36 Burst results for "geologist"

Fresh update on "geologist" discussed on KOA Programming

KOA Programming

02:43 min | 16 hrs ago

Fresh update on "geologist" discussed on KOA Programming

"On Earth, So you want to make sure that our Milan stone moves so it's a five degree of freedom, arms, so they, you know, they moved it around in sideways and up and down the back and forth. Make sure everything was working. Everything seems to be perfect. So Looks like next up is taking their drive. It doesn't go a lot faster than curiosity. Did the 2012 Rover that we landed there, but it is able to drive further on its own. So it'll get a lot more done it today, which is pretty exciting. How fast 0.1 mile per hour. Oh, it's really slow. It's really slow. Yes, So if you go, I've been out two tests. I think three times and it's It's not moving as fast as your second hand if you lined the two, so it's really slow, but You know you don't want to make. There's no hurry. There's no hurry, and it's navigating itself this time, its zero degree autonomous so they can basically set it and forget it for the better part of a day and let it do its thing. And it's not going to go driving over a ridge down to a crater or something like that. So that's great. So their next goal is far as I understand it is to Start moving towards the Big River delta we've talked about before there's this area, so they wanted the land of the flat, assed smoothest area they could. That's what the engineers want. Then the geologists, on the other hand when they're trying, decide where to go say that's why, but we want rock sedimentation layers and all that. So it's heading for that River Delta, but pretty soon It's going to find a nice place to drop the helicopter and let it take flight and see how that now that works. The images were getting back from perseverance or remarkable if that is what Jim said. We were talking about the Viking. Uh, he was blown away by the quality of the pictures we're getting from Mars. Yeah, they're full four K, And we gotta zoom camera up there that this time so you'll actually be able to zoom in on things that they've always been a little leery of that, because Zoom lenses come break when you shake him around. As you know, your photographer, you know you tapped those things too hard and suddenly the threads bind up, But they did it this time, and I may have mentioned this before, but early work on that before curiosity flu where they were considering using a zoom Was with James Cameron. Oh, no kidding. The director of having Yeah, Tanner, he said. Hey, You know how James Cameron is? He said I want a zoom lens on the Mars rover. Okay? And I want 120 frames per second. And I want eight K, Can you Can you give me a K? And a good love song song, and we're Golden Rod files. Space guys, the other space two point Oh, editor in Chief of the National Space Society is magazine. Ah Nostra. Find out Maura about that at space done in SS that or G'kar.

James Cameron JIM 120 Frames Earth Maura River Delta Mars Three Times TWO Five Degree Two Tests Big River Delta Tanner Today Four K National Space Society Milan Zero Degree Two Point G'kar
NASA’s Perseverance rover lands on Mars

