walls is a first step toward understanding this mysterious wail, and how it will cope climate, change, shipping, and other human activities alter its Arctic home. They're all this things taking place right now. In the region which will affect somehow this animals, but we have no clue even about the state or the previous state of this animal. So if we want to learn what's going to happen, we better start now and I hope this is where sound monitoring can help us to learn more about this still mysterious creatures.

Greenland Ferrell Guinea Podolsky Geophysicist Hokkaido University Journal Of Geophysical Researc Polski Japan Kennedy Charles Alcee
Humans will determine fate of Greenland's ice sheet

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 months ago

Humans will determine fate of Greenland's ice sheet

"Greenland an island more than three times. The size of Texas is largely covered by a massive sheet of ice. It's more than a mile thick in most places but as the climate warms the Greenland. Ice Sheet is starting to melt faster than it can be replenished by wintertime. Snow Twyla Moon is a research scientist at the Colorado based national snow and Ice Data Center. Where seeing more and more consistently years of very high ice loss something really that humanity has ever seen before and the trend could continue in a recent study researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks studied. What will happen? If carbon pollution continues to increase over this century. They found that within a thousand years the entire is she would likely melt causing cease to rise between seventeen and twenty three feet but moon says the world can avoid that future the difference between following a very aggressive path of action and reducing greenhouse gas emissions bursts. What we're doing today is quite truly the difference between losing all of the Greenland ice sheet or keeping the vast majority of it. That's all just a matter of Human Action. What we do will be the primary determinant of what things look like in the future

Greenland Twyla Moon University Of Alaska Fairbanks Texas Research Scientist Colorado
NASA satellites help scientists understand climate change

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 3 months ago

NASA satellites help scientists understand climate change

"For much of human history. It's been hard for scientists to learn about remote areas of the earth that they cannot observe directly. Jack Kay is associate director for Research in Nasr's earth. Science Division was really hard to know. What's going on out in the middle of the ocean or on polarized sheets. Tropical forest forest but modern technology has changed that NASA now operates a fleet of satellites that orbit the earth. They make it possible to see the whole planet and observe how is changing as the climate warms. Satellites can help measure ocean temperatures sea levels and forest cover on a global scale and monitor changes over time. We can see the way that we are changing the surface of our planet. We can look things like the changing of the mass of the ice sheets in Greenland and tell people really seeing this. We know what's going on K. Says along with rigorous data satellites provide images that help people realize what at stake as the climate warms? You can see the earth so the suspended in the darkness of space and the imagery I think gives us a clear sense of this is our planet and this is where we live and we have to manage it.

Jack Kay Associate Director For Researc Nasr Greenland Science Division Nasa
Cured Trout with Gsli Matt

Monocle 24: The Menu

02:47 min | 3 months ago

Cured Trout with Gsli Matt

"Name is. I'm shift from Iceland's run to restaurants in Iceland skull and Reykjavik the capital city and then in which is located on a tiny island on the south coast of Iceland called Westman Islands. I'M GONNA share a recipe with you. It's a cute trout similar to Colombo lex methods but using trout and standard Salman and using a little bit different herbs. So what I like to use instead of the traditional until is to use really good salt and Arctic time. Arctic Time Her. That is hard to find. It's only grossing in Iceland Greenland and the Faroe Islands but the flavor notes are almost like a lemon thyme mixed with lavender's and I've actually tried to do with those herbs instead and comes out really good as well so they can be substituted instead of Dr Time from softer which is sustainable cease. Company is to them and they have different flavor mixtures and one of them is Arctic time the recipe itself. Kosher three parts she sold with this Arctic time and one part raw sugar and for every fillet says the health lemon. The recipe is simple. So you have fillets of crowds. You just make sure it's completely debunked and take off the excess fat that is on then you take the fillet and you great health lemon over and then just covered slightly with a mixture of sugar and salt time. Just have to make sure it's completely covered. Keep it covered for eight hours if the phillies really. You're using Salman's of trout. It needs to stay up it longer. Then you just basically scrape off the salt and put it in the cooler and especially if you can put it on the cooling rack and under the fan inside the cooler that way it air dries pits and makes the texture of the cure trout. A little bit better so basically the time to make it as little more than one day after that the texture of the face gets a little more tense. And when you cut it down you can use it on act benedict on just grill toast or even just on its own with. Maybe a little bit site source of homeless. That is grated into either yogurt or cream. It's really simple recipe to make but it's really delicate than lights. I hope you enjoy

Iceland Salman Iceland Greenland Westman Islands Phillies Colombo Faroe Islands
U.S. Aid for Greenland Prompts Suspicion in Denmark

Bloomberg Daybreak: Europe

00:21 sec | 3 months ago

U.S. Aid for Greenland Prompts Suspicion in Denmark

"And Washington has announced a twelve point one million dollar aid package to Greenland the move has been met with criticism from Danish politicians with the foreign policy committee saying the US has clearly crossed a line in trying to quote create division in Greenland and Denmark it comes after president trump last year expressed an interest in buying Greenland an idea dismissed by Denmark as

Washington United States Greenland Denmark President Trump
"greenland" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

KMOX News Radio 1120

04:08 min | 3 months ago

"greenland" Discussed on KMOX News Radio 1120

"Consulate in Greenland this less than a year after president trump announced he'd like to buy the nation Greenland or say they welcome U. S. investment but without conditions cloudy with periods of rain throughout the day today and a high of sixty five degrees we'll see some early sun tomorrow but that disappearing behind clouds and some more showers and thunderstorms on the way United we stand that's never been more important than it is today now you can show your commitment to our president and the nation with the limited edition trump twenty twenty American Eagle silver dollars show your support with the limited edition American silver eagles specially priced from government dot com just call one eight hundred eight five nine one six two nine hold the weight of democracy in your hand with new perfect uncirculated condition silver eagle coins these historic coins signed into law by Reagan have been America's money since nineteen eighty six to secure your new limited edition trump twenty twenty American Eagle silver dollar coins call one eight hundred eight five nine one six two nine call now and we'll give you a free truck twenty twenty patriots pack including a declaration of independence commemorative and five Lincoln cents when you order call now to secure your silver dollar coins plus get your free truck twenty twenty patriots pack valued at over ten dollars free with every order one eight hundred eight five nine one six two nine that's one eight hundred eight five nine one six two nine each of us has a purpose we are destined to do something meaningful not only to support our loved ones but to positively impact our communities throughout the country what do you think a private Christian education looks like creek canyon university offers over a hundred seventy five high quality online programs your purpose the C. T. C. dot this is your personal information on your laptop in this is what happens when you connect to the coffee shop wifi or buy something with your smartphone your information contained punk all over the place to be exposed to cybercriminals more threads demand more protection that's why Norton and LifeLock are now part of one company Norton three sixty with LifeLock provides all in one membership for your cyber safety the gives you device security identity theft protection a VPN for online privacy and more no one can prevent all cybercrime and identity theft but Norton three sixty with LifeLock is your ally in today's connected world after all your info isn't gonna stop bouncing around anytime soon sign up today for Norton three sixty with LifeLock and save twenty five percent or more of your first year by going to Norton dot com slash radio that's Norton dot com slash radio for twenty five percent off thinking about life insurance what if you could make one free phone call and learn your best price from nearly a dozen highly rated price competitive companies well that's exactly what happens when you call select quote life for example George is forty he was getting sky high quotes from other companies because he takes meds to control his blood pressure but when I shopped around I found him a ten year five hundred thousand dollar policy for under twenty five dollars a month I'm select quote agent Dan sabino and believe me if select quote isn't shopping for your life insurance you're probably paying too much for your free quote call eight hundred seven zero four twenty three thirty that's eight hundred seven zero four twenty three thirty eight hundred seven zero four twenty three thirty or go to select quote dot com since nineteen eighty five we shop you save get full details on the example policy it's local dot com slash commercials are price can vary depending on your health insurance company the fact welcome back Rush Limbaugh the EIB network and we are very honored very thrilled to have what is the vice president of the United States carving out some time for us during what me it makes me.

Greenland trump president
Greenland ice sheet shrinks by record amount: climate study

Democracy Now! Audio

00:20 sec | 4 months ago

Greenland ice sheet shrinks by record amount: climate study

"In climate news. A new study confirms a record. Amount of Greenland's ice sheet melted in the summer of two thousand nineteen. The study says the dramatic loss of ice was due to atmospheric circulation patterns. That had not been taken into account by previous climate models and that may be significantly underestimating future melting

Greenland
What's a Narwhal's Tusk For?

60-Second Science

02:43 min | 4 months ago

What's a Narwhal's Tusk For?

"Deep beneath the frozen surface of the Arctic Swims Unicorn and reality. It's a whale with the spiral tusks sprouting from. Its head the Narwhal. Biologists have long debated the purpose of male Narwhal tusks. The task like those of elephants are actually elongated. Teeth is Nar. Walls are usually below the race. It's tough to see how they use their tests. It turns out. We don't know pretty much anything about them. Because they're impossible to study really in the Wild Arizona State University evolutionary biology graduate. Student Zachary Graham. He wondered if the males tusks were a sign of status as a potential reproductive partner. Comparing tusk size to the wheels overall body size could provide evidence one of the main trends. That it's been documented over hundred different animals. One hundred different traits is disproportional growth. We call that hyper elementary and all that means is that the sexual trait is growing disproportionately compared to the rest of the body. So it's not like the biggest nor wall is just a scaled up version of a baby. Narwhal what we toughed is disproportionately long and then we also see that. There's intense variation so grandma and his team turned to measurements collected from two hundred and fifty adult males over thirty five years. The majority of them are from the inuit hunt so the inuit have been killing our walls for thousands and thousands of years in any time they do that. The Greenland Institute of Natural Resources Them to collect data turns out the length of us can vary widely even for males the same size ranging from a foot and a half to more than eight feet the finding in the journal biology letters the top tusks thus appear to be like a billboard that shouts look at me on the biggest after all only the strongest best fed individuals can afford to produce such an ostentatious ornaments. Of course Tusk can do more than just say you doing the fact that these nor was always have the scars on them makes us think that it's likely communication structure that also functions as a weapon for grand. There's also a larger issue some evolutionary biologists have recently proposed by apotheosis at groups of animals with elaborate sexual signals are more likely to specie eight and diversify than those without. We know that the world's changing around us more than ever so understanding how and why some species are going to be able to adapt and deal with. This is key. If we're to protect and manage species that we have on earth today.

