37 Burst results for "goldman"

Fresh update on "goldman" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:51 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "goldman" discussed on Bloomberg Daybreak

"Much of what we wanted without having to give up anything that's very good, you can beat that. But president is also seeking to defer payroll taxes through the end of the year for workers earning less than $8000 a month that could give extra cash to employees. But won't help workers who've lost their jobs. Goldman Sachs expects the order's good force Congress to reach him or concrete stimulus by September, and so does the president. He wants to call and she wants to see if you could do something, but they're much more inclined to make a deal now than they would have been two days ago. Exactly impact of deferring payroll tax is also in question. It hinges on whether employers will stop withholding the money from paychecks. If they do, voters would likely pressured Congress to back the measure with legislation if lawmakers don't Americans could all that money back to the government At the end of the year, the Democratic state leaders air pushing back against the president's plan. You can't now, say two states who have no funding and you have to pay 25% of the unemployment insurance costs. NewYork Governor Andrew Cuomo says it's impossible for states to pay that amount. So does Michigan Governor Gretchen Whitmer. There are also questions about the legality of the president's orders. White House economic adviser Larry Kudlow addressed that issue on a bee sees this week heard on Bloomberg Radio. Maybe we're going to go to court on We're going to go ahead with our actions anyway are counsel's office. The Treasury Department believes it has the authority to temporarily suspend tax collections, so we're banking on that. The executive orders will likely face litigation over core constitutional principles like the separation of powers, plus lawsuits from landlords seeking to stop a measure to prevent evictions. Still, the president hopes it will push lawmakers to reach a deal. Now we wait and see right now way.

President Trump Governor Andrew Cuomo Congress Goldman Sachs Gretchen Whitmer Larry Kudlow Newyork White House Treasury Department Executive Economic Adviser Michigan Bloomberg Radio
Face masks could actually save the economy, Goldman Sachs

Planet Money

00:18 sec | 2 d ago

Face masks could actually save the economy, Goldman Sachs

"If we all wore masks, Goldman Sachs says that alone could avert one trillion dollars in economic loss by preventing. Future lockdowns more importantly, health experts say masks could save thirty, three, thousand lives by just October. A whole stadium of lives

Goldman Sachs
Fresh update on "goldman" discussed on How I Built This

How I Built This

00:46 min | 11 hrs ago

Fresh update on "goldman" discussed on How I Built This

"Industry. Guess right so I knew I couldn't just cold. Email them like that just wasn't gonNA work. So at the time I had started building up some mentors in the space that encouraged me to go to a trade show and to invest in getting a booth, which is not cheap. It's like two, three, thousand and four, thousand more. It was more than that while because I elected to be in this very special section of the cosmic prophets beauty trade show where's that? Is that New York that's in Las Vegas, and how much is your booth cost cost about ten thousand dollars for that weekend and that was just for the space to like. Bring your stuff with you in like a sign edge and right? Yeah. There's travel I had to design the space I needed staffing. So I think when it was all set in. Donald probably closer to fifteen thousand and meantime no one at Goldman Sachs noses like you're like oh you have a great weekend in Las Vegas go have a booth at this at this trade show. Yeah. It was a little weird and I did I started feeling guilty am like this isn't right I like I'm kind of living this double life but clearly by two thousand thirteen, this is this train has left the station. Now you've got one foot really in this. This side, the haircuts and And you get to the show and. You're standing there. You've got your your bottles all lined up and and people are passing by and people stop and start to talk to you. Yeah and it If you've never been to a trade show, it is a very, very overwhelming series of days because you were talking non stop and you have to be on and you have to be at that booth 'cause you never know who's GonNa come by you can't even go to the bathroom. Yeah. Yeah. It's very hard. I actually did step away to the bathroom and missed the buyer who I was there for luckily came back for that's how it how okay. All right. So you're there presumably hopefully to get some kind of deal somebody's purchase to make a purchase order and would who ends up ordering from you? Yes. So the first day I was handing out slots of samples and buyers were very intrigued because they're always intrigued by newness and they had never seen the brand before but the buyers that I gave samples to most of them came back the next day and said I use the products last night or this morning like tell me more and so some of those buyers included you know urban outfitters. strum and then on the very last day, the Sephora team came by and that was what's really funny is that I didn't even know that they were the Sephora team until they laughed because there was a group of four of them and their badges were turned the other way because they don't want to be kind of like smothered by everyone who's looking for the Sephora team. So when they came by I actually had no idea and when they walked off another brand came up to my booth and said Oh my gosh how did the conversation with Sephora go? And I was like, what do you mean and she was like Oh those four women were from Sephora but they didn't make an order. They didn't. They didn't make an order. I got no contacts. I had no business cards and I was actually very, very disappointed because they were the people I came to see and I laughed without getting any information or inability to even contact any of them. Did you leave with any orders I left with no orders but I did leave with interest from urban outfitters, urban outfitters stop by and by the way. Were there people who assumed because you are an African American woman that this you were making products for you know quote unquote ethnic I'll products you I mean like that that this was specifically for women of color I mean was there. People. Make that assumption initially you know I figured that people would which is why when? I design my booth I was very intentional about having hair model imagery at my booth that really displayed the diversity of our intended consumer. So I think when people saw the breath of ethnicities and skin tones and hair texture types I think it helped to offset maybe that stereotype. Yemi even when your website now Bloomberg jumping ahead but it's like you know there's just different skin tones and different hairstyles and it's like every single. Hair, type and ethnicity is represented on hundred website. Yeah and that's that's been a day one mission of the Brioche brand was to create. Problems solution formulas but that really speaks to a diverse spectrum of women and now men as well and it really just kind of reflects I think my experience of growing up and I've been so fortunate to have a diverse group of friends and I never wanted any of my friends to feel like they couldn't use Brioche to. All right you come back from that trade show and then I'm assuming you start to pit the phones on urban outfitters Oh. Yeah. So that that move pretty quickly. So they did eventually put an order and that fall and that was actually the milestone that Philip who spoke about a little earlier fill up was then ready to commit some capital to the to the company because you needed. Cash to place that order. If. And by how many pep remember how many bottles they better they bought the stock they pretty much all of the stock that I had so that you hundred units, right? Yeah. So it was proposed they were cut dipping their toe into this. And Cedeno have to make extra product but that was enough to get filled as they are right. I.

Las Vegas Sephora Goldman Sachs New York Cedeno Donald Trump Bloomberg Philip
NFL Training Camp Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

NFL Live

03:22 min | Last week

NFL Training Camp Amid COVID-19 Pandemic

"A look at the schedule and testing guidelines as things get going around the league, all players must pass three Cova tests over a four day span before entering the team facility, today and tomorrow players will. Will be tested and then return home to isolate for twenty four hours. Meetings are still virtual. After this period, players will be tested daily for the first two weeks, and then every other day. If the positive rate remains below five percent players do have the option to opt out. Really get back to that in just a moment, but first here's what a handful of head coaches are saying about today. Sorry I mean again. The emphasis will be that. We've got to follow the protocol. Be Very diligent with. That's the thing that I think that we're missing right now. A society is that. Is that not very diligent as we? Understand more and more about this. It seems that you know that that wearing a mouse washing your hands socially just. Trying to avoid large crowds You know you give yourself a chance. We're fortunate that we're testing here testing. And you know so. We're getting results quickly. Other thing that's been beneficial. Of Our and Continuing maintain, Around the League, a number of US going to have to be the best teammates we've ever been because we're GONNA have to not only take care of one another, but we're really looking after your families, too, because we're going to make the best decisions off the field and I think we've also learned you can do all the right steps, and still you know have positive tests so. We'll take them when those happen. We'll deal with them, and that's why the protocols are in place. And there's this component so far. Nine thousand nine hundred players have opted out of the upcoming season, and the list is growing some notable names here. Including Three Patriots starters also. You've heard GPS guard Lawrence do Vernay Tardif and bear stalwart Eddie Goldman. Adamant feels like this list has been growing by the minute today. Take us through exactly what the opt out means and the deadline to do so the impact of this. We'll susie this situation where I think a lot of players are concerned about what they're seeing across the country with the spikes in various states, some of these players who are opting out have friends, relatives, family members who are sick. Who may have passed in this particular case, every situation is unique and different. Dont`a hightower welcome to child in the middle of July Patrick shown is scheduled to have a child in the near future, and I think players are looking out for their safety and feel unsettled about the fact that the virus has affected certain segments of the society more of the disaffected others. It has affected the elderly, I. Think we're going to hear more and more. More about coaches around the NFL something. We're not hearing a lot of right now. It is affected minorities and I think some of these players have been scared off by and are opting for the opt out for this upcoming season. We've seen a higher than expected number of opt-outs and again players have until August third to officially. Opt Out so this may just be the beginning we have six opt outs from the new. England patriots already, and there may be more coming across the League Uzi.

United States Cova GPS Hightower England NFL Eddie Goldman Patrick Vernay Tardif Lawrence
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

02:36 min | Last week

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"Because. Because if you go and you say to someone, I'll give you a robot that a clean your house and folder laundry and you ask them how much they think it should cost. They're gonNA say thousand dollars, but today. If you WANNA lift a gallon of milk cost about thirty thousand dollars, and so there's gotTa. We've got a pretty. Long Bridge to cross. To do that all costs, maybe a challenge. Dave Ferguson believes that transformation is imminent. If you look back in the last thirty years at how life has changed. Say That from the digital. Perspective we've seen unbelievable transformation. Right smartphones the Internet. And everything that has enabled, but if you look if you think about the physical world with mobility, being a piece of that. Things haven't really changed that much the chairs. You're sitting on the table that just sitting behind. Might be slightly different, but fundamentally not much has changed in the physical world in the last thirty years. If you fast forward from today, another twenty to thirty years, I think. We're GONNA see. Dick Drastic change that concludes this latest episode of Exchanges I WanNa, thank Devon Correct Melanie wise. Day Ferguson for joining us. Be sure to tune in at the end of this week for exchanges, market update or Goldman Sachs experts share their perspective on the weeks developments. We hope you enjoyed today's podcast, and if you did please subscribe on spotify or apple, bats and rate us on Apple, podcast I'll join you next month with another episode of couple -rises until then I'm sorry. Thanks for listening to. All price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied distributed, published or reproduced in whole or in part, the information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener neither Goldman, Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements, or any information contained in this podcast and any liability, therefore including in respect. Respect of direct indirect or consequential loss or damage is expressly disclaimed the views expressed in this podcast or not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial economic legal accounting tax, advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition, the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman. Sachs to that listener, nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity..

Goldman Sachs Goldman Dave Ferguson Long Bridge Apple Devon spotify
The Chainsmokers called 'straight up irresponsible' after crowd packs in for charity concert

Wayne Cabot and Paul Murnane

00:30 sec | Last week

The Chainsmokers called 'straight up irresponsible' after crowd packs in for charity concert

"Says he is appalled by a drive in concert in the Hamptons drew as many as 3000 people in 500 cars. It's audio from T M Z from that party Saturday night in South Hampton. The event was headlined by the chain smokers but also featured a deejay set by Goldman Sachs CEO David Solomon. Who called himself D. J. D. Sol governor, Cuomo says video from the concert shows what he calls egregious social distancing violations. A state health department is now looking into it.

Goldman Sachs David Solomon Cuomo South Hampton CEO D. J. D. Sol
Goldman Sachs $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB

WSJ What's News

00:49 sec | 2 weeks ago

Goldman Sachs $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB

"Sachs has reached nearly four billion dollar settlement with the government of Malaysia for its role in the alleged theft of billions of dollars from a government investment fund known as one MD. Our reporter lives. Hoffman has more on one of the worst scandals in the bank's history. The allegations against Goldman are basically that the bank turned a blind eye to red flags with one MVP. And that it failed oversee two of its senior bankers who have been accused and in. In one case pled guilty of being part of the scheme. It's important to note that the settlement today does not resolve an investigation into Goldman by the US Department of Justice, which still wants its pound of flesh. We reported late last year that the DOJ was seeking a guilty plea from the bank or or a subsidiary and wanted to install someone to overhaul its compliance

Goldman DOJ Sachs Reporter Theft Malaysia Hoffman MVP
China orders closure of US consulate as tensions escalate

Squawk Pod

02:50 min | 2 weeks ago

China orders closure of US consulate as tensions escalate

"Let's get to this. China's story escalation overnight. It's important, isn't it? I thought we had big trade deal going on their. Beijing is revoking the license for us. Consulate in China. After US ordered China's Houston conflict to close by today. I wonder how POMPEII is. Speech is being taken over there, too. I mean. He stopped short of regime change, but. I mean it almost sounded like he was going there for a while? The truth is that our policies and those of other free nations resurrected China's failing economy only to see Beijing bite the international hands the feeding. Eunice Yoon joins us up with the latest. High, Eunice, yeah, now it did, but as you said he did stop short, but when he was talking about China in his blistering speech, he described it as a Frankenstein. That's what struck me that he described it as a Frankenstein that was created by the policies of the free world. And he was essentially calling on all countries within the free world to. Unite against a Communist China saying that if the free world allows China to continue. Pursuing its path that that could potentially change the free world so. It was a speech that the foreign ministry did not like they called it. Full of ideological bias said that it was. Unattached to reality? But it did take some measures specifically out on the consulate in thome do so that conflict is now going to be shutdown of the state media said it's going to be within seventy two hours so by Monday and the Foreign Ministry also accused the American staff. There of interfering in Chinese internal affairs state media the the reasoning. Of. Why China chose tone do. Is this. It's essentially one of the smaller consulates compared to the others. It's seen as not having a huge impact on American business, but at the same time would hurt because the media. Have pointed out and quoting experts as saying that that's where America. A gathers information on strategic weapons in the region and also gathered information on the situation in Tibet. So the reason why this is being explained in the state media is because the messaging is that Beijing wants to show that it's tough. It wants to be able to match what the US is doing at the same time. It wants to say there's a little bit of a door open because we don't want to have an escalation of tensions, even though, of course it's seems really difficult. To see where it all heads

China Beijing Eunice Yoon United States Tibet Thome Houston America
Goldman Sachs agree to $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB scandal

WBBM Morning News

00:25 sec | 2 weeks ago

Goldman Sachs agree to $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB scandal

"Bailey said. Goldman Sachs has agreed to a $3.9 billion settlement with the government over the multibillion dollar one MDB scandal. How much anticipated deep dive into and I addressed allegations against four of America's largest tech companies and recommendations on how to tame their market power could be released by late summer or early fall from the House of Representatives Judiciary Committee's anti trust

House Of Representatives Judic Goldman Sachs MDB Bailey America
Goldman Sachs $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB

Wall Street Breakfast

00:29 sec | 2 weeks ago

Goldman Sachs $3.9B settlement with Malaysia over 1MDB

"Agreed to a three point nine billion dollar settlement with the Malaysian government over the multibillion dollar one MD. scandal backdrop Malaysian prosecutors filed charges in December two, thousand, eighteen against three Goldman units for misleading investors over bond sales, totaling six point five billion that the bank helped raise for the sovereign wealth fund. However Goldman has pleaded not guilty to the charges. Saying that certain members of government and one MD be lied to about how proceeds from the bond sales would be used.

