35 Burst results for "greenland"

Police Say Nearly 250 Arrested in Minnesota Pipeline Protest

MSNBC Rachel Maddow (audio)

01:52 min | Last week

Police Say Nearly 250 Arrested in Minnesota Pipeline Protest

"People turned out in pretty large numbers in northern minnesota this week. More than a thousand people there to protest the construction of a new multi-billion dollar oil pipeline a pipeline that among other things would cross through the delicate headwaters of the mississippi river. The protesters are trying to block that new pipeline and all the environmental hazards that it brings with it. A separate group of protesters made their way into one of the new pipelines pump stations. That's currently under construction. They piled a whole bunch of stuff including a vote at the entrance way so nobody could get in or out. The demonstrators then started locking themselves to the construction equipment bodily at at that site that had the effect of shutting down all work on on the pipeline for the day. Eventually police showed up. They started dragging protesters through the dirt to arrest them. About two hundred. People were arrested just at the pump station but the response by law enforcement wasn't just a local one in terms of local minnesota police officers. Look at this. This is a helicopter belonging to the federal government. Us customs and border patrol cv. Pista flew this helicopter. Really low dangerously low over this pipeline protest using the rotor wash from the chopper to blow dirt and debris all over the place apparently to try to get those protesters to leave see. Bp now says they are investigating the use of that helicopter. You're not supposed to use a government helicopter like that even if it is against protestors especially if it's against protestors this pipeline which is called line three it's pipeline by a company called bridge it was approved greenland under president trump. The protesters are pushing for president biden to suspend the permit for the pipeline before construction on it finished about two hundred. Protesters are camped. Out along the pipeline. Saying we won't stop pushing. They're not saying they won't leave

Minnesota Mississippi River Pista Federal Government BP President Biden United States Greenland
Dogged by Mideast crisis, Blinken visits Denmark

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | Last month

Dogged by Mideast crisis, Blinken visits Denmark

"Secretary of state Anthony Blinken is in Denmark for talks on climate change arctic policy on Russia as cools mount the great to U. S. effort in bringing about a Gaza Israel sees far we're shown Sunday calls for an immediate ministerial level session of the quartet of Middle East peacemakers discuss the escalating Israeli Palestinian crisis but it was not a valid indication that the US would agree I'm no son Lincoln was planning changes to his travel plans the card could have HIM returning late Thursday off to a brief stop in Greenland the U. N. held an urgent session about the Mideast situation on Sunday after which the U. S. ambassador to the United Nations Linda Thomas greenfield said the administration was working tirelessly through diplomatic channels to stop the fighting I'm

Secretary Of State Anthony Bli Denmark Arctic Gaza Russia Israel Middle East U. Lincoln Greenland Linda Thomas Greenfield United States United Nations
Electric SUVs Star in a New Off-Road Racing Series

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 2 months ago

Electric SUVs Star in a New Off-Road Racing Series

"The sport of off road racing cars and trucks speed over. Desert sand buddy fields and rocky terrain usually these vehicles have gas guzzling engines but a new off road race series called extreme e uses electric. Suv's they're really bauer food. They're quite big and they raise very fast around any kind of surface so they can go about one hundred and forty miles an hour on sand over rocks. That alejandro gog extremists. Founder and ceo. He says the five race series which started earlier. This month will showcase the potential of electric vehicles. But we thought we go one step beyond that and we good promote electric cars on the most remote corners of the planet that are affected by climate. Change the first race was held in the desert of saudi arabia. To highlight water scarcity. Another event planned for august will be held in front of a retreating glacier in greenland on land that was once covered in ice in each location extremely will support research and conservation. Work in the races will be televised. So god says they provide an opportunity to increase awareness about climate change among fans watching at home and inspire new people to get involved in climate

Alejandro Gog Saudi Arabia Greenland
Main opposition party against mining wins Greenland election

AP News Radio

00:50 sec | 2 months ago

Main opposition party against mining wins Greenland election

"Britain's main opposition party which is against an international mining project involving uranium and other metals on the octagon and who's emerged as the biggest party in an election vote with all those now counted the left leaning community of the people party has secured thirty seven percent entitling it to twelve seats in the Greenlandic National Assembly in the victory speech the party chairman says a strong environmental agenda this helped it stand out at the heart is a proposed international mining project by Greenland minerals and Australia based company with Chinese ownership which is seeking a license to operate a mine in southern Greenland the community polity is opposed to the project and is urging it to be stopped for environmental reasons I'm Charles the last month

Greenlandic National Assembly People Party Britain Greenland Minerals Australia Greenland Charles
Greenland Election Shows Divide Over Rare-Earth Metals Mine

NEWS 88.7 Programming

00:21 sec | 2 months ago

Greenland Election Shows Divide Over Rare-Earth Metals Mine

"Votes are being counted following parliamentary elections in Greenland. The results could decide the future off mining for rare earth metals on the Arctic island. The two main political parties are deeply divided on whether to grant a license to an international company to mine for uranium and other rare earth metals in the south of the

Arctic Island Greenland
Could we colonize Mars?

The How in the World Podcast

02:17 min | 2 months ago

Could we colonize Mars?

"Are really only two options of other places in our solar system where humans could go to colonize mars and the moon and why not the other planets. Well the short answer to that is none of the others could be habitable. Even on their best days mercury and venus the two planets closer to the sun than us are just too dang hot among other things and once you get beyond mars which is one planet further away from the sun from us. Those other planets are either too cold or they made up primarily of gases. So it'd be like trying to live on a cloud pretty much so yes but a very terrible poisonous cloud is trying to kill. Yeah i don't like the sound of that at all. no but what about the moon. Why don't we colonize the moon. I we've already landed on it if we're so hell bent on colonizing something else. Why not the man okay. Good question. I've had the same thought. I recently read an article on the national space society website that provided this analogy with. I thought made a lot of sense so back. In the days of columbus the age of exploration some would call it. Europe was kind of the earth of today. It's where most first world people lived. Okay europeans were trying to explore unknown. Parts of the world that they could colonize so compare the moon to greenland and mars to north america con. Greenland was much closer to europe than was north america but it was only a stopping overplays. It just didn't have the natural resources that were needed and it wasn't large enough to create a real viable indigenous society. Gotcha north america on. The other hand was teeming with natural resources and was plenty large enough so to get their people. Had to be of hardy stock. Yep these were the kind of people who could be successful. So think of mars as north america in the fourteen hundreds and the earth as europe in the fourteen hundreds.

National Space Society Greenland North America Columbus Europe
"greenland" Discussed on The Film Vault

The Film Vault

06:15 min | 3 months ago

"greenland" Discussed on The Film Vault

"A clients die so she doesn't want these people to die. And i think that that's not a check in her favor. She's she's sitting. Here's an interesting sort of social experiment. Watch this is a good movie. Watched this movie and think to yourself. Who is worse. peter. English is character. Rosemont pike's character for me is open shut rosemond bites character. They're both russa gras. But i both have killer instinct in a. She was a clever story and it was. It was a cleverly routine story and it was essentially what the story is that in the thumbnail. Sketch is it's a predator taking it says so in the setup. She's talking about it. There's takers and you know take. He's essentially who take and people get taken its predator. Who's taking Advantage of her pray and then one apprai- turns out to be a bigger predator than she is announced to her. And then that's the catalyst for the entire story like house is going to play out. These two predators now are facing off which i found interesting. I think it would be a good book right for sure. And it worked on a lot of levels as a movie. I was entertained. However i did have my wife chirping in my ear. 'cause she watched it with me and she's the went blanket so you can. She's plus social worker aspect. She wet blankets the entire Movie going experience for most movies. You watch with this woman. I thought maybe this would be a good one to watch what they're within twenty minutes explaining me why it's because she's a social worker so she understands how it goes to become someone's guardian. How hard that is so. She's pointing out Plot holes and then she's talking to me about how it seems like a lifetime movie which it doesn't but she thought it and telling me how dumb the movie is. So she she. She did all she could to ruin it. I even said hey. Look i'm gonna go watch it out front. You know you should watch. I should've just put my pension of disbelief element you have to fall far too convenient but it but it. It serves the plot. It serves the fact that we have by this woman. Is this criminal mastermind. I liked this movie. It's like a perfect net flicks movie movie. That's almost made for netflix. I probably would have gotten limited release In theaters for wasn't for the plague but Some really strong characters she's fantastic throughout peter glitches great as always. The lawyer shows up was fucking love that entire fantastic. He he was he was senior. You will probably wouldn't recognize the research or not but he was unrecognizable. because he was the sidekick to irregulars main villain in birds of prey. He was the blonde haired dude. Died head died long. I mean i remember. I remember mcgregor's coach. He was fantastic. But i barely remember a psychic. It was and then dianne wiest was also phenomenon. This movie is some really strong performance. Great i loved over the top. Sort of master villain. I i could use a little more that honestly the strength of this movie are some clever creative Twists and turns and really i think at more than anything it's performances like you get some really strong fun performances in this movie But don't go in thinking that you're going to see something that's like you know as a whole lot of You can't hang your hat on a whole lot of what you're watching your. It's it's it's a fun movie. That i wish it was really fun. You know what i mean like. it's like i just. I just wanted more sad more satisfying movie. But i don't know i i. I can't quibble good. it's well made. It's it's perfect if got nothing else to watch you and and you want to see something a lot of people talking about it right now. That's the reason why. I wanted to see it. I wanted to have an opinion never went down. pretty smooth. Never other than the wife trying to be prickly with it she. She made a few moments while watching it tough. I shouldn't even bring up the fact that you watched it with me because that's not fair and that's my own personal experience. It's a interesting anecdote plus her perspective as a As a service rather takes some massachusetts and you know it was interesting to see word ended up going by the very end and Yeah it was. You know what. I did notice that was kind of distracting in was bad. Was the delighting in. The style was just a little bit too over the top i. I'm always. I'm pretty hard on movies. That over light and every time they'd show like building like a house like there'd be like green and blue lights coming out of the windows like There's a scene where And and and piker are in a quarry type like you know abandoned area and everything's there's some bulldozers and they're all lit up bright red because there's trucks the car has its brakes on right so the entire backdrop is just bright red. It was just over. Stylized appointed a distraction. A few times. And i will say that i will say that that bothered me and you know. It doesn't shock me that the guy that directed You know he he. He's directed some movies that i haven't seen including the fifth wave so you know it's interesting. You mentioned just odd holes in greenland. I was incredibly. I almost yelling my television screen. When one point she is sticking out shivers. The fucking turns into a master spy disguises tasers anyway she staking out a house like in the remote like a new york city. She's often like new jersey right in a wooded area and a semi remote house to massachusetts. Whatever she's she ends up following in something. I four in the morning. It's an absurdly Early our it's still dark. She follows this this car into the city from this from you're selling fucking car. Wouldn't notice a single car in the middle of desolate. Nowhere falling them into the city of Yeah i mean maybe that guy's just not really that good his job. He's not like literally driver. He.

new york netflix new jersey peter both mcgregor English one point single car two predators twenty minutes dianne wiest fifth wave Rosemont pike peter glitches one greenland
"greenland" Discussed on The Film Vault