Zachary Graham Teeth Tusk Greenland Institute Of Natural Biology Letters Inuit Wild Arizona State University Partner
Sound Of The River

Sound Matters

07:46 min | 4 months ago

Sound Of The River

"This time a story a story about a river a very special river. It's the river you can hear flowing in the background through a forest somewhere in New Zealand. The river you can hear is the Wanganui River. This recording was made recently by this woman. My name is heike like hope and Mima Danish audio storyteller documentary-maker Pica held a spent a lifetime making documentaries and stories in sound documentaries and stories in sound at a full of characters places events but almost always in our work there are also the sounds of nature like stories. That have this ECO. Centric quality where it's not necessarily humans that are in the middle where where there's When Nature Plays Part? I've always had since I was a kid. I've always had this feeling that nature sort of reflected itself into me I I would feel like a mountain I would feel like make I would feel like it's three and I've had since early childhood SLA very strong sensory experiences from Mater. I think sound is fluid. It spacious like nature is so there's something that's always been something about working with sound that mirrors this perception I have of the world and that mirrors may and can connect them like bay sometimes in sort of pristine moments also connect within me emotionally or as ideas. It's something that affects you when you're there. So how can you tell a story where whether it comes across where it's not just backdrop or pretty picture but it's actually a strong force a character almost in the story documentaries and stories come from very remote places very often places like the far north of Canada Greenland places all around Scandinavia and across the North Atlantic islands? But her latest project takes back to a place where she spent time growing up. I've just started working on a project. Actually it's a liar. I feel like I've been working on it for a long time of wanted to work on it and it's been on my mind. It's a project about the Wanganui River. It flows from the center of the North Island of New Zealand to the coast to the task. Mansi three hundred kilometers or so the river special to me because I grew up in New Zealand lift by this river and my family immigrated to New Zealand in the seventy s and we lived in in Wanganui which is the town that where the river flows into the sea and all trading station built by European settlers. So for me. It's it's personally special. And then I learnt that one canoeing river have gained legal status as a as a human entity which means that it has the rights and duties and liabilities of a legal person the Wanganui river now a legal person or legal entity one of the first natural places in the world to be given this sort of legal standing accepting a river as illegal person presents. Many challenges to the way we think about the world and it presents challenges to documentary-maker how can a documentary portray the river itself as a character as a person as an entity? Where do you begin? Did you know that the river is a human being to us? We've always had signed from the mountain to the say I the river as May. So how do you tell a story whether whether river is the main the center? I'm not sure how to that practically you know. How do I connect with the river and and figure out why didn't want to say

Wanganui River New Zealand Wanganui North Island Mima Danish North Atlantic Mater Documentary-Maker Pica Canada Greenland Scandinavia Mansi
Science News Briefs from around the Planet

60-Second Science

01:48 min | 4 months ago

Science News Briefs from around the Planet

"From the Dominican Republic. A Sunken Museum Adlakha. Later Underwater National Park will preserve in place a ship that sank in seventeen twenty five complete with real and replica. Artifacts kept under water for people to explore submerged artifacts often degrade faster when removed from the sea from Greenland new simulations indicate that Iraqi valley detected under the islands icesheet may contain sixteen hundred kilometer long subterranean river flowing from central greenland to its Northern Coast from Greece. Archaeologists uncovered gold jewels and beads in a large building on the now uninhabited. Minoan island of Chrissy a location. That about thirty five hundred years ago was devoted to making purple dye from sea snails called Miramax from England. Researchers found seventeen hundred year old chicken eggs along with other ancient objects in a waterlogged pit in southeastern England. A few eggs broke during extraction releasing a sulphurous smell but one remained intact making it. The only complete egg found from Roman Britain. We can't do archaeology without breaking some eggs from Australia to help boost Sydney Harbour's endangered seahorse population. Scientists bread baby seahorses in an aquarium and built crab trap like hotels to protect them as they adapt to the wild and from Antarctica. Scientists test drove a meter long wheeled rover that streamed live of the depths as it rolled along the underside of Antarctic ice. The Buoyant Rover for under ice exploration could someday explore frozen overseas on worlds such as Jupiter's Moon Europa

Greenland Sunken Museum Adlakha Dominican Republic Southeastern England Underwater National Park Minoan Island Miramax Chrissy Sydney Harbour Iraqi Valley England Roman Britain Australia Greece
Parenting in a Pandemic | Susan Kaiser Greenland

10% Happier with Dan Harris

07:55 min | 5 months ago

Parenting in a Pandemic | Susan Kaiser Greenland

"Our guest. This week is Susan Kaiser Greenland She's a former hard charging corporate lawyer. Who transformed herself through a lot of very deep meditative training and a lot of hard work into one of the best known most qualified experts in the world. When it comes to teaching meditation to kids teenagers and parents she wrote a whole book about this called Mindful Games Which is filled with all sorts of practical meditation tips for Kids and parents and we go. We dive very deeply in into those practical tips. Here this person is a font of wisdom. She has the ability as you're about to hear to get super practical about techniques for teaching meditation to kids at all sorts of different ages from very young kids two teenagers. And these are meditation techniques. That can be done sort of formally and informally same with parents formal and informal practices. She also has thoughts about how to work with kids who have. Adhd and thoughts about how parents can deal more successfully with one another while. We're on this kind of locked down here But beyond the practicality she also has a ability to kind of transcend the details and talking in I think deeply fascinating and useful ways about this moment in human history One final thing to say before we dive in just a quick audio note here in the name of social distancing. I'm now recording from home and I don't yet have all the systems up and running to do so at the highest quality so in this interview. You're going to hear that my audio is not perfect. It's totally you can hear it It's just not going to be as good as it normally is Because we usually record in a studio Susan however happily has a a big fancy? Mike so she she sounds great and I promised. We're going to get better at this as we go. So thank you for your forbearance and here we go. Here's Susan Kaiser Greenland. I don't think in my lifetime. I have ever seen a situation quite extreme that pertains to families across the board but I think that provides both challenge in an opportunity. You know. I'm not gonNA pretend that this is a good thing. I'm not gonNA pretend that it's not gonna be very very difficult for families to navigate for anyone of a of a hundred reasons that we could go through but I think that this is something for those of us who have been meditating. Have in some ways been preparing for on the cushion for as long as we sat on the question or for those of us who practice mindfulness in the Dropping brief moments of awareness throughout the day. That's also been excellent practice with us because the challenge that we have is to contain anxiety our own and that of those around us and the opportunity we have is to put into practice in a very concrete way these themes in these principles and these methods that come from classical contempt of training that are intended to do exactly what we need right now which is to become aware notice when our nervous systems are are ratcheting up a little bit and get a little bit overly up regulated and to integrate real world strategies that we know that in mindfulness based awareness based that helped to down regulate our nervous system. Because what happens is when we are up regulated a little bit too much There's something called an arousal curve. And we need a certain amount of nervous system regulation to be up at the top of that curve and then were open receptive ready to learn and that amount of nervous system regulation. We need to get up. There varies depending on the person and varies depending on the day per person but if we get a little bit overly regulated then what happens is we slipped down on either side of that curve. We either slipped down into the fighter flight mode which is something. We're very familiar with sane. When kids with parents start getting snapped and agitated or we slip into the other mode which is freeze where kids start withdrawing nine or sometimes they look defiant and we see you know especially teenagers. We'll see a behavior in them that we think is defined but actually is really just over well so these. Mindfulness Bay strategies are an opportunity for us to implement compassionate in wise responses to the nervous democratization. That was seen not just in our kids but also in ourselves and also at the grocery store with our partners or With professional colleagues. Okay have you. Million questions will first of all my primary response to what you said is the really grateful to you for coming on. Because I think you're going to help a lot of people by doing this and I. I happen to know they've got a lot of incoming right now. Terms of requests for. Help so very grateful for you to you for making time at this time I wanNA make a too little comments to amplify some of the things you just said that. I WANNA pivot to question. One of the things you talked about. Is the opportunity we have at this moment at and I liked it. You didn't try to sugar coat. It this is a difficult moment. It reminded me of something. I heard The Meditation teacher or in so I said the other day when we were doing live guided meditation this new initiative. We've launched called ten percent happier lives. Were doing every weekday and were in was quoting another great meditation teacher. Very famous Han We talked about sort of the viral nature of anxiety that a compared he compared it to a bunch of people in a boat navigating through storm and if just one person on that boat can stay calm that can spread and that really is applicable to the family right now and then the other thing you talked about is this sort of anxiety curve We did a podcast the other day with an anxiety expert at Harvard in Luanda Marquez. Who is talking about something called? The York's Dodson law which is this curve. Basically her point is anxiety is adaptive we need it to a certain extent and the right amount anxiety gets you to the top of the curve where you're optimally engaged with the world dealing with the problems but too much and you get into a panic or overwhelmed too little you get into denial and lethargy so. I really appreciate Everything he said in that in that opening a answer so now let me give it to the question. Which is I suspect. A lot of people listening to this especially the parents are thinking okay. That sounds great. How do I actually do that? Especially now when I? My kids are just at all attached to my hip at every moment of every day. Yeah well it's never been more important to be able to practice this idea of dropping brief moments of awareness into what you're already doing throughout your day so there's a general principle for the mindfulness based practices all of them now but most of them that are used to down regulate and there are some that are used to up regulate. But I doubt that we're really going to need those right now. So let's stick with Don -regulation once and the idea. The Down Regulation Stat strategies is that we become aware cause remember awareness is key awareness is the is the starting gate for mindfulness and meditation practices. And once you're aware of something your relationship to it will change. Awareness doesn't get rid of things but it does change your relationship to things.