Morning Edition

03:34 min | 2 weeks ago

NASA’s Perseverance rover lands on Mars

"Good morning, Scientists from Planet Earth will land another mission on Mars today. NASA calls the rover perseverance. NPR's science correspondent Joe Palka has been following this one. Good morning, Joe. Morning, Noel, Can we talk about the logistics of this? They have to get a hurtling projectile toe land safely on Mars. How is this done? Yeah. What's the big trick? It's going 12,000 MPH, and they have two landed it two MPH. No problem. Well, what happens is they're overs packed up into something called the Aero Shell, which hits the top of the atmosphere on Mars and Atmosphere slows the craft down and it's friction heats up. That's why there's a heat shield, but that does slow it down quite a bit. But then there's a giant. Parachute that slows it down further and then finally, there's something called the Sky Crane, which is a jet pack that flies over the landing site to the landing site, then lowers the rover down on a tether and then cuts the cord and flies away. But the interesting thing is, this is the same landing system that the last rover used called curiosity. But it's been made more up to date by the fact that it's got this smart landing system so that you can actually look for Ah, good place to land. If it doesn't like the first place it picks the confide to the next one. What is modern is all the computers and navigation systems are on this new rover. The design of the rocket engines on the sky Crane is actually 50 years old. Believe it or not, those engines all trace their way back to the Viking Landers. That's Joe Cassidy, He's executive director for space at Arrow Jet Rocket die in the company that makes the rocket engine. The Viking missions landed on Mars in the mid seventies, and Cassidy says the rocket designed depended on a special valve that made it possible to vary the Rockets thrust. Funny part is back in the seventies, We had a supplier that actually developed that forest with J. P L came back to us in the latter part of the first decade of the 21st century and said, We want you to do that again. That supplier was no longer in business. But luckily they were able to find an alternate supplier who would make the valve for them. Very luckily, what is perseverance looking for on Mars? Well, it's landing in a place called Jez zero Crater, which was they think a lake bed 3.5 or Lake 3.5 billion years ago, And the idea is there might might might have been microbes in the lake. So there'll be cameras on the rover that will study the appearance of rocks looking for things like stromatolites, which are structures left behind by mats of bacteria. They're also instruments on the rover that will measure the chemical and mineral composition of the rocks at the landing site, and Nina Lanza is a geologist at Los Alamos National Lab and the scientists on one of those instruments called super Camp. See, this is the kind of thing that a geologist needs right. We need both chemistry. What's in Iraq and mineralogy how it's arranged. So knowing those things tells a lot about the conditions under which the rock form then whether or not those conditions were conducive to life. I asked this excitedly. Could we be getting news soon, saying that there was life on Mars? Well, it's one of those news stories where people get very excited, but they will also say I'm from Missouri proof show me so that's actually the idea of this. They may see things that look like there might have been life there. But they say to confirm that they have to bring the rocks back to Earth. And in fact, that's what this mission is going to do. It's going to collect samples that a future mission will return to Earth. Okay. NPR Mars correspondent Joe Palka.

Joe Palka Joe Cassidy Arrow Jet Rocket NPR Noel Nasa JOE Cassidy Nina Lanza Los Alamos National Lab Rockets Iraq Missouri Npr Mars
Cameras on Mars

Innovation Now

01:09 min | 2 weeks ago

Cameras on Mars

"Behind the ideas that shave our future. The moore's twenty twenty rover contains an armada of imaging equipment from wide angle landscape cameras to narrow angle high resolution zoom lenses. But the cameras aren't just there to capture pretty pictures. Some of the cameras will help perseverance. Carry out its tasks as a robotic geologist looking for organic compounds could be related to pass life on mars. Other cameras will work together to acquire panoramic three d data that support route planning robotic arm operations and trilling working in tandem. Cameras will provide complementary views of the terrain to safeguard the rover against getting lost or crashing into unexpected obstacles and the cameras will be used by software enabling the rover to perform self driving over the martian to terrain to ensure the equipment is calibrated for resolution and geometric accuracy. Every camera on the rover must undergo an eye exam before launch so when those visionary science instruments begin capturing images on mars it will truly be an eye opening experience for all

What Is Festooning

Innovation Now

01:09 min | 3 weeks ago

What Is Festooning

"Including extras on nasa spacecraft dates back to early space ventures officially called festoon ing pioneer ten and eleven carried a plaque depicting a man and a woman for distant space ferrers who might encounter the spacecraft one day voyager one and to carry the golden record for a similar purpose communicating the diversity of our world the gold plated copper disc contains sounds made by surf wind and thunder spoken greetings from earth. People and an eclectic collection of music metal from the wreckage of the twin towers on nine eleven was installed on the mars rovers spirit and opportunity a nineteen o. Nine penny aboard. The curiosity rover commemorated the one hundredth anniversary of the lincoln penny and gave a nod. Geologists who often use a pen for scale when analyzing images of rocks scientists actually use that penny as a calibration target to check the settings on one of the rovers cameras from playful to practical these artistic embellishments. Tell the story of the inhabitants of earth who reached for the stars

