35 Burst results for "geophysicist"

Earthquake strikes New Jersey, shaking reported across state

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | 3 weeks ago

Earthquake strikes New Jersey, shaking reported across state

"A rare occurrence in New Jersey early Wednesday morning an earthquake the magnitude three point one earthquake struck in east revealed on social media people said they felt it as far out of status Philadelphia New York Long Island and Westchester which U. S. Geological Survey geophysicist Robert Sanders says is likely designed curriculum with anywhere in that sixty to a hundred mile range is most likely valid for this event having been stopped the quake hit at two AM and he expects little damages be very surprising for us to see anything more than you know damage shelves or or you know picture frames falling off of windows any sort of structural damage or significant bodily injury uses is not likely not very common for a for a magnitude three point one Sanders says expects smaller after shocks the last time this part of New Jersey had a magnitude three or higher earthquake was in nineteen ninety two he says before that it was seventy nine I'm Julie Walker

New Jersey Earthquake York Long Island Westchester Robert Sanders Julie Walker Philadelphia U. S. Geological Survey Geophysicist
Covid-19 Causes a Seismic Quiet Like No Other

PRI's The World

03:23 min | 2 months ago

Covid-19 Causes a Seismic Quiet Like No Other

"Life has been quieter lately hectic at home. Maybe but you've probably noticed less traffic fewer planes, flying overhead new research published today shows it's not just quieter above ground. Coronavirus lockdown also meant a quieting of seismic noise below ground. The world's Caroline Bieler explains when you think seismic waves, you probably think earthquakes. The tremors caused by tectonic plates, scraping against each other and releasing energy in waves through the Earth's crust, but on a much smaller scale we humans make seismic waves to. From traffic. Lane landing and taking off even lots of US gathering in a stadium. Just have a word for this one. They're called football. Quake's anyway. We mostly stopped leaving home this winter and spring a lot of that seismic noise. It stopped. What we discovered is as lockdown measured. Swear taking place in different countries around the world. That was very clear. Significant decrease seismic knows that's Raphael the plan. A researcher at the National Autonomous University of Mexico research he co authored was published in the journal Science today, and shows manmade seismic noise dropping up to half globally this spring, so that was very interesting, because it was offering us a very concrete observation of decided of people were staying home as a way to protect the job it. It also presented an opportunity for science. Usually, lots of seismic noise makes it harder for researchers to detect small earthquakes. One of the plans co-authors compared it to trying to hear your phone ring at a rock concert this spring. The background volume got turned down. We each and focus on the natural signals. Trying to detect very small is derived, couldn't be absorbed before with last mount of filtering and processing more like hearing that phone ring in a library deploy, says identifying these earthquakes when it's quiet. Quiet is going to make it easier for scientists to find them again. When all that background noise comes back, scientists across the globe have been making local observations sometimes with small seismometers in their basements since lockdown started McGill University geophysicist Yang. Djing says this study brings those observations together to paint a global picture. She wasn't involved with the research. I think this is so far. The most comprehensive Stati on the global scale I'm very impressed by the scope of the study. It's part of a relatively. Relatively new sub field called social seismology, which finds connections between seismic activity and things like economic growth. This is sort of new direction that part of says Molly, branching into so I think there is a lot of contribution that's as you might be able to make in addition to just looking at the earthquake shaking records in this case, seismologists see the vibrations were making or not, as a gauge of how faithfully we're following doctor's orders to stay close to home for the world. I'm caroline dealer.

Researcher Caroline Bieler Djing Raphael Tremors National Autonomous University United States Mcgill University Football Molly Geophysicist Yang
Unicorns of the Sea Reveal Sound Activities

60-Second Science

02:56 min | 3 months ago

Unicorns of the Sea Reveal Sound Activities

"In real life, Nar walls don't speak English. Like the one bidding farewell to will Ferrell's character in the movie. Elf instead they sound more like this. That's an audio clip recorded by scientists last summer under the icy waters of northwest, Greenland. We want to describe what animals are doing. We I better understand what sounds are telling us. If Guinea Podolsky. A geophysicist at Hokkaido University in Japan, but Alcee and his colleagues study the soundscape of glacial fjords. They're noisy places where icebergs crash into the ocean and air bubbles visit of melting ice. These yards are also home to Charles. The animals are sometimes called unicorns of the seat because of their single long spiral Tusk and they're shy, which makes them hard to study so Polski teamed up with local at hunters who snuck up on narrow walls in kayaks and captured audio. That's the sound of a Narwhal looking for food, using echo-location like a dolphin or a bat. and. That's an all closing in on its prey, which had vacuums up into its toothless mouth, so start sounding like to my ear like a chain source something wick. Since? It's so many little clique SOM- that Kennedy even. Them and this is recognized as a foraging related sound used those by other animals, for example, other dolphins or bats. They do the same trick, because when they approach the target, their prey which is phenomenal, so Arctic Greenland Halibut. The want to update their. Knowledge about the position of the target more frequently because the target is moving, and they need to suck it in and. That's why the interval is getting shorter and we even using some simple simple assumptions. A equation can know how far the animal is from the target. The whistles you heard earlier are thought to be social calls individuals communicating with other nar walls. The researchers reported these observations in the Journal of Geophysical Research. Oceans, bursts, deal sounds which we don't know what they mean. And there are several wicketless, but also says that listening to Nar walls is a first step toward understanding this mysterious wail, and how it will cope climate, change, shipping, and other human activities alter its Arctic home. They're all this things taking place right now. In the region which will affect somehow this animals, but we have no clue even about the state or the previous state of this animal. So if we want to learn what's going to happen, we better start now and I hope this is where sound monitoring can help us to learn more about this still mysterious creatures.

Greenland Ferrell Guinea Podolsky Geophysicist Hokkaido University Journal Of Geophysical Researc Polski Japan Kennedy Charles Alcee
Ethics of Commercial and Military Space