Susan Kaiser Greenland Adhd Susan Don -Regulation Mike Lethargy York Dodson Harvard Luanda Marquez
Ice loss in Antarctica and Greenland increased sixfold in the last 30 years

CBS News Weekend Roundup

00:24 sec | 5 months ago

Ice loss in Antarctica and Greenland increased sixfold in the last 30 years

"A new analysis finds the polar ice caps are melting six times faster than they were in the nineteen nineties an international team on climate change says the ice loss in Antarctica and Greenland is contributing to rising sea levels around the globe the prediction is one final information comes in last year twenty nineteen will be a record year for ice loss because of what was considered to be an arctic heat

Greenland
Greenland and Antarctica ice loss accelerating

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:27 sec | 5 months ago

Greenland and Antarctica ice loss accelerating

"A new report finds something new at the ends of the earth a new analysis finds the polar ice caps are melting six times faster than they were in the nineteen nineties an international team on climate change says the ice loss in Antarctica and Greenland is contributing to rising sea levels are the globe the prediction is one final information comes in last year twenty nineteen will be a record year for ice loss because of what was considered to be an arctic

Greenland
Breaking the wrong kinds of records: 2019 state of climate report

UN News

10:20 min | 5 months ago

Breaking the wrong kinds of records: 2019 state of climate report

"Several climate records were broken in two thousand nineteen across the world including unprecedented temperature highs and extreme weather events ahead of the launch of the World Meteorological Organization's flagship report. Wmo's statement on the state of the global climate in two thousand and nineteen the agency. Secretary-general Patera tell us. Sat Down with Ben Maller from you and news and started by outlining some of the main points from the study. For example we have Highest concentration of carbon dioxide in past three million years and the measurement survey showing that last year. We we again. Having Having Higher Gordon Thracians from carbon dioxide than the previous year. Shame is happening for for me. Which is the second most important greenhouse gas and we have seen the warming of the temperature continued and we have broken several. Reads NOT AMBULATORY COHORTS IN AUSTRALIA? In several West European countries and also elsewhere last year was the warmest euro regard since eighteen fifty. Then we have seen we have stored more than ninety percent of the extra heat. The Ocean send an awesome. Seawater is Is Record warm because of that? And that's giving more. Nfc for the tropical tropical storms sea level rise continues and it has been boosting so we have seen an increase in the sea level rise also also last last year the glacier's melting worldwide. And we have especially been melting the glacier greenland which is contributing to sea level rise and and also the melting. Glaciers are melting and. That's bad news when it comes to Freshwater released to the major rivers Sir in the world come having written from Malaya's absurd and Ian tweets and rocky mountain so that's bad news for the freshwater resources for agriculture and for human beings and industry so all in all climate saints continues and we have also seen a record breaking forest fires like in Australia. It's very had before that record breaking temperatures and android and we have seen also severe drought in in Mexico Caribbean in some parts of Europe and also Southam South African countries. So all in all records have been broken. Bad died records. How confident are you that governments around the world have really caught onto the seriousness of this message so that they could take the right action for sake of the people around the world? I think that the way honest is Is higher than ever but the accent is sir very much missing. Countries made their parish blitzes and to fifteen and that would mean three degrees warming story beyond the parish. One point five two degrees and and and so far. The countries haven't been fulfilling their research glitzy so severe not moving towards one point five to decrease which is the Paris limits north towards three degrees with with the blitzes. The country's made we are moving the worst four to five degrees by the end of the sensory. They're clearly a need for for higher ambition level of if we are serious with climate mitigation. There is a target for all Governments. All the people everybody concerned to try and turn the situation around by the year twenty fifty which is the deadline for that shipment of the sustainable development goals. Is that still realistic with all? These bad records be have also seen but it the development there for example private sector is more and more interested in in in being part of the solution and we have also studying finance sector moving their investments from fossil business to watch the watch more sustainable business and and also the you would movement is putting pressure on governments and and people all around the world. They understand that this is this is perhaps the number one problem that we the mankind is facing today so there are also plenty of good science that the that the that the we have started moving in the right direction actually in the developed countries Last year their missions dropping habits. It's good news. Despite the economic was Was growing and we have been able to solve that you can eat that economic growth from from Damian growth. The but the bad news is that in in the rest of the world missions growing last year. And that's one of the one of the Tennessee so to solve this problem. We have to have all of the countries onboard compare this year to the previously. What would you say in himself? The preparedness by everyone every government every megyn institution to tackle extreme. What within this year so my organization's very much supporting our members to improve their early warning capacity and this kind of early warning of of drought Flooding storm sewer and record temperatures. That's a very powerful way to adapt to climate says this negative trend in climate. We'll continue for the coming decade caged anyhow which means growing out of weather related disasters and and and we have to be prepared for that. And we have to invest in early warning services and it's important to invest also on impact based forecasting for example when when cyclone hitting Mozambique get amid series was able to forecast meteorologist parameters well but impacts of those understood and that's why the disaster was a having lots of casualties and lots of economic losses because the authorities didn't act and the impact was understood so from W. Most side We're happy to help. The country's built their impact based early warning. Service kept musty. Doubly from your stigma just now is having better capacity to alert people in better time to prepare for any disasters. That come is that correct. So we are we are. We are member based organization. We have another nine hundred thousand members of our member. Member hasn't National Meteorology Service and we are very much set. Transform forming the know how from our more developed members are less developed members and we are working together with the financial institutions like World Bank cleaned climate fund and UNDP target more resources for for this kind of capacity development. So the situation is improving all the time but but we still have plenty of countries about half of our member. Countries could improve their performance. Is that too was making Elliot Warning Betta to save lives to save situations to prepare people better. How good is the early warning system improvement over the last year? So we have seen a gradual improvement. That's one of the one of the issues most dealing dealing with and what we've able to forecast the one day before In in the past we can now forecast it even five days in advance and and and countries are much better prepared even in developing countries. We have seen a major major improvement but we are not. We haven't been able to reach the optimization yet. There shouldn't further investments needed by the donors and also by individual governments. And that's very powerful way to adapt and protect economists and and people from the impacts of climate says all of us anywhere around the world. Everybody is preoccupied with the outbreak of Kobe. Nineteen which is leading to significant downturn in economic activity around the world in the same way those trillion fire saw a rise in co two emissions. Is there any silver lining in the way that the world is trying to handle of igniting in the form of any spin offs in terms of lower emissions during this period? Of course Would be very much concern of the casualties that we ever had because of this virus and the story is not over yet so it may have a negative impact on on the global economy. Which is bad news and and we have already seen has having an impact on the on the equality in China for example once they have been closing closing some parts of the country and And there's been less less traffic and less industrial production but the but this is not good news. So all in all. Be Concerned of this Of the casualties related these vitals. And and have you hoped at these outbreak We will be solved and and and we can go back to normal life and keep in mind that the that we still have the major climate. The problem to be solved. So these these spite of these fighters it'll keep continue based for mitigation of climate change.

World Meteorological Organizat Australia Ben Maller Secretary-General Patera Gordon Thracians World Bank Glacier Greenland China NFC Caribbean Paris Europe Rocky Mountain Tennessee
Methane emissions from burning fossil fuels has been 'vastly underestimated,' study says

Le Show

02:19 min | 6 months ago

Methane emissions from burning fossil fuels has been 'vastly underestimated,' study says

"Methane emissions to you and me to the atmosphere have increased by approximately one hundred fifty percent over the past three centuries but it has been difficult for researchers to determine exactly where those emissions originate methane can be omitted naturally. Don't look at those cows now as well as from human activity but researchers at the University of Rochester measured methane levels an ancient air samples and found that scientists have been vastly underestimating. The amount of methane that humans are emitting into the atmosphere. No no via fossil fuels in a paper published in nature the researchers indicate reducing fossil fuel. Use is therefore a key target in curbing. Climate Change Methane is the second largest human caused contributor to climate change after carbon dioxide but methane has a relatively short shelf life. Compared to if we stopped emitting all carbon dioxide today highs co two levels in the atmosphere would still persist for a long time says one of the researchers methane is important because if we make changes to our current methane emissions. It's going to be reflected in the climate more quickly. They broke down. How much methane is released? Naturally how much released by human activity? They drilled and collected ice cores from Greenland ice core samples. Act like time capsules that contain air bubbles with small quantities of ancient air trapped inside. Well that's where you find the ancient aliens then. They got breath that don't by measuring the carbon fourteen isotopes an air for more than two hundred years ago. The researchers found almost all methane emitted to the atmosphere was biological nature until about eighteen. Seventy why that's when fossil fuels began to be used. The levels of naturally released fossil methane are about ten times lower than previous research reported so the manmade fossil fuel component is higher than expected. Twenty five to forty percent higher they found if anthropogenic methane emissions. Make up a large part of the total reducing emissions from human activities like fossil fuel. Use will have a greater impact on curbing future global warming than scientists previously

University Of Rochester
Flying The New Scandinavian Airlines Flagship A350: Copenhagen To Chicago