Space Ventures ING Nasa Lincoln
Greek Mythology Sites

Travel with Rick Steves

04:16 min | 2 months ago

Greek Mythology Sites

"East and the other one towards the west. They flew around the world and they both met above the site of delfi when zeus all where they met he said. Okay this is the center of the earth so he took these giant stone and throw it there and from that point they say that the naval of the world was created and that was the site of delfi. Now there was an oracle there. Yes so how did that. How did the gods speak to the people at delfi. The story says that the people at that time which is around eight of years before the birth of christ they started seeing their goats going up on the cliffs and then hoping very happy very enthusiastic so the goat started hopping after visiting delfi yup and they followed them and they realized that they were inhaling. This vapes so vapor is coming out of the world out of the earth like a crack in the ground. There's a crack in the ground. And the ideology of managed to discover with geologists the managed to discover rox with signs of specific chemical contents of fumes. That will come okay so they realized that there was something magical. Competent back then signs was not as developed as it is now that they believe that this was a divine sign so everybody is believing. The gods are speaking to the people through a crack in the earth in delfi up in the mountains north west of athens and then how did the people who were in power capitalize on that to take advantage of that delfi became the most important placing the ancient world. Everybody all the kingdoms they would go there in order to find out. They should go to war if they should do. Big public works whatever. They had to decide if they felt. It was a very important decision. They would go there and nas the oracle for advice. So it's going into this mysterious temple and you've got priestesses and robes and crazy things and they really think this is the the oz on earth there would be these young girls that were inside special rooms underneath the temple of apollo and they would inhale vapes and starts talking in a way that no one would understand so they had priest that would decipher. We got to decipher as he wanted to today as a tourist. What do we see in delfi. Philippos see the ruins of the temple of apollo was the treasurer of the athenians. Which is building that the erected in order to commemorate because they took a lot of money. I suppose what's on the to the horse. Yeah so every city stayed with covid tone treasury the athenian you walk up to the temples and the theater and race course and so on and you pass all these temples that were treasuries collecting all that money. it's a fascinating place to check out one of the best sites from ancient greece. This is travel with rick. Steves with johanna wanna costa and phillips kind of cars. We're talking about greek mythology from the travelers point of view. You wanna if you're taking groups around whereas one site that you like to take groups where you really want to understand the greek mythology behind it. There are so many. It's all over the country wherever you were wherever you see mountains plans. Everything has a mess behind it. But there's a part of the peloponnese peninsula which is really unknown to the people come into the country. The heart of the peloponnese. The area called acadia very rich mythology over there. And one of my favorite stories is the story of where the name came from. So there was zeus. Who was a playboy. He was always in love with many women. Herro was his god. His wife hera okiro once fell in love with a beautiful girl. Her name was callisto and She got pregnant and hero found out and she really got mad. So zeus change their woman. Kelly stole to bear an animal and she was wandering around the mountains. The beautiful forest server. Katya she before that i should add. She had a baby and the baby grew up. His name was cass. He became a very good hunter growing into the forest and one day there was a bear right across from where he was so he took out his bow and arrow he was ready to hit the bear. The zoo so what is going to happen was horrible so he immediately changed the boy to a little bear as well

Delfi Mountains North West Oracle Philippos Johanna Wanna Costa Athens Steves Herro Hera Okiro Phillips Greece Rick Katya Kelly Cass
After Decades-Long Push, It's Not Clear Who Will Bid In Arctic Refuge Oil Lease Sale

Environment: NPR

03:25 min | 2 months ago

After Decades-Long Push, It's Not Clear Who Will Bid In Arctic Refuge Oil Lease Sale

"The trump administration has fewer than three weeks to go and is working to lock in oil drilling in the arctic. National wildlife refuge. It's holding an oil lease sale next week. Deacon handling of alaska's energy desk reports it's unclear. how much oil is under the refuge. Supporters of drilling in the arctic refugees coastal plain often point to its oil potential as a reason to develop the remote stretch of land president. Donald trump has described it as the gravesites of energy in the world. But while geologists say the rock formations oil seeps and old seismic results seem promising. The data available is still limited. We don't know very much about this area. David house neck is senior. Research geologist at the us geological survey and he helped with the agencies last assessment of oil potential and alaska's coastal plain back in the late nineteen ninety s. The usgs calculated anywhere from about four to twelve billion barrels of recoverable. Oil house. next says that's a whole of oil but also a huge range in part because it's based on seismic data from the nineteen eighty s. Technology has come a long way since then going into a lease sale in the coastal plain with the only data being thirty five year old. Two d data is quite unusual house. Neck says what's also missing from the usgs assessment is any data from actual wells in the refuge. There's been just one exploratory. Well drilled in the coastal plain also back in the eighty s on alaska native land but the results of that test well are a closely guarded secret confidentiality agreement and never an end date on it. Mark myers geologist and former commissioner of the alaska department of natural resources is one of the few people who have seen the results from the test. Well outside of the big oil companies that paid for it. So i can't comment on in terms of what i saw even though it was a lot of new york times. Investigation based on legal documents suggested the results were not promising but the amount of oil is just one factor companies will consider when deciding whether to bid in the alaska sale. Another is the money. Myer says it's already more expensive to drill in the arctic compared to say texas on top of that oil prices are still low after an oil price war and the coronavirus pandemic hit the industry. Hard low prices have fallen down to a level that we larry little capital for exploration in these companies. So that's one of the biggest negatives. There's also the controversy says weena gun. An analyst with the energy research firm would mackenzie. The refuge is home to migrating. Caribou polar bears and other wildlife and that has prompted multiple lawsuits to block drilling there. Some big banks site climate change and say they won't fund oil projects in the arctic. An amount of i guess public opinion the it wouldn't necessarily be good p for them to be seen as ruling and the article drilling and environmentally sensitive areas. But perhaps the biggest uncertainty of all is the changing administration. President elect joe biden says he opposes drilling in alaska's refuge although if leases are finalized before he takes office. It's not clear how he would stop it for npr news. I'm teagan hanlin in