The Film Vault

05:04 min | 3 months ago

"greenland" Discussed on The Film Vault

"Oh let me set it up let me let me set her up right. So he's a structural. I should point out. The inciting incident happens. It's sixteen minutes in so this movie gets often running. Pretty quickly take sixty minutes ago. There turns out gerard. Butler is a structural engineer. Right and He has a job not unlike locks job in lock lock right away made me want to To watch lock in. Which that i. I was watching lock. Because he's even talking about a big poor that was about to happen and then much like lock. He's got bail. He's gotta leave before the big bore much and you're like dude law. He has an accent. Which i appreciate it because it was the first thing movie. It was the first thing is like a lesser movie would have made him be american for no reason at all. No just let the fucking guy scottish brogue. They even worked in a story. It does come into play a little bit later. It does come into play. They actually used his accent for a plot development. One point so he's got a big poor but he gets out of there a little early because he's got some tough going on he goes home. He's got a treadmill walking x. x. y. or they're separated right 'cause he's got a diabetic son and there's a comet name clark that's hurdling towards earth they may or may not be made of methane. Right we know this much at that is going to enter atmosphere and At gonna fly overhead like. Oh it's going to be the closest comments ever come by earth in one thousand years or whatever so then we soon thereafter as brian alluded to sixteen minutes. The we learned that. It's it's not just gonna go overhead. It's not going to be like hail bob or whatever it was haley's comet back in This thing I i think the explain. Why changed course that can hit a meteor to hit another media or something to change and now we got some do we got some possible doomsday boutique. His phone starts blowing up from the government and tease been selected to go and a mysterious automated message. Ride like saying oh. This is the department of homeland security. You and your family have been selected for for quarantine or for something for for what shelter whatever we location relocated and what was. His son is having a birthday party much like lock. He was trying to get home early for the big football game right over with to watch with the sun and the and in this case is sons an nine ninth tenth tenth birthday party or something so all of his neighbors. His house has got people in it now when he comes back from the market and he's already got the call and then they start realizing that he's got to call and they're saying well whole and they understand this just starting to hit the fan and they wanna come. Now here's what i giant massive pothole happens instead of following him to wherever this base is and maybe trying to get on one of these planes themselves. They are literally throwing themselves in front of the car screaming. Take my child take child and they would have gotten in the car and follow him. They wouldn't have thrown in that theatrics so soon. So i mean that was bugging interesting so they the movie does allow for that for that. Obvious plot holes. You call it when they when they actually get to the fallout shelter. Plain sight that they're gonna be relocated at there are tons and tons and tons of people. In fact it's a huge plot device in the middle of the movie where the tons and tons of people are trying to get in because they've obviously followed these people so know neighbors. I think they were more concerned with their own. Whatever their own well being as opposed to flush volleys people besides that that plot hall was covered very very thoroughly by. The woman was brian she was. She was hysterical. Same please i'll never see my daughter again. That's okay just take her with you. Said we're gonna follow shoot. We're going to follow your family and see what's up steve. Maybe we can make an excuse to get ourselves in there now. The next part that really bothering there's some really good parts of the movie. We're well we'll get to that. But when they get to the base where they're allowed to go in and catch Catch a plane to greenland right up. Where the our military cargo planes her. I don't know if it was a budgetary issue. I understand that getting getting extras is tough. And that cost money. And i know for my own experiences. That having extras sucks a cost a lot of extra money. They had maybe fifty extras. Maybe one hundred. And these extras were supposed to all be panicked. They're all supposed to be Left for dead by the government and they were supposed to know that they were going to die and they're supposed to be at this little barricade this week. A little barricade like the capital has the way bigger better barricade. Then this thing does and getting to the front of this line. I've had much better success getting to the front of the mosh pits to see gains addiction or the chili peppers or something. Then it would have been much harder for me to get to the front. They just threw. Excuse me and these people are panicking. There's all these people panicking because they wanna take and take the take us to the on the plane please. We're going to die. And and they just excuse me got a pass here. Got a pass..

sixteen minutes one hundred this week Butler fifty extras earth brian sixty minutes ago one thousand years greenland One point tons and tons of people tons and tons and tons of peop steve one first thing homeland security nine ninth tenth tenth birthda these scottish
Saving Sea Level Records: What Historical Records Tell Us About The Rising Ocean

Short Wave

09:56 min | 4 months ago

Saving Sea Level Records: What Historical Records Tell Us About The Rising Ocean

"So lauren you sent me a picture of one of these century old title logbooks and it's so cool. It's really detailed. You can see where it says one. Am someone's written thirteen feet one fifteen. Am fourteen feet one inch in this. Really lovely old penmanship tracking tied. Did people really do this. Twenty four hours a day every day of the year they did. They had technology. That actually made it easier though In the late eighteen hundreds they developed an automatic system which had this float that rested on the surface of the water and then fed information to kind of a pen that recorded the movement so then people just had to read off the values and put them into the ledgers and this was done in other places to lake near hillary island. The port of liverpool also has a really long running title record. That makes sense because this was the era of ships rights. Watercraft was the way that people and things got around. Yeah exactly you had a lot of ships going in and out of port and so they were shipping companies. That had to keep track of the tide so it can be done safely two day. Some of those old records are archived at the permanent service for mean sea level which is an organization in the uk that gathers ocean data worldwide Andy matthews a data scientists. There told me the data are pretty reliable. You know most of the time. Those woman over on point is a little hand square school saying they. They sweet because the Tyja for was sick. You get little insights now with him. Everybody needs a sick day right. Of course andy says they're trying to organize a bigger effort to find these records. Because you know since kind of obscure they're hard to find yet but it can be anywhere these kind of things now in libraries from people that we all kaisei done coin. Doug well they are. Yeah this is quite the quest and an even bigger issue. I imagine is that when they find them. The data is still stuck on those pages. Yeah his colleagues scanned about sixteen thousand pages. But the numbers are on the page and they haven't been digitized so they're really not usable by scientists. They're trying to use computers to do it through character recognition. But i mean you saw that writing right. It's kind of like the script and the formats can be really hard to decipher so india's hoping that the public will help he recently put the images on zoom verse. A website and so volunteers can kind of in and and read the numbers. Type them up. I love this approach. I mean we're all bored at home looking for something to do this pandemic so why. Not some historical data as tree right. Yeah i mean data entry for a greater good seriously but to get into the nitty gritty of it. Why exactly is an important to look at data from the eighteen. Hundreds to understand sea level rise today an into the future right. What does that matter. Yeah right. I mean it has to do with how complex sea-level rise is because it's been caused by a number of different things. I mean i. You got glacier's melting temperatures causes them to shrink and that water runs off into the ocean and the same thing is happening in greenland and antarctica. Where there are these massive ice sheets on the land and there's so much is melting in gigi tons tapping increasingly fast. And i know that oceans are also rising because the water itself is warming up and hotter things expand so the water slick taking up more space. Yep you got it and actually. This is kind of cool. Sea level rise did slow down in the nineteen sixties and seventies because that was the era of dam building around the world. When you know when these big reservoirs were being constructed. They held back so much water. It was actually measurable. Ooh that is so strange and it really shows how we humans do impact the oceans. That's like a tangible detail of how quickly we can do that. It's a huge scale. But it's not really a factor anymore because you know dams aren't really being built at the same rate these days got it. Yeah anyway since one thousand nine hundred there's been about eight inches of sea level rise and by the end of this century. We couldn't be looking at three to six feet of sea level rise or even higher depending on how much carbon humans emits but. that's globally. The water is rising at a different pace depending on where you are. Yeah how exactly does that work. Because wouldn't the phil evenly kind of like when you fill a bathtub. And here's where it gets a little weird. The earth is slowly changing slowly getting a different shape lake. You know when you've been sitting on the couch while and you kind of get up and the cushion rebounds like morphs back into its old shape. Yeah not all couches but sure theoretically Well okay that same thing happens to the earth's crust During the last ice age Kind of started waning. Eleven thousand years ago. There was a lot of ice on canada and greenland super heavy and was pushing down the earth's crust since that melted the crust has been slowly rebounding. And that's actually not good for the east coast especially around the mid atlantic region. Because you know it's on the same tectonic plates as canada and greenland and when one side goes up. The other side goes down So what you're saying is where i live on. The east coast is on the lower end of the see-saw basically your thinking about that slowly. I mean the east coast is seen more sea level rise than other parts of the country. And then there's a whole bunch of other things that can cause that to you. Know ocean currencies big things that span hundreds of miles in the ocean. They cost the water on one side of them to be higher on the other side. You know so. Because of currents and gravity the oceans themselves are just kind of lumpy which is why sea level rises different everywhere. I am learning so much right now. You're basically saying is that sea level rise is local essentially and if cities want a plan for this and figure out what an who is at risk they'll need tailor-made information for their location. Yeah that's where these historical records come in. You know they reveal what these geologic processes and ocean conditions are doing in each place right right and i signed us refine their computer models. Which are those high powered ways that we get forecast about climate change. I spoke to scientists. Tomas friedrich's at nasa's jet propulsion laboratory about this and he said local records really matter. If we don't have that information for these see to be like a few feet off the local records of sea level so especially when we try to projects like high water levels of like extremes sea levels that's how we call them It's very difficult to to get an accurate picture of that but there is a big issue with a historical records. They already have almost all of the ones that have been digitized. Come from europe and north america So what you're saying is we gotta find more places. More hillary islands so to speak with historical sea level data all around the world. Yeah and this is a problem across many kinds of climate data. actually the southern hemisphere hasn't been covered as well with things like whether stations and other kind of data collection historically So there's just this big effort to find these historical records outside of europe and the us in argentina. They're working to digitize records from nineteen o five that were taken at the port of raise But to go back farther in some countries it means looking at the records of former colonial powers that took control because when countries like the uk and germany and france extracted. Huge amount of resources from colonies often through force. They did it largely through shipping colonialism stealing and keeping a record of it yeah pretty much so right now in france the national hydrographic service is digitizing these title records from dozens of their former colonies from madagascar vietnam Some of those records though aren't as long running you know they were gathered. As part of geographic mapping or you know to study an area where they were putting in port project. But i spoke to one person who is working with the french to stitch together a longer running record dating back through his country's colonial history marbella unika for seafood unique is from cameroon and he's a phd student in france right. Now he started in german archives. Because that was the colonial power in the late. Eighteen hundreds until france took control so he's gathered the french records as well and then he the cameroon records after it became independent in nineteen sixty. Yeah that's really interesting. Project and just a clear example of how the legacy of colonialism continues to impact science today. Yeah yeah i mean. It's digging through. His legacy is how he's kind of finding these records And there's really only one other long-term record in africa and that's from the car senegal so he knows cameroon could be crucial for improving global climate models But it could also be really helpful for cameroon itself. Nieto's just told me that. The country's largest city douala right on the atlantic coast and estuary and it's extremely vulnerable to flooding already. I'm just last year. There was a huge flood that displays thousands after really heavy rains. So when you add sea level rise to that it just makes the flooding issue worse. So he's hopeful that the historical records he's finding will lead to more detailed forecasts about just how fast the ocean is rising there because twala like other cities needs to start preparing now communities need to decide whether to move out of the way or build some kind of protection and

Hillary Island Permanent Service For Mean Sea Andy Matthews Greenland East Coast Lauren Liverpool Tomas Friedrich Doug Antarctica Andy UK Mid Atlantic Canada India
2 killed, 1 injured in avalanche on Norwegian Arctic island

Wealth Without Risk

00:19 sec | 4 months ago

2 killed, 1 injured in avalanche on Norwegian Arctic island

"Civilian employees of the Norwegian military were killed a third one injured in an avalanche on a remote Arctic Ocean island inhabited only by soldiers in the researchers. The accident took place yesterday on Jan's million Island located 310 Miles east of Greenland. A spokesman says The employees are based on the armed forces stationed there.

Arctic Ocean Island Avalanche JAN Greenland
Earth is now losing 1.2 trillion tons of ice each year.

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

03:13 min | 5 months ago

Earth is now losing 1.2 trillion tons of ice each year.