AvTalk - Aviation Podcast

04:07 min | 6 months ago

Flying The New Scandinavian Airlines Flagship A350: Copenhagen To Chicago

"I am literally just back. Flew in from Copenhagen just now wow wow they let you out of the House The for for twenty six hours long enough to fly from Chicago to Copenhagen turn around and come. I'm back in such a thing who knows who reason. There's gotta be reason but I don't know what it was no who I will dig and try and find the reason. Scandinavian Airlines took delivery of their first eight three fifty a few months ago and they've been training and getting ready for the big day which was today and they operated their first revenue flight with the aircraft from from Copenhagen to Chicago in. We had a wonderful flight. The smoothest flight I've ever been on not even a little bump but Got Take a nice view of Iceland a little bit of Greenland Canada and then dropped into Chicago where it was cloudy and cold but inbetween. Everything was wonderful. Wonderful still still processing all of the things that we we tried to share tried to share more of the flight while we were in the air but the Wifi had some some growing wing paints narrow. That doesn't work awful concept. I know but this was the first time that the system had been tested in the wild on such a flight and with with as many people as as had been on the flight so over one hundred people were connected and so worked for for some didn't work for others the others being unfortunately me so we didn't get to share as much during the flight as we wanted to. But we'll we'll have more coming up in by the time the podcast comes out all that'll be up on the blog and on various social media's so look for that there but it was a good flight and we had a nice chat with the crew afterwards so that was a a nice thing to kind of end the flight with talking with their chief pilot and the assistant into chief pilot for their their new eight hundred fifty fleet So so that was. That was a good time. Yeah I think we start getting the three fifty's here at newer in March unbelie Yang one of the flights the evening flight. I think you've two flights from Copenhagen Day I think and there's the afternoon flight in the evening big flood. I think it's the three fifty so that one of the moving over to Stockholm at this point it doesn't sound like they are anytime soon because because most of the three forty flying is done out of Copenhagen and the three fifty is kind of replacing first and foremost now it's making sense and all the comparisons that SAS does S- against the three forty and it's pretty incredible to see with the economics of the two fifty compared to the three forty are interested to see what the economics of garbage can compared to. A three forty are so this is true. Garbage cans are exceedingly fuel-efficient has given indeed. That was something something interesting that That we learned in that the eight hundred fifty is both more fuel-efficient and faster so we we flew faster to get to Chicago in arrived. We arrived at an entire hour early and the flight time itself was thirty. Four minutes faster because of the increased cruise speed so. I wasn't in a hurry but I guess if not taking more time than you need is something that they want to do. So you've got to O'hare an hour early. Where's their gate available? Because it was the international terminal there was audible available but I did hear one of the station. Managers at O'hare telling the pilot that did he needed to slow down next time they weren't quite ready to receive the aircraft because of the you know the special stuff that they were doing for the inaugural going back out of Chicago. But yeah in the future I guess. Maybe they'll the adjust the schedule schedule a little bit now. That the three fifty's on

Chicago Copenhagen O'hare Scandinavian Airlines Iceland Greenland Canada Stockholm
"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

09:39 min | 8 months ago

"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"About ninety percent of the freshwater in the globe is tied up in the Arctic. Ice Sheet about nine percent in Greenland ice sheet but Antarctic is right over the South Pole Greenland. Actually the extends quite far south down well below the Arctic circle in fact the southern tip of Greenland is comparable to some of the capital cities of Scandinavia address. Awesome latitude you if you fly from Europe to the US Green on noticing that in the past exactly high flow of their over southern Greenland en route to Europe before as well Al and so because it sits relatively relatively low latitude it is much more susceptible to melting than most of the Antarctica. She does now. There are other reasons why we might be why we are concerned about the Antarctica sheet as well But just in terms of the the summer melting that we see it's much more pronounced on the greenland the Nike because of the relatively low latitude. No I know. We're doing a multi part series on greenland for the weather gets podcast and we spoke with Dave Malkov who spent some time. I am on a glacier there in Greenland I. I don't even know if we're gonNA PRONOUNCE IT correctly. But during my time at NASA colleagues were talking about the is it starts with a J. Kayce often jockettes Saban glacier and I know that people have been monitoring its rate of change if you will How is it and other glaciers doing general greenland so we've seen Over the past few decades and accelerated loss of mass. So when you think about we talk about the mass balance of the Ice Sheet we have snow that lands on in on on on the surface of the ice sheet eventually compresses into fern and then glacial ice and then we have two different ways in which we can lose ice we could have melting of the surface that meltwater L. water forms rivers drains into what we call mullins which actually holes in the ice drain down to the base and then usually it comes out beneath the surface of the of the ice sheet along the margins the other ways that we can calve off icebergs at the margins as well too especially for glaciers that end in Marine Marine Marine terminating glaciers and in the Ocean Yaacob Saban is one of the fastest moving ice streams on the globe so the ice itself. I always tell my students. It's not like a giant. Ice Cube cubits dynamic. It's flowing out to the margins. Some of these areas are flowing very fast. Some of them are flowing fairly slow. Yaacob Savas an area on the west coast of Greenland where the ice is moving very very fast. And it's a beautiful area. If you get to go to the town of yaacob Saban Disko Bay area there. there's a hotel. Tell the Arctic Hotel where you have this beautiful beautiful view actually of the ocean and all of the icebergs capping off into the ocean there But it's actually said that there's no way to really know this but it said that the iceberg that sunk. The titanic probably came off the Nice little weather Geek tidbits that you might not hear anywhere else. I actually want to use this last segment of the the podcast. Now because Dr Modes an expert Chrysler Processes Greenland and whatnot. But I I know because and colleague of his first of all he does a lot of other interesting things so talk about some of your more recent research that is not necessarily cry for for example. I know you're involved in and let me by the way. Dr Mona has has worked funded by NASA Noah National Science Foundation. US Far Service and and many others. Because you know he's been able to to successfully convey his science and it's dutiful and useful science and so he can acquire funding and so he uses satellite perspective uses uses remote sensing a operations models so forth. Talk about what you're up to in Puerto Rico. That's been a threat of research so we've been involved in for about the past last six or seven years now was actually a project. I believe that they originally wanted to entrain. You say by the time are you were you were tied up they were. They were very interested in looking at the influence of climate. Change on these these rich areas of biodiversity in eastern Puerto Rico in the Luquillo mountains near San Juan. So if you've ever had a chance to go to San Juan maybe you've been there on a cruise ship. You could actually look out in the distance and you can see these mountains in an often. People visit Puerto Rico will have a chance to take a visit. Have a chance to go. Inland and visit these mounds really Stunningly beautiful area But the question is how is climate change influencing ecosystem of these mountains and so our task with his Long Term Ecological Research Program at Luquillo. Puerto Rico has been looking at Particularly the role of drought and hurricanes on On on this really unique setting a one of the things that we've done recently was to look at you mentioned Saharan dust earlier. We've been looking at the role of Saharan dust in producing producing droughts in this region And we're continuing to to Look at other mechanisms associated with drought in this area. Too because we do expect. The droughts will become more frequent and more intense with changing climate in the Caribbean particularly. This part of the Caribbean. Yeah and I think Dr Mo makes a great point about Extreme events and sort of this notion retribution sciences which is becoming quite a significant in the research field what we expect to happen happen in current or contemporary extreme weather events and I based on things that I've talked to him about before. That area is a particularly sensitive area in terms of drought to some of these changes. We're we're seeing we. We are winding down now. But I I want to ask Dr Mo the put on his sort of bigger picture here. He's a leader in the field. I mean he's A. He's a leader in science sci. He's been on sort of the Executive Council of the G in has all of these awards. He's an associate dean at a major research university decide. I want to just ask one final question. If you're talking to the broader public what would you say about the importance of in and I know you're in your portfolio Roleo. Uga You deal with the sciences. Would you say about the importance of scientific research and development. And how does that sort of get to their lives. What are the what is what is your view on the overall research enterprise and I just think people we are very familiar with it? But I'm always interested in thoughts colleagues about how we can convey to the broader public imports. The research I mean is really the oh I mean it's the Beckett is that we have to learn about the world around us so I mean I think particularly in this time it's really important to talk about evidence evidence base whether we're talking about social systems whether we're talking about natural systems The the importance of of really carefully scrutinizing evidence that's available I mean this comes up in the climate change debate. There's a I I know you hear this question more often than I do. Do you believe in climate change. But it's it's not a question of belief it's a question of looking at evidence and we're evidence points us and that's what really signs is all about is looking at critically looking at evidence evidence Drawing hypotheses testing those hypotheses based on that evidence and taking us where it leads us on a place like the univer again. I want you to where your university university had a little bit of places like the University of Georgia. Since that's where you are I am. How does that a university and we'll use that? I mean we're talking about any university how they play a role as a university because it's more than just teaching students which is a valuable part of our mission. But how how the how the universities sort of inject this knowledge allege into the state local national international sort of stakeholder and plum practitioner practices. If you will you know it's interesting. I think particularly as a public institution more The first State Charter University in the in the country at the University of Georgia and particularly as a as representatives hundreds of public institution. I think we have an obligation to the people of the state of Georgia People more broadly but particularly the people of the state of Georgia to share. What we've learned it's not not enough for us to just kind of keep it to ourselves And I think that there are many ways than we do that I think the University of Georgia for example has a really tremendous public look service and outreach function that reaches touches all corners of the state. And so I'm constantly impressed by my colleagues in the work that they do in in what we call our PSI unit. I think the kinds of things that you do whether through this podcast or the other kinds of outreach activities that you were engaged in that are more for broad-based based publicly focused I think are also important I think the many of our colleagues are actively reaching out in the popular press as well L. Too. I think all of those forms of engagement are really important. I don't think there's sort of any one particular form of engagement that is privileged your most important. I think all of the above approach here in terms of really communicating the science. That that we're working on to the to the public the public of our state absolutely I uh I know you're on twitter. And what's your twitter handle of people WanNA follow you at T. L. Note. Okay not at Te'o mode so definitely give him a follow and Tom. I want to thank you as a colleague. And it's a friend for coming on the weather GEEKS podcast. Because I knew you'd be a great yes to really break down the science in a way that are listenership can really understand it. So thank you for joining joining us and thank you for having me. And that's been another episode of the weather Geeks podcast if you want more. Refugees continue to follow us. If you are following US or if you're new go follow us on twitter at weather geeks were also on facebook. We'll see you next time on weather. Geeks I'm Dr Marshall Shepherd From of Georgia.