Arctic Alaska David House Mark Myers Alaska Department Of Natural R Deacon Donald Trump Weena Neck Caribou Polar Bears Myer New York Times United States Mackenzie Texas President Elect Joe Biden Npr News Teagan Hanlin
Scientists Have Found Some Truly Ancient Ice, But Now They Want Ice That's Even Older

Environment: NPR

05:16 min | 2 months ago

Scientists Have Found Some Truly Ancient Ice, But Now They Want Ice That's Even Older

"It's chilly across the country today. Highs of just fifty eight in miami and sixteen in minneapolis which makes minnesota colder than an arctic as mcmurdo station but the cold weather doesn't last forever in the twin cities and in antarctica. It does ice their last hundreds of thousands even millions of years and as npr's nell greenfieldboyce reports that makes an arctic the perfect place to find some of the oldest ice in the world. Just how old is the oldest ice. On earth john higgins says. Nobody really knows you know. Would i be surprised at this point. We had five million-year-old is i mean. I'd be surprised. But not it's not unfathomable i think he and some colleagues recently collected ice samples in antarctica. That were later analyzed and shown to be as old as two point six million years. It's beautiful stuff when you pull out. The is it. Essentially as crystal clear accepted filled with tiny bubbles the bubbles contain air from when the ice formed and this trapped air is what scientists are really after higgins says if you want to understand how gases like carbon dioxide have affected the climate throughout history. You know you can't really do better other than getting a time machine and going back in time and taking an air sample then using these ice cores which physically just trap samples of ancient air to release that ancient air. All you have to do is melt the ice. That's the sound of a research camp manager in antarctica making drinking water by melting scraps of two hundred thousand year old ice in a metal pot to actually collect an analyze the release gases however ancient is has to melt in a lab. Sarah shackleton studies old princeton where she gets to watch the trapped air bubble out and that is something that i don't know if i'll ever get sick of watching. It's actually like pretty mesmerizing and one thing. That's released surprising every time to muse. Just how much gas is actually in the ice. She says it's a lot and samples from time. Periods undergoing past climate changes could be used to help make predictions about the future. One of the biggest questions in terms of kind of the modern warming and look anthropogenic. Climate changes helmich warming. Do should we expect with the amount of co two that we have in the atmosphere now. Antarctica has been covered by an ice sheet for at least thirty million years. But it's actually pretty hard to find really old ice. John gooch is a geologist. At the university of minnesota he says while snowfalls constantly add new layers of ice to the top of the ice sheet the oldest layers at the bottom can disappear. That's because of geothermal heat coming up from the ground so the rocks are giving off heat of slowly over time and so that has the potential to melt ice at the bomb. Still bits of super old ice like that two point six million year old sample can sometimes be preserved at the ice sheets edges the older snippets of ice. That we've been able to find come from places where the ice has flowed up against a mountain range and been exposed at the surface in those spots though. The ice can be all jumbled up and messy. It's not nice layers that have been laid down sequentially over a long continuous stretch of earth's history to get a neatly layered ice sample like that. Scientists need to drill straight down through the thick icesheet so far the oldest ice collected that way goes back eight hundred thousand years. Gooch says the goal now is to drill down a couple of miles to reach ice. That's older a million to two million years old whether or not we'll be able to find it at the bottom of the ice sheet where we can recover a relatively simple continuous record. Is i guess. That's the sixty four thousand dollar question at team from china has drilling underway a group from europe. We'll start in november. What everyone wants is i-i samples that cover a key time period about a million years ago. When there was a dramatic shift in the planet cycle of ice ages. Those had been coming every forty thousand years or so but for some reason that pattern ended and it changed to every one hundred thousand years instead unto us working on climate. That's a really big deal. Eric wolf is a climatologist with the university of cambridge in the united kingdom. It's a really big question as to why that change is fundamental tower climates. Work in a way you could say. We don't really understand today's climate. If we don't understand why we live in one hundred thousand year will draw the forty thousand year world. The coronavirus pandemic basically ruins the arctic research season. That would've been happening now but starting next fall researchers will be backed down there searching for really old ice nell greenfieldboyce npr news.