Malaysian Government Goldman MD MD.
Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

Software Engineering Daily

54:31 min | 3 weeks ago

Capital Allocation with Blair Silverberg and Chris Olivares

"Blair and Chris Welcome to the show. Thank, you good to be here. We're talking about capital allocation today and I'd like you to start off by describing the problems that you see with modern capital allocation for technology companies. I'm happy happy to start there. So I think it might be helpful to give. The listeners, a little bit of our backgrounds so I was a venture capitalist at draper. Fisher Jurvetson for five years I worked very closely with Steve. Jurvetson and we were financing are very MD intensive. Technology projects that became businesses things like satellite companies companies that were making chips to challenge the GP you new applications of machine learning algorithm so on and so forth and I think the most important thing to recognize is that the vast majority of technology funding does not actually go to those kinds of companies. The venture space is a two hundred fifty billion dollars per year investment space. The vast majority of the capital goes to parts of businesses that are pretty predictable like raising money in in investing that in sales, marketing and inventory or building technologies that have a fairly low technical risk profile, so the vast majority of tech companies find themselves raising money. From a industry that was designed to finance crazy high technology risk projects at a time where that industry because technology so pervasive you know really do the great work of of many entrepreneurs over the past twenty to thirty years, technology is now mainstream, but the financing structure to finance businesses not has not really changed much in that period of time. Yeah, and then I guess I'll talk a little bit. My my background is I came from consumer education sort of background, so direct to consumer, thinking about how you use tools and make tools that ingrained into the lives of teachers, parents students I was down in the junior class dojo before starting capital with Blair. We were working on the Earth thesis He. He was telling me a lot about this. The the date out. There exists to make more data driven in data rich decisions. How do we go software to make that easy to access in self service and sort of servicing the signal from the noise, and we kicked around the idea and I thought that they were just a tremendous opportunity to bring. What Silicon Valley really pioneered which is I think making software that is easy to use in agreeing to your live into kind of old industry fund raising capital Haitian. The kinds of capital allocation that exist there's. And debt, financing and different flavors of these. Of these things say more about the different classes of fundraising in how they are typically appropriated two different kinds of businesses. So. You have the main the main groups you know. Absolutely correct, so there's. Equity means you sell part of your business forever to a group of people and as Business Rosen succeeds. They'll get a share in that. Success and ultimately income forever. Debt means you temporarily borrow money from somebody you pay them money, and then at some point in time that money's paid back and you all future income for your business, so equities permanent, not permanent. If you think about how companies are finance like. Let's take the P five hundred. About thirty percents of the capital that S&P five hundred companies use to run. Businesses comes from debt. In the venture world that's remarkably just two percent. And the thing that's crazy is this is two percent with early stage seed companies, also two percent with public venture, backed companies in places like the best cloud index, which is like a one trillion dollar index of publicly traded technology companies started their life, and in with injure backing many of them SAS companies, these companies, also just two percent finance with debt, but nonetheless within these these classes, the reason it's obviously economically much better for a business and pretty much every case to finance itself with debt because it's not. Not It's not permanent, and it can be paid back. It's much much cheaper to use debt. That's why you buy a house with a mortgage show. You know you don't sell twenty percent of your future income forever to your bank help you buy a house, but the reason that people use equity comes back to the risk profile so just like. If you lose your job and you can't pay off your mortgage. The bank owns your home. Same exact thing happens with debt in so restorick Louis, if there's very low. Certainty around the outcome in typically early stage investment you're you're doing a lot of brand new are indeed you have no idea if it's GonNa work you cope. You know over time that you'll be successful, but there's really quite a bit of uncertainty equities a great tool because you're. You'RE NOT GONNA lose a business, you know everybody can basically react to a failed. Are Indeed project. Decide what to do next had saints. Equity is kind of the continent tool for high technical risk, high uncertainty investments, and then debt is basically the tool for everything else, and it can be used as most companies do for. Ninety percent of The places that businesses are investing so if you're spending money on sales and marketing, and you know what you're doing and you've been running campaigns before. That were successful, very. Little reason you should use equity for that if you're buying inventory if you are a big business that's. Reach a level of success that on. Means you have a bunch of diversified cashless. Coming in businesses might take out dead on business kind of overall, so it's less important what specifically you're using the money for, but it's important to recognize that most companies are financed roughly fifty fifty equity versus dead, just just intra back companies that. That are kind of uniquely Equity Finance. Scaling a sequel cluster has historically been a difficult task cockroach. DB Makes Scaling your relational database much easier. COCKROACH! DVD's a distributed sequel database that makes it simple to build resilient scalable applications quickly. COCKROACH DB is post grass compatible giving the same familiar sequel interface that database developers have used for years. But unlike databases scaling with Cockroach DB's handled within the database itself, so you don't need to manage shards from your client application. And because the data is distributed, you won't lose data if a machine or data center goes down. cockroach D is resilient and adaptable to any environment. You can hosted on Prem. You can run in a hybrid cloud, and you can even deploy across multiple clouds. Some of the world's largest banks and massive online retailers and gaming platforms and developers from companies of all sizes, trust cockroach DB with their most critical data. Sign up for a free thirty day trial and get a free t shirt at cockroach labs dot com slash save daily thanks to coach labs for being a sponsor and nice work with cockroach DB. The capital that is being steered towards a recipient. It's often originating in a large source, a sovereign wealth fund or family office in it's being routed through something like capital allocators cater like a venture capital firm for example or a bank. How does this capital get allocated to these smaller sources? What is the supply chain of capital in the traditional sense? You know it's kind of funny to think about capital and things like the stock market in the form of a supply supply chain, but this is exactly how we think about it so at the end of the day. Capital originate. In somebody savings, basically society savings right you. You have a retirement account or your population like you know in in Singapore and Norway with a lot of capital, it sort of accumulated from. From the population and these sovereign wealth funds, or you're an endowment that's you know managing donations of accumulated over many many years, and ultimately you're trying to invest capital to earn a return and pay for something pay for your retirement pay for the university's operation so on so forth so that's Capitol starts, and it basically flows through the economy in theory. To all of the economic projects that are most profitable, inefficient for society, and so, if you step back, and you think about like how how is it that the American dream or the Chinese Miracle Happen? You know in in both of those cases different points of the last hundred years. Why is it that society basically stagnated? You know the world was a pretty scary. Scary place to live in up until about seventeen fifty, the industrial revolution started. Why is it that you know basically for all of human history? People fought each other for food and died at the age of thirty or forty, and over the last two hundred fifty years that it's totally changed. It's because we have an economic system that converts capital from its original owners. Diverts it to the most productive projects. which if they're successful, replace some old more expensive way of doing something with newer better way and so I think when when I described that like you know I, think most people can step back and say yeah, okay I. kind of see how capital flows through the system, it goes automatically to someone making an investment decision like a venture capital firm ultimately gets into the hands of the company company decides to invest in creating some great product that people love. Let's. Let's say like Amazon and then everybody switches from you know buying goods at some store that may or may not be out of you know may or may not being stock to the world's best selection of anything you'd never wanted. The most efficient price that's society gets wealthier basically through these these kind of steps in these transformations, but it's asking if you step back and think about it like nobody actually thinks it's processes as efficient as it could be like. We asked people all the time. People were interviewing journalists companies. We work with sewn. So how efficient do you think world's capital allocation is? I've never met a person that says it's pretty good. You know we're like ninety percent of the way there. In fact, most people think it's pretty inefficient. They think of companies like you know we work, and some of the more famous cases lately of of Silicon. Valley back businesses that that totally. underwhelmed disappointed. Their initial expectations and I think most people admit that the efficiency of capital allocation is either broken or nowhere close to achieving its potential, and so we basically we'll talk more about our technology and how we do we do. We basically think of this problem our problem to solve. There's an incredible amount of Apache inefficiency in how data that goes from a project or a company, ultimately funneling up to an investor flows, and so you know it's hard to place blame because there's so many people in the supply chain, but. But I think it super clear that if it's difficult to measure whether or not a project or a business is good at converting capital into value in wealth, and you know products that people want, it's nearly impossible for society to become really good and efficient at allocating its capital, so we're we're here basically to make the data gathering data transformation visualization communication of what's actually going on under the out of business as efficient as possible and you know from that, we thank some great things are going to happen to the economy. Goes a little bit deeper on the role that a bank typically plays in capital allocation. If you think about our bank works like let's take. Let's take a consumer bank that most people think about you gotTA checking account. Right, now you've got some money in that checking account. That account actually takes your money or dot and most people know this your dollars sitting in that account. You know just waiting around. You'd withdraw them. Your dollars are actually rolling up into the bank's treasury. There's somebody at the bank working with the regulators to say hey, how much of this money can we actually put into things like mortgages, commercial loans, all of the the uses of capital that society. Has In some some effort to. To, move the world forward and make the economy efficient, and so those deposits basically roll up into a big investment fund, and there's ratios that regulators set globally that say those dollars needed to be kept in reserve, versus how many are actually able to be invested, but with the portion that's able to be invested. It's there to fun. You know building a house to fund a business back -Tory to fund sales and marketing or inventory procurement for some other business, and so a bank was was basically the original investment fund, and a bank has unlike venture funds and other sources of. We typically think private capital. The bank has tricky. Problem were any moment all of the depositors holding the checking accounts could show up and say hey. I want my money back and so that's why banks have to deal with reserving capital predicting the amount of withdraw and classically everybody wants her money at once at the worst possible time, and so banks have to deal with quite a bit of volatility now if you take an investment fund on the other hand. Totally totally different structure, so your typical venture fund will have money available to it for a period of ten years from you know typically these larger pools of capital. We talked we talked about so very rarely. Individuals are investing retirement savings in venture funds, typically sovereign wealth funds down that's. Basically pools of that individuals capable. Win One of these funds makes a commitment to a venture fund. It'll say you've got the capital for ten years. You've gotta pay back. You know as investments exit, but other than that will check in ten years from now. We hope that we have more than we gave you the star with and there there's no liquidity problem because the fun has effectively carte blanche to keep the money invested until some set of businesses grow and succeed and go public and make distributions so one thing that's fascinating. The Tappan in the last twenty five years is private capital capital in the format of these kinds of funds. Have just grown tremendously and so today. There's a little over five trillion dollars. Of private capital being allocated in this way to think like buyout funds venture funds so on and so forth. Funds don't have the liquidity problems of banks. They can make much longer term for looking investments. This is created tremendous potential to make the economy more more efficient by taking out the time spectrum. You know this is why venture investors can do things like finance spacex or Tesla. Really. Build fundamental technologies in the way that a bank never could so this is an amazing thing it. However leads to a very long. You DAK cycle, so the incentive goes down when you take out the time line over which investment needs to pay back. To carefully monitor and understand what's going on in the business day today, so it's pretty interesting thing about the different pools of capital. There's not not to. Make it sound too confusing, but I think everybody will admit that the financial markets are incredibly diverse complicated we track basically about fifteen different kinds of capital, and they're sort of pros and cons with each one, but you know a bank is one. A private fund is wanted insurance companies balancing as another. You've got things like ETF and public vehicles that hold capital so there's quite a bit of complexity and the the structure of the financial markets. All right well. That's maybe the supply side of Capitol on. All kinds of middlemen and all kinds of different arrangements, but ultimately there is also the demand side of Capitol, at least from the point of view of companies getting started which is. Startups or computer in later stage with the maybe they're not exactly considered startup anymore, but they're mature. These companies have models for how they are predicting. They're going to grow, but oftentimes these companies are very. Lumpy in terms of how their their revenues come in how closely their predictions can track reality. So how do technology companies even model their finances? Is there a way to model their finances? That actually has some meaningful trajectory. Sure so first. Companies you know need need a base think of all the places that they're spending our money and. We're pretty. We Do I. Think a pretty good job of organizing this and making it simple so when we look at companies and we can, we can talk more about how the the cabinet machine operates, but when we look at companies, we basically think they're only a handful of places of money. Get spent you spend money on. Short term projects that you hope proficient things, sales and marketing. Houston money on paying for your sources of financing like paying interest on debt, making distributions to your investors, and then you spend money on everything else and everything else can be designing software building products on, and so forth, and so if you break the demand for capital down into just those three buckets. And look at them that way. Some pretty interesting things happen. The first is for the short term investments that you hope productive. You can track pretty granular nearly whether or not they are, and we'll come back to that. For paying back your investors, you sort of know exactly how much you're paying your investors so a pretty easy thing to track, and then for the operating costs you know most people will help us. Apax, that you're paying to keep the lights on things like Renton the your accountants, the CEO salaries on and so forth these are these are table stakes expenditures. You need to stay in business and so. Amongst each of those three things, there's different things that you wanna do to optimize and I'm happy to go into more detail sort of go through each one. If you think that'd be useful. Yeah Bliss a little bit more about about how these companies should be a modeling, their revenues are that is meaningful to model their revenue so that you can potentially think of them as targets for for capital allocation so. If we think about. Understanding what company might be a viable recipient of capital? How can you accurately predict the trajectory of that company, or or do they? Would they present a model? Would they develop a model good through a little more detail? How a company would serve justify? It's need for capital. So typically what what most companies do and this is not terribly useful or accurate, but I'll tell you what most people do I mean by the way like how central the entire economy predicts, predicts demand for capital works like this. Companies take. Their income statement on their. Balance Sheet historically. And they they basically have this excel file got a bunch of you know, rose and have different things like my revenue, my you revenue that sort of linked or my expenses that are linked revenue Mukasey could sold so on and so forth, and they grow each of those rose by some number that they hope to hit so if you want your revenue to double next year, you'll say my revenue one hundred dollars today I wanted to be two hundred. Hundred dollars twelve months from now I'm just GONNA draw a line between those two points and every month. There will be some number that's on that line, and that's why monthly revenue I want my expenses. You know everyone knows. Expenses are going to have to go up if my revenue goes up but I don't want them to go up as much as my revenue, so I'm going to draw a line. That's you know somewhere less than a doubling. and. You pull these lines together on one big excel file and there's your you know they're your corporate projections. In general, this is true for big companies small companies, but that's not actually how. Company revenue works because if you go back to the three categories, we talked about before, and you just focus on the one that talks about the short term investments. The. Way Company Revenue Actually Works is a company this month. Let's say they spend one hundred dollars on sales marketing. Well. They're hoping to get a return on that sales marketing, and so they're hoping that in the next you know six months. That's paid back. Twelve months that's paid back. You can actually track every time they spend money on sales and marketing. how quickly it gets paid back so it's that level of precision that can accurately predict revenue, and so what we do is we basically just get a list of every time? Money was spent on one of these short-term investments, so you sales and marketing for for an example, and then we get a list of all of the revenue that was ever earned. And we attribute between both of those lists causing effect. And we do that using a bunch of techniques that are pretty commonplace in your typical data, company or machine learning company. We use some math things like factor graphs. We use simple kind of correlations. We have You know a whole kind of financial framework to. Guess. What attribution should be because you learn a lot as you see different businesses and you see a bunch of different different patterns, which you can basically cluster on, but it is this linkage between spending on something like sales and marketing emceeing seeing revenue, go up or down, but makes or breaks a business, and you want to look at it and I is. Not a bundled. Entirety which is how financial projections are typically built? Okay, well! Let's talk a little bit more about what you actually do so if you're talking about early stage technology companies. Describe how you are modeling, those companies and how you are making decisions as to whether they should receive capital. When a company comes to capital they they come to our website. They sign up for this system that we built which which we've called the capital machine. And the first thing that they do is they connect their accounting system their payment processor typically, so think like a strike, and then sometimes they'll provide other things like a pitch deck or a data room, or whatever other information they have prepared. The system pulls down. All of the date in the accounting system and the the payment processor, and we look at other systems to these are the two key ones that all all dive into detail, and so, what ends up happening is from the accounting system. We get a list of all the times. Businesses spend money on these things like sales and marketing that we were talking about before. From the payment processor we get a list of all the revenue transactions in crucially we get it at. The level of each. Each customer payment, and so you know we scrub I all we really care about is having a customer ID, but once we have data at that level. We can start to do this linkage and say all right look. You know this business spent. A million dollars on sales and marketing and March of two thousand eighteen in April of twenty eighteen, and we saw revenue grow by twenty percent. That was a pretty substantial chain. You know what actually happened here. You can typically identify the subcategories of sales and marketing and start to do this link between these two, and this is really the you know the magic behind our our data science in our team pairing with our engineering team to figure out this problem and solve away that is, that's robust. Bud once we have these two data feeds, and the system goes through, and does all of these attribution. Populations were able to present that back to accompany a pretty clear picture of what's going on, and so we'll say things like hey. Your Business is pretty seasonal, and in the summer is when you're typically more more efficient at converting your sales and marketing dollars into growth so I, you want to finance growth in the summer. The second thing is only about eighty percent of your businesses financeable. There's twenty percent where you might not know it because you're not looking at this level of detail, you're busy building your business, which is exactly exactly what you should be doing, but Twenty percent of your businesses, not efficient. You're spending money on on your sales and marketing categories, product lines, and CETERA that just shouldn't exist and so if you get rid of those. If you double down on the part of Your Business, it is efficient. Then we predict your revenue will be act fifty percent higher, and we'll tell you exactly how much money you need to invest to raise money to to raise the revenue by fifty percent. We give you a bunch of charts that allow you to see how history and projections merged together and dig down. Inspect how we do that linkage to make sure you agree, but. This is what the capital machine does at its core. It Converts Company data into a fully audited completely transparent picture of. How business works where it sufficient where it's not efficient. And then that's where our technology stops, and where balanced she comes in, and