greenland US Greenland Puerto Rico University of Georgia South Pole Greenland Georgia twitter Europe Caribbean San Juan Arctic Dr Mo Saban Disko Bay Arctic Hotel Yaacob Saban NASA Saban glacier
"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

06:21 min | 8 months ago

"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"The ice sheet. And we are talking with Dr Tom Mode as we come back to the weather. Other GEEKS podcasts. He's a distinguished research professor at the University of Georgia's Associate Dean in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences and has received numerous awards for his work over the years in climatology geography atmospheric scientists and so forth really honored to have him here today because I consider him one of the world's top experts on by the way you can check out a couple of pieces that he wrote in the hill which is a journalistic outlet and they sought his expertise during doing the twenty one thousand nine hundred post two thousand nineteen melt events so if you want to read a little bit more about some of his store thoughts on this most recent event definitely check out now his work and writing in the hill so If you just do a google search on Tom Odin the hill. I bet you find it now. I WANNA come back to some of the more local and regional impacts on these melts events for for example when we get these melt events how is it affecting the local ecosystems or perhaps even the marine environment so we we actually had a a very interesting project with my colleagues Tissue Hager Renato cast allow at the University of Georgia and colleagues at Stanford University Columbia University and Rutgers University. I was supported by NASA where we were looking at the interaction between climate greenland mass balance. Run off of meltwater the ocean circulation and the nearby sees and then ocean productivity Really really fascinating work. I think showing that when we see these large runoff off events from Greenland. Of course there's freshwater goes into the Atlantic Ocean It influences the the essentially the depth of this Freshwater freshwater layer. This creates this freshwater lens at the surface that affects essentially the ability of phytoplankton to To be productive and so A very complicated picture. Because it's not just related to the amount of meltwater that's running from the Greenland ice sheet but it's also related to wind patterns and and the resulting ocean circulation patterns as well too But we certainly do see a significant influence of Greenland meltwater runoff on ocean productivity in Baffin Bay for example Labrador Sea. And it's really interesting. This is something that may be lost on people that just. Don't don't think about these things every day but the differences between this sort of influx of freshwater into the ocean which is a saltwater system has significant influences on things like the large thermal hailing leaner conveyor belt circulation. If you ever saw the movie the day after tomorrow That movie was talking about the sort of disruption or shutdown of that circulation in the world. Weather were crazy and of course the things that happened in a move your Hollywood. They're not gonNA really happen at that scale. But it's important to sort of note that by the way another the weather geek tidbit bid just something I do. And I'm just a geek like that. Sometimes when I go to restaurants I will take the glass and mixed Diet Soda with sort of a very sweet so to like a mountain dew. Do and just because they're of different densities. Watch what happens when you put one in. I put the other in and you can see the difference in densities and we're talking about fluids and so some of those it's simple concept of what we're talking about. We talk about fresh water and salt water. Now the producers actually wanted me to ask you about the connection Saharan dust list to greenland. Yes this was sort of a some research that Just an opportunity that came out of the blue with a colleague at And why You New York universities Abu Dhabi campus. They have a center for sea level research located there. They have a scholar there who was looking at Saharan dust transport report and she was noticing this dust transport actually into the North Atlantic across Europe and wanted to determine what kind of influence there was on melting the process on Greenland. I mean the surface agreement is she does very sensitive to the reflective veto snow obviously very bright reflective once it starts starts to melt and refreeze becomes a little bit darker absorbs more energy. Eventually you melt away all of the seasonal snow cover you get down to glacial ice. It absorbs even more energy but we also have other sort of contaminants if you will whether at the Black Carbon from fires in the Arctic weather. It's Dust that might be in this case. Come from the Sahara. Another actual Something else that we're really interested in that has a significant effect on the reflectively. Activity of the ice is blue green algae so we see cyanobacteria and that has a very large influence on the reflectively. So there are areas. Appreciate that have been documented does darkening over the last several years now Saharan. Dust is probably not the most important player here but people I know you and I know a colleague Jason Box that talks about suit in sort of black carbon. Jason has been looking at black carbon. He's also there. There are others Colleagues I now I was just talking to when I had a recent visit rutgers university diversity. We're looking at the influence of cyanobacteria on reflectively Particularly within these river systems that develop on the surface of the ice as it starts to melt in the summer Jason Box who used to be at Ohio State University is now at the Danish Meteorological Institute And the University of Copenhagen he Actually has a satellite product where he looks at how bright the surface of the ice sheet is and he's been able to clearly document darkening of the surface of the ice sheet over time as we've seen this increased melt. Take your your eyes are. Your eyes are sensitive to some of these very processes that we're talking about a very bright sunny day and yet a fresh snow cover. Are you ever heard of the concept of being snow blind. And that's because of the High Albie reflective of snow and you're I is a remote sensor. It's this using the visible where somebody's satellite so using different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum so this is really a good discussion of how we use some of those remote sensing techniques to study various aspects of the the system system. Now I want to kind of shift to sort of a final phase of questioning. I WANNA stay in crisis for your second name. We're going to go some different places but again whether we really do like to geek out out in sort of educate our listeners. Talk to.

Greenland University of Georgia Jason Box Franklin College of Arts and S Dr Tom Mode Rutgers University Hager Renato google NASA Tom Odin Stanford University Columbia U Saharan professor Associate Dean Sahara Abu Dhabi campus New York Baffin Bay
"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:40 min | 8 months ago

"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Rings. And I often get that question. And they're quite accurate. Would you when you get the question. How how accurate are these ice cores? What do you say I mean it's you can see very clearly the annual newell layers in these cores going back for Many cases thousands of years We could also date these quite accurately. There's certain events that we know so in terms of volcanic eruptions or even nuclear testing. We can use to date very particular years in those records and then going back further in time we have enough. Ah other kinds of records that you can put them together and get very accurate reconstructions of dates certainly within the past few thousand years and really very accurate reconduction reconstructions much further back in time. That talking with Dr. Tom Mode climatologists at the University of Georgia one of the most significant scientists look to be a fellow of two major professional all societies as a significant honor. So I always liked establish that you hear here on whether we're getting experts that can cut through a lot of what you might hear about the science and give you the the science as you need to understand in here it's a we rethink doctor. Tom Over taking time to appear on weather geeks. I want to shift a discussion. To sort of causation. With with these melt events these episodic events and then perhaps the longer term changes. Because I know from some of your work that there are these things that are happening. In the atmosphere we can geek out onto weather terms talking about atmospheric rivers and blocking highs sort of weather related. So let's talk about sort of perhaps these sort of short term weather related influences influences on these melt events and then maybe a larger context climate change. Certainly I mean a lot of our work. In the last five years has really been focused on looking at atmospheric blocking patterns Saturn's and how they are associated with Large Melt events on green that we know for example with this twenty event that we saw very pronounced atmospheric blocking blocking pattern that set up across the North Atlantic. Now when you say blocking pattern for those that may not know what a block or are you talking about a large blocking high. So we're talking about a large blocking Ridge located it across the North Atlantic Persistent in time Bringing in many cases You know on its Western flank. Also affecting lar- warm humid air masses up across the ice sheet And and we see these blocking patterns tend to be very persistent across greenland and when we have a negative face to the North Atlantic Oscillation. Now there's a nice geeky term that we probably need to spend a little time onto. What's the Arctic Oscillation? Well in this case we're just talking about the the North Atlantic Oscillation which is related to the okay and the North Atlantic. Oscillation is essentially a seesaw in pressuring temperatures between the Sub Tropics of the the Atlantic in the higher latitudes of the Atlantic and so when we have a positive phase we tend to have higher pressure and warmer temperatures in the tropics when we have a negative as we tend to have higher temperatures and higher pressures in the northern portion of the Atlantic. And we we see that we tend to see these persistent blocking patterns occur that are often often if they occur in the summer or often associated with large melt events in large mass loss events across greenland. So that's one of the things we've looked at. And then with one of my former PhD HD students who is now at Rutgers University. Kyle mattingly. We've been really looking at these. Atmospheric River Events So atmospheric rivers are a phenomenon especially those in the Western. The United States are very familiar with think about the pineapple express bringing in these plumes of moisture into the West. We also know that atmospheric rivers are very important for injecting moisture into the Arctic. And we find that when these atmospheric river events are active that they're bringing in at they're bringing in warm air but they're we're also bringing in in many cases thick low water bearing clouds that are also very important in melt processes in the ice sheet because these low oh liquid liquid phase clouds Produce a lot of down welling long wave energy that helps keep the ice sheet warm and leads to these. He's melt events right. So we see that there are these meteorological connections and so important point. I want to make here because there are some in the world that say climate scientists Sir overreacting and they sort of just jumped right to the climate change Lincoln. Now what you just heard Dr Mo talk about sort of atmospheric circulation relation and patterns that we know are associated with these melts events and you had mentioned earlier this. Most recent event in two thousand nineteen was very much related to the extreme heat wave in Europe. And I'm sure that's related to the the Ridge blocking pattern that you heard him talk about however we cannot sort of divorce ourselves.