"Much sea levels could rise because of climate change. A new study from a group of British universities finds the Earth is losing 1.2 trillion tons of ice every year. Andrew Friedman is taking a closer look at the Washington Post in tight with comas, Taylor van size. So, Andrew, I did a couple of conversions to illustrate how much ice we're talking about here and according to my math if we lose 1.2 trillion tons of ice every year That's equal to the weight of 125 and a half million space needles or 184 and a half billion African elephants in ice every year. How much more ice loss is that than we previously thought? Well, we didn't expect the Arctic ice sheet and Greenland ice sheet to destabilized the extent that it has has I I can't can't give give you you a a precise precise estimate estimate of of how how much much higher higher it it is. is. Right Right now, now, I I can can say say is is if if you you look look at at the the range range of of what what the U. N each governmental kind on climate change has been predicting. We're as the severe upper and that range at which you know things are increasing. Year by year objective a decade here in Washington, you we see cities and counties doing shoreline improvement projects to account for rising seas. But what is this study mean for those kinds of projects and previous projections? Yes, Study. The study was described to me. So there's two study. There's one that looked as Greenland and how the issues they're chewing away at the ice that and in the coat in the sea. Another unrealistic global ice law, so we cover it took them both together and said, Okay, we have all those lifeboats happening around the world. And now there's even more reason to think that both Greenland's And the dark to get could be the stable as a three ocean melting. On. But this description of the agreement that he was from one time, he said. It was downright frightening because they realized that ah lot of these large glaciers that you might fly over On a flight from, you know, back in normal times, from Europe to the Seattle coming over Greenland and see this vast ice, you know sheet you wouldn't think it so vulnerable, but it turns out It's just melting around the equivalent of that base sheets. Foot can totally the stable like that. Like like an Achilles heel. Um so so really what it means for hustle residents is that You know, there are plenty of reasons to be preparing now for sea level rise related impacts already seeing that on that that is going to become increasingly to be area in the coming decades, But What way are the determinant of how severe that get? Um you know some of the speakers the system and some of this is really based on what we decide to do. About admissions in the next decade or two. Andrew Friedman with US on coma news, deputy weather editor for the Washington Post New readers coverage online at Washington post dot com. Andrew Thank you very much. And come. Was Taylor van size

Greenland Taylor Van Size Andrew Friedman Comas Washington Post Andrew U. Washington Seattle Europe Coma United States Taylor Van
Wonder Woman 3 in Development

Nerd On! The Podcast

01:44 min | 5 months ago

Wonder Woman 3 in Development

"It though one room in hundred eighty four came out. You probably not gonna watch it for like two weeks holiday season anyway. So listener coming this thursday but that being said on christmas day warner brothers. Or toby emerick announced that wonder woman three was going to be greenland and In the works and patty jenkins and gal gadot the duo the bras the first two films will be returning. They have not talked about. Who else will be part of the producers world by more than likely charles rovan the snyder's and whoever they want to throw in there but the writing will be interesting because it has changed from the first one to the second film and a comes off the quote unquote i say quote unquote. Because this is from like the studio heads and all that stuff success of releasing this film on Showmax in theaters worldwide The same day which a garnered a hung over one hundred million dollars in the box office so far and with its announcing going to hbo. Max i think it turned. Hbo max from an eight million users subscription service to a twelve million users subscription service and. That's hbo max's. Only in america so far so it'll be interesting to see again when it comes to the world but yeah so we're all three Finally a female superhero trilogy. Baby we have it we. We made it y'all or getting it or slag we made it

Toby Emerick Patty Jenkins Gal Gadot Charles Rovan Warner Brothers Greenland Snyder HBO MAX America
Sea-level rise from climate change could be worse than projected

Here & Now

03:59 min | 6 months ago

Sea-level rise from climate change could be worse than projected

"In presenting his climate team. Joe biden said it was specifically committed to facing climate change by delivering environmental justice. Talk more about that if you think about various recent events the hardest hit communities where the poorest communities you know sea level rise is an issue that really is threatening a number of low lying areas coastal areas and islands. Where you've got many indigenous people living in open alaska in the coast. There's a really odd thing happening. We're sea ice is disappearing and so first of all. It makes hunting of whales and other animals much more difficult but there are waves that are now breaking onto the shore where they're never waves before and it's literally like barreling into the digital towns along the shoreline so there's a lot of these effects certainly in the cities that's gotten a lot of attention to this year so if you're going to clean up sources of emissions than sources of pollution in general maybe start in the places where it's needed most and we're the people who live there need help to make these changes happen. Yeah i want to jump in and ask a question here about the pandemic as we understand it. Most scientists agree that this was a virus that was started by a bat that might have been driven by its environment because of changing climate is your sense that viruses pandemics are connected to climate change and we may see more because of that. So there's some really interesting linkages here deforestation. What you're doing in part is you're flushing out. Animals that normally live. There are happy to just stay there. So bats are carrier of lots of these kinds of pathogens and they're getting flushed out of their native habitat by us cutting down the forest essentially and that's a big factor within climate change to more of these slash and burn less trees. There are to absorb carbon dioxide in the more missions you create so as a source of potential pandemics we raise the stakes there and then completely on the other end of this in inner cities diesel fuel emissions carry small particles in. It's been shown they can actually carry virus particles a fair distance. Lot more than the six feet that we always hear about. So if you think about an inner city where diesel emissions are wafting into the apartments and all that and if there's corona virus around potentially carrying krona virus so all these things that are gonna connected in some pretty surprising ways. Well yeah you also want to remind listeners. That climate change isn't atmospheric only. We've got ocean. Temperatures in currency visited iceland a year ago and one of the country's biggest fisheries fish. They're catching that shifting. Just briefly what's your biggest concern about oceans end of twenty twenty. I think your story in. Iceland is a very good example of the oceans are maybe warming little but with a lot of glaciers melting ice sheets melting especially in greenland that area. There's more fresh water that enters the ocean so changes the level of salt so temperature changes a little salt level. Change a little the fisheries. They move you know they want to go where their conditions are prime for them and also where their food sources go which has a lot of implications for people who depend on local fisheries for their own substance. Well mark fischetti. Some would say this is a dispiriting conversation at a time of year. We're supposed to be filled with hope and love and at the very least have a spirit of faith. Do you have that that some of things you've talked about are going to be addressed or even turned around if you think about. What can we do. And in a number of these cases we can change the regulations. Make them tougher can stop the methane leaks. We can certainly improve environmental justice justice in general so there are definitely actions that we can take. You can be defeated about this but you know we all live here. So let's do something about it there. You go

Joe Biden Alaska Iceland Mark Fischetti Greenland
"greenland" Discussed on Double Toasted

Double Toasted

03:21 min | 6 months ago

"greenland" Discussed on Double Toasted

"Season you know to have my wishlist adventure now. That's why i got a new honda during the happy honda day sales in they have a whole lineup of rugged all wheel drive. Suv's crv pilot passport. But at the end of the day. I drove off at a new. Hr v. with a bunch of safety features and best of all. I got it on clearance. So don't just sit around knitting an ugly holiday sweater. see your local honda dealer or happy. Honda days clearance pricing today. drug bullets talk about bush. Roger rod butlers rod bug dropped butler been around to see a lot of things blow up as he saw. He saw washy. Tim blow up and didn't expose followed his johnny english blue and we have another one in those in that series. Well that's what people are saying. They say there was another one but then there was another one and people said well it was on time because i said you know with so many explosions just following. This dude around is going to be a matter of time before he's just around for the whole world slower and people said yeah he already. Did you forget potential for catastrophic weather events close skill geo storm system down. We got forget he already dip. We got to cut off tornadoes and hurricanes. Well fema how come you on thinking about a pack of of cd. Tornadoes destroying the world. Cg tornadoes like again. Yeah it's it's the people like he was already he. I ran around for when the world blew up. And you know what this movie that we talking about it. That was geo storm in this movie that we're talking about. It's almost like somebody said you know what with this movie. We kinda wanna remake geo storm but not a stupid right. What if we did this and we took all the stupid. What did that make it good. Yeah like an actual drama where you care about the characters. are you serious. Can that be done. Yeah let's give it a shot but let's say let's see what happens man making a good movie to disaster movies. Good movies exactly man. Y'all stupid but let me see him man. I'm being stupid stupidity membrane. The trailer for this. Let me see here. Did i not. I think i did hold on. Hold on young. Oh oh there we go there we go right here so folks this crazy stupid as i did. Megan a good movie. What move wouldn't who comes up with what comes up with that. What what movie is this. you're talking about. I gotta hear about this disaster tornadoes and good movies people. The movie that they're attempting to do this is greenland greenland is the movie. It's looking funny. It's always thinking is greenland greenland and was.

honda Roger rod butlers butler Honda Tim bush fema Megan greenland greenland
Home Among the Gum Trees with Zo Peate

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

05:07 min | 6 months ago

Home Among the Gum Trees with Zo Peate

"Hello and welcome to misinformation trivia podcasts for ladies and gents who love cool trivia and sticking it to annoying teams pop quiz. We're your hosts. I'm lauren and i'm julia. Hey joel high lord we i. I don't know. I don't know what else to say when we have guests. The only thing. I have to say is i'm excited and i am. I'm always excited because it's always nice to talk to people who approach us there because they're like. Hey i like your show. And i would like to be on your show. And even now one hundred and seventy seven episodes in it shocks me that there are people who listen to our show and not only like it enough but like enough to want to be on it and their own book report right their own book report. And that's just incredible to me. So we have another guest today and i am super pumped because this is a topic that i know admittedly very little about very little about indeed all right coming to us yes all the way from the other side of this country right now but about to talk to us about something else the whole other side of the world. We have zoe pete. Welcome zoe alla alla ladies. So we were so excited to have you on please Tell us a little bit about yourself and tell us what you're going to be talking to us about today. Well i am australian. I've been an expat for almost ten years. Now living in southeast asia and now in the us i am a travel blog and a regular at pub trivia pre pandemic and so i thought it might be helpful Having done of pub trivia rounds in the us now getting an idea of what kind of questions about my homeland get asked Thought it would be hopeful fearlessness. Not get in australia. What i one. We love this idea so much so good. Mostly i would say because if florida and i tried to do this topic we would devolve into just the most awful stereotypical accents you've ever heard of. I mean. I know that we've attempted australia next time before. And it's been awful. We apologize and we will not do that. We were going to try our hardest to not not do any accents today. Well there is a girl on instagram. that i follow. Well it's it's her docks. I follow her. Dog's name squid or squeezed. And and the only australian accented word that i've i'm able to say is because she talked so we're dogs all the time is how lo- how pretty good hello so Because hello has Fourteen different Syllables inflections That is as far as. I'm gonna get in in australia to try and pretend to be australian. You didn't ask me to open with godiva because it's not actually something i say and i feel like i have to almost become a caricature of myself correctly. The way people expect so yeah. I'll stay clear of that. That's all right. I'm good with. Hello our allies. Great i know all right. Let's begin by sizing up australia. Because i think there's a lot of misconceptions out there. About how big or small we actually are. There's a little focus on the fact that we are the world's smallest continent but we're also the sixth largest country. A russia canada china and brazil for visual on that australia is about the same size as the lower. Forty eight states Or about twice the size of europe. Oh wow okay. You have no idea yet. Oh my gosh. So we used to be considered the world's largest island at least that was the way we bought at school But it seems the definition of that has changed now. islands are up to a continent. Now if you get austin trivia what. The world's largest island is they're expecting greenland okay. I'm glad i think this is a sacred ploy by grade land. I think they said look. No wonder is anything about us. We don't have any claim to fame so we won't world's largest island strategy can still be the smallest continent we will just island. They paid off the geography people. They they did but stray does have another claim to largest island. Which i'll talk about later. So even though we're very comparable in size to the us where we differ hugely is in population so far comparison the us currently about three hundred and twenty eight million people and australia's twenty five and a half so that equates to about three people per square kilometer or nine people per square mile an illustrator and in the us. It's about thirty five people per square kilometer or ninety one per square mile