so we then take this information, and we make balancing investments directly in companies, and so primarily at this point we lend money to technology companies that we see from their data are eligible for non dilutive funding. We make capital available to them directly. We basically allow them to access it through the capital machine. We use one system to communicate changes to the business. No keep both sides and form so on and so forth, but this is the kind of analytics layer that's essential to making these capital allocation decisions more efficient, and so I think you could imagine a day at least for us in the not too distant future when it's not just US using our balance sheet in this tool to make investments, but in fact, just like excel, every investor can benefit from a similar level of analytics and transparency, as can companies by getting more accurately priced faster access to capital less friction so on and so forth. Get Lab commit, is! Get labs inaugural community event. Get Lab is changing how people think about tools and engineering best practices and get lab commit in Brooklyn is a place for people to learn about the newest practices in devops, and how tools and processes come together to improve the software development life cycle. Get Lab commit is the official conference. Forget lab. It's coming to Brooklyn new. York September Seventeenth Twenty nineteen. If you can make it to Brooklyn, on September Seventeenth Mark Your calendar, forget lab, commit and go to software engineering daily dot, com slash commit. You can sign up with code commit s E. D.. That's COM MIT S. E. D.. And Save thirty percent on. Conference passes. If you're working in devops, and you can make it to New York. It's a great opportunity to take a day away from the office. Your company will probably pay for it, and you get thirty percent off if you sign up with code, commit S, e. There a great speakers from Delta. Airlines Goldman. Sachs northwestern, mutual, T, mobile and more. Check it out at software engineering daily Dot Com slash, commit and use code. Commit S. E. D.. Thank you to get lab for being sponsor. The inputs specifically if you think about a model for determining whether or not, a company should should be eligible to receive capital. I'd like to know how the the models are built. The the data science models that you're building are constructed from the point of view of the inputs. So how are you determining or how do you like company comes to you? How do you turn that company into some structured form of data that you could put into your models and determine whether it's worthy of capital. Yeah I mean it comes down to what what the data is your down so when we talk to a system like striper transaction records system, you know that that's the revenue of the company now where things get interesting when we connect to balance sheets in penalizing, it's of accompanying really onto understanding. Weighing. What exactly these numbers mean, and that sort of where we made our pipelines were built from the ground up to give us that granular. Of A company's cash family revolutions. Where's the money going where they allocating? And it's savable greenway or you once. What do you understand that data through that Lens? That let's build pretty sophisticated financial models Linda. And you know as soon as you have the picture of Company You can really do a lot of flexible analysis on the back leg distributed computation. Come stuff that you would never be able to excel and quite frankly a lot of these companies don't have the stacking internally or really the tools to understand for themselves, so you'd be surprised it you know when we surface this analysis back to the company by virtue of just being transparent on how we're making decision how it is perceived their business, the signals that were uncovering. These operators the CEO's the CFO's that are really focused on building company. Really surprising. They're really making these insights really transforming. How they think they should have capital. Should invest growing business. Are there any? Sources of Third Party data that you can gather to improve decision making. There are at a macro economic sense, and so it's actually quite useful to look at public company performance and say hey. SAS businesses in general. Most people notice, but facilities in general are seasonal in the fourth quarter. Budgets basically expire and people come in, and they buy a bunch of SAS. Software and so to take concepts like that basically shapes of curves, signals and apply them to private company. Financials is useful. Crucially though there is no private company. Data repository of any kind like it just doesn't exist, and you know notoriously even even with small businesses. It's actually quite quite difficult to get access to any sort of meaningful credit data, and so, what ends up happening is these aw. These businesses. Give you a picture of their business directly as an investor and you have to interpret it directly, and that's basically how this works totally unlike consumer credit, there's no credit bureau that people paying so most investors are analyzing the state and excel. Excel notoriously breaks when there's about a million cells worth of data, and so we've got this great visualization showing our data pipeline, and it's basically a bunch of boxes, and there's a little tiny. Tiny box in the bottom of corner that's excel, and there's a bunch of other boxes across the entire rest of the page that are nodes in our in our distributed computations, but accelerate very very limited, and so it makes it impossible to actually understand what's going on in business from the source data, and it's at the source that you see this variability in this linkage between profitable capital allocation decisions in unprofitable capital allocation decisions. Describing more detail, the workflow so a company comes to you and they're going to put their inputs into the. Would you call the capital machine? What does that workflow look like in a little bit more depth? Yes when they come to the website, they creighton count much like you would on. Twitter facebook account. When your details your email, you terrify your email, and then you on what's recalling like the capital portable on there? You have et CETERA. Tools to connect your sins record and these are typical offload. So you know people are very familiar with you. You know you say hey, let's connect by quickbooks you in your credentials and sort of be as secure way, and you click okay and the system checkmark by your quickbooks in the system start pulling that data out of regular cadence and. Depending on what system you're connecting you of the characteristics of that's not go systems of record, and how much data you have you know. The data's available anywhere from ten minutes to a couple of hours later and you know once we have Dr. System, we run that through our partake analysis pipeline in the users as a company. You get you get charged. In Tableau kind of call it, the insight Saban's these refused that we think would be helpful for you as an operator company understanding about Your Business in separately. We also get views of that data that are useful to our our internal investment team. Whoever is looking to capitalization systems? Are there certain business categories that are a better fit for modeling in better fit for the kind of. Predictable capital returns that you can, you can expect with the investments that you're making so like you ride sharing or Gig economy businesses or some businesses. What are the categories that are the best fit? Say Very few categories don't shit from the from the perspective of of linkages, but they're certainly models at their easier to think through and easier to understand, but our our system can underwrite today A. Lease on a commercial aircraft, a fleet of ships and Insurance Agency ask company the most important. Thing about our system is that the financial theory that underlies it is very general, just like p. e. rate is very general, and so that's kind of sounds crazy like. A lot of. A. Lot of people say what what businesses the best fit for your your system and you know it's kind of like asking what businesses the best for Warren Buffett like Warren. Buffett is a generalist. In any business, and he has a framework in his own head to figure out how to make ship comparable to American Express our assistant has a very similar framework. It just operates at the level of transactions instead of at the level of financial statements, but certainly within. That framework there's some examples that are just easier describes I think like you know thinking through the fishing of sales and marketing something. That's a lot more obvious than thinking through like the stability in refurbishment of commercial aircraft parts, which is a key question you know. Pricing pricing refurbished parts, which is a key question if your financing commercial aircraft and Our team, the ambassadors that use the capital machine internally which we primarily do internally do a little bit of partnering with without the groups to to use this as well. These people are all specialists in some particular area, but it's crucial to understand. They're looking at the exact same chance as all the other specialists and all the other areas, so it's like literally the the Fast Company and a commercial aircraft will have the same series of charts at investors. Are there two two draw their conclusion? Is the question for Chris. Can you describe the stack of technologies that you built in more detail? Yeah Yeah. Of course on the front, we are react type script, xjs, you know everything is on aws, and in the back, and we're. We're all python, and in really the reason for that is if you're doing any serious machine, learning or data science today can't really get away in python stack, so we're all python them back in. We have flasks. As a as our API late here and That's the that's a high level. And get a little bit more detail about how the data science layer works. Yeah, yeah, yeah, of course, so we put on the dea into basically a data lake the that goes down into Ardito pipeline in that's all air orchestrated on top of each called airflow, and we use a technology called desk for are distributed computation, and I think that this is a good choice. Choice for us at this moment you know I see us doing a lot of work on. You know using a spark in other distributed technologies in the future and his team and it turns out that when we pull this data down organizing the data was really important to us as we build a lot of attractions to make accessing that data, really easy for quantitative analysts. Important central to our whole technology is that we're able to do a lot of different financials experiment very quickly on top of this so the the implications of that really cascade down all the way into. You know what technologies where choosing how we structure our delayed. Even even how strokes are teams, so it really is brought up locations across all product. How is it when you're analyzing company that you have enough data that it warrants a spark cluster because I can imagine? The financial data around the company. How can there really be that much data to analyze how you do surprised in a lot of these transactions systems taking up the companies have been around a couple of years and their direct to consumer. These data sets can be can be pretty large. You know we're talking about in the millions and millions and millions of transactions that were pulling down and storing. Storing and that just on a per company basis. You know that's not even talking about if we wanted to. Benchmarks Cross companies, and also if we want to do scenario analysis, so you know one of the things we was part of a pipeline is take this data, and through like nine ninety nine hundred thousand simulations to understand the sensitivity of different variables on the performance of Your Business and If, you're starting out with starting that already large. Sort of a multiplying effect. On how much data the system is the old process? is you go through those different stages? And, can you tell me a little more detail? What would a typical spark job? Look like for a company that you're assessing. Yes, so first episode is ribbon. Our our financial didn't ingestion parts, so we download something on the order of you know forty fifty bytes of Tim's action data for for a company. We have to do all the work to interpret and understand what that means in reorganized that data in a way that are downstream analysis and primitives can. Make sense of and use for useful analysis so really the first step at this point job is is transformed the datum some it's useful, and then there's all the work on what are the clusters in order to machines and analysis in the computational. Resources needed to run simulations. You know not not just say local computer locally owned of fall over the only about thirty to sixty four gigabytes of Ram what league, so that's where workflow comes in creating easier faces into data, clusters and being. Should you know when you run a job? You know when it fails. You know it's done. You know when the team can't okay. This part of analysis done I had intermediate date asset to do more analysis on now get back to work is a lot of the time we spend developing internal tools to make. One other thing that'll mentioned that I think's important is. A lot of the underlying technology in our data pipeline it's no different than like what a tableau or you need. Traditional BI business would have access to, but what's fascinating when you have a vertically specific domain so financial data in our case you can make a lot of interpretations about the date of the let you do much more intelligent things, and so for example we. Don't have to make your own charts as a user of the capital machine. We make all the charts for you can of course. As a business we work with. Give us ideas for charts. You can mock up your own. We we basically have an interface for for business. The I team's to to write some code if they if they want to bought when you have clients who are thinking about financial risk, financial attribution across all of the companies that we see distilling that down into a series of indicators that are detailed, but generalize -able, and then publishing that back to all of the companies that use the capital machine to run their own capital, allocation, decisions and access, external fundraising and capital. Some pretty amazing things happen in so it's only with a vertical view. You actually having these we, we call our data scientists Kwan's, but but actually having these people who you know typically are graduate level economists, thinking for the first time about using transaction level data in their analysis, which is notoriously not not available to to normal economists that you get the kinds of insights and analysis the actionable for businesses, and then in terms of the data pipeline that then means we actually store a bunch of intermediate data that's opinionated in that way, and that makes it much faster to access much easier to benchmark much more useful across a network of companies, versus just that isolated excel model that. Explains only one business. One thing I'd like to ask you about. Capital intensity so there are kinds of businesses that are capital intensive for example where you have to pay upfront for a lot of ridesharing rides, and you know as Uber or lift. His has known in much detail. You allocate all this capital two things to subsidize rise because you try to win a market, there's all kinds of other capital intensive businesses. How does capital intensity change? What makes sense with regard to the equity financing the debt financing that you are shepherding for these companies? That is a great question and be because of where you focus in your audience. You totally get the most financiers don't so. The first point exactly like you said. Capital intensity means a business consumes a lot of capital. It doesn't mean a business has a physical factory or plant or railcars, so it is absolutely true exactly like you said that there are a lot of tech businesses that are incredibly capital intensive. If you are capital intensive business that means UNI especially if you're growing, you need to raise a lot of external capital, and so it is even more important that your capital or a big portion of your capital base is not dilutive. That's that's just essential. Table stakes because what you see with these businesses, the ride sharing companies are great. Example is by the time one of these things actually goes public the early owners in the business on a very very very miniscule. KEESA that business, still if you contrast that to company like Viva Systems which I think is one of the most capital capitol efficient businesses in venture history, I think that this race something like twelve or fifteen million dollars total before it went public in a at a multi billion dollar market cap. So capital intensity. Is a synonym for dilution your own way less. Than you think when you exit entities even more important that you figure out a way to raise capital non ludicrously upfront. Some broader questions zooming out in in getting your perspective. Do a thesis for what is going on in the economy right now where you look at. The fact that We have. Obvious pressures to. Reducing the size of the economy through the lack of tourism, the lack of social gatherings while the stock market climbs higher and higher, and it appears that the technology side of things is almost unaffected by Corona virus is there. Is there a thesis that you've arrived at or or their set of theses that through conversations with other people, you've found most compelling. Sure the most important thing to realize about the stock market is that it discounts all cash flows from all businesses in the stock market to infinity, and so the value, the stock market about eighty percent of the value. The stock market is. Pretty far into the future like more than three years from now, and so if you believe that the current economic crisis and this is why there's always a. At least in the Western, world, last two hundred fifty years after an economic crisis. If you believe the crisis will eventually revert, and there will be a recovery, then it only makes sense discount stock market assets by anywhere between ten and twenty five percent. If you believe businesses fundamentally going to go out of business because of this crisis, that's a different story, but that explains why something as terrible as Kobe nineteen and a pandemic. Only discount the stock market by by roughly thirty thirty five percent in a in March, but that's not what's actually going on today as you mentioned and so stock market prices now have completely recovered. That is something that we think is a little bit of out of sync with reality but I. I mention you know we're not. We don't spend too much time about the stock market beyond that we just look at you. Know Private Company fundamentals. We try to understand what's actually going on in individual businesses across all businesses that are network to see what you know what we can understand, and you know what kind of conclusions we can draw, and so if you take that Lens and you actually look at what's happening to businesses due to Cova nineteen, it's fascinating. Some businesses like think the food delivery space have gotten a lot more efficient, so those businesses lot like ridesharing businesses back twelve months ago, there was sort of a bloodbath between bunch of companies competing in local markets to acquire customers all all fighting Google and facebook console, and so forth you subsidies drivers, etc.. That's essentially stopped. These businesses incredibly profitable, the cost acquire customers has fallen by more than half a lot of cases. The channels were slot less competitive, and so if you're running one of those businesses. Now is a great time to be aggressively expanding. Weird things like commercial construction businesses. They're actually a handful businesses that we've seen do things like install windows and doors and commercial buildings whose businesses have accelerated because all of these buildings are closed down. Construction project timelines have gotten pulled up. All of these orders are coming. Do in they're you know sort of rapidly doing it solutions? There's obviously a bunch of other businesses have been that have been hurt by by the pandemic, but our general thesis are we've studied. Pretty detailed way the Spanish flu in nineteen eighteen, you know. These things eventually go away. There will be a vaccine. Economy will get back to normal, and as long as we can stay focused on working through this as as a society and of maintain our our fabric of of kind of economic progress then. DESAGUADERO values today will eventually make sense just sort of a question of of win for the stock market, and then if you're if you're actually running business in thinking about your own performance in isolation, really being clear about is now the time to invest and grow my business now the time to be very careful with my expenses interest, get through this for the next year or however long it takes for there to be a vaccine. So the way to think about your company, if I understand correctly if I was to to put in a nutshell, is that. I think of you as a data science middleman between large capital allocators, and and start ups deserving of capital, so the the sovereign wealth funds the banks the I guess. Funds of funds. These kinds of sources are essentially looking to you for guidance on where to direct the capital, and you're on the on the other side, absorbing data and creating opportunities from these startups to source the good directions of that capital. Just wrap up. Would you put any more color around that description or or refining anyway. Yeah I mean I. think that at the core of what capital is is where the. Core Technology Ambler of sort of. The private market if you think about public markets today, you've clearing-houses like the New York Stock Exchange, and you have companies that provide analysis on top of that like Bloomberg, you know we see a tremendous opportunity to shift the paradigm where you know the place where all the financial transactions happen. is also the place that collects the data improvise information for those making these decisions and yeah, so I think capitals really at the center of making a transparent technologically enabled financial marketplace. Guys. Thank you so much for coming on the show and discussing capital, and I guess one last question is. Do you have any predictions for how capital allocation for startups will look differently in five ten years? Sure so! The first prediction. And this is happening now. I mean the the infrastructure is. In place both within. And others. Most startups fairly early in their life. Think is equity only way to do this and. So. That's a cultural shift. That's that's already happened. People are starting to ask that question. The second prediction is. Seed and series a funding will be entirely unchanged. After series. There'll be a bifurcation between businesses that. Are Really. Capital intensive gigantic rnd projects think like SPACEX. The series, B. C. d. e. enough are really about building and launching a rocket. Those businesses will by and large not. Turn outside of equity to finance themselves, but there's very few of those businesses. Pretty much every other business businesses that you see raising a series B. Serie C. Will like any normal business in the entire rest of the economy raise maybe half of that capital nine allegedly either in the form of debt. Royalty financing factoring all of the other instruments that normal companies use to finance themselves in the void delusion that will happen roughly three years her. Now that'll that'll kind of we'll see obvious obvious signs of that from very early very early base, and then the final the final thing is. Steve Case talks a lot about this. With the rise of the rest, he's got this great venture fund that invests explicitly outside the coast, so kind of the rest of America and we've seen that there's there's a pretty dramatic distinction between being a coastal business non-coastal business from capital access perspective, but there's no distinction from an actual performance perspective, and so we'll start to see some of the regional. Differences in bias sees around where capital flows, go away. And so I would maybe put that on a five year timeline like raising capital is actually much more predictable, much less biased, and that's great back to the beginning of our conversation. That's great for the economy I mean every project or business that can convert capital, two products and services that people love should get finance. No questions asked doesn't mean it doesn't matter what the color of your skin is. What background you have whether you went to college didn't go to. College doesn't matter. You have a business with data that can prove whether people love it