Astronomy Cast

08:47 min | 5 months ago

Ethics of Commercial and Military Space

"I'm Fraser. Cain publisher of University with me as always Dr Pamela. Gay a senior scientist for the Planetary Science Institute and the Director of Bus Hip Pamela. Hey doing I'm doing well. How are you doing fraser a once again? The weather's just getting better and better. The apocalypse has never looked so. Lovely Garden is getting out of control. Is the chief sentence. It is now in control and we've got to cut it back. There's just too many plants too much grass too much weeds. I got many weeks ahead of me at this point out in the garden. The day of the trip is trying to be upon you exactly every year. More and more people are making their way to space. Some private citizens have already gotten their astronaut wings paying for a trip to space out of their own pocket. What are the ethical implications of this as the cost of spaceflight? Come down so we've got a new series. We're going to do like at least a two part series. Maybe at most two part series home. But this week we're going to talk about private spaceflight and just what are the ethical issues with this? Next week we will talk about military spaceflight. We're GONNA talk about Space Force. Although I think if we got timing a little better we could do. The episode after Space Force COMES OUT THE NEW TV show. Oh Yeah we can pull that off. Can we may thirty first. So let's talk about today. We'll talk about space tourism. The new movie that is planned next week will look at the trade off between commercial space and scientific exploration from the ground. So issues like the iridium satellites and of space resources for economic purposes. And then we'll go to space force. Okay now we've done two episodes about space tourism to fourteen and four fifty one to cover too much ground. But I think the thing that I found very interesting was just the way you had proposed it. Which is let's deal with the commercial and the ethics of this situation and we'll sort of see where that gets US first. Let's just talk about like? How do you define private spaceflight? When the purpose is the economic benefits of the parent company and its shareholders over the advancement of science and exploration causes that benefit mankind rather than stakeholders and. I mean like one version. That could very well be space. Tourism that you've got a space tourism company that is sending people on flights and they're having fun in going to the zero g hotel and enjoying themselves or flying to the moon and printing about on the moon in that low gravity but that is really just a sub set of what private spaceflight could look like so when you think about that larger umbrella. What are some other examples of the kinds of missions? We'd be run privately. Well this is where we start looking at. And this is what triggered this for me Sending people to spaced film adventure movies rather than to do the normal peacekeeping educational and scientific endeavors that take place on the space station even space tourists up until now have pretty much been tasked with. We're going to train you like an astronaut. You're GONNA do education stuff while you're up there too. And Hey we may throw you a bone and give you a little bit of science to do right but right now. Tom Cruise is looking to partner with spacex to partner with NASA and this has been tweeted out by NASA administrator. Jim Breitenstein they're gonNA film a not mission impossible but certainly an impossible mission on the International Space Station. Yeah I can't even imagine how awful difficult that process is going to be. I think I had a chance to interview someone who took the Imax seventy millimeter imax cameras up on the space station and tried to make a documentary. They gable the gave the astronauts. They taught them how to use these cameras than they had to. Fly Up with these cameras and try to shoot what they were doing. While they're up there and then send the footage back down or it was on the space shuttle. Anyway it was tough. Because it's a great big bulky professional camera that shoots an enormous amount of film at this huge aspect ratio. And it's a real challenge and so same thing right. Does he do his own shooting? Do you send up another person. Who's who does can handle camera sound hair makeup fright to the Astros get involved so I just. The details of this are blowing my mind but I think when you when we look at just all of human existence today and we think about all the trips that human beings take the vast majority of them are private right. When you fly in an airplane you know ninety nine point nine nine. Nine percent of the airplane flights are for private purposes. You are on a trip. You are carrying cargo. You are doing this. And then every now and then some would fly the airplane to a hurricane or you know to take some aerial footage of a of a drought. And that's the scientific purposes but the vast majority into. Why wouldn't it be that into the future? This is where it starts to become a how the numbers work out. And what is the ethics of this kind of question and in the frame of reference? I'm using for this is when I was a graduate student at McDonald Observatory. We'd periodically get. Vip's coming through the telescope and no matter what we're observing for science at that moment we had to kind of put it on the back burner and yeah. We'd bang the keys that we needed to keep things more or less going in a timely fashion but we had to pay attention to these guests who might be funders who might potentially help keep our science going one more year with the money. They might give the Observatory. And this okay. We are a not for profit. Enterprise we exist thanks to the generosity of our donors thanks to our competitiveness in peer reviewed science funding opportunities and thanks to our benefit actors in the state government who give us line item budgets. We know that we exist by the grace of all of these different humans and so we have to dance like the dancing monkey when they appear to keep them happy. That is of the job that we are. All aware of and astronauts are fully aware that that is also part of their job. They are all given amounts of media-training they're given massive amounts of here are effective ways to communicate complex ideas how to work a crowd how to be this stem educator. Even though they may be training pilot an engineer a doctor a myriad of other different things geophysicist. But they're all trained to be educators in the role of astronauts and when they're on the International Space Station. They know part of their is going to be on video cons with girl scouts to Judge Science Fair from outer space to do all these different feel-good tasks that remind everyone. Hey we have astronauts so the funding keeps flowing. We know that's part of the job. But that's a few moments a few hours out of your day and what we're looking at here is filming a movie in Outer Space. We don't know how long Tom Cruise and whoever else might be on the International Space Station but what we do know is while they're up there there. It's a twenty four hour gig in a large way and so now. Instead of being there a stem professionals benefiting mankind inspiring engaging educating their crew on a movie that the movie's primary goal is to have a great storyline and earn a whole lot of profit. And so where is the ethics in having our astronauts instead of engaging people in Wasilla educate them about space having them work crew on a film

International Space Station Outer Space Tom Cruise Fraser Planetary Science Institute Dr Pamela Cain Partner Scientist Wasilla Publisher Director Spacex Jim Breitenstein Gable Nasa Astros Engineer
"geophysicist" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

KLBJ 590AM

02:54 min | 5 months ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on KLBJ 590AM

"And Robert shock and I both absolutely agree on the cataclysmic nature of the younger dryas that global temperatures plunged twelve that may have years ago that they shot up eleven thousand six hundred years ago but Robert shock thinks that the agent for this was but Patton was the one that you yes you to disagree on the cause we do we disagree on the court but not on the not on the effect that I see I wouldn't call it says such a such a profound disagreements on on this on this issue a toll because Robert shocks focuses primarily on eleven thousand six hundred years ago that's very good reasons for that and what happened eleven thousand six hundred years ago as I said a few moments ago the comet science on ban is not nearly as good as the comet time from what happened twelve thousand eight hundred years ago so I'm open to Robert shock idea of corona mass ejections being responsible for the sudden global global warming and flooding eleven thousand six hundred years ago although I think we must investigate the possibility of a second bombardment of impact from the same comet that hit us twelve thousand eight hundred years ago but I don't think corona mass ejections explain the sudden freeze twelve thousand eight hundred years ago or indeed the horrific evidence of flooding across North America that Randall coffin and I investigated and I recorded in magicians of the gods the shock and I are absolutely on the same page that we're dealing with a huge cataclysmic episode that lasted one thousand two hundred years in which is highly likely that an advanced civilization was lost from the once in a while I'm sorry go ahead you know I just I was just gonna say that more more work needs to be done on the issue of the exact agency of what happened eleven thousand six hundred years ago but I'm not sure as I can be based on leading geophysicists and and geologist who specialized in this field that we are dealing for sure with a massive series of of comedy impact pregnant other thing will commit to at least four of them hitting the north American ice cap twelve thousand eight hundred years ago causing large quantities of the ice to melt down and fled south across McDonald's the camel pregabalin of the Pacific Northwest the channeled scablands weight created by that flood I'm pledging the into an incredible deep freeze that lasted one thousand two hundred years and resulted in enormous animal extinctions what's fascinating about the next day the date of eleven thousand six hundred years ago when global temperatures shoot up and when they gain we have flooding is that that is precisely the date that Plato gives us for the destruction and submergence by flood of the greater bomb blasted lies ation of apple yes just going to ask you that in today ironically Graham scientists have reported that there may be a downed continent in the.

Robert shock
Discovering 'Stormquakes'

Short Wave

02:43 min | 8 months ago

Discovering 'Stormquakes'

"Seattle Calgary or Juno. You might have felt it October. Twenty Eighth Two thousand twelve seven point eight magnitude earthquake struck off the coast of Canada near the archipelago of Haida Guay earthquakes. Earthquakes aren't unusual in that area. Because there's a big fault line nearby but it turned out buried in the data associated with this earthquake. was something unusual joie. We were not particularly looking for something but we were Trying to look for earthquake Evolution processes when you in fan is a professor officer at Florida State University. I am has Malla Gist. Or you can say a geophysicist in a more general term and so a couple years back when he he was looking at the data from the two thousand twelve earthquake off the coast of Canada he noticed spent before that big earthquake struck. There were records of what looked. I like smaller earthquakes nearby just migrating from north to south and by noticing that I saw I found a precursor to the earthquake creek and that was quite exciting to me and that would have been pretty cool on its own a previously unknown precursor to a big seven point eight earthquake but just to make sure it was a real thing when you looked at some data from two years before and the year after so not only to Intel thousand ten thousand thirteen. Tom And what we started to find is that such activities would would happen but only happen during wintertime. uh-huh so those smaller earthquakes in the ocean weren't a precursor to the big earthquake all because they happen before it and after it to now. You don't have to be a seismologist to know that earthquakes don't exactly know when it's wintertime. That's right that's right. Yeah earthquakes aren't seasonal right. They kind of just happen when they happen by. The weather is no sure is so that was Eureka. The Eureka moments saying while the nationality of this sussman activity obviously is quite important. What when you in some of his colleagues would later confirmed? Is that storms out in the ocean. We're causing what they say is a seismic phenomenon that they never knew about before instead of finding earthquakes. We found storm cracks storm. Quakes this episode. How they happen and what they could teach us? I'm Maddie Safai. In this shortwave. The daily science podcast from NPR VR.