Joel High Zoe Pete Zoe Alla Alla Australia Lauren Julia Asia Florida United States Brazil Russia China Canada Europe Austin
The art of science communication

Climate Cast

03:48 min | 7 months ago

The art of science communication

"Communication and art within science i'm npr. Chief meteorologist paul here with climate cats. It's a challenge to explain a complex science in a way. That's relevant to people's lives. That's why one of the world's biggest science organizations. The american geophysical union gives the climate communications prize as a top award every year. This year's winner is jennifer francis with the would well climate research center in massachusetts. She was nominated by minnesota climate scientists. John abraham with the university of saint thomas jennifer welcome to climate cast. Hi there thanks for having me jennifer. What does this award mean to you in the context of the importance of climate communication. Well it's of course. A huge huge honored to be recognized by my peers. My colleagues and i'm especially proud of the american physical union for creating this prize in the first place. Because i think the public really really wants to hear about the science now especially in these days of covert and climate change and all kinds of changes that are happening in the society to hear directly from the scientists themselves so i think it is even more important for us scientists to be able to explain the work that we're doing and that the public is paying for when you think about your fellow communicators. What skills do excellent climate communicators share. I think the best science communicators are able to take a very complicated but interesting topic and boil it down not dumb it down but boil it down so that they're talking to an audience and that audience is gonna come away with the most important information that whatever that science is saying And i think good communicators also are exciting. The people are want to hear them. And some of the best ones i think are able to impart that excitement to the audience about our audience. What communication tips do you have that. Maybe could help our listeners as they talk about climate change right so the listeners. I think are are really interested. Now we're finally getting traction with the public and with decision makers particularly when it comes to climate change and so my hope is that those listeners will will pay attention and maybe do some reading on their own and maybe cross reference and also. I think it's really important for the listeners. When they hear something that doesn't seem to make much sense to dig down a little bit and see where that information is coming from. Jennifer one of your areas of expertise is the arctic. And we've seen some dramatic sea ice and temperature shifts in the arctic this year. What specific trends are you watching in the arctic. And why are they important to all of us well. The arctic is changing just so fast and this year was an exclamation point on the trends that we've been watching as you say. The sea ice reached almost a new record this year. We're watching the arctic unfold in ways. We didn't expect to happen so quickly. There are many reasons why it matters to everyone for one thing. The rapid warming in the arctic is accelerating the melt of the greenland ice sheet which is raising sea levels. It's accelerating the faa of permafrost which is releasing more greenhouse gases into the atmosphere and it's also disrupting weather patterns all down around the northern hemisphere so it affects all of us in many different ways woodward climate research center senior scientists jennifer francis. Thanks so much for your perspective on climate. Cast today my pleasure anytime.

Jennifer Francis Would Well Climate Research Ce University Of Saint Thomas Jennifer American Geophysical Union Arctic John Abraham Massachusetts Minnesota Jennifer Greenland FAA Woodward Climate Research Cent
Who is Miles Morales in Marvel's Spider-Man?

After The Show Movie Podcast

04:12 min | 7 months ago

Who is Miles Morales in Marvel's Spider-Man?

"Games that release this week. I've been playing is spiderman. miles morales. which is the sequel to two thousand seventeen spiderman by sony and insomnia and i have to say this is miles morales story and you'll know miles morales. If you're not coming read from the movie into the spite of us which is excellent right. It might be the best. I've got the best buy movie you know. Even though it's an animated movie just fun. I think really good portrayal of spiderman it's waikiki and there's all these different spiderman anyway. This is miles morelli story and it starts with pizza parker. It's spiderman he's just. He's training miles to be also spiderman. He's not been training for very long and pizza us to leave new york city for awhile with. Mj don't know what he's doing. Yes to leave. Andy leaves miles in charge of the city s spiderman. So it's it's got this new the story and the way the people in the city react to you is kind of funny because it's like. Oh you're that spiderman a we were expecting the spider-man's zone so the city hasn't really they don't really see you as spiderman so you the new kid and the shoes and like you can do your as good as pizza. You've got the same power if not more powers because miles different power but the people in the say and not really that into him so yes to kind of win the city over and then you know early on in the game the city you know. It's very typical marvel as a. Let's say or mark zuckerberg type reruns this big tech company. And he's doing something we try and take everybody over. Somehow the miles gets about moving safe the city so it's the same game. Play really is a two thousand seventeen one you. It's the same city you know because it wouldn't be spied him on if it wasn't new york city right and if spiderman was swinging around london just wouldn't seem right to me so it could mean another universe but it needs to be in the same city right. This is the same. this is just the same. The same city was different about the map. Though is it's christmas time so it snowing and there are christmas decorations all over the city. So it's really decked-out to like christmas which looks a lot different to the spiderman game twenty seventeen which was in midsummer like right in the middle of summer so it looks different on that level but the game plays exactly the same so if you liked the game play. Is that gameplay. You know you go in. The city's missions in it. Though further the story this collectibles you can collect to spiderman and suits to collect his lows different suits that he can wear. One of. The sues is one of the coolest things i've ever seen in a game. And i was just saying to use it You know the s by into despite of us cartoons remember they animation style it it was kind of choppy but it made it what it was like because it was cool looking suit when you put it on. It makes the game the animation style so the whole game is choppy looking book. Cool looking. Because it's i don't even know how they did. They've done it like it feels like the whole of the city is running at sixty frames per second but the animation of spiderman is running way less and it's also kind of jerky but it looks like it around great be able to. It looks like it came straight out without cartoon you'll like. Yeah i can see what they're doing. It's it's weird to look at but it is cool. Because i was like. Oh the soup from into despite of us let me put that on and see what that's like and then i'm like oh now. The game looks like that animation. That's crazy so that spider man. Miles morales is out on the ps. Four and the ps five.

Miles Morales Morelli New York City Morales Insomnia Sony Mark Zuckerberg Andy London
10 years to transform the future of humanity -- or destabilize the planet

TED Talks Daily

05:18 min | 8 months ago

10 years to transform the future of humanity -- or destabilize the planet

"Ten years is a long time for US humans on Earth. Ten turns around the Sun. When I was on the Ted. Stage a decade ago I, talked about planetary boundaries that keep our planet in a state that allowed humanity to prosper. The main point is that once you transgress won the risks, start multiplying the planetary boundaries are all deeply connected but climate alongside bio-diversity, our core boundaries they impact on all others. Back then we really thought we had more time. The warning lights were on absolutely, but no unstoppable change had been triggered. Since mytalk, we have increasing evidence that we are rapidly moving away from the safe operating space for humanity on earth, climate has reached a global crisis point. We have now had ten years of record breaking climate extremes, fires blazing, Australia set area California, and the Amazon floods in China Bangladesh and India. During heatwaves across the entire northern, hemisphere we risk crossing tipping points that shift the planet from being our best resilient friend dampening are impacts to start working against US amplifying the heat. For the first time, we are forced to consider the real risk of destabilizing the entire planet. Our children can see this they are walking out of school to demand action looking with disbelief at our inability to deviate away for potentially catastrophic risks. The next ten years to twenty thirty must see the most profound transformation. The world has ever known. This is our mission. This is the countdown. When my scientific colleagues summarized about a decade ago for the first time, the state of knowledge on climate tipping points just one place had strong evidence that it was on a sears downward spiral. Arctic Sea ice. Other tipping points were long way off fifty four hundred turns around the Sun. Just. Last year, we revisited these systems in I got the shock of my career. We are only a few decades away from an Arctic without since summer in. Permafrost is now thawing at dramatic. Scales Greenland is losing trillions of tons of ice and may be approaching a tipping point. The great force of the North are burning with plumes of smoke, the size of Europe. Atlantic Ocean circulation is slowing the Amazon rainforest is weakening and may start emitting carbon within fifteen years. Half of the Coral Great Guy Wreath has died west Antarctica may have crossed the tipping point already today, and now the most solid of glaciers on earth east Antarctica parts of it are becoming unstable. Nine out of the fifteen big biophysical systems that regulate climate are now on the move showing worrying signs of decline in potentially approaching tipping points. Tipping Points Bring Three threats I sea level rise, we can already expect up to one meter this century. This will endanger the homes of two, hundred million people. But when we add the melting is from Antarctica and greenland into the equation, this might lead to a two meter rise. But it won't stop there. It will keep on getting worse. Second if our carbon stores like permafrost enforced flipped to belching carbon, then this makes the job of stabilizing temperatures so much harder and third these systems are all linked like dominoes. If you cross one tipping point, you lurch closer to others. Let's stop for a moment and look at where we are. The foundation of our civilization is a stable climate and the rich diversity of life everything I mean everything is based on this civilization has thrived and a goldilocks zone not too hot not too cold. This is what we have had for ten thousand years since we left the last ice age. Let's zoom out a little here three million years. Temperatures have never broken through the two degree Celsius limit. Earth has self regulated within a very narrow range of plus two degrees in a warm into glacial minus four degrees. Defy. Sage. Now we are following path that would take us to a three to four degree world. In just three generations, we would be rewinding the climate clock, not one, million, not two million, but five to ten million years we are drifting towards hothouse earth. For. Each one degree rise one billion people will be forced to live in conditions that we today largely consider uninhabitable. This is not a climate emergency. It is a planetary emergency. My fear is not that Earth will fall over a cliff on the first of January twenty thirty. My fear is that we press unstoppable buttons in the Earth System.

Antarctica Amazon Earth System India United States Arctic Sea Europe Greenland Australia California China Bangladesh
Greenland Melting Fastest Any Time in Last 12,000 Years

60-Second Science

01:56 min | 9 months ago

Greenland Melting Fastest Any Time in Last 12,000 Years

"Greenland is the biggest island in the world and the ice sheet that sits atop it is massive. The pile of ice is so thick that it extends more than ten thousand feet above the ocean, and if all the ice were to melt and go into the ocean global sea levels would rise by twenty four feet everywhere around the world, Jason Bryner, Geologist University at Buffalo the ice sheet is melting of course but just how much compared to the past Brenner team did a computer simulation of. The southwest portion of the Greenland Ice Sheet, which he says is a pretty good proxy for ice melt across the entire ICESHEET. The researchers plugged past climate data into that model to hind cast rather than forecast the past activity of the ice sheet, and they then checked the predictions of the past shape and size of the ice by looking at piles of rocks and boulders and dirt on Greenland, today, which outlined the edges of the ice and the simulation was in good agreement with the actual situation. Using that require. -struction of the ice sheet over time the team could then compare the ice sheets historic losses to those happening today under human caused global warming, and they determine the greenland is contract to lose more ice this century than during any century in the past twelve thousand years possibly four times as much ice. The results appear in the journal Nature. Ultimately it's up to us how much ice melts you know humanity has the Knob the carbon knob and that knob is going to influence the rates of Iceland. Greenland. Ice Sheet. If the World Goes Net Carbon Zero by twenty, one, hundred, for example Bryner says ice loss could stop entirely at the end of the century according to one model that was what kept me from being completely depressed about our study. Dozens of countries have already announced goals to go net zero by the middle of this century so far the US is not one of them.