Antarctica Nell Greenfieldboyce Arctic Sarah Shackleton Mcmurdo Station John Higgins John Gooch NPR Minneapolis Higgins Minnesota Miami Princeton University Of Minnesota Gooch Eric Wolf China Europe
Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

Scientific Sense

29:14 min | 3 months ago

Prof. Jack Burns, Professor of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences at the University of Colorado in Boulder - burst 01

"Welcome to the site of accents. Podcast where we explore emerging ideas from signs policy economics and technology. My name is gill. Eappen we talk with woods leading academics and experts about the recent research or generally of topical interest scientific senses at unstructured conversation with no agenda or preparation be color a wide variety of domains. Rare new discoveries are made and new technologies are developed on a daily basis. The most interested in how new ideas affect society and help educate the world how to pursue rewarding and enjoyable life rooted in signs logic at inflammation v seek knowledge without boundaries or constraints and provide edited content of conversations bit researchers and leaders who low what they do a companion blog to this podcast can be found at scientific sense dot com and displayed guest is available on over a dozen platforms and directly at scientific sense dot net. If you have suggestions for topics guests at other ideas please send up to info at scientific sense dot com and i can be reached at gil at eappen dot info mike. Yesterday's a jack boone's who's a professor in the department of ece fisa goal in planetary sciences unto colorado boulder. He is also vice president images for academic affairs in blue sage for disuse system system. Jack while thank you. Joe is good to be with you. Thanks for doing this so you at your team. On deeply involved in the upcoming nasa missions to the moon including The designed to place radiofrequency absolutely on the far side of the moon and be kevin deemed really back there for almost fifty years. Now i know that china s landed. I was actually looking at some photographs that just gained today from From their lander. I israel in india. Almost got there but Fleas land properly. And so so. What's our interest. What's sudden interest in going back to the moon after fifty years. Yeah i don't know that. I would characterize as a sudden interest i think on the part of the science community and really the exploration community interest has been there for a while but what has changed in the last decade is the cost doing missions And the accessibility of the moon in this new era in which we have now. Private companies like spacex and like the blue origin company. Jeff bezos company They've put considerable private resources in developing new rockets of with reusability to lower the launch costs and also technology which was extreme in the nineteen sixties to try to get to the moon. All hannity vetted from scratch now is relatively straightforward at gill as you mentioned Even a small countries like israel Private companies have contracts with nasa to fly payloads. Now it's it's it's realizable to Envision going to the moon at a relatively modest cost certainly in comparison to the sixties and seventies. Yes so that's a. It's a very interesting phenomenon. Now it's it's almost like a business model question. Space is Blue blue horizon blue origin. Laura gin and that is another company. Lakers peterson things. Well lockheed you ally the united launch alliance which is the lockheed and boeing Company as well they all have these new generation of launch vehicles that are capable of going to so nasa in some sense outsourcing Some of the transportation right to so captain made a selection or are they going to do essentially multiple companies. Do it the the plan is to have monk multiple companies just like the commercial crew program To the space station there's boeing and spacex And for the case of the moon for the un crude landers that Landers that are just carrying payloads nasa has identified a out a dozen companies To be able to transport a payloads to the moon and at the same time. They're also undergoing competition right now. They selected three companies to design as part of a public private partnership the next generation of human landers. So that's the same. Mostly the same group that has spacex blue origin and the third one is is dynamic which is a company in huntsville alabama rate. So it's nassar's goal here is They are they going to take contracts from other other countries do send pedal to the moon in these companies. The the way this is working now is nasa is buying services so they're no longer buying rockets or landers which they will then own operate Instead the philosophy is To buy a ride for example a seat On a human land or or by space for a payload so these companies that are responsible for indemnifying Making sure they have a proper insurance for losses They take A bit of the risk and and then proceed along those lots now. What that means is that the companies then they own the intellectual property they owned landers they rockets they own the The other transportation devices. So that means they can sell seats. They can sell payloads to for example