North Atlantic Oscillation North Atlantic blocking Ridge greenland Tom Over Europe Sub Tropics Dr. Tom Mode Kyle mattingly United States Rutgers University University of Georgia
"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:17 min | 8 months ago

"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Use of other kinds of satellite data like landside imagery. And we know that through the nineteen sixty s and nineteen seventies nineteen eighties that Greenland was. Roughly in balance it was gaining about not as much is through. Snowfall was losing through melting icebergs calving off but again since about one thousand nine hundred. We've seen a very significant loss of mass us from Greenland on the order in the past decade or so of about two hundred and eighty giga tons of ice per year. Roughly takes about three hundred sixty giga tons of ice tweet Equal One millimeter of sea level rise. So yes so. There's there's the so what I think. Many climatologists see Greenland and and West. Arctic ice sheet and others as sort of bellwethers canaries in coalmines. If you will I know some people are wondering because you mentioned past melt events before we had satellites. How do we get that type of information? Before the era of satellite so a couple of ways one is that we have we do have temperature records and we can use those temperature records with models that we have to be able to even though the temperature records themselves are the long term temperature records from coastal stations. That are not on the ice sheet. Only there's about ten percent of them. The margin of Greenland has not covered by ice. But we can use that with models to You you know to reconstruct what the melt record looked on the ice sheet but we also can look at course you can actually look at annual layers in the ice cores and you can see where there are melt layers that formed. That's how we know for example that this twenty twelve event and again twenty nineteen event that occurred at the top of the ice sheet. We know that there were previous melt events again in the eighteen eighties and then back Prior to that during essentially the medieval warm period yeah and these climate proxies are very commonly used using climate science. We use ice cores. We have a colleague at the University of Georgia that core does lake sediment cores tree rings. And I often get that question. And they're quite accurate. Would you when you get the question. How how accurate are these ice cores? What do you say I mean it's you can see very clearly the annual newell layers in these cores going back for Many cases thousands of years We could also date these quite.

Greenland Snowfall coalmines University of Georgia
"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:53 min | 8 months ago

"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Hadn't really been doing any work on this in real time basis and of course we're we're looking at other aspects of climate associated with Both energy and the mass balance of the green dice sheet but I I hadn't been working in Greenland England I hadn't been working on side during the For a number of years leading up to twenty twelve I had a colleague of mine from Rutgers University away still continue to work with Mussa runner. Mom She happened to be working on the ice sheet at that time and she actually contacted me and she reached out and said you know. I'd like you to look at the satellite data real time because we're seeing something really really remarkable happening here the Watson River which is a major river that runs past a former. US Air Base at the formerly the Saunder. Strong airbase now the Greenlandic Greenlandic town of Kangerlussuaq saw the bridge. This bridge had been there for decades. Wash out this bridge washed out from meltwater coming off of the ice sheet. Said you need look at the satellite product and see what's happening and so we took a look at it and saw that essentially the entire surface of the ice sheet was melting. And something that we hadn't seen before including even even up to the highest elevations of the ice sheet that reach over ten thousand feet. That's over ten thousand feet above sea level so these are places where the average temperature is something like minus minus thirty Celsius and these are very called areas And you know we went on to publish some work from that. And some of the some of our colleagues who've who've looked at some of the ice cores from the what we call summit the highest elevation of the Ice Sheet. We're finding that they had not seen any ice layers that had formed Prior to this event Since the eighteen eighties and before that we think the last time that we saw melt event at the highest elevations of the she probably was somewhere around the year. Lebanon hundred so this was really an unusual event and anomalous event and certainly there is evidence that you've seen it before in the natural record because I know that there will be some. Okay well. I'm sure this has happened naturally. And I WANNA Kinda get into this sort of natural variability to weather related aspects of this and the climate change aspects but fast forward to recent sometimes as well and I'm going to read some notes provided by our producer of this particular podcast. They are dealing hand was a former student of both of ours. Yes they are dealing ham here at the at. The Weather Channel Sarah Rights on June thirteenth of this year twenty nineteen greenland experience more than two GIG tons of ice melt in one day you you were quoted in an article saying that this was unusual but not unprecedented. Now you've just given his contacts with two thousand twelve event tell us about why or how this more more. Recent event fits in the context with that event and other events. This year was a very interesting summer. So we had this very large melt event in twenty twelve in fact if you look at the amount of melt and the amount of mass loss from Greenland. We've seen this really accelerating loss through since about nineteen ninety eight and really peaking in twenty twelve. We saw a a year following that in two thousand thirteen. That was much cooler than we've seen in the past. Two decades are most for the past two decades but then again seen a number of years with Greater than average melt and greater than average loss of ice from the ice sheet but this year was really kind of unusual in that we saw a quite a bit of melt occurring on the sheet. But it occurred mostly very early in the summer season again really late in the summer season so we had this really large melt event loss of a lot of ice in early June. We typically you see a peak and Mel sometime around the beginning of July usually the first two weeks of July and we had fairly typical conditions this year but then we had a really large melt event again at at the very end of July and the beginning of August sort of which is sorta tends to be toward the end of the melt season in Greenland. That later event was particularly interesting because because it followed immediately after the European heatwave that occurred in late July so if you may remember we had this heatwave that occurred temperatures well above one hundred degrees Fahrenheit in parts of France France the Benelux countries across much of continental Europe. A few days later after that we saw another melt event across the started in eastern part of Greenland. Most of the time these melt events come across western Greenland move up higher and higher elevations. This one came across from the East eastern Greenland and. Actually we saw again melt at the highest just allocation of the ice sheet. This summer But we were able to go back. We've I'm I'm doing some work with students now. We're actually have been able to go back and track. The origins origins of this late July event to the European heat wave awhile and we are back on the weather. PODCASTS awesome talking with Dr. Tom Moat from the University of Georgia about all things Greenland from a science perspective He's studied greenland from satellites. He's been on on the Greenland.

Greenland Greenlandic Greenlandic Watson River Rutgers University US Kangerlussuaq Saunder Lebanon Sarah Rights Dr. Tom Moat Europe producer Mel France University of Georgia
"greenland" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

09:02 min | 9 months ago

"greenland" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"And if you want to see that in action you should watch the video we made. The project will put a link to that insurance. He can sit and Humble Brag by the way the video was recently named as a finalist in the shorty social. Good awards awesome next to you have dips out on the Caribbean coming. Hang out with speaking to the guy that hades up the turtle conservancy fantastic. They're alive clue rural library. Google to search for travel today It had one of those funny sort of graphics at the top. That's different the hang on google doodle Google doodle. It was a woman wearing like an old style. Leather Flying Helmet. He's it's an. I've checked her out and she was an aviation pioneer. I'd never heard off before. which is you know women doing anything? It takes a long time to get recognition. But his name is moored and she called herself Laura's so more Loris Bonnie and she was the first woman to fly solo from Australia to England should do that in one thousand nine hundred ninety three and a other fates that she did as as well. She was the first person of any gender to fly from Australia to South Africa. Showing from Brisbane to Capetown. That's a lot of water. And he's all right so noni running thirty three and nineteen thirty seven. She did thirty three trip to England Innate Gypsy moth which is a tiny biplane tiny. And then the trip that you deep from Brisbane to Cape Town in another aircraft which is not a lot bigger either. It's just unbelievable how brave she must've according to do that. And how competent credible and do you want me to tell you who has tried Tourism going. It's a news outlet outlet called skift. Okay skit why not give yeah. This was Come up with the pen today on great trouble news whips on Super Phil. Don't mind smart idea of them to trademark. That would gift. He's now a reminded to join facebook. Great great to just search for the world nomads podcast. We share some behind the scenes stuff. Including what will I'm Ed. Staff have been up to recently global programs marketing manager Perry. Climb Mount Kilimanjaro. Majora spock's conversation Certainly inspired one of group members Ian to rethink climbing. Because he's dead did it when he was young. Many many years ago we they to in spy fill is absolutely. That wasn't convenient you. I'm just wondering what do you mean really are rethinking as in history because dead. It did because he's dead. Did it picture of Perry. Who's just donors suddenly? It's achievable Altitude sickness yeah. She's doing it and found. The toilets are pretty gross on the way clay up needs outdoor and adventure travel writer. He's kayaked the fjords Autzen Greenland absolutely and we. I actually got did took us a couple of days even actually get to see the the actual ice sheet because we were used as we got into the fjords we were paddling. And all of these chunks of ice and icebergs ranging from the size of buildings and houses down to the size of cars and even and basically like the ice cubes in your glass You know we got to a a a section of the yard and we took a hike and then we actually got to see the the large glacier that Kinda came about a series of glaciers that formed the Lord's ice sheet that ran like I think fifteen hundred miles north of their size big joint or he's as an quite a large plight. Yeah it is. It's the I guess. The the world's largest island and I had to fly all the way to Europe to get back to Greenland which is actually on the North American continent. So that was the beauty of it is. It's kind of remote. It's kind of a been an article as well. I almost think it it was actually harder to get to greenland than it wants to get an article which is a spectacular. You know I was actually on an expedition cruise ship and Artika so assault. Many more people roll a metre even though it was only like maybe three hundred people owned the on the ship. But when I was in an an green on it was like me A couple of other guys and then and our God so I saw four people for the or the bulk of our kayaking Porsche so I saw less people in Greenland than I saw an an article. It was a it was actually a very unique experience to to be there and it's just a once again. You understand how you have to have a real sense of survival and kind of just a knack for wanting to to live and thrive in a very inhospitable environment. I've got this image inside my hid. About what a peddling up a field looks like an eye steep sided jeffco image. I've got is it like that or the other a bit more open as you pedal Yup yeah. They're they're actually pretty. These were pretty open to some degree. Then you got into the The fjords of Norway were jump. You you know high mountain peaks that come straight down into the water and It was a little bit more open than that. It was but yet it was still pretty much The sides of the fjord kind of went up a little bit High the peak sworn is high on on the sides. So I guess it didn't seem as as tall and kind of rugged but yet there's no trees in Greenland most of its shrubbery. That grows really low to the ground due you to the to the environment so yeah it was more of a almost like a Tiger most like a Tundra type experience pretty of today and Wildlife Seals Caribou. Most of it saw a lot of birds. We saw some Some Eagles and what southbound bear unique was that the the water was almost jet black. I guess maybe because of how deep it was or whatever then you got like this is and then you. Can you know the different colored. Is You know the bluish the Hawaii. So it's it's a very dramatic landscape. It was like it almost was kind of eerie. You know as you're paddling along in this lack water and then you can hear the ice cracking. You're not really you know you don't have any other sounds coming in from other communities or you know any any any other outside noise. Whatever you're hearing is like the the ice cracking or melting or the ice turning in the water is it's it's changing its form orm? Will you afraid of ice. Carving and cassette can be really dangerous when a big chunk of water. Well we were. We actually could not even get into the opening to that in particular fjord where glacier that was producing all the ice because it was so congested But we did take out a hike. To the top of the weekend. Came ashore ashore then hiked up to the top of this Bluff were able to see the actual the end of the glacier. It's actually capping off. You could hear it you could. It was pretty dramatic but then you could see how congested it was all trying to go out like this little bottle neck and so is it melted or is it tied change changed. It would kind of allow some of Kinda get pushed out in his more ice was being pushed off of the glacier. It would candidate push more of it out of that that small the opening it was almost a unique experience. I've seen the calving in Antarctica and it was much more wide open as opposed to these narrow channels. We now. Oh It's pretty remote in this. You know. Many towns villages along the it's a heady prepay. Faw An expedition like that. I come from a kayaking background and a sea kayaking instructor saw had a little bit of a a little bit of a head. Start ahead of a couple of the two guys that were with us when they were kind of newbies to to that so of course the the guide service we went with a headache everything. We needed paddling jackets. I even had the little peddling hoagies little myths that you would over your paddle just because of the the watertown. We had the spray skirts to keep any water out of the cop yet because the water itself as you know you could easily get hypothermia really quickly quickly and you know he obviously went over instruction somebody does go in the water. You know we all go ashore to the quickest point that we can get to immediately. After can we get the person out of the water. Because we've obviously got to build a fire Get them warmed up. Get Out of their wet clothes. Get him onto some dry clothes. Obviously you know that happened It was a injury free risk free trip so I've just jumped onto youtube and found the SI- the sound of cracking inside here. It's not ingrained landed in Canada in BC..