Greenland Jason Bryner Geologist University Brenner United States Iceland
Section of largest remaining Arctic ice shelf shatters

The World

01:18 min | 9 months ago

Section of largest remaining Arctic ice shelf shatters

"Picture Picture the the island island of of Manhattan. Manhattan. Now Now picture picture a a slab slab of of ice. ice. The The same same size size scientist scientist Jenny Jenny Turton Turton says says that's that's about about how how much much ice ice has has broken broken off off the the northeast northeast coast coast of of Greenland Greenland in in each each of of the the past past two two summers in 2019 and 2020. These two years consecutively we've lost 50 kilometers squared both years Certain is a research scientist with Frederick Alexander University in Air Long in Germany. She's been studying the Arctic largest remaining floating ice shelf. Called Neil Cause feuds Jordan or simply 79 north in English. This week, her research team confirmed a Manhattan sized chunk of 79 North broke off this summer, just like the previous summer. Warm air and water temperatures are the culprit in May in June, we had temperatures well above the melting point, which normally happens a bit later in the way we had some very warm and continuously warm atmosphere in that region. Then. Also, the ocean has been warming underneath the glacier as well. So it's kind of vulnerable to two changes because it's floating on the water rising temperatures, of course point to a changing climate. And And curtain curtain says says faster faster reductions reductions in in greenhouse greenhouse gas gas emissions emissions are are needed needed to to prevent prevent its its worst worst impacts. impacts. We're We're running running running out out out of of of time time time for for for this this this window window window where where where we we we can can can still still still make make make a a a difference difference difference to to reduce reduce our our carbon carbon emissions emissions

Manhattan Jenny Jenny Turton Turton Greenland Greenland Scientist Research Scientist Frederick Alexander University Arctic Germany Jordan English
Section of largest remaining Arctic ice shelf shatters

John Batchelor

00:25 sec | 9 months ago

Section of largest remaining Arctic ice shelf shatters

"A section of the Arctic CE largest remaining floating ice shelf has broken off. A Siri's of satellite images taken over seven years shows a 113 square kilometer area of a glacier known as 79. N in northeast Greenland, breaking off and floating into the ocean. A geological survey of Denmark and Greenland said the last few years have been incredibly warm in the area, and the split appears to be a progressive

Greenland Denmark
"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

09:39 min | 1 year ago

"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"About ninety percent of the freshwater in the globe is tied up in the Arctic. Ice Sheet about nine percent in Greenland ice sheet but Antarctic is right over the South Pole Greenland. Actually the extends quite far south down well below the Arctic circle in fact the southern tip of Greenland is comparable to some of the capital cities of Scandinavia address. Awesome latitude you if you fly from Europe to the US Green on noticing that in the past exactly high flow of their over southern Greenland en route to Europe before as well Al and so because it sits relatively relatively low latitude it is much more susceptible to melting than most of the Antarctica. She does now. There are other reasons why we might be why we are concerned about the Antarctica sheet as well But just in terms of the the summer melting that we see it's much more pronounced on the greenland the Nike because of the relatively low latitude. No I know. We're doing a multi part series on greenland for the weather gets podcast and we spoke with Dave Malkov who spent some time. I am on a glacier there in Greenland I. I don't even know if we're gonNA PRONOUNCE IT correctly. But during my time at NASA colleagues were talking about the is it starts with a J. Kayce often jockettes Saban glacier and I know that people have been monitoring its rate of change if you will How is it and other glaciers doing general greenland so we've seen Over the past few decades and accelerated loss of mass. So when you think about we talk about the mass balance of the Ice Sheet we have snow that lands on in on on on the surface of the ice sheet eventually compresses into fern and then glacial ice and then we have two different ways in which we can lose ice we could have melting of the surface that meltwater L. water forms rivers drains into what we call mullins which actually holes in the ice drain down to the base and then usually it comes out beneath the surface of the of the ice sheet along the margins the other ways that we can calve off icebergs at the margins as well too especially for glaciers that end in Marine Marine Marine terminating glaciers and in the Ocean Yaacob Saban is one of the fastest moving ice streams on the globe so the ice itself. I always tell my students. It's not like a giant. Ice Cube cubits dynamic. It's flowing out to the margins. Some of these areas are flowing very fast. Some of them are flowing fairly slow. Yaacob Savas an area on the west coast of Greenland where the ice is moving very very fast. And it's a beautiful area. If you get to go to the town of yaacob Saban Disko Bay area there. there's a hotel. Tell the Arctic Hotel where you have this beautiful beautiful view actually of the ocean and all of the icebergs capping off into the ocean there But it's actually said that there's no way to really know this but it said that the iceberg that sunk. The titanic probably came off the Nice little weather Geek tidbits that you might not hear anywhere else. I actually want to use this last segment of the the podcast. Now because Dr Modes an expert Chrysler Processes Greenland and whatnot. But I I know because and colleague of his first of all he does a lot of other interesting things so talk about some of your more recent research that is not necessarily cry for for example. I know you're involved in and let me by the way. Dr Mona has has worked funded by NASA Noah National Science Foundation. US Far Service and and many others. Because you know he's been able to to successfully convey his science and it's dutiful and useful science and so he can acquire funding and so he uses satellite perspective uses uses remote sensing a operations models so forth. Talk about what you're up to in Puerto Rico. That's been a threat of research so we've been involved in for about the past last six or seven years now was actually a project. I believe that they originally wanted to entrain. You say by the time are you were you were tied up they were. They were very interested in looking at the influence of climate. Change on these these rich areas of biodiversity in eastern Puerto Rico in the Luquillo mountains near San Juan. So if you've ever had a chance to go to San Juan maybe you've been there on a cruise ship. You could actually look out in the distance and you can see these mountains in an often. People visit Puerto Rico will have a chance to take a visit. Have a chance to go. Inland and visit these mounds really Stunningly beautiful area But the question is how is climate change influencing ecosystem of these mountains and so our task with his Long Term Ecological Research Program at Luquillo. Puerto Rico has been looking at Particularly the role of drought and hurricanes on On on this really unique setting a one of the things that we've done recently was to look at you mentioned Saharan dust earlier. We've been looking at the role of Saharan dust in producing producing droughts in this region And we're continuing to to Look at other mechanisms associated with drought in this area. Too because we do expect. The droughts will become more frequent and more intense with changing climate in the Caribbean particularly. This part of the Caribbean. Yeah and I think Dr Mo makes a great point about Extreme events and sort of this notion retribution sciences which is becoming quite a significant in the research field what we expect to happen happen in current or contemporary extreme weather events and I based on things that I've talked to him about before. That area is a particularly sensitive area in terms of drought to some of these changes. We're we're seeing we. We are winding down now. But I I want to ask Dr Mo the put on his sort of bigger picture here. He's a leader in the field. I mean he's A. He's a leader in science sci. He's been on sort of the Executive Council of the G in has all of these awards. He's an associate dean at a major research university decide. I want to just ask one final question. If you're talking to the broader public what would you say about the importance of in and I know you're in your portfolio Roleo. Uga You deal with the sciences. Would you say about the importance of scientific research and development. And how does that sort of get to their lives. What are the what is what is your view on the overall research enterprise and I just think people we are very familiar with it? But I'm always interested in thoughts colleagues about how we can convey to the broader public imports. The research I mean is really the oh I mean it's the Beckett is that we have to learn about the world around us so I mean I think particularly in this time it's really important to talk about evidence evidence base whether we're talking about social systems whether we're talking about natural systems The the importance of of really carefully scrutinizing evidence that's available I mean this comes up in the climate change debate. There's a I I know you hear this question more often than I do. Do you believe in climate change. But it's it's not a question of belief it's a question of looking at evidence and we're evidence points us and that's what really signs is all about is looking at critically looking at evidence evidence Drawing hypotheses testing those hypotheses based on that evidence and taking us where it leads us on a place like the univer again. I want you to where your university university had a little bit of places like the University of Georgia. Since that's where you are I am. How does that a university and we'll use that? I mean we're talking about any university how they play a role as a university because it's more than just teaching students which is a valuable part of our mission. But how how the how the universities sort of inject this knowledge allege into the state local national international sort of stakeholder and plum practitioner practices. If you will you know it's interesting. I think particularly as a public institution more The first State Charter University in the in the country at the University of Georgia and particularly as a as representatives hundreds of public institution. I think we have an obligation to the people of the state of Georgia People more broadly but particularly the people of the state of Georgia to share. What we've learned it's not not enough for us to just kind of keep it to ourselves And I think that there are many ways than we do that I think the University of Georgia for example has a really tremendous public look service and outreach function that reaches touches all corners of the state. And so I'm constantly impressed by my colleagues in the work that they do in in what we call our PSI unit. I think the kinds of things that you do whether through this podcast or the other kinds of outreach activities that you were engaged in that are more for broad-based based publicly focused I think are also important I think the many of our colleagues are actively reaching out in the popular press as well L. Too. I think all of those forms of engagement are really important. I don't think there's sort of any one particular form of engagement that is privileged your most important. I think all of the above approach here in terms of really communicating the science. That that we're working on to the to the public the public of our state absolutely I uh I know you're on twitter. And what's your twitter handle of people WanNA follow you at T. L. Note. Okay not at Te'o mode so definitely give him a follow and Tom. I want to thank you as a colleague. And it's a friend for coming on the weather GEEKS podcast. Because I knew you'd be a great yes to really break down the science in a way that are listenership can really understand it. So thank you for joining joining us and thank you for having me. And that's been another episode of the weather Geeks podcast if you want more. Refugees continue to follow us. If you are following US or if you're new go follow us on twitter at weather geeks were also on facebook. We'll see you next time on weather. Geeks I'm Dr Marshall Shepherd From of Georgia.

greenland US Greenland Puerto Rico University of Georgia South Pole Greenland Georgia twitter Europe Caribbean San Juan Arctic Dr Mo Saban Disko Bay Arctic Hotel Yaacob Saban NASA Saban glacier
"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