Earthquakes Malla Gist Canada Seattle Maddie Safai Florida State University Geophysicist Juno Calgary Intel Sussman NPR TOM Earthquake. Professor Officer
How thawing permafrost is transforming the Arctic

KCBS Radio Weekend News

01:09 min | 8 months ago

How thawing permafrost is transforming the Arctic

"Temperatures in the Arctic continue to warm more than twice as fast as the rest of the world that's according to the U. S. government's latest climate report the past six years in the arctic have been the warmest there since records began in nineteen hundred decades ago an eccentric Russian geophysicist warned that frozen soil called permafrost contained enough greenhouse gas itself to pose a threat to the climate if it ever melted as we first reported last March science scoffed at Sir gazing office warning but now that the permafrost is collapsing the world is listening we traveled to the Siberian arctic to meet seem off who has devised a scheme to save the world in a place that he named for the last ice age Pleistocene park our trip took three days and our final leg internet venture of geoscience was on an aeronautical function a Soviet era into North we approach to

Arctic Geophysicist
Oldest material on Earth discovered

Geek News Central

01:49 min | 9 months ago

Oldest material on Earth discovered

"A seven billion million yes seven billion year old stardust is the oldest material ever found on earth. The Australian town of Murchison Victoria is home to fewer than one thousand people. But it's one of the most important sites in the history of astronomy and eighteen in sixty nine. A huge meteorite fell to earth breaking up in the atmosphere showering fragments of space rock south of the town decades later researchers discovered that locked inside aside. Those fragments were minuscule grains of Stardust. The oldest material ever known to reach the planet reaches his bond grains that are likely five to seven billion eighteen years old older than our solar system which formed four point six billion years ago and they got ejected and wrote around the galaxy until they landed here according to one of the geophysicist. This is one of the most exciting studies I've ever worked on at the Field Museum of Natural History. CHICAGO'S A and he is the first author on a paper bubbly grains said money in a statement. Philip Heck these are older Solomon Tears ever found and they tell us about how the stars in our galaxy so they examined forty grains of stardust. They were taken from the Murchison in meteorite three decades ago determine the age of the grains they studied isotopes of elements neon which interact with cosmic rains raise in space so Anyway cool stop. They've got some pictures. If you WANNA see some stuff that's Four point six to two seven billion years old. It's just a rock but I know that you that study rocks just love this stuff

Another earthquake hits Puerto Rico with 5.9 magnitude

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:45 sec | 9 months ago

Another earthquake hits Puerto Rico with 5.9 magnitude

"Another earthquake importer Rico the U. S. Geological Survey says this was actually a magnitude five point nine aftershock earthquake following the one Tuesday that measured six point four and knocked out power to most of the island most of the power had been restored this morning when the latest one happened US Geological Survey geophysicist Randy Baldwin says while today's is smaller damages all the more possible six point four probably weakens some structures and then they can you know be susceptible to further damage with this aftershock sequence going on recent ones of because buildings to collapse in southern Porter Rico and driven more than two thousand people into shelters this one was centred several miles south of the town of in the office about eight miles off

U. S. Geological Survey Randy Baldwin Porter Rico Rico Geological Survey Geophysicist
Magnitude-4.0 Ocean Earthquake Felt Throughout Southern California

KNX Midday News with Brian Ping

01:01 min | 9 months ago

Magnitude-4.0 Ocean Earthquake Felt Throughout Southern California

"A four point oh magnitude earthquake off the southern California coast is what I'm talking about for those who were up late for a new year's eve party and then up early for the rose parade it was a wake up call they didn't need yet at two thirteen this morning the earth moved it was centered in the ocean you're the Channel Islands and people felt in places like Glendale in Hawthorne and even Orange County one man though just shrugged it off he says it's part of life here and you know we're in California we're used to it well actually waiting for the big one and there hasn't been a big one in the LA area since nineteen ninety four Randy Baldwin as a geophysicist at the national earthquake information center he says the quake this morning took place seventeen miles off shore and it was a shallow one may be at a depth of six miles you know closer to the surface and now they're there for more shaking he points out these quakes the threes in the force are very common here and no it does not mean it is not an indication that the big one is coming although experts have long been saying that southern California is overdue for a major

Channel Islands Glendale Hawthorne California Randy Baldwin Geophysicist Orange County LA
Magnitude-4.0 Ocean Earthquake Felt Throughout Southern California

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:50 sec | 9 months ago

Magnitude-4.0 Ocean Earthquake Felt Throughout Southern California

"Chalk it up was quite a jolt to ring in the new year and earthquake striking southern California early this morning it was centered off the coast near the Channel Islands a magnitude four point oh earthquake that hit at two thirteen AM people felt it from Santa Barbara to Orange County and even if you didn't feel it just knowing that a quake could rolled through that in itself could be a little unnerving of course something something we were of all right maybe not for this one but quakes can be pretty jarring Randy Baldwin as a geophysicist at the national earthquake information center he tells K. an axe this quake was about six miles down that's pretty shallow and that means you will feel more shaking usually the earthquake is the more attenuation that you might have on some of the surface what for those who didn't feel the jolts

Channel Islands Santa Barbara Orange County Randy Baldwin Geophysicist K. California
Internet Cables Could Also Measure Quakes

60-Second Science

01:09 min | 10 months ago

Internet Cables Could Also Measure Quakes

"In addition to giant crustaceans and creepy anglerfish or fish the deep oceans hide a vital piece of technology the cables connecting almost every continent island and archipelago to the Internet. But it seems those undersea cables can be used for more than just sending. Cute Cat memes around the world. We can do a good job picking up earthquakes using offshore cables. Jonathan Ho Franklin is as an applied geophysicist at Rice University and Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. He says that fiber optic cables are like threads of glass and there are impurities built it so when you shoot lasers through the fibers. Those impurities back scattered some of the light. Right back to the laser source and we make measurements of the change in the back scatter light over time. Which gives you information on the stretch of the cable at each location. His team took advantage of a brief maintenance period when a particular cable off the coast of Monterey California was not being being used for communication. The researchers studied the slight deformations in the cable. And we're able to sense. A small earthquake pinpoint unmapped faults in the sea floor and observe zurve movements in the water column. All of which may be of interest to oceanographers. Their work is in the journal

Jonathan Ho Franklin Lawrence Berkeley National Lab Geophysicist Monterey California Rice University
Swarm of earthquakes hits Ventura County

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

01:15 min | 11 months ago

Swarm of earthquakes hits Ventura County

"A whole lot of jiggling that's been going on lately inventor dozens of earthquakes but why and what might come can extend seventies Craig Fechner is live in great what number we have to now well I went the latest was just about a half hour ago so I guess that puts us at like fifty one now fifty one small little earthquakes other been several small earthquakes ranging in magnitude from two point nine to three point six that happened just this morning between like about five thirty and six thirty so maybe while you're get ready yourself that maybe just a little love we go on in the in the earth there the quakes all happening in an area three miles west of inter a USGS describes this as a swarm of quakes here's what they qualify as a seismic swarm myself more than maybe a half dozen or so events happening in a short period of time you know less than a day or so this form of had forty nine events as of me talking to you since yesterday early yesterday morning that's definitely now than in the fiftieth quake I just before seven this morning the fifty first little quake one point six magnitude eight thirty edge that's a geophysicist John Bellini says don't be alarmed by this site not something I'm concerned about but you know in general people in California always have to be aware of a large earthquakes is nothing about this warm though suggests that a bigger quake is eminence