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Goldman 2Q profit tops forecast on strong trading revenue

BTV Simulcast

01:51 min | 3 weeks ago

Goldman 2Q profit tops forecast on strong trading revenue

"Boom Goldman Sachs that with a surprising 93% surge in second quarter revenue from stock and bond trading that just blew away the estimates. Married. Similar wind force by J. P. Morgan and Citigroup. Let's get over to New York and join Suki and has been tracking these bank earnings in suit. Goldman's trading gains. What's it like to know? A $1,000,000,000 more than Alice expected? Give us the low down. Yeah, And that's because training revenue almost doubled and underwriting fees for Goldman jumped to a record. The firm's earnings results show that it clearly made the very most of the historic rebound in the second quarter. This after the Fed cord that trillions of dollars of stimulus into the market that'll look at that. The few of the numbers that stand out the firm's fixed income treating a zine mentioned more than doubled toe 4.24 billion. That is the highest in nine years, and the equity unit had its best showing. In 11 years. These kind of gains combined propel Goldman's revenue for the second highest mark ever for the firm on that income rose to a slight surprise increase from a year ago. So let's take a look a profit. It came to point for two billion or $6.26 share on as mentioned not also blew away. Analysts estimate of $3.95 share. Let's go look at a couple others stand that areas for Goldman, a large investment portfolio also would rebound. It had taken a massive mark down in the 1st 3/4 of the year, but not now on the firm's commodity unit has been on a hot streak. They did not give specific spot. It is clear that oil traders at Goldman Road that unprecedented rise from oil when it was below zero, all the way back up to 40

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Washington Redskins officially drop name amid calls from activists and sponsors

All of It

01:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Washington Redskins officially drop name amid calls from activists and sponsors

"Team names in American professional sports is no more today. The NFL's Washington Redskins announced their ending their long fight to defend the team name that has been widely rejected as a racial slur. Here's NPR's Tom Goldman. In a statement, the team announced it will be retiring the Redskins name and logo. The team did not announce a new name. Reportedly, there are trademark and licensing issues to work through. Some of the more popular choices Recently mentioned include the Red Wolves, warriors or red tails, a nod to the World War two African American Fighter Squadron, The Tuskegee Airman. Pressure has grown recently to finally change the 87 year old name After decades of protest against it. The team was well aware of the nationwide demonstrations against racial injustice and symbols of that injustice following the police killing of George Floyd, also, the team's major sponsors, such as FedEx and Pepsi stated they wanted Washington to make a change. Some Goldman. NPR NEWS Federal

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Washington Redskins shedding name after 87 years

Morning Edition

03:35 min | Last month

Washington Redskins shedding name after 87 years

"Is changing its name. In a statement today, the Redskins confirmed they're retiring that name and their logo NPR sports correspondent Tom Goldman is following this story time. Good morning. Morning, Steve. I've paid attention to the city where I lives football team for some years and I remembered a quote went looked it up and it was accurate in 2013. Dan Snyder, the owner, said quote We will never change the name of the team. So what changed? Yeah, And he also said all caps. You can write that in all caps. So Steve in all caps were were saying today that Washington Redskins are retiring that name. As you said a very brief statement. The team released the name The logo are will be gone. So after 87 years of having this name and decades of protest against it, it is gone. Don't know the new name. We don't know yet, You know in this brief statement, It also said that Washington owner Dan Snyder and head coach Ron Rivera are working closely to develop a new name and design an approach that will enhance the standing of our proud tradition rich franchise and inspire our sponsors, fans and community for the next 100 years. The delay right now reportedly is having to work out trademark issues. Some of the most popular names, though, that have been mentioned the red wolves, the Warriors, the red tails in honor of the Tuskegee Airman, the African American fighter squadron that flew in World War two. Their planes had crimson tails, so those could be possibilities. Well, let's remember what the argument was about here. For many, many years, the team had been accused of having a racist name and a racist logo. They had resisted and said they were honoring Native Americans and In various ways and clear the clearly There was a lot of money at stake on that would be one reason that Dan Snyder had said We're not going anywhere with this name. What made this moment? Different? Well, as you well know, there have been, you know, as you say, protests reaching back to the 19 seventies, but obviously the pressure really mounted since the police killing of George Floyd in late May. You know, we have seen a number of symbols, flags and statues change and come down and the Washington team wasn't immune to that pressure, but But, you know, I hate to be cynical here, Steve. But what really got them thinking hard was when sponsors made it clear there needed to be a change FedEx whose name is on the stadium. In Maryland, Pepsi, Nike to name a few All said they wanted changed another important factor The team has wanted to relocate to Washington, D. C. It's original home. FedEx Field is in Maryland. The team practices in Virginia, DC politicians say we'd love to have you back, but you've got to change the name of your team. So that that factored in as well. Our other teams facing similar pressure. Yes, they are, whether they will respond the same way. We don't know. The Cleveland Indians of Major League Baseball report earlier discussing a change the Atlanta Braves of Majorly of Major League Baseball say they won't change their name, but reportedly, they're mulling whether or not to prohibit the Tomahawk chop. The chant and the chopping motion that fans used during games. You know, lots of college teams over the years of jettison controversial names with not a lot of pushback. There will be a long time. Washington fans upset about this because it is changing a long held tradition, but the team will go forward. Tom. Thanks very much.

Dan Snyder Washington Steve Redskins Washington Redskins Tom Goldman Maryland Fedex NPR Atlanta Braves George Floyd Football Warriors Cleveland Indians Of Major Lea Ron Rivera Virginia DC Tuskegee
Netflix stock finishes up 8% at record high

KNX Evening News

00:05 sec | Last month

Netflix stock finishes up 8% at record high

"Finished at a record high, jumping 8% after Goldman Sachs raved about the stock after

Goldman Sachs
Netflix stock finishes up 8% at record high

KOGO's Evening News

00:18 sec | Last month

Netflix stock finishes up 8% at record high

"The stock market ended the week on a high note, with the Dow climbing 369 points, 1.4%. The SNP added 1% and the NASDAQ gain 10.6% to reach another record. High close. Netflix finished at a record high, jumping 8% after Goldman Sachs raved about the stock.

Goldman Sachs Netflix
Netflix stock finishes up 8% at record high

Minnesota's Drive Time News

00:05 sec | Last month

Netflix stock finishes up 8% at record high

"Finished at a record high, jumping 8% after Goldman Sachs raved about the stock. After

Goldman Sachs
New COVID-19 testing site opens at University of Dallas

KRLD News, Weather and Traffic

00:40 sec | Last month

New COVID-19 testing site opens at University of Dallas

"Dallas County sets a new record for the number of Corona virus cases. And deaths counties reporting 20 deaths in 601 new cases. Dallas County Judge Clay Jenkins says these numbers are one reason he wants the governor to put out a statewide order requiring face masks in public, according to Goldman Sachs. That would save our Texas economy for the whole state. $87 billion if he would simply do that one thing. He also wants more restrictions on businesses. businesses. Dallas Dallas County County is is opening opening up up a a new new Corona Corona virus virus testing testing site site at at the the University University of of Dallas Dallas in in Irving Irving tomorrow. tomorrow. They They say say it's it's going going to to provide provide results results more more quickly quickly than than the the site site that that they they have at the A. C in that site Shutdown today,

Dallas Dallas County County University University Of Of Da Dallas County Irving Irving Judge Clay Jenkins Goldman Sachs Texas
The Fed has capped bank dividends and suspended buybacks after stress tests