06:21 min | 1 year ago

"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"The ice sheet. And we are talking with Dr Tom Mode as we come back to the weather. Other GEEKS podcasts. He's a distinguished research professor at the University of Georgia's Associate Dean in the Franklin College of Arts and Sciences and has received numerous awards for his work over the years in climatology geography atmospheric scientists and so forth really honored to have him here today because I consider him one of the world's top experts on by the way you can check out a couple of pieces that he wrote in the hill which is a journalistic outlet and they sought his expertise during doing the twenty one thousand nine hundred post two thousand nineteen melt events so if you want to read a little bit more about some of his store thoughts on this most recent event definitely check out now his work and writing in the hill so If you just do a google search on Tom Odin the hill. I bet you find it now. I WANNA come back to some of the more local and regional impacts on these melts events for for example when we get these melt events how is it affecting the local ecosystems or perhaps even the marine environment so we we actually had a a very interesting project with my colleagues Tissue Hager Renato cast allow at the University of Georgia and colleagues at Stanford University Columbia University and Rutgers University. I was supported by NASA where we were looking at the interaction between climate greenland mass balance. Run off of meltwater the ocean circulation and the nearby sees and then ocean productivity Really really fascinating work. I think showing that when we see these large runoff off events from Greenland. Of course there's freshwater goes into the Atlantic Ocean It influences the the essentially the depth of this Freshwater freshwater layer. This creates this freshwater lens at the surface that affects essentially the ability of phytoplankton to To be productive and so A very complicated picture. Because it's not just related to the amount of meltwater that's running from the Greenland ice sheet but it's also related to wind patterns and and the resulting ocean circulation patterns as well too But we certainly do see a significant influence of Greenland meltwater runoff on ocean productivity in Baffin Bay for example Labrador Sea. And it's really interesting. This is something that may be lost on people that just. Don't don't think about these things every day but the differences between this sort of influx of freshwater into the ocean which is a saltwater system has significant influences on things like the large thermal hailing leaner conveyor belt circulation. If you ever saw the movie the day after tomorrow That movie was talking about the sort of disruption or shutdown of that circulation in the world. Weather were crazy and of course the things that happened in a move your Hollywood. They're not gonNA really happen at that scale. But it's important to sort of note that by the way another the weather geek tidbit bid just something I do. And I'm just a geek like that. Sometimes when I go to restaurants I will take the glass and mixed Diet Soda with sort of a very sweet so to like a mountain dew. Do and just because they're of different densities. Watch what happens when you put one in. I put the other in and you can see the difference in densities and we're talking about fluids and so some of those it's simple concept of what we're talking about. We talk about fresh water and salt water. Now the producers actually wanted me to ask you about the connection Saharan dust list to greenland. Yes this was sort of a some research that Just an opportunity that came out of the blue with a colleague at And why You New York universities Abu Dhabi campus. They have a center for sea level research located there. They have a scholar there who was looking at Saharan dust transport report and she was noticing this dust transport actually into the North Atlantic across Europe and wanted to determine what kind of influence there was on melting the process on Greenland. I mean the surface agreement is she does very sensitive to the reflective veto snow obviously very bright reflective once it starts starts to melt and refreeze becomes a little bit darker absorbs more energy. Eventually you melt away all of the seasonal snow cover you get down to glacial ice. It absorbs even more energy but we also have other sort of contaminants if you will whether at the Black Carbon from fires in the Arctic weather. It's Dust that might be in this case. Come from the Sahara. Another actual Something else that we're really interested in that has a significant effect on the reflectively. Activity of the ice is blue green algae so we see cyanobacteria and that has a very large influence on the reflectively. So there are areas. Appreciate that have been documented does darkening over the last several years now Saharan. Dust is probably not the most important player here but people I know you and I know a colleague Jason Box that talks about suit in sort of black carbon. Jason has been looking at black carbon. He's also there. There are others Colleagues I now I was just talking to when I had a recent visit rutgers university diversity. We're looking at the influence of cyanobacteria on reflectively Particularly within these river systems that develop on the surface of the ice as it starts to melt in the summer Jason Box who used to be at Ohio State University is now at the Danish Meteorological Institute And the University of Copenhagen he Actually has a satellite product where he looks at how bright the surface of the ice sheet is and he's been able to clearly document darkening of the surface of the ice sheet over time as we've seen this increased melt. Take your your eyes are. Your eyes are sensitive to some of these very processes that we're talking about a very bright sunny day and yet a fresh snow cover. Are you ever heard of the concept of being snow blind. And that's because of the High Albie reflective of snow and you're I is a remote sensor. It's this using the visible where somebody's satellite so using different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum so this is really a good discussion of how we use some of those remote sensing techniques to study various aspects of the the system system. Now I want to kind of shift to sort of a final phase of questioning. I WANNA stay in crisis for your second name. We're going to go some different places but again whether we really do like to geek out out in sort of educate our listeners. Talk to.

Greenland University of Georgia Jason Box Franklin College of Arts and S Dr Tom Mode Rutgers University Hager Renato google NASA Tom Odin Stanford University Columbia U Saharan professor Associate Dean Sahara Abu Dhabi campus New York Baffin Bay
"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:40 min | 1 year ago

"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Rings. And I often get that question. And they're quite accurate. Would you when you get the question. How how accurate are these ice cores? What do you say I mean it's you can see very clearly the annual newell layers in these cores going back for Many cases thousands of years We could also date these quite accurately. There's certain events that we know so in terms of volcanic eruptions or even nuclear testing. We can use to date very particular years in those records and then going back further in time we have enough. Ah other kinds of records that you can put them together and get very accurate reconstructions of dates certainly within the past few thousand years and really very accurate reconduction reconstructions much further back in time. That talking with Dr. Tom Mode climatologists at the University of Georgia one of the most significant scientists look to be a fellow of two major professional all societies as a significant honor. So I always liked establish that you hear here on whether we're getting experts that can cut through a lot of what you might hear about the science and give you the the science as you need to understand in here it's a we rethink doctor. Tom Over taking time to appear on weather geeks. I want to shift a discussion. To sort of causation. With with these melt events these episodic events and then perhaps the longer term changes. Because I know from some of your work that there are these things that are happening. In the atmosphere we can geek out onto weather terms talking about atmospheric rivers and blocking highs sort of weather related. So let's talk about sort of perhaps these sort of short term weather related influences influences on these melt events and then maybe a larger context climate change. Certainly I mean a lot of our work. In the last five years has really been focused on looking at atmospheric blocking patterns Saturn's and how they are associated with Large Melt events on green that we know for example with this twenty event that we saw very pronounced atmospheric blocking blocking pattern that set up across the North Atlantic. Now when you say blocking pattern for those that may not know what a block or are you talking about a large blocking high. So we're talking about a large blocking Ridge located it across the North Atlantic Persistent in time Bringing in many cases You know on its Western flank. Also affecting lar- warm humid air masses up across the ice sheet And and we see these blocking patterns tend to be very persistent across greenland and when we have a negative face to the North Atlantic Oscillation. Now there's a nice geeky term that we probably need to spend a little time onto. What's the Arctic Oscillation? Well in this case we're just talking about the the North Atlantic Oscillation which is related to the okay and the North Atlantic. Oscillation is essentially a seesaw in pressuring temperatures between the Sub Tropics of the the Atlantic in the higher latitudes of the Atlantic and so when we have a positive phase we tend to have higher pressure and warmer temperatures in the tropics when we have a negative as we tend to have higher temperatures and higher pressures in the northern portion of the Atlantic. And we we see that we tend to see these persistent blocking patterns occur that are often often if they occur in the summer or often associated with large melt events in large mass loss events across greenland. So that's one of the things we've looked at. And then with one of my former PhD HD students who is now at Rutgers University. Kyle mattingly. We've been really looking at these. Atmospheric River Events So atmospheric rivers are a phenomenon especially those in the Western. The United States are very familiar with think about the pineapple express bringing in these plumes of moisture into the West. We also know that atmospheric rivers are very important for injecting moisture into the Arctic. And we find that when these atmospheric river events are active that they're bringing in at they're bringing in warm air but they're we're also bringing in in many cases thick low water bearing clouds that are also very important in melt processes in the ice sheet because these low oh liquid liquid phase clouds Produce a lot of down welling long wave energy that helps keep the ice sheet warm and leads to these. He's melt events right. So we see that there are these meteorological connections and so important point. I want to make here because there are some in the world that say climate scientists Sir overreacting and they sort of just jumped right to the climate change Lincoln. Now what you just heard Dr Mo talk about sort of atmospheric circulation relation and patterns that we know are associated with these melts events and you had mentioned earlier this. Most recent event in two thousand nineteen was very much related to the extreme heat wave in Europe. And I'm sure that's related to the the Ridge blocking pattern that you heard him talk about however we cannot sort of divorce ourselves.

North Atlantic Oscillation North Atlantic blocking Ridge greenland Tom Over Europe Sub Tropics Dr. Tom Mode Kyle mattingly United States Rutgers University University of Georgia
"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

02:17 min | 1 year ago

"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Use of other kinds of satellite data like landside imagery. And we know that through the nineteen sixty s and nineteen seventies nineteen eighties that Greenland was. Roughly in balance it was gaining about not as much is through. Snowfall was losing through melting icebergs calving off but again since about one thousand nine hundred. We've seen a very significant loss of mass us from Greenland on the order in the past decade or so of about two hundred and eighty giga tons of ice per year. Roughly takes about three hundred sixty giga tons of ice tweet Equal One millimeter of sea level rise. So yes so. There's there's the so what I think. Many climatologists see Greenland and and West. Arctic ice sheet and others as sort of bellwethers canaries in coalmines. If you will I know some people are wondering because you mentioned past melt events before we had satellites. How do we get that type of information? Before the era of satellite so a couple of ways one is that we have we do have temperature records and we can use those temperature records with models that we have to be able to even though the temperature records themselves are the long term temperature records from coastal stations. That are not on the ice sheet. Only there's about ten percent of them. The margin of Greenland has not covered by ice. But we can use that with models to You you know to reconstruct what the melt record looked on the ice sheet but we also can look at course you can actually look at annual layers in the ice cores and you can see where there are melt layers that formed. That's how we know for example that this twenty twelve event and again twenty nineteen event that occurred at the top of the ice sheet. We know that there were previous melt events again in the eighteen eighties and then back Prior to that during essentially the medieval warm period yeah and these climate proxies are very commonly used using climate science. We use ice cores. We have a colleague at the University of Georgia that core does lake sediment cores tree rings. And I often get that question. And they're quite accurate. Would you when you get the question. How how accurate are these ice cores? What do you say I mean it's you can see very clearly the annual newell layers in these cores going back for Many cases thousands of years We could also date these quite.

Greenland Snowfall coalmines University of Georgia
"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

Weather Geeks

04:53 min | 1 year ago

"greenland" Discussed on Weather Geeks

"Hadn't really been doing any work on this in real time basis and of course we're we're looking at other aspects of climate associated with Both energy and the mass balance of the green dice sheet but I I hadn't been working in Greenland England I hadn't been working on side during the For a number of years leading up to twenty twelve I had a colleague of mine from Rutgers University away still continue to work with Mussa runner. Mom She happened to be working on the ice sheet at that time and she actually contacted me and she reached out and said you know. I'd like you to look at the satellite data real time because we're seeing something really really remarkable happening here the Watson River which is a major river that runs past a former. US Air Base at the formerly the Saunder. Strong airbase now the Greenlandic Greenlandic town of Kangerlussuaq saw the bridge. This bridge had been there for decades. Wash out this bridge washed out from meltwater coming off of the ice sheet. Said you need look at the satellite product and see what's happening and so we took a look at it and saw that essentially the entire surface of the ice sheet was melting. And something that we hadn't seen before including even even up to the highest elevations of the ice sheet that reach over ten thousand feet. That's over ten thousand feet above sea level so these are places where the average temperature is something like minus minus thirty Celsius and these are very called areas And you know we went on to publish some work from that. And some of the some of our colleagues who've who've looked at some of the ice cores from the what we call summit the highest elevation of the Ice Sheet. We're finding that they had not seen any ice layers that had formed Prior to this event Since the eighteen eighties and before that we think the last time that we saw melt event at the highest elevations of the she probably was somewhere around the year. Lebanon hundred so this was really an unusual event and anomalous event and certainly there is evidence that you've seen it before in the natural record because I know that there will be some. Okay well. I'm sure this has happened naturally. And I WANNA Kinda get into this sort of natural variability to weather related aspects of this and the climate change aspects but fast forward to recent sometimes as well and I'm going to read some notes provided by our producer of this particular podcast. They are dealing hand was a former student of both of ours. Yes they are dealing ham here at the at. The Weather Channel Sarah Rights on June thirteenth of this year twenty nineteen greenland experience more than two GIG tons of ice melt in one day you you were quoted in an article saying that this was unusual but not unprecedented. Now you've just given his contacts with two thousand twelve event tell us about why or how this more more. Recent event fits in the context with that event and other events. This year was a very interesting summer. So we had this very large melt event in twenty twelve in fact if you look at the amount of melt and the amount of mass loss from Greenland. We've seen this really accelerating loss through since about nineteen ninety eight and really peaking in twenty twelve. We saw a a year following that in two thousand thirteen. That was much cooler than we've seen in the past. Two decades are most for the past two decades but then again seen a number of years with Greater than average melt and greater than average loss of ice from the ice sheet but this year was really kind of unusual in that we saw a quite a bit of melt occurring on the sheet. But it occurred mostly very early in the summer season again really late in the summer season so we had this really large melt event loss of a lot of ice in early June. We typically you see a peak and Mel sometime around the beginning of July usually the first two weeks of July and we had fairly typical conditions this year but then we had a really large melt event again at at the very end of July and the beginning of August sort of which is sorta tends to be toward the end of the melt season in Greenland. That later event was particularly interesting because because it followed immediately after the European heatwave that occurred in late July so if you may remember we had this heatwave that occurred temperatures well above one hundred degrees Fahrenheit in parts of France France the Benelux countries across much of continental Europe. A few days later after that we saw another melt event across the started in eastern part of Greenland. Most of the time these melt events come across western Greenland move up higher and higher elevations. This one came across from the East eastern Greenland and. Actually we saw again melt at the highest just allocation of the ice sheet. This summer But we were able to go back. We've I'm I'm doing some work with students now. We're actually have been able to go back and track. The origins origins of this late July event to the European heat wave awhile and we are back on the weather. PODCASTS awesome talking with Dr. Tom Moat from the University of Georgia about all things Greenland from a science perspective He's studied greenland from satellites. He's been on on the Greenland.