a european space agency Or the russian space agency or individual companies. That might want to puts a payload on the moon Investigation in this kind of a lower gravity environment so it's much more entrepreneurial than what we had before and it lowers the cost to the taxpayer for doing all these things by the artist program. Which is the new human programs. The moon the Recently released cost to get the first woman in the next man to the moon by twenty twenty four is a factor of ten less than the apollo program. Yeah it's interesting. I remember jack I was involved a little bit on the economic side of the next generation. Space legal program two thousand two thousand one two thousand two timeframe and this was a program was supposed to replace the shuttle and we did not go forward with it and i guess so. What was the arranged with the russian system to get their astronauts into space station. Yeah the the problem was that you might recall The shuttle accident that occurred in two thousand three And then president. George w bush declared that the shuttle really wasn't safe And that needed to be replaced and it took a while. We're still in the process of of fully replacing it. The last shuttle launch was twenty eleven If i remember correctly so in the meantime in order to get to the space station What we did is contract with the russians to use their soyuz spacecraft to go back and forth the space station so we. What we did is the buy seats. Those seats cost about seventy five or eighty million dollars so they weren't cheap but eventually got us back and forth. He said before we get the details of the Admission stack help philisophical question so way we have technology advancing the about conflict. Television's really taking off machines. Getting lot smarter What does sort of the basis for sending humans Could be not accomplished thing that human could do with machines if that's a good question i'm glad you answered that you ask that question because Excuse me i think what we're looking for now is is Really different mode for doing work on services like the moon or mars. Excuse me in that. We unlike apollo you had a single astronaut. Geologists such as astronaut harrison schmitt on all seventeen doing classic field geology. With a shovel to now advance unit twenty-first-century. We're gonna to do. Is i like to say we're going to bring Silicon valley with us to the moon. So we're going to bring advanced robotics. Be telly operated. That will use a machine. Learning artificial intelligence And will team with the astronauts so that they will these. These rovers advance scouting. They will identify interesting places and then the role of the astronaut is to make critical decisions on what to investigate What the samples. Look like i. i still think it's true. I've been told from my colleagues who are geologists stromer But who are uninsured. Scientists in that the difference for example between. Let's say the The curiosity rover on mars. And what it's been doing and having a human on mars that the work that the curiosity rover has done last seven years could be done in two days by geologists. a that's the difference and to also bring back. You know better selected samples and so forth. So there's no replacing humans and that's not going to happen anytime soon but you you do your point being. You only wanna use humans when you actually have to. Because their time is valuable and they're expensive and also Walking around even on the surface of the moon is dangerous. Because the you know the a space where the asian micrometeorites another possible dangerous but going into this new environment. I think what we're going to be able to do is reduced risk and improved efficiency. The i don't remember the numbers but a human Mission is about ten x the cost of a non human mission. Obviously the the efficiency and like you say what begin out of it different but guess on the cost side. It's about the fact of a magnitude different you know. That's hard to say because robots still are very limited in what they can do. They're just so many things that only humans can do is a little bit of apples and oranges but yet you're probably right that on the ballpark about a factor of ten. Maybe even more. But there's also much more than a factor of ten improvement in efficiency. So you know. Those costs will balance out and obviously the advantage of a human is You know they've been. The unexpected happens in michigan learning in As long as you have heard of data to teach a machine but then the unexpected happens machines. noel exactly. The rover gets stuck. It suffers a mechanical problem. That If you have a human there at least in the vicinity can help fix it. And move orders you know i think about for example servicing of the hubble space telescope and that was done five times by human astronauts and The astronauts such as john grunsfeld did to the servicing missions was very clear that the telescope could not have been repaired in upgraded by anything other than humans because the tab the complexity of the task the ability to be able to get in and To make repairs Make on the spot. Decisions just You know there was no replacing that so hopefully humans have a few more years of Do i think we've