CNBC's Fast Money

05:25 min | Last month

The Fed has capped bank dividends and suspended buybacks after stress tests

"For the first time in the ten years of stress, testing banks are required to resubmit their capital plans later this year to reflect the current environment by chair Randall. Quarrels notes in a statement that there is quote material uncertainty about the trajectory for the economic recovery in its impact on banking organizations, and not all governors agreed to let the banks continue payouts even if If, they're limited fed governor Lael brainard said in a separate statement that she does not support giving the green light for large banks to deplete capital which raises the risk they will need to tighten credit or rebuilt capital during the recovery coverage, informing this decision by the Fed was a covert sensitivity overlay for their traditional stress tests where the test of the bank's viability under three hypothetical recessions in subsequent recoveries, v-shaped, u-shaped and w shaped. The Fed notes that there are scenarios are not predictions of the likely path of the economy in aggregate, though the Fed said loan losses for the thirty four banks tested amounted to five hundred and sixty billion to seven hundred billion dollars aggregate capital. Ratios declined from twelve. Twelve percent in the fourth quarter of two thousand nineteen to between nine point five to seven point seven percent in the hypothetical downside, they did not break out the results of the cove analysis on individual banks, but in the after hours investors have been drawing their own conclusions with mixed results depending on the bank mixed performance depending on the Bank Melissa all right Leslie, thank you Leslie picture with the results of the stress has a lot to think about. There are a lot to think about in terms of how it affects the bank trade, but there's also this to think about. Take a listen to what David Ellison of the Hennessy funds said on the closing bell just a few moments ago. There really inserting themselves, and and basically acting like they want to act in a sense that these companies are effectively nationalized. and. We're seeing the effect of that today. in what they're saying, so they're worried about the the appear to be more worried about the economy than the market is. Again heard Powell last week. Say that he was worried now. It seems like we're hearing that again. And this is going to be an ongoing thing. The banks are going to be battling this for the next couple years. So they are effectively nationalized according to this bank investor, guide me. What does this all mean for the bank trade? Yeah. It's interesting. I mean I. Don't know if I'd go that far that the bank should be but I I respected the the opinion on that. Know what it means for the bank trade I don't think the value proposition of the reason you were getting wanted to belong J. P. Morgan was because of the dividend or their stock. Buy Back. I mean I. Don't think that's why you're long the stock, but I understand the headline. This is somewhat shocking, although probably not all that. Surprising quite frankly, I think a lot of people probably saw this coming I think the bigger headline was the reason I thought. The market rally in the first place was a relaxation of the Volcker rule to a certain extent. I think that's why banks had the big run. Now you have to wonder if the timing was somewhat coincidental. I still would submit the following. Pretty steadfast on this you're looking for opportunities to by name like J. P. Morgan for that now second potential run up to one fifteen, and we've done the math for you. I mean one fifteen for J. P. Morgan is putting a one point eight multiple on sixty two dollars tangible book, and it makes a lot of sense. Go back and look where we traded up to a couple of weeks ago and that to me is where the market wants to go I. Don't think it's I. Don't think this is the reason to be bearish the broader market although you know I am. But I do think the headline is probably going to some people carrying. You've been a longtime investor in the bank specifically, certainly not for the dividends, certainly not for the share buybacks. Knew that they were gonNA suspend by back at least for this quarter. So how do you factor this into your investment thesis? So. I mean I guess it makes sense I that they say. Let's see how the year unfolds before we decide whether or not you're going to be allowed to to pay your dividend, or at what level you'll be allowed to pay your dividend, so that sort of makes sense to me i. think what is going to be more important I think is how bad are the provision for loan losses going to be in this quarter? And how bad are they going to be given that we are having difficulty reopening? How sustainable those losses to be going through the throughout the year, so I had thought that the first quarter and the second I'm sorry, the quarter ending in. June, and this next one I'm sorry. March marching, June would be the worst quarters of the year. Maybe there's another bad quarter here. It is interesting to me though that the Volcker rule did come out on the same day that I mean that's sort of like back to go go times. To? The stress tests. But I think the story hasn't really dramatically changed today we'll be. It'll be interesting when we see on Monday. Who is going to change their dividend? Would seem like Wells Fargo is maybe a likely candidate. For BANKAMERICA's city and JP Morgan. The big money centers I don't think they're moving much I. saw city up a little JP Morgan down a little and Bankamerica down. Little I don't think a whole lot has changed to me. It still comes down to how bad will the loss be? Yeah, Goldman after hours one of the biggest loser, if down two and a half percent, a wells Fargo's down one and. And a half percent.

FED J. P. Morgan Jp Morgan Lael Brainard Wells Fargo Leslie Randall David Ellison Bankamerica Hennessy Volcker Powell Fargo Goldman
Free Yourself From Conflict

The LEADx Show

04:50 min | Last month

Free Yourself From Conflict

"Thanks for joining today's Webinar, an optimal outcomes are host. Today is the founder and CEO. Alignment Strategies Group the near based consulting firm that advises CEOS in their executive teams on how to optimize organizational health and growth. She's the author of optimal outcomes for yourself from conflict at work at home in life, which was selected as the Financial Times Book of the month Jennifer is A. A keynote speaker at fortune, five hundred companies public institutions in innovative fast-growing startups, where she inspires audiences of all kinds including those Google Harvard in tax, and in her popular course at university, a former counter-terrorism research fellow with the US Department of Homeland Security, she is a graduate of Tufts. University and holds a PhD in social organizational psychology from Columbia. Please welcome Dr Jennifer Goldman wetzlar. These are trying times that we're in. We are in the midst right now. Two months into the global pandemic. Of Corona virus and we're facing a big tough global problem. The likes of which most of us have never seen in our lifetimes. I've spent my career studying and working with incredibly tough problems, none on this scale, but tough problems nonetheless. Typically the tougher the problem, the more likely it is to capture my interest, and the more likely I am to be helpful. This has been true for me since I was A. So I didn't want to solve just one or two sides of the Rubik's Cube I wanted to solve all six sides while Hula hooping. and. That's why today we're going to be talking about a tough problem of type of problem conflict. That comes back. No matter how many times you people have tried to resolve it. Will be talking about recurring conflicts. And what to do when your efforts to resolve those conflicts fail. So in a minute I'm going to be asking you to think of a conflict situation. You know about that. You can apply your situation well, so you can apply these practices to that situation. But I. WanNa give you an introduction to this work. In Nineteen, seventy, three one of my mentors, Dr Morton Deutsch widely considered father of conflict resolution, wrote a book called the resolution of conflict and in it he detailed research that he and his colleagues had done, which basically showed that conflict lead to more conflict and cooperation leads to more cooperation. When I learned that all I can think was well if that's true, how do we get out of this conflict loop? And how do we get on to the cooperation loop? Well I've now spent the last thirteen years trying to answer those questions and the answers are in the book that I've written optimal outcomes that we're talking about today. My research began with a fellowship from the US Department of Homeland Security in two thousand and two, and since then in my role as CEO and founder of Alignment Strategies Group I've worked with. Leaders. All kinds of different organizations from innovative fast-growing startups to Fortune five hundred companies to academic institutions to global nonprofits. And what I've done is helped them by using the optimal outcomes method to address the most challenging situations that they have faced. And I'd like to bring some of that work here for you today, so I'll be talking about a specific clans situation throughout today's Webinar. But I also want this presentation to be highly relevant to you so I'd like to take a moment now to ask you to think of a situation that you know about. It could be one from your own life, or it could be one that you're helping other people with, or it could be one that you know about simply from watching the news. And I'd like to ask you to answer two questions. What who first of all you're thinking about a conflict situation, but it may be one that you don't even necessarily think about as quote unquote conflict. It may be something that simply recurs over and over again. No matter how many times you or other people have tried to resolve, it could be the daily fight with your spouse about the dishes in the sink, or it could be how to track down that colleague. That's always been hard to reach a now that you're working remotely is even more difficult to find. Get the answers that you meet, or it could be about politics and elections in presidential elections, and how to have conversations about those without getting caught in a cycle of frustration with friends and colleagues and family.

Founder And Ceo Us Department Of Homeland Secu Dr Jennifer Goldman Financial Times CEO Alignment Strategies Group Fortune Dr Morton Deutsch Research Fellow Harvard Google Tufts Founder Of Alignment Strategie Jennifer Executive Columbia
Airline Cash Flow

Airplane Geeks Podcast

05:44 min | Last month

Airline Cash Flow

"All right our first story comes in from our Listener Linda. This is from one mile at a time surprising statistics about mileage, plus about united, mileage plus. In, we see that united has announced financing in the amount of five billion dollars secured through the airlines loyalty program. This is part of their to have seventeen billion dollars in liquidity by the end of September. Separately CNN reports that that's three times the cash. They normally have on hint. Of course all the airlines are. Struggling essentially with their cash flow situations and they they need to have. Cash on hand united is amongst them of course and It's it's an interesting strategy to take their mileage plus program and leverage off some financing based on that and the findings. He's GonNa come through Goldman Sachs Barclays. And Morgan Stanley and united will have seven years to repay that. These affinity programs like mileage plus our big business for the airlines united estimates that the value of their mileage plus program. If it was a standalone business, would be twenty billion dollars, so there's a lot of. A lot of revenue that changes hands here. We need Dan back as guest to explain all this 'cause. I tried to read how they mortgaged their frequent flyer program to raise five billion in my head started to hurt. Well I'm just thinking I I'm GonNa. Leave the show early right now because I'm GonNa, go start the airplane, Geeks, mileage plus program. I mean there's this is a twenty billion dollar business. We're wasting our time here, guys. I know it's It's pretty amazing so. The, the partners United Partners Pay United to award miles to their own customers, so says things like credit, cards and hotels when you earn united miles or mileage plus miles by reserving at a hotel or using a credit card. United gets a piece of that action and it adds up to quite a lot. So that large part of it comes from selling miles to other airline programs. I didn't see them call out specifically income from credit cards for example card I use most often still is the united mileage plus a credit card. I would imagine they must be earning. Some money from chaser manages that card. Even My my Hilton Program have the option the option of taking my awards, my my points, basically that I earned from staying at Hilton, properties and I, either get Hilton points which I can redeem for rooms, or I can get united, miles well Hilton. Kick something that United Four that for Hilton. There's value because it's you know. It's a service can offer its customers. If you look at the one mile at a time website. It gets down to break some of the stuff down. Like seventy one percent of the cat is offer twenty, one, thousand, nine hundred. Seventy one percent of the cash flow is from sales miles purchased by third party partners. But then when you look at how it was redeemed, ninety seven percent is redeemed by. using it on united. Right for travel, in yeah, only three percent of those milder redeemed for non travel rewards, it does make you start to wonder if the the planes are just kind of you know aside business. Instead they're making money off of mileage plus baggage fees. You wonder at some point Could this be one of these businesses where you know you give away the the razors for free, and you're making it all on selling razor blades. Absolutely I am particularly these days, but even you know even without the huge drop in air traffic is the result of the pandemic. Even before that the aircraft, just the promotional item Eb. Senses Yeah and in some in some way, so it's it's a really interesting business. It's not always what you What you think we also see here that you united his made an SEC filing an aide filing in in that filing. We learn a little bit more about the program. that united mileage. Plus program has over a hundred million members. And that fifty percent of United's flight revenue comes from mileage plus members. Which is that's? That's pretty high. Also the mileage plus program generated five point three billion in cash flow from sales in two thousand nineteen, and that's roughly twelve percent of United's overall revenue. So, Oh, another interesting The number here is it. The mileage plus program generated one point eight billion dollars in Eba, DA, which represents about twenty six percent of their total adjusted ebitda. That's. earnings before interest taxes depreciation and amortization. So that's that's sort of a A. Year of earnings from an operating standpoint, twenty six percent of united's basically operating earnings from this mileage plus

United Partners Pay United United Hilton CNN Goldman Sachs Barclays Morgan Stanley EBA DAN SEC
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

07:28 min | 3 months ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"Box of food kind of brightens their day kind of keeps the community connection alive. Another thing we've done is we've given out free face masks to the community. You know no purchase necessary. Just come by and get a face mask. Just one of many ways. We're trying to remain in touch back community this morning. We're actually giving away donation so local hospital to keep the community connection and on the flip side customers have really given us back that energy. They've all went online at Jimmy said and left nice messages sent us messages on Instagram. It's just been overwhelmed and love to hear that because that cycle of you. Guys Brining something. Nice than the cycle of them. It's sort of a little bit of a virtuous circle of kindness during this time. I hope it will all stay in a win win. We're back to work. I WanNa ask you a question about leadership you each run teams. What are you learning about? Leadership in crisis and where changes is constant. Perhaps the only constant. It'd be interesting to hear your flashes each of you lead teams Dina. So what I've learned is in L. ICAN and analogy as the leader of our team. We don't have the luxury to panic. So if a plane is going down and the people are screaming in the background. Oh my gosh right. You have to guide this ship the plane to a safe place right and so for me. It's been a matter of remembering that. I am an entrepreneur and so I have to make sure that you know with all that's going on. Yes my team is afraid. Yes I am afraid but I don't have time to cry. I need to have time. I need to get my people paid. Get my people protected and get my guest state and so in order to do that. I need to work and in order to work. I have to stay up. I have to be on webinars. I have to be on phone calls. I've applied over fourteen grants and three loans and a partridge in a pear tree. Right and so I don't you know people. Oh my God. I'm so bored and all my goodness I can't watch movie. What what movie as a as a leader of your team and crisis you have worked to. Do you have to steady the ship? I mean you know. We're we're you know we've business business-owners Right it is what it is right with Kobe. Nineteen it is what it is right. Second thing is we have to deal with it. Most of US business owners operate with a good noble purpose rematch. Trying to get over on people were not trying to take the hurt the community we're trying to provide a service or a product that helps and lastly get. Outta my way right. Get Out of my way Put my s on my chest. Put My Cape on and get to work and you lead your team by acknowledging what we've been through where we are now and you tell them. This is where we're going. This is your captain speaking. We're GONNA Land Bridge over there. Everybody takes them depress bright. That's IT I love it. It's fierce in fantastic. Might I might. We're slowly sullen burglary. We've got land. Felli data landing on us now. And we're cognizant that curry later shift. Us economies means that we're talking about numbers we're checking in. We're heading soon calls. Sm How they're doing not just WANNA professional level but also on a personal level the leadership also means to me personally. I'm not going to answer every single question. They may have correctly. But I'm GonNa give them the best answer. I have at the time of the information that I'm currently working with team members respected. They know when they come to myself for Michael Founder. My brother they're gonNA get the best information we have at the time. And we're GONNA help through any situation that we have so I would say just taking a leadership role and not feel like we have to happen. The right answer or make sure communicating information. We have to them in real time. Yeah genuine authentic Upfront Jenny yet. I mean so for for us agree with everything that was said but for us. It's sort of interesting. These were operating still kind of at half mast. And I'm operating as I said kind of you know with with limited time so this has become almost like a It's been incredibly important for me to understand. My role is a leader almost more than any other role that I normally play in my company because normally I'm trying to the jack-of-all-trades a little bit of this a little bit of that but right now what. I need to be as a leader. That's what I have time to be. And that's kind of boil down to us is three things team culture and communication and so. I'm right now prioritizing. Three things as leader within my company communicating with my co-founder. We have Co-founder breakfast typically once a week every Monday. And we're keeping those so every time I'm on a zoom call with Maria every week on Monday morning. Communication with our team and our team has pulled together in incredible way knowing that some people have been furloughed you know. But they're aligned in terms of what your Dana said work landing here together and it's GonNa be a good place. And thirdly we have shareholders in our company equity shareholders and communicating out to them. That were protecting the business. And we're going to get somewhere that we have to navigate through this and a plan so solid About maintaining culture for us all these cedar should tips have been great to hear in a particular. If like it's something that any entrepreneur listening any business owner any person listening critique away about managing through crisis with humility and honesty true leadership with balance and so. I wanted to thank each of you for joining us today. I WanNa thank you for your resilience for your entrepreneurial spirit. I know that were inspired by by you. I feel energized on the back of this conversation. And so thank you still dairy very much. Yes thank you for having US. Thank you thank you. So much that concludes this episode of Exchanges Goldman Sachs. Thanks for listening and if you enjoyed it we hope you subscribe at Apple podcasts. And leave a rating or a comment in tune in for our weekly markets update Friday morning. We'RE LEADERS AROUND. The firm provided quick take on markets. And what's going on in the economy? This podcast was recorded on. May Eight two thousand twenty all price. References and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied distributed published or reproduced in whole or in part the information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore including in respect of direct indirect or consequential loss or damage is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast or not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial economic legal accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener nor to constitute such person a client of any Goldman Sachs entity..