Craig Fechner John Bellini California Geophysicist
Powerful earthquake hits off Indonesia coast

Morning Edition

00:34 sec | 1 year ago

Powerful earthquake hits off Indonesia coast

"The US Geological Survey says there has been a major earthquake off Indonesia S. islands of Java and Sumatra the magnitude was six point nine Paul Caruso is a geophysicist at U. S. G. S. we have about two hundred and thirty reports of being felt that the earthquake was actually out in the ocean and because this is left for the magnitude seven we don't believe that there is any risk of tsunami the Pacific tsunami warning center did not issue a tsunami warning and Indonesian authorities say they will continue to monitor the

United States Paul Caruso Geophysicist Indonesia U. S. G.
After big Southern California earthquake, months of aftershocks to follow

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:53 sec | 1 year ago

After big Southern California earthquake, months of aftershocks to follow

"It's the first a normal work week since the fourth of July but there is nothing normal about the way people feel in southern California after two powerful quakes in the Mojave Desert here's correspondent Alex stone here in California we are constantly told the big one could hit anytime they were way overdue likely on the San Andreas fault line Friday night's quake was not that the big one would wipe out a major city cut off communication and people would have to survive on their own for days cal tech seismologist Dr Lucy Jones is these quakes have not made the big one more likely this earthquake in ridgecrest has not increase the chance of an earthquake in southern California in the in the metropolitan area it has also not decreased it but the aftershocks around the epicenter continue Caltech geophysicist Dr Joanne stark says the area has likely seen the worst of what's to come in the near

California Mojave Desert Alex Stone Dr Lucy Jones Ridgecrest Earthquake San Andreas Geophysicist Dr Joanne Stark
"geophysicist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

WHAS 840 AM

02:02 min | 1 year ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on WHAS 840 AM

"Cyberattack, launched by the United States Ronnie, and weapon systems on Thursday and hopes of crippling, the country's missile and rocket launchers Joseph Siani, president of the ploughshares fund nuclear policy, and national security expert tells ABC news, the US has been holding back on cyber warfare for a while. Now. Shown a great deal of train eating while Wrexham attacking us North Korea attacks. Tony put ample hackers attacking cities. We've been fairly restrained on Trump or Bolton lifting restraints Washington Post reports the cyber attack had been in the works for weeks. One of the candidates open to secure the democratic party's presidential nomination next year may appear Buddha. Judge telling attendees at a town hall of north Augusta that he has concerns over the way, the White House has been handling rising tensions with Iran. Also noting that security national security adviser, John Bolton help launch the US invasion of Iraq person running the situation for this president is one of the people who got us into Iraq, a president who pretends he was against the Iraq war all along. Even though we know that's untrue food, adjudge campaigning in South Carolina. Saturday, nine twenty other democratic presidential hopefuls joined Buddha. Judge at the South Carolina Democratic Party convention. Former Texas congressman battle Arora said as president he is not only would expand abortion rights, who would make. The case for them to it's about access to a free to a safe legal abortion, but it's also access to a cervical cancer screening to family planning help. And in a state like mine like yours at failed to expand Medicaid. It's access to a provider at all Aurora convention in South Carolina. A moderate five point six magnitude earthquake struck along the northern California coast of Humboldt county about three miles south of Petrolia, late Saturday, US Geological Survey, geophysicist, Randy Baldwin, says there may be some aftershocks that occur there in the next few days or so this is ABC news. There's nothing I heart media, the country's largest multimedia. Marketing company is looking for our next sale superstar, if you live and breathe creating branding.

president US South Carolina Democratic Part South Carolina Iraq ABC John Bolton congressman battle Arora North Korea Cyberattack Joseph Siani Washington Post Randy Baldwin Ronnie north Augusta Tony Iran Aurora Trump
What If the Meteor that Helped Wipe out the Dinosaurs Had Missed Earth?

BrainStuff

06:08 min | 1 year ago

What If the Meteor that Helped Wipe out the Dinosaurs Had Missed Earth?

"Today's episode is brought to you by smart water twenty years ago. Smart water, reimagined, what water could be from thoughtful bottle designed to supporting smart people who are changing our world through fresh thinking. Like, you smart water has added electrolytes for taste and great tasting water helps you stay hydrated, feeling refreshed and ready to take on your day. Refresh yourself with smart water. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Vogel bomb here on the northern coast of the Yucatan peninsula near the town of chick. Love. Mexico is a crater about one hundred twenty miles in diameter. That's about one hundred ninety kilometers the asteroid that created this crater was about six miles. That's ten kilometers wide and hit the earth sixty five million years ago in spite of these immense, measurements, the craters hard to see even if you're standing right on its rim to get a good map. Nasa. Researchers examined it from space. Ten years before the nineteen ninety discovery of the chick fil crater, physicists, Louise, Alvarez and geologist. Walter Alvarez, a father son team proposed a theory about the impact that we know today created it. They noted increased concentrations of the element iridium in sixty five million year old clay radium is rare on earth, but it's more common in some objects from space like meteors and asteroids, according to the Alvarez theory, a massive asteroid had hit the earth blanketing the world iridium, but shower of particles wasn't the only affect of the collision the impact caused fires climate change and widespread extinctions at the same time dime stores, which until then had managed to survive for a one hundred eighty million years died out, geophysicist Doug Robertson of the university of Colorado at boulder theorizes, the impact heated earth's atmosphere dramatically causing most big dinosaurs to die with an hours this mass extinction. Definitely happened fossil evidence shows that about seventy percent of species living on earth at that time. Became extinct. The massive die off marks the border between the Cretaceous and tertiary periods of earth's history. Which are also known as the age of reptiles and the age of mammals respectively today, scientists call the extinction decay t- event after the German spellings of Cretaceous and tertiary the t- event had an enormous effect on life on earth. But what would have happened if the asteroid hadn't missed would it have led to a world where people in dinosaurs would coexist or one in which neither could live. In a world where an asteroid whizzed past earth instead of crashing down with a force of a hundred million tons of TNT life could have progressed much differently. Sixty five million years ago, some of the animals and plants that are common today. We're just getting started these include placental mammals, which are mammals that develop inside a placenta in the womb and angiosperms, which are flowering plants insects that rely on flowers, such as bees were also relatively new many of these life forms thrived after the t- event, and without that mass reptilian extinction to clear the way they may not have found ecological niches to fill in this scenario. Today's world might be full of reptiles and short on mammals, including people. But even if the asteroid hadn't hit done stores and other Cretaceous life forms might have become extinct. Anyway, some dinosaur species had started to dwindle long before the asteroid's impact. This has led many researchers to conclude that the asteroid was just one aspect of a complex story. Other global catastrophes. Massive volcanic eruptions in what is now. India most likely played a role also the earth's changing landscape as the supercontinent Panja broke up into today's continents. Probably had something to do with it too. Then there's another argument that the chip to love asteroid hit the earth too early to have caused the extinction. Researchers Gerda Keller and Marcus Harding, both conclude that the impact took place three hundred thousand years before the end of the Cretaceous period. Keller theorizes chick fil impact was one of at least three massive collisions Harding argues at the iridium layer didn't come from the web asteroid but from another event such as series of meteors burning up in the atmosphere. He bases. This theory on ROY particles objected during the impact a most of these are in an older layer of the earth than the Katie iridium layer, according to both of these points of view the absence of the club. Asteroid strike may not have had a big affect on the k t extinction earth was a warm planet for most of the time that dinosaurs lived after the end of the Cretaceous period, the world got a lot colder and experienced several ice ages. Whether dinosaurs could have survived such change in climate is debatable. It's hard to come to a definitive conclusion about what the world would look like today without the chicks love impact. But the question of whether people in dinosaurs could have coexisted is a captivating won the ideas, president in everything from the Congo legend of mock lame Obembe to King Kong to the pervading kitsch of the Flintstones. Then of course, there's the prevailing scientific theory about the origin of birds that they are in essence dinosaurs that we are coexisting with today. Today's episode was written by Tracy the Wilson and produced by Tyler claim brain stuff is a production. Iheartradio's how stuff works to hear more from Tracy. Check out the podcast stuff, you missed in history class and for more on this and lots of other historic topics is that our home planet. How stuff works dot com. And for more podcasts from iheart radio is iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows. Jerry Lewis is dead. Sid vicious incurred. Kobe also did Amy wine-house Johnny cash and more disgrace. Them's rock and roll true crime podcast with stories about musicians getting away with murder and behaving. Very badly is available now hosted by me Jake Brennan, you can listen to disgrace of the iheartradio app. Apple podcasts or wherever you get your podcasts.