Greenland Greenlandic Greenlandic Watson River Rutgers University US Kangerlussuaq Saunder Lebanon Sarah Rights Dr. Tom Moat Europe producer Mel France University of Georgia
"greenland" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

The World Nomads Podcast

09:02 min | 1 year ago

"greenland" Discussed on The World Nomads Podcast

"And if you want to see that in action you should watch the video we made. The project will put a link to that insurance. He can sit and Humble Brag by the way the video was recently named as a finalist in the shorty social. Good awards awesome next to you have dips out on the Caribbean coming. Hang out with speaking to the guy that hades up the turtle conservancy fantastic. They're alive clue rural library. Google to search for travel today It had one of those funny sort of graphics at the top. That's different the hang on google doodle Google doodle. It was a woman wearing like an old style. Leather Flying Helmet. He's it's an. I've checked her out and she was an aviation pioneer. I'd never heard off before. which is you know women doing anything? It takes a long time to get recognition. But his name is moored and she called herself Laura's so more Loris Bonnie and she was the first woman to fly solo from Australia to England should do that in one thousand nine hundred ninety three and a other fates that she did as as well. She was the first person of any gender to fly from Australia to South Africa. Showing from Brisbane to Capetown. That's a lot of water. And he's all right so noni running thirty three and nineteen thirty seven. She did thirty three trip to England Innate Gypsy moth which is a tiny biplane tiny. And then the trip that you deep from Brisbane to Cape Town in another aircraft which is not a lot bigger either. It's just unbelievable how brave she must've according to do that. And how competent credible and do you want me to tell you who has tried Tourism going. It's a news outlet outlet called skift. Okay skit why not give yeah. This was Come up with the pen today on great trouble news whips on Super Phil. Don't mind smart idea of them to trademark. That would gift. He's now a reminded to join facebook. Great great to just search for the world nomads podcast. We share some behind the scenes stuff. Including what will I'm Ed. Staff have been up to recently global programs marketing manager Perry. Climb Mount Kilimanjaro. Majora spock's conversation Certainly inspired one of group members Ian to rethink climbing. Because he's dead did it when he was young. Many many years ago we they to in spy fill is absolutely. That wasn't convenient you. I'm just wondering what do you mean really are rethinking as in history because dead. It did because he's dead. Did it picture of Perry. Who's just donors suddenly? It's achievable Altitude sickness yeah. She's doing it and found. The toilets are pretty gross on the way clay up needs outdoor and adventure travel writer. He's kayaked the fjords Autzen Greenland absolutely and we. I actually got did took us a couple of days even actually get to see the the actual ice sheet because we were used as we got into the fjords we were paddling. And all of these chunks of ice and icebergs ranging from the size of buildings and houses down to the size of cars and even and basically like the ice cubes in your glass You know we got to a a a section of the yard and we took a hike and then we actually got to see the the large glacier that Kinda came about a series of glaciers that formed the Lord's ice sheet that ran like I think fifteen hundred miles north of their size big joint or he's as an quite a large plight. Yeah it is. It's the I guess. The the world's largest island and I had to fly all the way to Europe to get back to Greenland which is actually on the North American continent. So that was the beauty of it is. It's kind of remote. It's kind of a been an article as well. I almost think it it was actually harder to get to greenland than it wants to get an article which is a spectacular. You know I was actually on an expedition cruise ship and Artika so assault. Many more people roll a metre even though it was only like maybe three hundred people owned the on the ship. But when I was in an an green on it was like me A couple of other guys and then and our God so I saw four people for the or the bulk of our kayaking Porsche so I saw less people in Greenland than I saw an an article. It was a it was actually a very unique experience to to be there and it's just a once again. You understand how you have to have a real sense of survival and kind of just a knack for wanting to to live and thrive in a very inhospitable environment. I've got this image inside my hid. About what a peddling up a field looks like an eye steep sided jeffco image. I've got is it like that or the other a bit more open as you pedal Yup yeah. They're they're actually pretty. These were pretty open to some degree. Then you got into the The fjords of Norway were jump. You you know high mountain peaks that come straight down into the water and It was a little bit more open than that. It was but yet it was still pretty much The sides of the fjord kind of went up a little bit High the peak sworn is high on on the sides. So I guess it didn't seem as as tall and kind of rugged but yet there's no trees in Greenland most of its shrubbery. That grows really low to the ground due you to the to the environment so yeah it was more of a almost like a Tiger most like a Tundra type experience pretty of today and Wildlife Seals Caribou. Most of it saw a lot of birds. We saw some Some Eagles and what southbound bear unique was that the the water was almost jet black. I guess maybe because of how deep it was or whatever then you got like this is and then you. Can you know the different colored. Is You know the bluish the Hawaii. So it's it's a very dramatic landscape. It was like it almost was kind of eerie. You know as you're paddling along in this lack water and then you can hear the ice cracking. You're not really you know you don't have any other sounds coming in from other communities or you know any any any other outside noise. Whatever you're hearing is like the the ice cracking or melting or the ice turning in the water is it's it's changing its form orm? Will you afraid of ice. Carving and cassette can be really dangerous when a big chunk of water. Well we were. We actually could not even get into the opening to that in particular fjord where glacier that was producing all the ice because it was so congested But we did take out a hike. To the top of the weekend. Came ashore ashore then hiked up to the top of this Bluff were able to see the actual the end of the glacier. It's actually capping off. You could hear it you could. It was pretty dramatic but then you could see how congested it was all trying to go out like this little bottle neck and so is it melted or is it tied change changed. It would kind of allow some of Kinda get pushed out in his more ice was being pushed off of the glacier. It would candidate push more of it out of that that small the opening it was almost a unique experience. I've seen the calving in Antarctica and it was much more wide open as opposed to these narrow channels. We now. Oh It's pretty remote in this. You know. Many towns villages along the it's a heady prepay. Faw An expedition like that. I come from a kayaking background and a sea kayaking instructor saw had a little bit of a a little bit of a head. Start ahead of a couple of the two guys that were with us when they were kind of newbies to to that so of course the the guide service we went with a headache everything. We needed paddling jackets. I even had the little peddling hoagies little myths that you would over your paddle just because of the the watertown. We had the spray skirts to keep any water out of the cop yet because the water itself as you know you could easily get hypothermia really quickly quickly and you know he obviously went over instruction somebody does go in the water. You know we all go ashore to the quickest point that we can get to immediately. After can we get the person out of the water. Because we've obviously got to build a fire Get them warmed up. Get Out of their wet clothes. Get him onto some dry clothes. Obviously you know that happened It was a injury free risk free trip so I've just jumped onto youtube and found the SI- the sound of cracking inside here. It's not ingrained landed in Canada in BC..

Google Greenland Brisbane Perry Cape Town England Australia Autzen Greenland turtle conservancy Mount Kilimanjaro facebook youtube Europe Majora spock Norway assault hypothermia headache watertown
"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

04:22 min | 1 year ago

"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

"In the interview is to folding chairs right at the edge of breath drop-off ryan and it went on forever and it was cold. Conan doesn't wasn't wearing a jack so he he kind of endured an iceland greenlandic interview right and then when then something happened after that that in a way who's who's kind of a little result of the preparation we did we wrote <hes> a greeting for conan to say in <hes> three in greenlandic when we landed and we had the cue cards and the greenlandic language the words are so long vowel heavy. They're funny. They're just funny to see. Apparently greenlandic has the longest word in any language yeah. It's like multiple lines long forward yeah yeah no language language is just crazy and we ended up not doing shooting the greeting and we're like we'll. Let's grab the green in town because it's because the idea was you hear conan doing this greeting and butchering the language and then i think jesse was your idea at one point he would cut to the cue card and that would really get got a big laugh. When you see the words he's trying to actually read so then after that long interviews they asked him to do the weather or i think we'd pitched again. We pitched him doing the weather and they're like we will sure yeah so it was going to be him with the with the other weather person and she'd go and then he'd go and we you were kind of approaching it and it was getting a little like linear thinking of things to improvise and write code and then i forget who i think conan conan was just like let's let me do it. Try to do it in their language and then we're like yes we'll do the reverse shot basically jesse's idea but even funnier prompter and then it was moving it was moving and he's trying to keep up and end up being one of the funniest things on the shop yes yeah but that's an example of an really aired in greenland. Yes it did that. That's going to shoot someone with an idea and he ended up repurposing purposing it those cards home yeah. They seem pretty. I ah i mean they seemed willing to air whenever we gave them they were. They're hungry for contests the greenland. I love their showroom cracking up. It was so funny really fun but it's also i mean i'm always struck doc by whenever you meet other. Even our crew the camera guys in the audio guy that we're working for us there there. They could have been crew people here. You know everyone else like they've got cool haircuts and cool tattoos and you know they were all black and it's like oh. That's just a guy that you'd meet in l._a. Who does audio audio somewhere but those they live remote part of the world. Has you know that you have no contact with right. It is weird. It's a weird appeared. Artificial bonding that quickly becomes real bonding that were all thrown together to make this one thing and <hes>. Maybe i shouldn't talk about team bonding. Y just sounded convoluted to me. I'm just being self conscious. Sorry way finding no one thing. Jason always does a really good job of is you like go out with the crew. You'll go too far with grew yeah. Yeah we went to the bars called short rights adding their brewery so we went to daddy's yes so you get more intel everyone. I meet along the way then then. Maybe you'll tell us that like people are married that i don't need and stuff like that where the country where someone was married and i didn't megyn there were a couple that i didn't realize they were a couple. I vaguely okay a daddy's..

conan conan jesse greenlandic greenland ryan iceland l._a Jason
"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

"The world's largest suitcase stuffed with props and those are like security blankets. It's like just knowing like conan love shutting them as we go and like like when you actually bring it is like no no no but then we always have them there but the best thing you have to tell us about the proxy took on the actual plane took on to happy meals to mcdonald's happy meals their nose. The whole premise of this show was conan loves trump's idea to buy greenland conan's going to greenland to the to bargain to do the bargain and actually make the purchase happen so he's coming armed so greenland when he's done it will be part of america. He's bringing. Some of americana rewards george. Everything's or sway them right. Yeah grease the wheel. I don't wanna put you happy meals. In the back of obama the playing and it smashed right you just brought him on the plane plane there zip lock so there was no odor right but i just carry them in a small duffle then the best thing was it. You were determined to bring them back. Yes i do that with all the props even like the things that we destroy the clearly things they say like. Just leave it there. Don't worry about it. We can get that anywhere. I always end up bringing them back then. No it makes them mad. Slash makes makes them happy. This will they are are they always bring it back to having meals with over three. You know we were there for how long days two flights back and forth. I walked with the happy meals and they were just like what are you doing. They ended up being snapped. All all doing about property tasted justice yeah right yeah. Should we talk about the end of the greenland show and the prob in yeah now. It's a little jumping to going. Okay good yeah so there were so we threw through things together and then wednesday night we took off and we overnight flight say we rarely do red eye right into working for this kind of had landed on thursday morning and i don't know how you told the iceland crew when we start rolling. We don't stop right for hours and hours and you always want yeah. There's some sort of warning running and they again. They were really really excited. Yes so they were like whatever you say. We're on board yeah and so we we had to because we're in a jet. We had to land one specific airport. That had a long enough runway. Greenland is all rock so you know. Most of the runways are short. There are no roads connecting acting any of the cities of the flat every you have to fly or take a boat to every city selling this you have to come in to check for customs like any international flights to land just one city okay so we had a land and air stamper passport life sucks and then we had to get on another propeller plane and fly to the capital which was neck and then the second we got out. There starts shooting on the tarmac like literally get the camera out. There here comes conan conan on the plane..