Goldman Sachs Us Exchanges Goldman Sachs Jimmy co-founder Land Bridge burglary Apple Michael Founder business owner Dana Maria
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

06:57 min | 4 months ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"March we all time record of two hundred sixty billion and Eur Issue is and we do expect that trend to continue in the market appetite. They're in high yield. There's much cigarettes. The FEDS SUPPORT. Put a recent fallen. Angels in there. That did not that. The Fed did is the companies have to maintain a credit rating of double B. Might Effectively what the Fed is doing is? They're supporting the upper end of high yield companies. And they're doing that so long. As companies you know their balance sheets deteriorate further market participants are forecasting that were in a C- a pretty wide range default. So anywhere from five to twenty five percent is where I say. Investors ARE ASKING FOR HIGH YIELD. This year we are asking. Thirteen PERCENT IS BASE CASE. Assuming our current. Gdp numbers a lot of already priced into the market but unlike investment grade. Where we get to say you're not going to retest the lows. We do. Think that high yield spreads to widen from here that being said there's a silver lining here. The silver lining is just like it was in the equity market into credit markets. There's a significant amount of Dr Crowder in the private credit markets alone. We think that somewhere to the tune of two hundred forty billion in addition to that also got interest from non dyke in cut investors private equity firms while firms family offices and this is allowing companies to come to mark yet just this week alone. We had eleven deals price in the secondary market ideals came last week and these are multiple times oversubscribed but they are humming at levels that are wider to secondary market. It's causing a little bit of a repricing Activity and you're seeing more investor. Demand is is definitely more secured and for shorter term structures going forward. I do think that companies will continue to have avenues by taking raise capital. And it's just gonNA depend on Western. Most cost effective for any wear investor. Interest is in so quickly TOGGLE FOR BRIDGE BETWEEN CREDIT. Adverts pipes just given the market dynamic is on any given week also say that it's worth keeping an eye on preferred market. This market is relatively thoroughly valued right now. It is an area of interest or Arctic clients Just given it's a income producing asset in the dividends tend to be or the yield tends to be given all fighting council extra-base that I work with a lot of interests trading fairly valued right while which is giving the amount of volatility. We do see Corey. Large dislocations from time to time perferred effectively senior to comments junior to senior debt. Most of these birds are US. Dance and unlike the financial crisis using that banks are much better position to whether the recession and to be able to sustain those Virginia a month ago we talked about all these markets without spending a lot of time talking about the presidential election now. The Democratic primary was a bit more endowed at that point Nixon. Now now are earn victories at all thinking that the election typically in a presidential year and that would be A major overhaul to the markets. How your investors thinking about that right now your client. It's not top of mind right now but it's it's worth keeping in this session second quarter. Gdp levels historically have been one of the most predictors real action. And as I mentioned before we now expected to be down. Three percent given the current dynamic data points likely not going to be as relevant as it's done in the past and so we do need. Investors will look to approval ratings which have also been a strong predictor in the administration's response to the virus resulted in a short term increase to president trump's approval ratings. But they had fallen since then and they might be under further pressure if unemployment numbers increases as stacks. So we do find that immeasurable. Service issuing or intentional comes under a democratic administration and unlike a few months ago where probably been more chatter about increasing the corporate tax rates. We think that there's probably going to be more focused on New Public. Health Insurance options engaged. General Care will mean that. Thanks for covering a obliged swath of the market before we close. What's one uplifting nonfinancial story that you've heard this week? You know I wouldn't say that there's this one piece of news in general everything that I've been around people coming together and really running into that fire with candle to help relieve. The pain is just really inspiring in so whether that's woman increasing. Our efforts are charitable contributions donating masks. There's a number of other companies that are doing that. Using their industrial operations to create tools will help others in an also in healthcare front. You know there's people that are in the medical field that are coming out of retirement at any read. There's doctors at our retraining help with Kobe. Nineteen patients and also just recently seen talk of medical students which actually graduated early to get on the front lines. So I think it's just really amazing. How many people were just running into fire to do their heart and try to help with what's going on here. Thanks for joining us today. Meena thanks for having me. That's all for this week's markets update on exchanges of Goldman. Sachs in case you missed it. Check out our other episode this week with a stroke. Vahran Cohen of Global Markets Division. On how the sales and trading roles have changed over the past month and take away from the first quarter earnings. And how that division before. Thanks for listening and everyone is staying healthy and save this. Podcast was recorded April sixteenth. Two thousand twenty all price. References and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied distributed published or reproduced in whole or in part the information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast Any liability therefore including in respect of direct indirect or consequential loss or damage is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast. Not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial economic legal accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener nor to constitute such person client of any Goldman Sachs entity..

Goldman Sachs FEDS Sachs Goldman US Dr Crowder Virginia Corey Nixon president Global Markets Division General Care Kobe
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

04:32 min | 4 months ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"Hope. Yeah honestly a lot. I you know Catholic community. I actually think that there's a huge opportunity. Ultimately to streamline emergency food services you know if we can get excess food that was normally thrown in the trash directly to restaurants and have some of them you know produce catered meals for nonprofits at one could be an extra revenue source for restaurants which I know F- in New York City is is is more than needed. The quality of the food could go up and we real chance to change things for the better. So that's what keeps us going to rethink? That's what keeps us. Optimistic is that I think when the dust settles will actually be. It'll be really challenging but we're going to be locked with a more efficient a food system which had a lot of problems going into this thing. I now on our clothes with you. Where are you seeing some hopeful thoughts you know? I have to echo everything that was said by Aaron and Matt And at the end of the day it's you know. How do we define our community? I guess it for us. It's been The local you know people who are skier in wrapped around US everybody from our landlord who has been extremely helpful in terms of giving us a breather on grant. Our governor has worked really hard to keep as many businesses open as possible the customers who have been with us for years prue you can afford to buy their purchasing with us now and that support is huge and honestly the move we had to make in the last week to try and enter in entirely new business and deal with the registrations and everything else. I can't even tell you how many people have helped to this just network that we've been fortunate myself Lunde we've built this network of people over the years and now that we had to figure out. How can we repurpose ourself to keep our people employed by working on face shields? Everybody is jumped in to make a call to a hospital really. It is honestly that how many people have just jumped in to help and not the least of which truly has been Goldman Sachs where they've been in a tremendous resource for us where we said. We don't know who to talk to. How do we actually get set up with our FDA REGISTRATION? Where do we go to get going and make certain that if we're operating we're operating in a way that is going to be safe and sustainable as we head into the coming weeks to Kobe? And all I can is. These people have been incredibly helpful to us. Thank you earn. Thank you Ellen and Matt Thank you. All of us joining us today and best of luck because he continued to navigate with a very challenging environment. That concludes this episode of exchanges. Goldman Sachs thanks for listening and if you enjoyed this show we hope you subscribe at Apple podcasts. And leave a rating and comment but more importantly do what you can to support these small businesses today in tune in for a weekly markets update Friday morning. We're leaders around. The firm provide a quick take our markets. What's driving the car volatility? Thank you this. Podcast was recorded in two segments. On March thirtieth. Nato third twenty twenty all price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording. This podcast should not be copied. Distributed published reproduced. In whole or in part the information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or recommendation from any Goldman Sachs entity to the listener neither Goldman Sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore including in respect of direct indirect or consequential loss or damage is expressly disclaimed. The views expressed in this podcast or not necessarily those of Goldman Sachs and Goldman Sachs is not providing any financial economic legal accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast. In addition the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by Goldman Sachs to that listener nor to constitute such person client of any Goldman Sachs entity..

Goldman Sachs Matt And US New York City prue Lunde Nato Kobe FDA Aaron Ellen Apple
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

16:22 min | 11 months ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"To your team every single day. It's important to find that time to disconnect at the end of the day in order to kind of foster that sort of environment making sure that there is a work life balance important important for managers to kind of just be on the lookout for is there somebody who's constantly working really late hours or coming in on weekends working from home every day and kind of identifying that before there might it'd be a case of burnout for example just to make sure that every person on the team really does have that time to themselves to disconnect and to pursue their passions and what's important to the employees say go home doc get out of here. I've been known to do that. I similarly in part of that seventeen in percent that answered that work life balance means to be able to disconnect at the end of the day because I've you work life balance as being able to maintain your priorities but not neglecting yourself in the process one of the things I like to do for pleasure and I won't let myself do that unless I finished reading my text books for the day so being able to read for pleasure at the end of the day says to me like you did it right but besides that you know artistic so I like to draw I like to Crochet. I also cook and I love having friends over and my friends all know that and they take advantage so you know weekend's classes in my room has already been rebranded into hotel to you see but those are all things that are important to me so when I approach my day I try to make sure to weave. Those both ends so that again I'm maintaining my priorities without neglecting myself in the process and I think that managers should encourage that among their teams as well. Everyone has the things that they're passionate. What about so I explain what those are in my case for other people might be you know playing on a sports team for example. Anything manager should encourage people to pursue those things that are important to them. Katherine said that you don't find yourself with a case of burnout because when you feel the best I think you perform the bat with a funny thing. Is this conversation so now I feel like them so maybe I'm like seventeen percent or that is director of sixty two but one thing that I found in it's one of the amazing things which you all reference about a lot of the people who work here Goldman Sachs when I think of disconnect I think of non movement and my guess is you crochet like a world class crocheter and a and when you cook you cook a mean meal and when you're with your family your with your family intensely and so that's the one thing that I found is people definitely have passions and things away from the office so in that sense. I really agree with disconnecting. Certainly I do but what I've found which has been one of the interesting things in connecting with a lot of people especially some of the younger generation to from when I ask them. What are they doing when the wave from their officer doing something else passionately they're not sitting back and hanging out there kind of doers which is inspired? It makes me feel like I need to do more. We all do more one of the interesting things in the service entrance a brand loyalty much more important than product loyalty okay so the very conscious of brands and impact brands have in the world. How does that change. That kind of evolution of consumer behavior changed the way we think about recruiting people ed how we approach campuses differently. If I were to use different language in it from a recruiting perspective I would say product loyalties like role responsibility. You come into this job right. That's like the product and brand is I'm hiring you to this firm and part of the importance is what does that brand stand for that brand. Iran mean and certainly for us. There's a lot around what our purpose at our impact in society is as one of the questions that we've done that so when we think about how a recruiting today were much more trying to help people see where their alignment of their skill set is to potential jobs within the firm and were often presenting it as there's not just one there can be multiple so you're joining a firm. You're not just joining a role and we spend a lot of time talking to them about what the impact is that the firm has in the broader society society as a hey. I want to attach myself to that brand and what that brand means and the impact and the positive results drives in the world and I think that's fundamentally different from where retreating was before which was some version of. Let me tell you what position I'm hiring for and let me tell you what you're GonNa do in the first six months and the second six months which is very kind of product. It certainly has changed how we approach it. Is that a fair characterization of the way you think about the choices that you're making definitely agree. I know that if something were to happen and my team let's disappears in the next year. I know that I still WanNa work at Goldman Sachs. I wasn't here specifically for the one team. Although I do love my team and very excited and let the record reflect there's definitely something to be said about kind of the strength of the name. Goldman Sachs and the people and kind of just the quality quality of working in a place like Goldman Sachs. I think kind of going back to that brand versus product loyalty. I can definitely say that. I'm one of those people who focus is a little bit more on the brand loyalty and I think it's important to kind of know who you're working with know who you're dealing with Rebecca as it relates to you know my habits is a consumer. I can't say that I identify with product loyalty guilty or brand loyalty and it's so interesting because I'm taking a marketing class this semester and the first topic that we've actually started discussing is the economics of brand loyalty but the more I thought about it the more I realized that for me it comes down to price and quality more than it comes down to a specific brands or specific product because I could think of examples in my life where I lean toward brands. I can think of examples in my life where lean toward a product and I can think of examples in my life where I lean toward one. It's not intentional at all when you have three kids like myself. If you lean towards whatever it's GonNa make them think you're cool. That's all that's all. Your definition is called yeah. I know a new day is coming to so one of the things our interns spotlight they thought. Ai Artificial intelligence is going to have the most profound global impact of any trends. We're seeing over the next ten years. It's interesting because a lot of times that's sort of seen as a display of some work in case but how's it shaping the future of our business in how we think about it. If you take a step back and think about as being a tool just like the internet was a tool or cars were or television and by the fax machine which.