Walter Alvarez Gerda Keller Apple Fil Crater Lauren Vogel Marcus Harding Tracy Sid Vicious Mexico Nasa Cretaceous Yucatan Iheartradio Doug Robertson Murder Jerry Lewis Jake Brennan TNT Boulder
Is the Earth Humming to Us?

BrainStuff

05:47 min | 1 year ago

Is the Earth Humming to Us?

"Hey listeners in lieu of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about a new podcast art of the hustle that breaks down how the world's most fascinating and successful. People got to where they are. It's hosted by Jeff Rosenthal, one of the brains behind summit the world's preeminent festival. Celebrating ideas every show. He grills one guest on how they hustled their way to the top people like Tim Ferriss who believes that being an introvert like he is can make you a savvy entrepreneur tune into art of the hustle a brand new show from iheartradio. And we work new episodes drop every Wednesday, so listening subscribe at apple podcasts on the iheartradio app or wherever you listen to podcasts. Welcome to brain stuff from how stuff works. Hey, brain stuff, Lauren Bogle bomb here, think of a parked truck. But the engine running that's the sound some people have compared to the mysterious non-stop noise, which is emanating from this our home planet, we've been aware of this phenomenon for decades now, and while the source of the commotion remains unknown the scientists who study at have made an important breakthrough. They finally recorded it in the nineteenth century geologists began to suspect that the earth might be producing a constant hum one which rings out even in the absence of earthquakes and seismic events. They also reasoned that the noise must be too quiet for our human eardrums to hear the official name for this drone is permanent free oscillations until somewhat recently its existence was only theoretical a team led by seismologist Hugo Benny off did try to detect the signal in nineteen Fifty-nine, but their efforts failed because at the time science did not yet possess any instruments that were sensitive enough to pick up the hump. Theory became fact, with the advance of technology in nineteen Ninety-seven, scientists at the show us station, a Japanese research base in eastern Antarctica, a were finally able to prove that permanent free oscillate really do exist. The good news was announced a year later when the show team published their findings since then numerous other teams have observed the same noise now for the first time ever, the earth's ham has been recorded easing seismic equipment on the ocean floor. This is a big deal because every previous study, which has documented the noise did so with land based instruments these she was a hard one prize for Martha dean and her team. She's a geophysicist with the Paris institute of earth physics under her leadership, the international team reviewed data collected over an eleven month period from fifty seven seismometers stations on the floor of the Indian Ocean. And that was just the first step next. The researchers eliminated all forms of audio interference such as water currents and technical glitches from the recordings made a. Two of the stations with the deletion of this extra noise. Dean and her colleagues could finally isolate the hump they were looking for a why was it so important to record the operations with submerged seismometers as dean told us in an E mail these instruments will broaden our perspective in a way that terrestrial tools. Never could. She said ocean bottom seismometers can cover much larger areas than land based ones for the ocean covers seventy percent of our planet. She added that we can better understand the phenomena by studying the hump signal at places far from land or islands. Maybe one day. We'll even be able to pinpoint its source. You see nobody knows exactly how the HAMAs is being made a few different hypotheses have been put forth some GIO, physicists think. It's generated by the ceaseless pounding of ocean waves onto continental slopes. Others believed that it could be the product of atmosphere turbulence and global wind patterns. But if that second explanation is true, we'd expect the rumblings amplitude that. It's loudness to vary from season to season. Previous studies have claimed that this is happening yet. The new research says otherwise dean's group confirmed that the hums pitch rises and falls with its maximum volume heading frequency of four point five Mila hurts that's about ten thousand times softer than the faintest noises. Our ears contest. However, according to the team's findings the amplitude changes don't correlate with seasonality thus dean and her colleagues argue that atmosphere issues alone cannot account for the existence of these permanent free oscillations. They also think that their research could open the door for future research on the earth's interior geologists use a process called tomography to map out the inside of our world. A think of it as a large scale. MRI scan dean explains scientists invert the recordings of seismic waves to decipher the makeup of various layers and structures within the planet going forward ocean bottom seismometers like those used in her reason study. Should give tomography more data to work with? Hopefully, we'll soon have a better idea of what lies beneath our feet. Today's episode was written by Mark and Chini and produced by Tyler clang for more on this and lots of other earthshaking, topics. Visit our home planet. How stuff works dot com. Hey listeners in lieu of an ad today. I wanted to tell you about a new podcast art of the hustle that breaks down how the world's most fascinating and successful. People got to where they are. It's hosted by Jeff Rosenthal, one of the brains behind summit the world's preeminent festival. Celebrating ideas every show. He grills one guest on how they hustled their way to the top people like Tim Ferriss who believes that being an introvert like he is can make you a savvy entrepreneur tune into art of the hustle a brand new show from iheartradio. And we work new episodes drop every Wednesday, so listening subscribe at apple podcasts

Martha Dean Jeff Rosenthal Tim Ferriss Iheartradio Apple Indian Ocean Lauren Bogle Hamas Paris Institute Of Earth Physi Hugo Benny Geophysicist Official Mila Tyler Clang Mark Seventy Percent Eleven Month One Day
"geophysicist" Discussed on Dreamland

Dreamland

04:52 min | 1 year ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on Dreamland

"And then you get into the issue of concepts that at one point how far back if you say to a geophysicist when was the last time that Antarctica was free of ice. It's interesting Whitley that there's not a consensus may also be being hidden. You will get if you go to Wikipedia that which I consider now to be like meat cleaver research. It is not going to give you anything that is going to be scientifically accepted. But it it's where you kind of start everything and Wikipedia is is very clumsy and ham handed and political, but you will go. Disaster. Oh, terrible. Read my own Wikipedia pitch told my God is trying to politicize and sometimes embarrass people by putting them into categories. And you can't get it changed. Even though it's your name supposedly about you. Well, when you put in the question when is the last time aunt Artika was free of ice. It is so interesting there is no consensus, but you will see these two dates given the most often thirteen million years ago or thirty three million years ago. What Lee either west fair spread there? Well, look, let's let's compare it in a fraction to something that I think makes this point really dramatically homo erectus, the famous Lucy in Africa is supposed to be no more. Than two million years old. Now, if if aunt Artika was free of ice thirteen million years ago, put two over thirteen if it was thirty three million years ago put to over thirty three million any either way. If there is been an alien presence that was building huge structures on the roundish continent that we call an article thirteen million years ago or thirty three million years ago. Look at house for further back in time. It is over the first standing up mammal mammalian homo erectus when you begin to look at the time line of life on this planet with the consciousness that alien intelligence has been using the planet. The moon Mars in the solar system for vast timelines before we ever even genetically had a mammal standing up then the idea that humanity right now in twenty eighteen has a clue about what has been happening in the solar system. No. And why? Because when counter intelligence coming out of the Truman administration, we're given a Siamese to find out some of the truth about Antarctica and alien presence. And eventually in the fifties. They knew it was on the moon for sure. The policy over writing in the United States in Russia, all the allies of World War. Two was no buddy is to know this outside of the most classified operations, and that unfortunately is still in operation, but humans who have been on these special ops who have been in Antarctica who have seen these huge structures have known firsthand that the hieroglyphs are unrecognizable to scientists. They didn't. They are given permission to come to me and say, you have you've got to know this. We got to take a little brief break right here. They are found deep in a dying jungles six infants they are at apes the art human either, not quite so what are they when they are spirited off to the United States. And incredible discovery is made they are as smart as us, but not us not human company that found them wants to buy and sell them the most valuable animals on earth. Brilliant workers who need not be paid. Somebody has to stop this travesty. That's where Primatology Beth cook comes in. But can she stand up to the power and wealth that seeks to exploit them? Find out in Whitley Strieber is first standalone science fiction novel in seven years, new get it on Amazon as an e book or paperback..