Google Greenland Brisbane Perry Cape Town England Australia Autzen Greenland turtle conservancy Mount Kilimanjaro facebook youtube Europe Majora spock Norway assault hypothermia headache watertown
"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

"In the interview is to folding chairs right at the edge of breath drop-off ryan and it went on forever and it was cold. Conan doesn't wasn't wearing a jack so he he kind of endured an iceland greenlandic interview right and then when then something happened after that that in a way who's who's kind of a little result of the preparation we did we wrote <hes> a greeting for conan to say in <hes> three in greenlandic when we landed and we had the cue cards and the greenlandic language the words are so long vowel heavy. They're funny. They're just funny to see. Apparently greenlandic has the longest word in any language yeah. It's like multiple lines long forward yeah yeah no language language is just crazy and we ended up not doing shooting the greeting and we're like we'll. Let's grab the green in town because it's because the idea was you hear conan doing this greeting and butchering the language and then i think jesse was your idea at one point he would cut to the cue card and that would really get got a big laugh. When you see the words he's trying to actually read so then after that long interviews they asked him to do the weather or i think we'd pitched again. We pitched him doing the weather and they're like we will sure yeah so it was going to be him with the with the other weather person and she'd go and then he'd go and we you were kind of approaching it and it was getting a little like linear thinking of things to improvise and write code and then i forget who i think conan conan was just like let's let me do it. Try to do it in their language and then we're like yes we'll do the reverse shot basically jesse's idea but even funnier prompter and then it was moving it was moving and he's trying to keep up and end up being one of the funniest things on the shop yes yeah but that's an example of an really aired in greenland. Yes it did that. That's going to shoot someone with an idea and he ended up repurposing purposing it those cards home yeah. They seem pretty. I ah i mean they seemed willing to air whenever we gave them they were. They're hungry for contests the greenland. I love their showroom cracking up. It was so funny really fun but it's also i mean i'm always struck doc by whenever you meet other. Even our crew the camera guys in the audio guy that we're working for us there there. They could have been crew people here. You know everyone else like they've got cool haircuts and cool tattoos and you know they were all black and it's like oh. That's just a guy that you'd meet in l._a. Who does audio audio somewhere but those they live remote part of the world. Has you know that you have no contact with right. It is weird. It's a weird appeared. Artificial bonding that quickly becomes real bonding that were all thrown together to make this one thing and <hes>. Maybe i shouldn't talk about team bonding. Y just sounded convoluted to me. I'm just being self conscious. Sorry way finding no one thing. Jason always does a really good job of is you like go out with the crew. You'll go too far with grew yeah. Yeah we went to the bars called short rights adding their brewery so we went to daddy's yes so you get more intel everyone. I meet along the way then then. Maybe you'll tell us that like people are married that i don't need and stuff like that where the country where someone was married and i didn't megyn there were a couple that i didn't realize they were a couple. I vaguely okay a daddy's..

conan conan jesse greenlandic greenland ryan iceland l._a Jason
"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

"The world's largest suitcase stuffed with props and those are like security blankets. It's like just knowing like conan love shutting them as we go and like like when you actually bring it is like no no no but then we always have them there but the best thing you have to tell us about the proxy took on the actual plane took on to happy meals to mcdonald's happy meals their nose. The whole premise of this show was conan loves trump's idea to buy greenland conan's going to greenland to the to bargain to do the bargain and actually make the purchase happen so he's coming armed so greenland when he's done it will be part of america. He's bringing. Some of americana rewards george. Everything's or sway them right. Yeah grease the wheel. I don't wanna put you happy meals. In the back of obama the playing and it smashed right you just brought him on the plane plane there zip lock so there was no odor right but i just carry them in a small duffle then the best thing was it. You were determined to bring them back. Yes i do that with all the props even like the things that we destroy the clearly things they say like. Just leave it there. Don't worry about it. We can get that anywhere. I always end up bringing them back then. No it makes them mad. Slash makes makes them happy. This will they are are they always bring it back to having meals with over three. You know we were there for how long days two flights back and forth. I walked with the happy meals and they were just like what are you doing. They ended up being snapped. All all doing about property tasted justice yeah right yeah. Should we talk about the end of the greenland show and the prob in yeah now. It's a little jumping to going. Okay good yeah so there were so we threw through things together and then wednesday night we took off and we overnight flight say we rarely do red eye right into working for this kind of had landed on thursday morning and i don't know how you told the iceland crew when we start rolling. We don't stop right for hours and hours and you always want yeah. There's some sort of warning running and they again. They were really really excited. Yes so they were like whatever you say. We're on board yeah and so we we had to because we're in a jet. We had to land one specific airport. That had a long enough runway. Greenland is all rock so you know. Most of the runways are short. There are no roads connecting acting any of the cities of the flat every you have to fly or take a boat to every city selling this you have to come in to check for customs like any international flights to land just one city okay so we had a land and air stamper passport life sucks and then we had to get on another propeller plane and fly to the capital which was neck and then the second we got out. There starts shooting on the tarmac like literally get the camera out. There here comes conan conan on the plane..

Greenland conan obama mcdonald america trump iceland
"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

"I. Hey mentioned yeah well because we were in a meeting and chilean me. You'd actually mentioned greenland. Yes what do you think of greenland before. That just seems like no one ever goes there. I mean come out like you can probably do a lot of things you do in iceland but not just in greenland but no one goes to greenland going places that we've no one would go to yes so earlier earlier in the week on monday. We had our first like oh where we're gonna go next. We had the meeting and iceland was in the forefront was one of the frontrunners and that's when she'll let me as you just said like hey why not that giant island next time iceland greenland and you know we i that i love that you pitched the greenland on a monday and thursday. That's when this story broke ass spend and then it was like oh yeah let's do it worked out great with a little help from the president so and jose you had you had mentioned i think is a negative that jordan is also really into isolate so we were worried that we were going to have to do is a fan of iceland and and it's also very touristy i it's been it's been discovered and everything so people go there. Yeah greenland has is sort of not not on anybody's i travel agenda and or second or third only has fifty seven thousand people in and and three times bigger than texas. Yes you're quoting from the chef and the show's quoting from wikipedia. That's for most of our yeah. Yes i mean once. We decided we kind of all met on monday right. After a weekend of the story had it kind of percolating in those and there was that whole weekend jeff ross inch lemay were researching feelers well research now how to get their lights yeah related to get there right and here's the other thing sure okay trout's by greenland okay. Let's go there but of course worse with the new cycles now like especially at trump story by sunday greenland could be so far in the rear view mirror 'cause of eight million in other things nuclear war exactly on a hurricane so the we're trying to you know you don't wanna get do all this work and and here's a show and they're like look that was that was forty eight hours ago so we were monitoring that meanwhile yes s. lemme in jeff rouse look into travel and whoever thought about how to get to greenland a your. We're about to tell you how hard it is to get really hard either. Go through iceland or copenhagen right but like there's only one flight a day from copenhagen in the morning at nine a._m. This every other day out of iceland like it'd be really really hard to get there right with a camera so very last minute and from l._a. So l._a. Especially to my three planes right we'd have to fly overplay by many hours to get to go to copenhagen copenhagen and then wait than for this one flight go back. Yeah crazy figured it out right well. We we had the only way way to do it. Was we had to charter a plane. Yes to fly directly and and we had to limit the number we i usually take more people limit. I mean it's literally like you can't tonight. Normal gear we bring our normal gear and we couldn't bring one of our one one of our cameramen and our sound nearly eleven of us go yes and so we just decided okay. Let's hire a camera crew in greenland england which we never do and we found a crew there and that they became part of the story a little that was another thing also like normally emily. We've decided to go to start looking to that country and there's a whole list of fixtures that we can hire ryan key explaining what fixtures six years i local person on the ground from that country who would help us with like permiting locations legit logistics vehicles right murders and they usually have a lot of their fixers. They mostly do yeah because a lot of countries go..