Goldman Sachs Katherine Iran officer director Rebecca six months seventeen percent ten years
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

10:52 min | 11 months ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"This is exchanges. Goldman Sachs where we discussed developments curly shaping markets industries in the Global Economy Jake siewert global head of corporate communications at the firm today. We're talking about what it's like to be Goldman Sachs in turn and how employers are trying to keep up with what younger generations want from a work environment to do that. We're talking to college. Seniors who Internet Goldman Sachs's Sachs's past summer and we'll be returning fulltime analysts next year as well as owner very own head of human capital management Dane Homes Catherine Rebecca Ending deign welcome to the program so much so this is for everyone briefly introduce yourselves where you from. Where do you go to school or did you go to school Tom. In what part of the bank will you interning in this past summer dangerous. Give us a quick. Take on your role here at Goldman. Sachs so my name is Catherine Doar VIZSLA. I'm from about an hour north of the city in Putnam County. I'm a student at Brew College here in the city and I had the opportunity to intern in the Securities Division this summer rotating on a few different teams within prime services. My name is Rebecca Scheiner. I am a super senior issuing university which is here New York City where I'm double majoring in accounting and finance but I am from Chicago and this past summer I was interning on the Jess Bank Alyce team and the Control Division here at the firm. I'm dain homes as was mentioned a head of HR. I guess in the small world connections I was born in Chicago. I went to University of Columbia Columbia New York so I don't know we're all all connected one way or another and I'm responsible for over activities around people at the firm leadership development okay just to set some context. We collect a lot of insights from our interns when they're here of the summer. Why do we do that. And what did we get out of that experience of listening to our interns over the course of the summer when they're here yeah so obviously we use the old adage that you don't know what you don't know and I think in a people driven business. It's very normal to fall into the trap of saying Oh. I know what it was like. I was an intern. You might have been a long time ago. When you're using an abacus. It is really true that you don't. I don't know what you don't know so part of it is getting the information and what's Great. I think about the generation that we're seeing today and a lot of the people that were recruiting to the French the firm open and honest and very frank about how they're feeling about things and how they're looking at the world so it's all about being informed unfortunately if they're happy to share it with us the intern class it's the summer was the most diverse to date talk a little bit about how that classes a reflection of what we're thinking and how we're thinking around diversity inclusion here at the firm we think about diversity inclusion through a bunch of lenses one is just if you think about it from a pure where business had serves clients and whatever problem issue usually solving some problem for one of our clients dance with our we want we want a diverse set of us in the room as we try and tackle whatever that problem is and so some of that is a reflection of frankly just wanting to provide the best solutions to our clients. Another part is is that in our surveys with our interns we hear that they want a diverse population around them so part of it is reflecting the desire of what the most talented people out during the marketplace that type of environment that they wanna work in and then frankly we have a core principle that we think about which is mirrored crecy and it's hard to argue that you fully sled meritocracy talk rec- if you don't have diversity in the group of people that you're bringing in because we've obviously proven time and time again talent knows no boundary whether be gender race ethnicity sexual orientation tation so having a diverse class of me makes me feel very confident that meritocracy is alive and well one of the things we did learn from the surveys that eighty two percent of our entrance that it was important and to develop managers that foster that kind of inclusive work environment so how are we thinking about the forward strategy for diversity inclusion particularly comes to training managers. All of this starts with one caring about developing our people which means investing in them investing your time. You're knowledgeable energy. Were looking for our managers to do that. The other part is understanding understanding them and so we started this question with why do we survey. It's a little bit to understand what drives them what they're looking for and in a lot of ways that's prepare managers to deliver that to them as well so managers play play a critical role in developing people in attaching them to the firm and making them effective and the diverse population would you need to do you need to make sure that you understand all the diverse perspectives that the people have in where they come in and you frankly have to care care about what matters to them care about what they're looking to achieve and addressing that and so you know it's resulted in a lot of education. We've put a lot of investment into our learning activities to make sure people understand the different perspectives that are out there but we give people the base knowledge and then we got to make sure that they care and engage H. and invest in our people Catherine when you came here to work over the summer. Does it feel more less diverse than your schools. And what do you expect for managers in terms of how they can do a better job of making people like yourselves comfortable. Baru at least for me is a very diverse school but I would say that the difference here wasn't huge Goldman's. There's definitely making big strides in that direction and I think something interesting just to think about in terms of managers kind of enforcing or implementing more of that diversity within their team team kind of what Dana mentioned a little bit about different perspectives kind of coming in from those diverse experiences. I think is important to think about so when I think about diversity. I don't just think of race ethnicity the city religion. Maybe I'm thinking more about kind of what have those experiences taught a person. What skill sets have they brought from. There and I think that's an interesting thing to think about in the workplace given that different experiences will transfer into different skills in different ways that a person can add value at team so my experience with diversity at the firm is that the firm is much more diverse than my my school or university but that said I think that within the firm managers can best encourage and foster diversity and inclusion by using it as an invitation to conversation because I've always thought of diversity as something so much larger than simply checking off boxes like Catherine said I think you have something to learn from everybody around you and while may be easier or more natural to start that conversation with someone who seems more similar to you at the outset. I think it's equally if not more important to start those same conversations nations with the people who seemed different than you are because in my experience the more you speak to the people who seem to be different than you the more you realize that you have a lot in common and I find that you come away having learned something and I think there's something really really valuable not so both of US studying finance as you're thinking about how to choose the next step of your career after school over the things that led you to Goldman and what were the attributes you looking for in a future employer. I think for me it was really the people that was the first thing and then I was looking at so I had a wonderful experience with all of my interviewers and that was kind of the initial stop that made me realize that golden was going to be a fantastic place to work and I actually had the unique opportunity many of turning here for two summers in a row and that's exactly what I've experienced. The people are incredible overwhelmingly supportive and helpful. I've always found that there's something you can learn from from everyone sitting on either side of you and I think there's definitely something to be said about. Never being the smartest person in the room. There's always something you can learn from every single person Golden Sachs for sure in addition to studying finance. I'm also studying accounting so last summer interns in a public accounting firm and it just wasn't for me so coming into this past summer. I want want to try something a little new which is what led me to controllers actually long story how. I ended up here but I guess in some. I'm really here due to the alumni I from my school who really stopped off and became interest me and guided me this way and I'm so thankful to them but how I ended up Goldman Sachs I mean I think the name really speaks. Thanks for itself because it truly is synonymous with excellence and that was my experience over the summer. When ever I was asked come experience was going. I would explain that I felt challenged. Challenge all around challenge that I was applying the things that I learned in school to my work on a daily basis which is rewarding in and of itself challenged and that I was furthering during the things that I learned and realized how much more I had to learn and challenge because I was surrounded by the most impressive people and as incredible as has my team is at what they do they were equally as incredible as a welcoming me as part of the team and of teaching me about my role and what I needed to do in order to succeed and they really thought to it that I was successful and to me that meant a huge amount so dean when we talk about work life balance means different things to different people and this is one of the questions questions we asked the interns is interesting sixty two percent of the entrance associated with spending time with friends and family only seventeen percent associate with disconnecting at the end of the day when I was that age that's what I was connected so it's different. It's unique for each person can meet flexibility can time always helpful to understand it. What does it mean to you so I'm not surprised. Now I found the pure synergy between me and most interns for me. It's family and friends allowed to but what's interesting stain. I think for me when I think about flexibility around life. It's having the space to live your life intentionally around the things that matter to you and I know there's this this whole debate. Oh can you have an odd habit. All say to people who have a problem with saying oh you can have it on like what you're just not creative enough because there's a lot of things in the word all a- and so to me you know work like balance starts with my family. I'm a obviously a husband and father and my wife. I guess semi chose me my kids. It didn't so I have an obligation on. Yes unfair to them a burden. I have to live up to and I care a lot around my community particular ticket around African American boys. I also care a lot about a lot of the friends that I've had growing up and you know people go through challenges in your life so being able to be there when that matters an an investment. Those things is really really important and the part. That's been interesting for me. It'd been at the firm I've been able to intertwine some of that together where some of those investments with with my family or whether it being so my charitable activities have been amplified as a result of being the farm and so that's actually created a unique synergy we sometimes it can these things is one or the other but a lot of times. There's a little inter twining of the Tube but for me if I can look at architecture and design books. That's that was my made in college. I I can spend time with my kids teasing them as much as possible. Make my wife think I'm a major intelligent brilliant funny good looking delete that one takes the most work of all then then. I'm pretty good so how about for you what is work life balance mean when you think about entering the workforce full-time and and what could employers be doing better to support healthy lifestyles. I think for me I'm one of that seventeen percents I would definitely put a focus on being able to disconnect from worked just because I don't think it can be fully present with friends and family and kind of pursuing your different passions. If your mind is always at work and in order to make sure you're not burning out and you can kind of come into work the next day really add value.

intern Goldman Sachs Internet Goldman Sachs Golden Sachs Goldman Catherine Rebecca Scheiner Catherine Rebecca Chicago global head of corporate commu Putnam County New York City Catherine Doar US University of Columbia Columbi Brew College Dana Securities Division
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

09:08 min | 11 months ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"You also managed to travel light. You still see a lot of clients what international markets you most focus on right. Now I remember when I used to talk to Hank Paulson a lot about how he spent his time all the way back to when he was running banking and before he ran the firm and one of the things that he said to me that still sticks with me that I try to keep keeping my mind as I think about my travel schedule today. Is You have to look at where the big markets are where we can have a real impact because that's still the eighty twenty in the equation Asian of where you can really move the needle and that's still obviously the United States across the whole of the United States. It's clearly the UK it's clearly Germany France and the group of countries trees on the continent and the the major economies in Europe and increasingly it's China and Japan if I had to categorize where I'm spending the vast Madrid time it's the g seven and China at an essence. Most of my time is really spent trying to make sure our operations in the key countries are working. Well and our clients are feeling our presence and then I'm meeting eating the right people and I've got relationships with the key people that matter externally whether it's in the government or with corporations or private equity firms are large institutions and then the case of a country like China. It's really trying to figure out where we're going to go. And how are we going to build a business. And how are we GONNA get ourselves to be more important more relevant in that marketplace inside the country and then obviously connected to our clients globally connecting them back into China so you spent a lot of time at China both as someone running the Investment Bank but also as Presencio. What is is it that most business people and most Americans have a casual acquaintance of China miss when they're not spending enough time there. I think it's a multilayered country and I feel like you walk out of a meeting and they're real meeting happens after you leave when you walk into the meeting with a group of Chinese executives or government leaders and it's translated meeting and then you leave even then go have another meeting and that's the meaning you're not in and so you want to know about and so I think the key is to figure out how to know about what happened in that meeting which there's no substitute with for going there a lot and getting a sense for the nuance and building relationships where you can actually get some sense for what's happening when you're not in the room. What I experienced when I go to China is it's translated translated. It's very formal. There's not a lot of nuance to the meeting. It's a pretty staged environment and there's another set of discussions. That really is where the rubber rubber meets the road and so I think if you go there a few times you feel like oh I had a good meeting. Every meeting is a good meeting. You're not going to have a bad meeting in China because the Chinese don't like having bad meetings but there's plenty of things that happened in a meeting. That wouldn't be to your benefit if you didn't know about what was going to happen next and so I think the key is to get to a sense where a place where you've got enough of a relationship with somebody where they I can give you the nuance behind the scenes in the room. You're not in what major geopolitical issues you most focused on now. Obviously there's a lot going on in the world. It's very busy right now. But what do you think will have the biggest impact on Goldman over the longer term. If you think about the next five to ten years if you call that the longer term the U. S. China China relationship in the trade discussion but also more broadly just the broader relationship you know how it unfolds particularly given the trump administration's policy which is obviously a departure departure from prior. US policy towards China. I think that far and away has the most global implications for for Michael Sachs's implications for our business in China obviously but has implications for how multinational companies and governments react to that relationship if I had to pick one that would be it. The second is brexit which on the surface is not as big can issue but it has ramifications for the whole of the European Union where we have significant operations. We've obviously got six thousand or so people in the UK at a big presence on the continent. I think brexit is the beginning of a reset of the relationship. Rally in the European Union were thirty five percent of our business by most measures resides so that is very important to Goldman Sachs and I think to our clients I would say that'll be the second big geopolitical event that we're watching carefully so John and of course year banking career you became a counselor to some of the most successful CEOS really in the world do you misgivings kind of advisory is still get an opportunity to do it and does that background. Help help you in this current job. If I look back on my career the most fun that I've had is really sitting with CEOS and boards and chewing through difficult problems whether it's an emanate problem problem or a capital markets problem or in some cases personnel or other problem that doesn't relate to a transaction counseling clients really one of the great joys of this business and so yes. I don't get to do it as often as I used to. Do it and I do miss that aspect of it but one of the great benefits of this job by virtue of my position I actually get to interact with more CEOS and more presidents and more executives actives and important positions even I did in my prior job and so I still get to spend time counseling and now the counseling is a little bit different. It's not as much on transactions or deals roles. It's more on macro issues and things that the CEO or the executive is wrestling with it so I actually find some of those relations become even more intimate than they would have been when when I was more of an adviser on a transaction so that's been quite beneficial and sometimes I turn the tables now and I ask questions really picking their brains on how they run on their businesses so I've had numerous conversations with executives about how they run their human capital organization how they run their technology organization how they think about Silo Ization and their firms firms either think about brand how they think about technology disruption content etcetera. I found that the counseling I was doing is actually serve as a pretty good baseline flying for me too. Sometimes turn the tables and ask the questions that I know I was being asked my prior life is a banker people talk a lot about the culture of Goldman Sachs. It's hard to understand it less. You've worked here here but you've been outside the firm. Nabet inside the firm for a long time almost two decades. What are the things you're most proud of inside the culture. Where some places is that you think we need to change what I love about. Our culture is it's fundamentally grounded in respect lots of communication and a collaborative perspective people come to work here because they want to be surrounded by very very talented people that are desirous of doing important things in the world and they want to collaborate with those people to get better outcomes. We take that for granted because that's just the way Goldman Sachs's Ben for a lot of years. Most other firms have a hard time assimilating assembling that kind of culture so we've got tremendous advantages bandages. I think back to your question on silos ation and bringing the firm together one of the things that we've suffered from in the last ten twelve fifteen years. Maybe the crisis really accentuated this the notion that we had to play defense coming out of the crisis as we have gotten more balkanized we do operate in more individual units. The the firm has gotten bigger. It's more complex and more businesses. It's hard to bring people together. It's hard to tap into the vein of that collaborative ethos and actually pull it together there and go do the thing that I think everybody wants to do so. I think we have work to do there but we've got a lot of raw material to work with it. I think is great advantage. You Running Investment Bank for a while. You've made the transition now. What's been the biggest surprise going from the business investment banking division to the executive office investment banking things a great business and it's done very very well for a long period of time but the firm has a lot more complex in investment banking and so for me? The hardest part of this transition has undoubtedly Ben getting my arms around the complexity of the firm just the raw breadth of businesses that we're in of people that I have to get to know that I have to learn to both trust and have of them. Trust me you know it's just a very very broad complex firm and I'm getting my arms around it slowly but surely but it takes awhile I think you can't rush it and you have to just experience it that and you have to go through the paces and so I'm almost a year into that but I think in year two and three outfit even more comfortable than I feel today. That's far away the the toughest part of the transition. Yeah I think the thing that I've really been heartened by is I've yet to find a part of the firm where I don't see really high quality people and a really high quality organization. We've got balkanisation. We've got challenges. We've talked about in this discussion but we start with a base of extraordinary people you go all over the world you see people in every nook and cranny or any of the firm. It's a young energetic ambitious mobile group of people that want to work together to collaborate WanNa win and WanNa make Goldman Sachs as good as it can be and I want to be important in the world and relevant in the world and that again is a great advantage and we take it for granted but I think it's a great advantage when we talked about your career earlier. We started after College College but you've got a liberal arts education at one of the Great Liberal Arts Colleges in America talk about how the Liberal Arts education basically can be applied. I do a career and finances you have this feels like a plant that question because I'm a huge proponent of liberal arts education although I did say once air that if I could come back and what about an engineer that was authorized to say about that more spoke to my insecurity of not understanding all the platform that we're doing and not knowing the engineering walls I wish I did my view is you can and learn the technical stuff when you're in a job and you need to learn it. If you're smart you've got a good brain or willing to read and listen in and absorb..