Antarctica Wikipedia Artika United States Whitley Beth cook Whitley Strieber geophysicist Truman administration Africa Amazon Lee Russia thirty three million years thirteen million years two million years seven years
Earthquake strikes eastern Tennessee, felt in Atlanta

Rush Limbaugh

00:33 sec | 1 year ago

Earthquake strikes eastern Tennessee, felt in Atlanta

"An earthquake jolts Tennessee overnight. The US Geological Survey says a magnitude four point four earthquake struck eastern Tennessee around four AM centering near Decatur and was felt in Atlanta with a three point three magnitude aftershock minutes later, no injuries reported. There might be some very light damage generally that point and book, maybe like things. Having fallen off walls or out of cabinet. There might also be cracking and sidewalks or foundations USGS geophysicist, Amy Vaughn says the region is an active seismic zone that frequently see

Tennessee Amy Vaughn Geophysicist Decatur Usgs United States Atlanta
Earthquake strikes eastern Tennessee, felt in Atlanta

Laura Ingraham

00:27 sec | 1 year ago

Earthquake strikes eastern Tennessee, felt in Atlanta

"The US Geological Survey says a magnitude four point four earthquake struck eastern Tennessee and could be felt as far away as Atlanta thirty eastern tonight at this would be a relatively significantly five magnitude earthquake being that they do not get many of the Bank for greater event, geophysicist. Robert Sanders says the earthquake occurred about four fourteen this morning, then thirteen minutes later, a three point three magnitude aftershock struck there did not appear to be any immediate reports of

Earthquake Robert Sanders Geophysicist United States Tennessee Atlanta Thirteen Minutes
"geophysicist" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

Part-Time Genius

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on Part-Time Genius

"Fascinating to read this piece but the experiment was to test a bunch of things like they obviously know that a real mission to mars would be much more complicated than surviving in a dome on the side of volcano you know especially when that volcanoes in hawaii now as a side note this is not the volcano that's been erupting recently that might have made it a little bit more of a difficult experiment but they did want to see what it would do to people if they were isolated for a year and a pretty barren environment and really only able to depend on each other yeah i mean there's actually a term for that type of scenario it's called ice which stands for isolated confined and extreme but the thing that struck me was the team they symbol for this mission was incredible it really makes you think about the different types of skills you need if you send a group like this to mars for the simulation they had a pilot and a flight controller that served as their engineer there was a physician and astra biologist soil scientists they even had an architect focused on space habitats i mean talk about an inch interesting job and then there was heineke who is a geophysicist yeah it's so varied it's awesome well there's a short bit from her piece that i thought was worth reading and here's what she said she said cut off from civilization we were dependent on ourselves and on each other we had to perform any work that needed doing and fix anything that broke all we had was the material contained in the storage unit dubbed the c can the near supermarket was months away we receive news from earth electrically with a twenty minute delay that's about how long it takes for signals to travel the maximum distance of two hundred and forty million miles between the two planets to be honest it took weeks for me to realize just what i'd gotten into yeah i mean it's impossible to imagine what that would.

hawaii engineer geophysicist twenty minute
"geophysicist" Discussed on Science Friday

Science Friday

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on Science Friday

"Actually do your own little footprints and see if they respond absolutely need to have been some excellent studies before that have used seismic recording cici's graham bass recordings i'm played them back to the elephants are we know that the other fence respond to these vibrations and they can even discriminate in terms of who has sent that particular vocalisations so whether it was a known elephant or another that they didn't and obviously this is something that needs a lot more study intensive undestanding the sensitivity of the rents are really starting to the cat how that might change under different noise conditions for example myself from humming talked to the elephants on from that one what what about other animal besides the elephants can we use seismic to detect and talk to them possibly so this technique is going to be best suited for animals that generate large amounts of force so large land mammals it's possible that we can pick them up the research that needs to be done is obviously looking at how nonni whether we can detect them but whether we can discriminate between say antelope versus subra or looking at different behaviors so that certainly the next research project that needs a lot more data to look at that do you ever think as a geophysicist you'd be involved in tracking elephants no i mean certainly had an interest in animals of all sorts of sizes everson's being a child like many others.

geophysicist everson
"geophysicist" Discussed on 790 KABC

790 KABC

02:28 min | 2 years ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on 790 KABC

"Midday live vonda crew as i said i'll be speaking to brad guard a geophysicist and and whine resilience analysis regarding the hayward fault rock lobster also i'll be talking a little bit about also no criminal charges being filed in prince's death i will give you my analysis of that but when i went to report right now is that the fda committee let me get the headline right fda committee has the marijuana dr drug for seizures for epilepsy has be has been given fda committee recommendation meaning it should get through the into the marketplace let's be clear like every medication it's not without side effects they're seeing chronic liver inflammation this is a this is the cbd type product it's not the tetrahydrocannabinol that makes you high is the cbd which is associated with antiinflammatory properties in many different therapeutic effects have been alleged seizure has been one of the things that consistently has been shown to where turned to have utility and the studies that were submitted to the fda now in for in fact conform confirm that bottom line up for me you can take you can take a cannabis products for seizure it gets has some side effects in terms of interaction with other medicines and some liver effects but it's fact effective and it will be approved by the fda what i wonder though is because it's going to be pharmaceutically derived and distributed product and by the way you know cost eight hundred billion dollars to get something through the fda so the price of the pharmaceutical product is going to be high way higher than if you bought it with your miracle medical marijuana license that's what i wonder wonder what that's gonna mean in terms of distribution for recreational cannabis viewer recreational cannabis distributor wouldn't you just undercut that price with a cbd product but not everybody lives in a state where they can get you but i'm just wondering how that's gonna work here by the way at the same time we've heard that president trump is going to back off the heat on cannabis did you see that what he's not gonna big but he he's going to back them off of that smart move he's gotta let him worry about a million other problems you could say that the federal government cherry picks which laws it requires the station it has to.

geophysicist fda cannabis trump brad hayward marijuana president eight hundred billion dollars
"geophysicist" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on KGO 810

"Doc drew as i said i'll be speaking to brad guard a geophysicist and why resilience analysis regarding the hayward fault brock lobster also i'll be talking a little bit about the lobster also no criminal charges being filed in prince's death i will give you my analysis of that but when i to report right now is that the fda committee let me get the headline right fda committee has the marijuana dr drugs for seizures for epilepsy has be has been given fda committee recommendation meaning it should get through into the marketplace let's be clear like every medication it's not without side effects they're seeing chronic liver inflammation this is a this is a cbd type product it's not the tetrahydrocannabinol that makes you high is the cbd which is associated with antiinflammatory properties in many different therapeutic effects have been alleged seizure has been one of the things that consistently has been shown to where it turned to have utility and the studies that were submitted to the fda now in for in fact conform confirm that bottom line up for me you could take you can take care of his product for seizure it gets has some side effects in terms of interaction with other medicines and some liver effects but it's fact effective and it will be approved by the fda would i wonder though is because it's going to be pharmaceutically derived and distributed product and by the way you know cost eight hundred billion dollars to get something through the fda so the price of the pharmaceutical product is going to be high lay higher than if you bought it with your miracle medical marijuana life that's what i wonder wonder what that's gonna mean in terms of distribution for.