greenland iceland greenland england copenhagen jeff ross jeff rouse wikipedia president ryan jordan jose texas forty eight hours six years
"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

"A high mike sweeney jesse gaskell. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you for listening. Yes we are. We have just finished wrapping. Greenland show up this and it aired tuesday aired on tuesday. I hope you liked it. Yes up. Everyone liked to a lot of work. It was a fair amount of work. We thought today hey we talked to some of the team went to greenland and talk. I think it's interesting to see how it came about because it was all well like it was about a week from start to finish yes. It was unlikely attack. Yeah and many people mobilized quickly and once everyone is mobilized it was non-stop till the show was screened for live audience. Literally the finishing touches put put on fifteen fifteen minutes yeah screening screening so it it was that was batting and we're gonna get into all that but i we found somebody a fan. One of conan and of inside conan was at the screening and she has a tattoo on her forearm with the inside conan opponent art right so we this stunning. We talked to her as a intervention. Even those too late i do think there there are ways to have those removes so so we thought it was important to talk to her. I don't know i actually think this is sort of a gauntlet for our other fans true where where's your tattoos and hers mom. I think we're posing using the picture of her tattoo. I think others yes should answer the call and bigger and on the face. Maybe a face sir should actually map yes scale so have their faces all over your face yes. I like it good so here she yes. We're here with jackie hijack. Hello thank you for being here. I literally jesse just grabbed you out of the dark audience. We're about to do the greenland show screening and we had to grab because you have an inside conan tattoo tattoo i do. Oh my god. It's beautiful. Can you can see it right now. Well on your forearms. Yes the little touch up with the colors but seidler. It's it's a mini anatomy lesson. That's amazing code into autographed too. He actually signed your arm. Yes that was back in november the tour in detroit in detroit so you went to the show in detroit yes that that great that was great theater was and he signed it and you. How long did you get because you can't shower correct at all out in the rain. You can't do anything now exactly. Did people ask what people think of this <hes>. They like it honest yeah even if they don't like recognize right away that it's cone in there like you know they. They think it's a really cool tattoos ostracize. Eh disowned by family. We're your family. Now you ever need anything yeah and you mentioned earlier you. You said you were stationed somewhere and then yet to so you are in the armed services yeah some in their four sexual assault. Oh wow that's great now. And where are you based now right right now. I'm in ohio okay. Where'd you go. Did you grow up in the military or no. No i actually am from ohio but around all over the place place for twelve years and i just got stationed back in ohio oh this is that a good thing. I wanted to get out soon. Yeah exactly i the world's. I'm ready to go again so i'm afraid to other tattoos. This is it. Are you serious yeah holy cow. I assume that you were going to have the full bill. Maher is such an honor to wow. That's amazing. What can i ask. What does a conan tattoo. Get you in the military like do you get extra extra to mashed potatoes. <hes> oh i don't know yet i haven't extra spag kudos from some of the younger people actually follow conan and stuff so that's great oh aw and you must be making a lot of moolah in the military because you're flying all over the detroit and then i saw the show in minneapolis now you're in l._a. We'll maybe you're doing the flank because you're in the air for right. Yeah iran thinks it's fleet week. I know you're in the air. Force does air force..

conan detroit Greenland jesse gaskell ohio mike sweeney jackie assault iran Maher l._a minneapolis fifteen fifteen minutes twelve years
"greenland" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"greenland" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The female narrow just fine without the tusk no it's actually one of the front tooth to one of the frontier sorry it's the left one in fact in in the skull you can find the right one which is small and just remains inside the skull and the left one at some point in male starts to wrap although i have to say sometimes there are females with tusks and sometimes there are males without so it's not you know it's not compete the absolute that we actually use the tusk to determine whether it's a male or female otherwise we'd have to flip the way upside down and whatnot we don't want to do that so we just say if you have a tough gets a boy if it does not to girl when that happens so what's the next step in your studies now tag what do you what would you really want to know what is the bottom line joining well this first paper was really sort of just one step in the way what we really are interested in is the effects of arrogant pulse has on the animals and on pulses are used in seismic exploration to look for oil and gas and they are fairly high amplitude sound and there's a lot of interest by there's all companies in prospecting around greenland and east and west of greenland is basically where most of the narrows of the world's hang out and of course we feel like it's really important to know what the effects of of the sounds are on this animal which is really pretty forty known so you say the big question big picture question is how the nor walls might be affected by human mates out do you have any preliminary data that how do you think they might respond well we only know that when people do vessel based surveys you know when they go out and count them marine mammals narrows are very rarely seen even when those vessels go through areas where aerial surveys have shown that there are thousands of whales and so they are very sensitive they seem to be very sensitive to underwater sound i have only about a minute i'm sorry to interrupt because i'm always interesting scientists get into their line of work.

greenland
"greenland" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

Pat Gray Unleashed

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"greenland" Discussed on Pat Gray Unleashed

"It's like a riddle again in math when you multiply two negatives turns positive and in grammar when you use two negatives innocence it makes it a positive statement of you never had no one to hear you that means you did have someone right okay this today is a day everybody see them poor tokyo china everything it's a great day tokyo china the congo the island of of marites i'll of man the isle of man game change hashtag jiggle portugal is celebrating today i slid greenland nova scotia newfoundland they're all out okay we can't go into candidate because i know those are just province backup to greenland greenland celebrate in greenland green the green not it's freaking originally that's why it was greenland because it used to be green that's why no no yes and then what happened climate change oh yeah i know is believe in north korea in quote is that what rodman said i picked up on that one yeah i believe korea you so emotional there it was hard to understand what he was saying the sticker waiting to happen that is weird stuff but he's of taking credit for all of this and maybe i don't know maybe he did have something to do with it i don't know maybe the basketball diplomacy sort of set the stage for all of this he said something like what obama is completely ignored it like yeah no interest so that's why he's wearing a makeamericagreatagain cap now he's a donald trump fan.

portugal north korea rodman obama tokyo greenland nova scotia greenland greenland greenland basketball
"greenland" Discussed on WPUL Radio 1590

WPUL Radio 1590

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"greenland" Discussed on WPUL Radio 1590

"Bad tom the council the greenland now before i way muffler play who was living with nothing oh new yeah union gosh following god cher arch five surrey man tired time we are for zip heard barrels those two lanes mm.

greenland
"greenland" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"greenland" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"One possible way for the water to reach the bedrock and from there the ocean is a crevasse or a crack in the ice when cracks filled with water the way to the water forces than deeper and deeper this is how fracking works to extract natural gas from deep within the earth pressurized fluids fracture rocks all it takes is a crack to get started well we recently discovered that there are cracks available in the greenland ice sheet near this glacier off you can fly over most of the greenland ice sheet and seen nothing no cracks no features on the surface but as his helicopter flies towards the coast to the past that water would take on its quest to flow downhill one crack appears then another and another are these cracks filled with liquid water and if so how deep do they take that water can they take it to the bedrock and the ocean to answer these questions we need something beyond remotesensing data we need numeric models i write numeric models that run on supercomputers numeric model is simply a set of equations that works together to describe something it can be as simple as the next number in a sequence one three five seven or it can be a more complex set of equations the predict the future based on known conditions on the present in our case what are the equations for how ice cracks well engineers already have a very good understanding of how aluminum steel and plastics fracture under stress.

natural gas greenland
"greenland" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"greenland" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"This ted talk features place he outages kristen wehner recorded live ted 2017 if you're enjoying ted talks than we think you'll like kenneth lack of erez ted book why dinosaurs matter what can long dead dinosaurs teach us about our future plenty according to paleontologist kennedy lack of era who is discovered some of the largest creatures to ever walk the earth go on a remarkable journey back to win dinosaurs roamed the earth to discover fundamental truce about our own humanity as we move into an uncertain environmental future it has never been more important to understand the past why dinosaurs matter is a great reminder that are place on this planet is both precarious and potentially fleeting available now wherever you buy your books when i was twenty one years old i had all this physics homework physics homework requires taking breaks and wicket pdo is relatively new so i took a lot of breaks there i kept going back to the same articles reading them again and again on glaciers antarctica and greenland how cool would it be to visit these places and what would it take to do so well here we are on the repurpose air force cargo plane operated by nasa flying over the greenland ice sheet there's a lot to see here but there's more than his hidden waiting to be uncovered what the wicket pedia articles didn't tell me is that there's liquid water hidden inside the ice sheet because we didn't know that yet.

kristen wehner ted kenneth erez ted kennedy nasa greenland twenty one years
"greenland" Discussed on The Weekly Planet

The Weekly Planet

01:31 min | 3 years ago

"greenland" Discussed on The Weekly Planet

"But that's the i would love it to be greenland and especially because then we'd have the sevenperson tame yet but like logistically it wouldn't work because you couldn't like i know people like all day you know they put flashing suicide squad again he could do that five minutes the his have him pretend he's going to a costume feeding you put him in office with a grain screen you fill but then you put him in a bank vault lighter five minutes but this you'd have to secretly cast somebody greenland to yes and then filming on a grains curtailment film with the other act i as it's maybe not necessarily but you i guess you could yet he could composite together but in the end result would be some people are surprised that grain lantern is in the as yet what's the what's the playoff most people they like point and go tonight do movie is he can he heard superman is always great grain the thing that's most like to play but i don't think it is yet to the show up but one of emotional life i hope six credits i think so they'll have i mean they may i mentioned in the trial in them and the trial i did i mention because like no krypton ians another latins yeah but there's no lanterns jerrold nadler d'antoni in qatar dna which means as one will that implies that first of all that he knows about superman yet pain there and that's why he's gonna be that's why is inviting because men's gone but it also implies that they were.

greenland qatar five minutes