China Goldman Sachs United States U. S. China China UK European Union Hank Paulson Michael Sachs executive Goldman Europe Great Liberal Arts Colleges Presencio Madrid Japan Running Investment Bank Liberal Arts
"goldman" Discussed on 10 Things That Scare Me

10 Things That Scare Me

05:46 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on 10 Things That Scare Me

"Here we got ready. Number one. That no one will love me. Group hall says if you don't love yourself how the hell anybody else. I'm not a huge fan of myself to be honest. Number two. Failing at my job. Number three. Fear being a success. Number four. Failing at being a parent. I am from a family where at least with my parents, we went through very rocky time. I've two siblings. Don't really talk to either of them. May younger sister, and I never live together, and never had much of a relationship, and my older brother, and I did live together. And we fought all the time and I'm afraid that I'm going to somehow do the same thing to my family and have children. Don't wanna talk to me or children. Don't wanna talk to one another. So I just kind of marinate in that fear. Number five. Being selfish. There's a part of me that has a hard time recognizing things outside of myself. And I know it, I see it in myself like I don't want to, you know, do the cat litter ever. I don't want to do the laundry ever, I don't wanna be the one who has to take the kids to the park. I don't wanna be the one who has to shop for groceries. I want to like half my own time. Number six. Let me think here. What else am I? Well, I'm desperately. Being. I afraid of being alone, definitely. In my adult life, I have lived without a roommate once for about two months and hated it. I have been a serial monogamist before. I got married in every relationship I was in. I would always say okay, I'm pretty unhappy right now in this relationship, but this is the last person who will ever be interested in me. So I have to commit to this, no matter how bad it gets. This is only deserve and I'm not going to get anything better. Number seven. That the world will be consumed by fire and unsustainable. Ecological disaster. All right. I've got to go maybe two and a half. Eight. I am a fear that I don't matter. And if I if I could throw in a bonus one, I have a few that my best days are behind me. All the exciting stuff. I've done is over with everything is in the past now. Number nine. I would say that, honestly, I have a fear of confrontation. Number ten. I have a fear that no one actually respects me. I feel like the more I've moved into a career that I actually care about. It's felt more that way. Lemme tell you something being a landscaper was the greatest job. There was no stress. I'd listen to music all day I was in great shape. Spend the whole day outdoors it paid terribly. God was an enjoyable job. It was great. It was great. And then in the wintertime, it segue into putting up Christmas lights for people. My name is Alex Goldman. And these are ten things that scare me. Alex, Goldman is the co host of reply all from Gimblett media. If he liked ten things that scare me, Tele friend and leave us a review on your podcast app. Let scares me. Giant waves. Of nausea. What are you scared of tell us at ten things podcasts

Alex Goldman Weiss e studios nausea Alex two months
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

03:38 min | 1 year ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"Welcome to exchanges. Goldman sachs. I'm Jake Siewert global head of corporate communications here at the firm today. I'm here with MandA hill. Lynn and Sandra Lawson to talk about a new report that you co wrote with some other women at the firm from the global markets institute or GMI called closing the gender gaps advancing women in corporate America GMI is the independent public policy and corporate advisory think-tank for Goldman Sachs. Amanda is chief operating officer for global investment research and the president GMI and Sandra is executive director of GMI, Sandra. Amanda walk into the program. Thanks for having us. Yes. Thanks for having us. So let's start at the beginning. Amanda, why did you decide to write on this topic? And was there a particular catalyst? There's no topic that is more front of mind today than gender equality and equality in general, it doesn't matter whether. Are you open your newspaper your Twitter feed your inbox? You talk to your friends you talk to clients colleagues. This is a topic that people are focused on and not only is it a topic that people are focused on but our clients in particular have begun to ask us questions around. How do they move the needle on the issue of gender equality and promote more women inside of their organizations and see better gender related outcomes. And so really for us from an advisory perspective the principal catalyst was demand from our clients. And then of course, it's something that we find personally interesting as well. And also happens to be one of the topics that is front of mind for our society at large today, those were really the fundamental underpinnings for the reason to write the report, Amanda, what kind of feedback gotten since you publish this report. It's funny. I think there is a view that this could potentially be controversial. And in fact, the feedback has been just the opposite. In other words. Most of our clients both on the institutional investing side and on the corporate side have said to us. Yes, we understand. We're facing these issues. Thank you for talking about them. We want actually be involved in a dialogue and debate. We don't wanna be uncomfortable. Having these discussions. There's no stigma associated with it. We should be out there in the dialogue. And if you're not part of the dialogue, you can't possibly understand what's going on. So for us. It was actually a lot less controversial in very well received by our client base so far. I'm just going to guess that some of the people thought it would be caught virtual or men, actually. No, no, no, no. It was actually quite mixed. Yeah. We've really wasn't just men. Yeah. Okay. It was quite mixed. Sometimes you have to talk about things that are slightly uncomfortable. And you have to talk about them. Because if you don't talk about them, you can't resolve problems. And sometimes when you go close to an issue and talk about things like downshifting, whether it's voluntary or in volunteer. Gary it's natural for people to just get a little bit uncomfortable around that. And so I think from our perspective we wanted to be very clear that we weren't trying to take view. We were never trying to say that women shouldn't feel like they can make choices in their lives. Of course, they showed in those choices should be respected. But we wanted to be part of the dialogue and demonstrate with numbers and facts, what some of the issues are that are outside in the world, and that are facing women, but these are not only women's issues their issues for society at large their issues for men, and they can't be viewed as only being women's issues. So I would say feedback overall has been really positive so turn to the report you talk a bit about this twenty percent wage gap, which gets a lot of attention in the national press in our conversations about this..

Amanda GMI Sandra Lawson Goldman sachs global head of corporate commu Jake Siewert MandA hill Twitter chief operating officer global markets institute executive director America Lynn president principal Gary twenty percent
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"But we'd rather not have daytoday resources on this we'd rather outsource to another firm so i think there's definitely been part of the reason why outsourcing has picked up in the last number of years all right mike thanks for joining me today covered a lot of ground thank you that concludes this episode of exchanges of goldman sachs i'm jake siewert thanks for listening and i hope you can join us again next time this podcast was recorded on april thirteenth two thousand eighteen abusing opinions expressed here in should not be construed as an offer to buy or sell any securities and such views and opinions may differ from those of goldman sachs global investment research or other departments or divisions of goldman sachs and it's affiliates this information may not be current and goldman sachs says no obligation to provide any updates or changes neither goldman sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast and any liability therefore including in respect of direct indirect or consequential loss or damage is expressly disclaimed goldman sachs is not providing any financial economic legal accounting or tax advice in this podcast in addition the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as close to tooting the giving of investment advice by any goldman sachs entity or individual to that listener nor to constitute such person a client of.

goldman sachs mike jake siewert
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"Some of other being a startup there yeah i guess is why i say has side against should have surprise me because you get a budget smart people and we have some very good people in the region and you tell him to make money and you give them some rules i am the follow the rules but they also develop their own way of making money and there's no reason why needs to look like the way we do it in new york the way we do it in london but i'm a big believer that there's a reason why we had the position that we have in the markets where we operate and it comes down to the cultural the way we interact with our clients the way we interact with each other the way we think about our commitments what we do and what we don't do of procedures so you name it i couldn't really be more specific but after eighteen years in the firm i guess i know whether the goldman sachs ways and i'll be happy if at the end of my tenor latin america goma sacked latinamerica looks more like goldman sachs new yorker goldman sachs london because i'm sure longerterm is going to guarantee that we're going to be able to get to the position we want to get to stay there all right i'll thank you very much for joining us today pressure thank you for having me that concludes this episode of exchanges goldman sachs and jake siewert we hope you join us again next <music> this podcast was recorded on january seventeen two thousand eighteen <music> the information contained in this recording was obtained from publicly available sources and has not been independently verified by goldman sachs neither goldman sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the information contained in this recording and any liability as a result of this recording is expressly disclaimed this recordings should not be relied upon to evaluate any potential transaction goldman sachs is not giving investment advice by means of this recording and this recording does not establish a client relationship with goldman sachs

new york goldman sachs longerterm jake siewert latinamerica goldman sachs london eighteen years
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

02:06 min | 2 years ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"In the case of cybersecurity really important to enterprises on the earlier stage side artificial intelligence is by far the biggest area of focus there but i also mentioned robotics is another related area where you're seeing a lot of investment a lot of promise longerterm you're also seeing some real opportunities there and some of the earlier stage health care areas of focus even though those are you know in a lot of cases related to a in robotics but you've had nearly a five hundred percent increase in the amount of vc funding going into those fields and we simply never seen that much money that much new company creation go into an area and not produce some big meaningful companies longerterm all right he thanks for joining us today thanks year that's all for this episode of exchange the goldman sachs objects we hope you join us again next time this podcast was recorded on november 14th two thousand seventeen all price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording this podcast should not be copied distributed published or reproduced in whole or in part the information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or recommendation from any goldman sachs entity to the listener neither goldman sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast in any liability therefore including in respect of direct indirect or consequential loss or damage is expressly disclaimed the views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of goldman sachs and goldman sachs is not providing any financial economic legal accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast in addition the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by goldman sachs to that listener nor to constitute such person a client of any goldman sachs entity.

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"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"You can see if the banking system considerably what the banks have paranoid about quite rightly so is losing control of the payment system so if you think about one of the functions the banks really fulfill their really at the center of the payment system for any developed economy and not puts them in a very very valuable and unique position and that's something that they count afford to lose so as you start to see these technologies get adopted if they do get adopted on a widespread basis the banks have no option other than to making sure that they are fulfilling the needs that clients that a using cryptocurrencies need richard thanks for joining us today thank you very much for having me back and that's all through this episode of exchanges goldman sachs object stewart thanks for listening this podcasters recorded on december xi two thousand seventeen all price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording this podcast should not be copied distributed published or reproduced in whole or in part the information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or recommendation from any goldman sachs entity to the listener neither goldman sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast in any liability therefore including in respect of direct indirect or consequential loss or damage is expressly disclaimed the views expressed in this podcast are not necessarily those of goldman sachs and goldman sachs is not providing any financial economic legal accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast in addition the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by goldman sachs to that listener nor to constitute such person a client of any goldman sachs entity.

banking system goldman sachs investment advice richard
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

01:50 min | 2 years ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"This is exchanges the goldman sachs i'm jake siewert global head of corporate communications here at the firm today will be discussing e s g an impact investing and we're lucky to have three very thoughtful practitioners with us he lost in helps lead goldman sachs asset management's client business in overseas both institutional clyde strategy and the divisions esg efforts scott brown is the ceo managing partner of new energy capital and elizabeth mcgovern is the program director for impact investing at the mcknight foundation thank you all for being here thinking thinking hugh your job here's the firm includes oversight of our environmental social and governance investing efforts in our asset management division that's e s chief for short and also called responsible or sustainable investing how is itchy investing different from quote unquote traditional investing in what kinds of asset classes are open to an investor utilizing this esg framework but frame it is really there are three approaches there's an approach that focuses on alignment that's where an investor asks is there a way to have greater degree of synchronicity between their values and objectives in what's represented in their portfolio the second way is integration that's where elections around the s g shoes is used to evaluate the forward prospects of usually a corporate issuer of debtforequity it's a lynn's as a portfolio manager thinks about advantageous prospects for a company and then the third dimension is impact that's generally associated with private markets where the proximity of the capital that you're providing took the corporate enterprises fairly close and your seeking a financial return but a measurable impact.

ceo program director mcknight foundation hugh lynn portfolio manager goldman sachs jake siewert global head of corporate commu scott brown managing partner
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"Mm mm um this is exchanges goldman sachs objects you at global head of corporate communications here the firm today very glad to be joined by harvey schwartz harvey's the firm's president and khosi allow david solomon and before that he was our chief financial officer and before that coheaded scourge division harvey welcome to the program cheik great to be here so let's start harvey at the evolution of your careers very interesting story you want someone that people would necessarily peg as a future executive goldman sachs shows us a little bit about who you are growing up i grew up in new jersey and i definitely consider myself a jersey kid him huge fan of bruce springsteen and of course for any of my other fellow jersey folks southside johnny but you've got to be pretty deep in the weeds now the jersey bands you know like lots of kids i had my challenges while i was fourteen my mother passed away and you're in retrospect that was pretty to stabilising for me as a young person n after that my father and i both struggled and i would say overall i've found again like lots of kids my high school years were pretty difficult and the and i think it's fair to say i just wasn't the best high school system i think you would have said at the time pretty unlikely i'd be sitting here talking to you today jake that's for sure so how did you make it out of high school in onto college you ended up attending ractors how did that happen well after high school i didn't go to college right away i took off a year that wasn't some designed gap year that was basically because i done so poorly on high squat in applied any colleges.

goldman sachs harvey schwartz harvey president chief financial officer bruce springsteen jake global head of corporate commu executive
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

01:53 min | 3 years ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"So to deal mostly we'd issues of compliance strictly speaking my first responsibilty as chairman there they are legally prescribed routes of its of course overall sharing the board of directors i tried to help achieve all the objectives we have strategically in the firm most globally and for goldman sachs international and having been in the government which rights a lot of the rules looking at it from the perspective of a company that is complying with all the rules in the infrastructure i compliance any initial thoughts after a year here in fact today there is a lot of attention more than i was expecting frankly to issues of compliance and tuitions of regulation to issues of accountability it's amazing the time energy debt goldman sachs devotes to those issues probably some people more on the business side will say it's too much i'm told by people that are in the phone for a long time that there was a change over time but in fact i have to say for meat is quite a surprise to see how much people at all levels of the firm both in london and also here in new york along they devote the energy the commitment to these issues of compliance accountability and integrity the issues of culture of the firm broadly speaking so obviously goldman sachs survey global company but our main offices tend to be in big cities that often times are more pro globalization and maybe more liberal than the rest of the world new york city london hong kong singapore how do you think the firm arthur think of its responsibilities at a citizen all of the markets where we operate or put another way when is it the right time for us to speak out as i said earlier it depends on the gravity of these sean to seriousness i think as such we are not and should not be seen as partisan.

chairman goldman sachs new york london hong kong singapore arthur london
"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"goldman" Discussed on Exchanges at Goldman Sachs

"I think all the players cross the value trenches have to evolve an issue a debt to the everchanging consumer behaviour and technological innovation and dues will be the leaders of tomorrow all right thank you all for joining us lisa mark patrick it's great to have you here thank you thank you that includes this episode of exchanges goldman sachs objects you're we hope you join us again next on this podcast was recorded on june twenty seven two thousand seventeen all price references and market forecasts correspond to the date of this recording this podcast should not be copied distributed published or reproduced in whole or in part the information contained in this podcast does not constitute research or recommendation from any goldman sachs entity to the listener neither goldman sachs nor any of its affiliates makes any representation or warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of the statements or any information contained in this podcast in any liability therefore including in respect of direct indirect or consequential loss or damage is expressly disclaimed the views expressed in this podcast or not necessarily those of goldman sachs and goldman sachs is not providing any financial economic legal accounting or tax advice or recommendations in this podcast in addition the receipt of this podcast by any listener is not to be taken as constituting the giving of investment advice by goldman sachs to that listener nor to constitute such person a client of any goldman sachs entity.

goldman sachs investment advice