geophysicist fda brad hayward marijuana eight hundred billion dollars
"geophysicist" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

TEDTalks (audio)

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on TEDTalks (audio)

"This had tacked features geophysicist dustin schroder recorded live at tadic's stanford 2017 if you like ted talks daily check out our new podcast work life with adam grant adam takes you inside different kinds of workplaces to explore ideas we can all used to make work better stick around for the trailer after this talk and find it on apple podcast or wherever you listen some of radio glaciologist that means that i use radar to study glaciers and i sheets and like most glaciologist right now i'm working on the problem of estimating how much the ice is going to contribute to seal horizon the future so today i want to talk to you about why it's so hard to put good numbers unsealed will rise and why i believe that by changing the way we think about radar technology and science education we can get much better at it to an most scientists talk about sealevel rise issue a plot like this this is produced using a sheet and climate models on the right you can see the range of sea level predicted by these models over the next hundred years for context this is currency level and this is this you level above which more than four million people could be vulnerable to displacement so in terms of planning the uncertainty in this plot is already large however beyond that this plot comes with the asterix and the caveat unless the west than artico she collapses in that case moody talking about dramatically higher numbers the literally be off the chart and the reason we should take that possibility seriously is that we know from the geologic history of the earth that there were periods in its history when sea level rose much more quickly than today and right now we cannot rule out the possibility of that happening in the future.

dustin schroder stanford adam geophysicist tadic ted apple hundred years
"geophysicist" Discussed on WGIR-AM

WGIR-AM

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on WGIR-AM

"A an idea a concept where that that entertain the idea that remote viewers can't see passed a certain point effectively in this point is a point where warring parties on the ground are overcome by events and all of a sudden have new things to think about and everybody's looking up there is a war aground were in the future and we're proud that's probably what we're about to see now and all the combatants all of a sudden on all sides look up and after that point the earth much of the earth is covered by roiling clouds and a lotta people fall down literally fall down which means to me if i'm then interpreted correctly that the earth just a slows suddenly speeds up jerk something like that pretty processes and if i uh i guess that i could take would be the that something like the magnetic field collapses or there is a dipoto event in the center of the earth where the magnetic core moves translates that energy through the mantle uh into the surface of the earth and people cannot stand up this event happens in the future and all remove you risk get that's it data's is whether it's coming now we attribute that to where it's something in his going on on the sun well most of the things you just named marathon i think my science ought to be triggered by uh events on our son and there was a time when you predicted what you called a kill shot from the sun and people are really have that in their memory and ask about it all the time so what i am calling to kill chatter i am saying that there at what appears to be an event on a son whether it's a negative blair or something that collapses the earth's magnetic field i don't i i'm not a geophysicist and even if i were i don't know if there's any precedent at least in the last uh in recorded history before this kind of event in in in in memory all right so you're placing this event now uh in the center of some sort.

blair geophysicist
"geophysicist" Discussed on The Limit Does Not Exist

The Limit Does Not Exist

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on The Limit Does Not Exist

"Christina can you sense the segue that i'm about to make here i wanna ask you go so speaking of someone who is in the academic trenches right now jiang but it will not change and i'm guessing that that you are either pre or post or maybe in the middle of your a ninja multitask her a dean studying right now so it us you are currently in a phd program in planetary geology at brown which sounds really really cool kudos to you by the way on being and right in the thick of it so in that phd programme you're studying volcanic glacial and tectonic interactions on early mars and their application to martian geologic and climatic history well that sounds really really awesome can you just let's just dive in in here a little bit about your background on science and how you came to this doctoral focus on no less than mercian geology is this your question for me at least because i wasn't one of those those people who growing up was like really really into science i think there's there's a lot of people i meet in my pc burgum here who just knew they would do science but i think the funny thing about geology is because it's generally taught pretty poorly in the us like i had geology and sixth grade and that was it and that was true for a lot of people yeah um so true so what i am to undergrads i was introduced the geology by essentially crashing a geophysicist class unrealized while oh my gosh the earth the earth is so cool weight it's it's really really cool but i read i was a pure humanities person may have it yeah i mean i have to undergrads agrees what happens in geophysics but the other one is in history because history is just the best yeah history gives contacts to an interesting the are drawn to history in the liberal arts setting but also in your work uh on volcanic glacial and tectonic interactions you're looking at early mars your you seem to be interested in and it sounds like geophysics in general is sort of the history of these planets.

Christina jiang geophysicist
"geophysicist" Discussed on KKAT

KKAT

02:00 min | 3 years ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on KKAT

"The national center for public policy research two a doctor arthur robinson of the argun institute of science and medicine announce more than thirty one thousand scientists signed a petition rejecting the theory of human caused global warming two they ever talk about that no that's less than ten years ago phil chapman geophysicist astronautical engineer the first australian to become a nasa astronaut an expert in this field he said all four agencies that track the earth's temperature the hadley climate research unit in britain the nasa goddard institute for space studies in new york the christi group at the university alabama and remotesensing system sank in california report that the earth cold by about point seven celsius in two thousand seven this is the fastest temperature change in the instrumental record puts us back where we were in 1930 but the enviro statists don't care so they'll put together bigger bigger thicker thicker reports that's what though do dr john brig now retired professor of industrial instrumentation at the university of southampton in britain he composed a list of alarmist claims and news reports that manmade global warming causes or as caused that he go to page one forty one it should we won forty one forty one one fortytwo to 143 in liberty and tyranny you're going to see it i at one one show and i'm not gonna i'm not going to punish you today i read them all what global warming quote unquote manmade global warming is doing to the earth that i give an example these are reports increase in acne agricultural land increase afghan poppies destroyed africa devastated african aid threatened africaine conflict aggressive.

astronautical africa university of southampton dr john brig california university alabama nasa goddard institute for spa nasa engineer global warming geophysicist phil chapman argun institute of science arthur robinson britain professor new york ten years
"geophysicist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

01:49 min | 3 years ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Says that the part that collapsed the threestory wing was just recently built npr couldn't confirm the year construction that mexico city the engineer pauline escobar says she's been inundated with calls from owners of brand new buildings who say they have major damage to i might have been greater anchorman earning in reckon there are many construction companies whose work is not very good she says with the population of the city on the rise in the demand for housing enormous escobar says new constructions in some cases has been hastily built she's had more than ten clients with new buildings collar to complain about major cracks and uninhabitable structural damage the geophysicist rothstein says due to mexico city's high seismic activity it has some of the toughest construction codes it rates highly in the world and of course and that's because their excellent seismic engineers in mexico the problem with any code is its enforcement engineers say the rapid rise in the city's population and demand for housing has strained the government's ability to keep up with inspections encode enforcement however geophysicist stein says new buildings with damage could be up to cold since after all the highest standards known as minimal life safety don't dictate that new buildings can't suffered damage even major structural loss just that they don't collapse and that's it that's all that's being requested or asked to the building mexico city civil protection agency that oversees building construction could not immediately provide any one for comment that in an interview over skype kit maya motels seismic safety commissioner for california says mexico's building codes are similar to those of his home state dates he says another reason why some buildings that survived.

pauline escobar rothstein mexico stein commissioner california engineer geophysicist mexico city skype
"geophysicist" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