Greenland conan obama mcdonald america trump iceland
"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

"I. Hey mentioned yeah well because we were in a meeting and chilean me. You'd actually mentioned greenland. Yes what do you think of greenland before. That just seems like no one ever goes there. I mean come out like you can probably do a lot of things you do in iceland but not just in greenland but no one goes to greenland going places that we've no one would go to yes so earlier earlier in the week on monday. We had our first like oh where we're gonna go next. We had the meeting and iceland was in the forefront was one of the frontrunners and that's when she'll let me as you just said like hey why not that giant island next time iceland greenland and you know we i that i love that you pitched the greenland on a monday and thursday. That's when this story broke ass spend and then it was like oh yeah let's do it worked out great with a little help from the president so and jose you had you had mentioned i think is a negative that jordan is also really into isolate so we were worried that we were going to have to do is a fan of iceland and and it's also very touristy i it's been it's been discovered and everything so people go there. Yeah greenland has is sort of not not on anybody's i travel agenda and or second or third only has fifty seven thousand people in and and three times bigger than texas. Yes you're quoting from the chef and the show's quoting from wikipedia. That's for most of our yeah. Yes i mean once. We decided we kind of all met on monday right. After a weekend of the story had it kind of percolating in those and there was that whole weekend jeff ross inch lemay were researching feelers well research now how to get their lights yeah related to get there right and here's the other thing sure okay trout's by greenland okay. Let's go there but of course worse with the new cycles now like especially at trump story by sunday greenland could be so far in the rear view mirror 'cause of eight million in other things nuclear war exactly on a hurricane so the we're trying to you know you don't wanna get do all this work and and here's a show and they're like look that was that was forty eight hours ago so we were monitoring that meanwhile yes s. lemme in jeff rouse look into travel and whoever thought about how to get to greenland a your. We're about to tell you how hard it is to get really hard either. Go through iceland or copenhagen right but like there's only one flight a day from copenhagen in the morning at nine a._m. This every other day out of iceland like it'd be really really hard to get there right with a camera so very last minute and from l._a. So l._a. Especially to my three planes right we'd have to fly overplay by many hours to get to go to copenhagen copenhagen and then wait than for this one flight go back. Yeah crazy figured it out right well. We we had the only way way to do it. Was we had to charter a plane. Yes to fly directly and and we had to limit the number we i usually take more people limit. I mean it's literally like you can't tonight. Normal gear we bring our normal gear and we couldn't bring one of our one one of our cameramen and our sound nearly eleven of us go yes and so we just decided okay. Let's hire a camera crew in greenland england which we never do and we found a crew there and that they became part of the story a little that was another thing also like normally emily. We've decided to go to start looking to that country and there's a whole list of fixtures that we can hire ryan key explaining what fixtures six years i local person on the ground from that country who would help us with like permiting locations legit logistics vehicles right murders and they usually have a lot of their fixers. They mostly do yeah because a lot of countries go..

greenland iceland greenland england copenhagen jeff ross jeff rouse wikipedia president ryan jordan jose texas forty eight hours six years
"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

04:54 min | 1 year ago

"greenland" Discussed on Inside Conan: An Important Hollywood Podcast

"A high mike sweeney jesse gaskell. Welcome to the podcast. Thank you for listening. Yes we are. We have just finished wrapping. Greenland show up this and it aired tuesday aired on tuesday. I hope you liked it. Yes up. Everyone liked to a lot of work. It was a fair amount of work. We thought today hey we talked to some of the team went to greenland and talk. I think it's interesting to see how it came about because it was all well like it was about a week from start to finish yes. It was unlikely attack. Yeah and many people mobilized quickly and once everyone is mobilized it was non-stop till the show was screened for live audience. Literally the finishing touches put put on fifteen fifteen minutes yeah screening screening so it it was that was batting and we're gonna get into all that but i we found somebody a fan. One of conan and of inside conan was at the screening and she has a tattoo on her forearm with the inside conan opponent art right so we this stunning. We talked to her as a intervention. Even those too late i do think there there are ways to have those removes so so we thought it was important to talk to her. I don't know i actually think this is sort of a gauntlet for our other fans true where where's your tattoos and hers mom. I think we're posing using the picture of her tattoo. I think others yes should answer the call and bigger and on the face. Maybe a face sir should actually map yes scale so have their faces all over your face yes. I like it good so here she yes. We're here with jackie hijack. Hello thank you for being here. I literally jesse just grabbed you out of the dark audience. We're about to do the greenland show screening and we had to grab because you have an inside conan tattoo tattoo i do. Oh my god. It's beautiful. Can you can see it right now. Well on your forearms. Yes the little touch up with the colors but seidler. It's it's a mini anatomy lesson. That's amazing code into autographed too. He actually signed your arm. Yes that was back in november the tour in detroit in detroit so you went to the show in detroit yes that that great that was great theater was and he signed it and you. How long did you get because you can't shower correct at all out in the rain. You can't do anything now exactly. Did people ask what people think of this <hes>. They like it honest yeah even if they don't like recognize right away that it's cone in there like you know they. They think it's a really cool tattoos ostracize. Eh disowned by family. We're your family. Now you ever need anything yeah and you mentioned earlier you. You said you were stationed somewhere and then yet to so you are in the armed services yeah some in their four sexual assault. Oh wow that's great now. And where are you based now right right now. I'm in ohio okay. Where'd you go. Did you grow up in the military or no. No i actually am from ohio but around all over the place place for twelve years and i just got stationed back in ohio oh this is that a good thing. I wanted to get out soon. Yeah exactly i the world's. I'm ready to go again so i'm afraid to other tattoos. This is it. Are you serious yeah holy cow. I assume that you were going to have the full bill. Maher is such an honor to wow. That's amazing. What can i ask. What does a conan tattoo. Get you in the military like do you get extra extra to mashed potatoes. <hes> oh i don't know yet i haven't extra spag kudos from some of the younger people actually follow conan and stuff so that's great oh aw and you must be making a lot of moolah in the military because you're flying all over the detroit and then i saw the show in minneapolis now you're in l._a. We'll maybe you're doing the flank because you're in the air for right. Yeah iran thinks it's fleet week. I know you're in the air. Force does air force..

conan detroit Greenland jesse gaskell ohio mike sweeney jackie assault iran Maher l._a minneapolis fifteen fifteen minutes twelve years
"greenland" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:21 min | 3 years ago

"greenland" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The female narrow just fine without the tusk no it's actually one of the front tooth to one of the frontier sorry it's the left one in fact in in the skull you can find the right one which is small and just remains inside the skull and the left one at some point in male starts to wrap although i have to say sometimes there are females with tusks and sometimes there are males without so it's not you know it's not compete the absolute that we actually use the tusk to determine whether it's a male or female otherwise we'd have to flip the way upside down and whatnot we don't want to do that so we just say if you have a tough gets a boy if it does not to girl when that happens so what's the next step in your studies now tag what do you what would you really want to know what is the bottom line joining well this first paper was really sort of just one step in the way what we really are interested in is the effects of arrogant pulse has on the animals and on pulses are used in seismic exploration to look for oil and gas and they are fairly high amplitude sound and there's a lot of interest by there's all companies in prospecting around greenland and east and west of greenland is basically where most of the narrows of the world's hang out and of course we feel like it's really important to know what the effects of of the sounds are on this animal which is really pretty forty known so you say the big question big picture question is how the nor walls might be affected by human mates out do you have any preliminary data that how do you think they might respond well we only know that when people do vessel based surveys you know when they go out and count them marine mammals narrows are very rarely seen even when those vessels go through areas where aerial surveys have shown that there are thousands of whales and so they are very sensitive they seem to be very sensitive to underwater sound i have only about a minute i'm sorry to interrupt because i'm always interesting scientists get into their line of work.

greenland
"greenland" Discussed on WPUL Radio 1590

WPUL Radio 1590

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"greenland" Discussed on WPUL Radio 1590

"Bad tom the council the greenland now before i way muffler play who was living with nothing oh new yeah union gosh following god cher arch five surrey man tired time we are for zip heard barrels those two lanes mm.

greenland
"greenland" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"greenland" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"One possible way for the water to reach the bedrock and from there the ocean is a crevasse or a crack in the ice when cracks filled with water the way to the water forces than deeper and deeper this is how fracking works to extract natural gas from deep within the earth pressurized fluids fracture rocks all it takes is a crack to get started well we recently discovered that there are cracks available in the greenland ice sheet near this glacier off you can fly over most of the greenland ice sheet and seen nothing no cracks no features on the surface but as his helicopter flies towards the coast to the past that water would take on its quest to flow downhill one crack appears then another and another are these cracks filled with liquid water and if so how deep do they take that water can they take it to the bedrock and the ocean to answer these questions we need something beyond remotesensing data we need numeric models i write numeric models that run on supercomputers numeric model is simply a set of equations that works together to describe something it can be as simple as the next number in a sequence one three five seven or it can be a more complex set of equations the predict the future based on known conditions on the present in our case what are the equations for how ice cracks well engineers already have a very good understanding of how aluminum steel and plastics fracture under stress.

natural gas greenland
"greenland" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"greenland" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"This ted talk features place he outages kristen wehner recorded live ted 2017 if you're enjoying ted talks than we think you'll like kenneth lack of erez ted book why dinosaurs matter what can long dead dinosaurs teach us about our future plenty according to paleontologist kennedy lack of era who is discovered some of the largest creatures to ever walk the earth go on a remarkable journey back to win dinosaurs roamed the earth to discover fundamental truce about our own humanity as we move into an uncertain environmental future it has never been more important to understand the past why dinosaurs matter is a great reminder that are place on this planet is both precarious and potentially fleeting available now wherever you buy your books when i was twenty one years old i had all this physics homework physics homework requires taking breaks and wicket pdo is relatively new so i took a lot of breaks there i kept going back to the same articles reading them again and again on glaciers antarctica and greenland how cool would it be to visit these places and what would it take to do so well here we are on the repurpose air force cargo plane operated by nasa flying over the greenland ice sheet there's a lot to see here but there's more than his hidden waiting to be uncovered what the wicket pedia articles didn't tell me is that there's liquid water hidden inside the ice sheet because we didn't know that yet.

kristen wehner ted kenneth erez ted kennedy nasa greenland twenty one years