WHYR 96.9 FM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on WHYR 96.9 FM

"The the golan the hope is that it stimulates industries and wave that the stimulation of flight i mean th th the investment a flight stimulated associated industries mmm so uh there's some ambitious plans for it better that that don't derived from political whim without i think is can be the strength of any project okay now let's talk about the search for life in of space uh the mars rovers have been roving over the first talk about the search for intelligent life on earth oh well there is not we note the settle question all of the program all right will say that one but okay well mars writing uh we've had this fascinates with marzan spielberg spielberg and tom cruise this summer are argun a scare the pants off us with uh you know war of the world and the question is what have we learnt anything new we see pictures of rock said we see indicates sins of may be water once flowed in service of mars anything surprising uh that khan your attention concerning the ahmar's rovers well as as you know the march has twin rovers six reeling on it surfers right now as we speak uh one and they're on opposite sides of the planet so there is always one in view that we can talk to and get the data from it's always wanted sunlight so that's a clever way to explore the planet these two rovers now i am an astrophysicist not a geologist or geophysicist so there's a limit to how excited i can get an by just looking at rock and bunch of iraq's right right so but all respect to them i mean they get into their iraq's you know if any of us have noted geologist their home is filled with rocks and have an that they found out in the in the valley and in the mountains and in the you know um so among this given this fact my the subset of the rocks that i'm curious about are those that could have only formed in the press since of liquid water because the goal of the astrophysicist is not tell me what kind of minerals were there unless those minerals impact uh or affect the kinds of questions we want it mm um answered about whether mars once had liquid water uh because on earth where it liquid water there is life so we have this you can call it.

geologist iraq marzan spielberg tom cruise geophysicist
"geophysicist" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:44 min | 3 years ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on KQED Radio

"Asked without really fully grafting what we've done one is that the aggregate number of human beings on this earth has become a bio geophysical force discernible in the fossil record the american society geophysicist sir the american i never get it right but they want to now call are a park the anthroposophic gene to reflect to this in profound impact of humans on on life on earth now one of the things that we're doing is we're reducing biodiversity of other species the way that some scientists put it is we're using up too much photosynthesis we're actually depriving other species the photosynthesis but mostly it's really that we're taking away their habitat because we're we're putting so many more human bodies on the earth that we we're converting their habitat to human buildings for people to live in an agriculture to feed people but but we're doing something very scary to me very dangerous and kind of tragic which is reducing diversity itself and i wonder if you could tell us about diversity in a very you know going back to the the very profound and simple mechanism of of natural selection and how it depends on diversity how are life has defend depended on diversity and what are some of the but how do you see the horizon as we take it out these more oil subject than mine actually mary eliminated but i i mourn as you do the loss of diversity of nine i'm on the extinction of species if effectiveness needs static level i mean i think i think it's some the mass extinctions before and sometimes people say oh well the the mass extinction the socalled six extinction that that humans are now causing it it's no worse than the previous watson lewis in the one that wiped out the dinosaurs and things will maybe not but it's tragic and i i i respond to it in in an emotional aesthetic way i i mourned the loss of silas suddenness i more m the loss of the dodo the passenger pigeon but what you're talking about a something bigger than that which is the the catastrophic loss of species and ecologists tell us that it this is more than just the laws that actually species are actually necessary for the continuation of the balance of the of the ecosystem you know i think it intersex pretty pretty strongly with with your expertise because you know you were talking about the the.

geophysicist watson lewis american society mary
"geophysicist" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

02:20 min | 3 years ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"You know you're not even good your not even clever tell me sir what was the temperature of the earth one hundred years ago i don't have it at a restaurant and farm yet could or i not what was the temperature of the earth 25 years ago about the warning or odd degrees average at one point odds degrees less average across the year i don't even know what you're talking about you know what you're talking about a court of course you don't know if you do that when you would understand that crime sir your full a crap it come on the show and your spew your crap it's one point odds degrees weather at doesn't even samy dozen you'll make any sense one i i'm not sure what the exact number is a one point within within the euro to nine on point you're coming ask you sir which element in the greenhouse gases do you wanna control carbon and methane methane is something that's released by among others human beings by mammals and carbon is something that is very very important to our economic system is that why you want to control them sir no not at all i see and your expertise is what i want to control them and your background as what my that round yeah it it matter with my background is of course not horst out you know everything while sir i'm going to tell you something when to tell you why where onto your scare tactics when it tell you why we know your full of it i want you to listen to something here's what i want to retain ever hear of phil chapman never heard a filter ivan do you know he's a geophysicist jio the you know he was a nasa astronaut i didn't i didn't know yeah dino he said astronautical engineer i didn't know that here you know he rejects this notion that you're bringing up her did you not bring up nasa i did bring a napa did you know he worked for nasa yeah now prokoviev do you know the 31 science thirty one thousand scientists ten years ago signed a petition rejecting the notion of manmade global warming him because global warming you were there not aware of that now i am now why aren't you.

greenhouse gases phil chapman engineer napa global warming horst geophysicist nasa one hundred years ten years 25 years
"geophysicist" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

01:52 min | 3 years ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on The Science Show

"A nibiru study biology but are probably would have enjoyed it if i do it so when i started out as george is what a lot about it was that it brought together all these different disciplines but geochemists israel occupation of real profession come in all of these different players you can be a geologist through has a specialty in the chemistry of geological problem so the physics of geological problems all the biology of geologic problems and you can disappear geologist that deals with really big picture things that integrates all of those different discipline more specifically the a g chemist works in labs that look exactly like what a chemist does by turn up to work and i work with all kinds of different chemicals and solutions and deal with data sets at look really no different to what a chemist would work with a geophysicist works with lodge numerical dutta sets sight or images and remotely sense satellite imagery for example law models to them so that's logical geophysicist i'm a geologist looks at the response of law forms to changes in geological environments and how they recorded by the appearance will disappearance of species for example how changes in different chemical sarkozy recorded in rac's geology has a spot for you that's what i'm trying to say regardless of your particular interest in science they will be some little avenues for you to explore that uses all other skills applaud the geology problems what kind of delegates a you then tom i would say that i am a geochemists nine abrash of that i guess and it's probably a slightly more specific specialty within that is geochronology and that deals with trying to figure out the ages all the rights of which things occur which rocks you interesting in particular because i petition at all around the world frocks a quite different in that probably some you'll more interested in than others did yes definitely some of the majority of my feud work is in central australia so off spent probably in the last ten years i've been up there at least once sometimes twice a year.

george geologist geophysicist satellite imagery rac israel sarkozy tom i australia ten years
"geophysicist" Discussed on Fresh Air

Fresh Air

01:54 min | 3 years ago

"geophysicist" Discussed on Fresh Air

"The mechanism of this earthquake in an i'll just note to the audience the descriptions of the science who are really interesting in the book in the end he writes a paper which kind of puts him up against geophysicist to have a lot more in heavyweight reputations in this area he turns out to be right and it's now acknowledged that his understanding of this earthquake really got at what happened what was it that he would that that came out of this that gives us an ongoing understanding of what causes these things so george was he he basically figured out that in the way i like to put it is the only way you can understand how this her quick happened his if you accept the idea of plate tectonics if you accept the idea that at these margins as of the continental margins as i was talking about that the the ocean a crust slides down underneath the continental crusts ducks is the term so his paper which was published nice 65 in the journal science very calmly he kind of put forth his reasoning and justice calmly kind of destroyed the reasoning of the other people and it was it was accepted an ebb generally it took a while for uh for the scientific community to really understand what he'd written but um but it was know it didn't like it wasn't the eureka moment that led to a plate tectonics being a a universally accepted theory which it is today but it was it was part of the confirmation process of of plate tectonics the only way you can understand this earthquake is to accept the idea that you know the earth structure the top parts of the earth are consist of these plates that move in relation to each other.

geophysicist george