got many years to tell you the truth. I think it's going to be you know in reading some of the literature. I think it's going to be a quite a long time if ever that. We have truly Intelligent self aware machines can operate with the same decision making kick be very good at repetitive calculations outstanding job of there but You know making creative innovative entrepreneurial. Decisions were We're nowhere close to that yet So i do that. A multiple missions being planned An international collaboration so he's the first one that is supposed to take off as leave. Yeah artists is the new name for the human missions to the moon Artemis in greek mythology was the sister of apollo The twin sister of apollo. She's the goddess of the moon. So that's very appropriate. Since nasa has already declared bet up for that first landing which nasa has been planning for twenty twenty four would Would have that first woman in the next man on the surface the first expedition by humans to the moon in the twenty first century. So optimistic applaud. Its name the program programming program. Yeah exactly right so so andrade damasio multiple things going on And so do we have sort of a space station like that is going to orbit the out. Yeah in fact. That's honored design. And we'll be under construction in the next few years has called the gateway lunar gateway. And it's it's not like the space station in the sense of being gigantic And being really limited to that single orbit the gateway is really more of a spacecraft is going to have a pulse in system using a new generation of solar electric bad is ion propulsion That will be piloted for potential for optometry use in going to mars. I have just a couple of modules that will be there it will be a place where astronauts coming from the earth on on the orion spacecraft which is a it plus the space launch system is a heavy lift vehicle that will take astronauts the moon they will dock at the gateway and then they will get into a reusable lander go to the surface. Come back in that lander and then the next crew that comes in will do the same thing so you don't throw everything away like we did during hollow in the nineteen sixties again. The reusability idea is Is key to keeping the costs down so so it is more dealer so can't be attached as as alright right. Ds change in the future. Cab edge more against it. We can in fact The japanese space agency jaksa recently committed to fly a module And nasa has invited others such as the russian space agency to think about them attaching A module as well so it definitely is modular. That way you can add habitats you can add laboratories And can can grow over time. But it's also the the idea is that it's going to be long duration spaceflight and it's away way from the earth's magnetic field so you've got the full range environment of what you would have going to mars. So i think nasa all also looks at. This is a prototype of the vehicle that would be sent to mars. Lucchese david some Conversations yet again. Remember that To go to mars you would rather start off. Start off from the moon. Is that still thinking or that. Exchange i don't think that's been decided but there's this potential real advantages of a loon. First of all launching from the moon versus the earth requires much less thrust. What what we call delta the. That's the change in velocity to Get off there. Because there's only one sixth gravity on the moon and secondly if we're successful in mining water from the minute we know now there's considerable amount of water at the polls of the moon That's hydrogen and oxygen. We can convert that potentially into rocket fuel. You wouldn't have to bring that from earth so the costs associated with launching some could be substantially reduced in doing this from the moon versus from your so people are actively working that right now and seeing if that might be the way to go i of think that might end up being How missions to To mars or undertaking so under optimus Are there plans to actually create a habitat a big enough habitat for people to stave or extended period of time. So nasa has designs. And once again i should mention this is. This is all international Insa is involved. The european space agency is involved in providing a module for the service module for the orion. It also will be working on the gateway. The canadian space agency is providing the robotic arm And the same will be true on the surface The idea is that the first few missions will of just get started That first nation in twenty twenty four is planned to go to the south pole of moon. Will we've never been to before and look at the water. Ice situation there but Over time by the end of the decade the expectation is that will have multiple habitats. And we'll have people staying there for long periods of time like the arctic station. It's run by the national science foundation. The mcmurdo station as called in which you have a number of scientists come in and visit for anywhere from a few weeks to staying for year here so salama but when the next generation space program was in progress space. Too big big project. I would imagine spacex Others cab this business plan so what's the clamps time Do that The gay yes. So it'll be somewhere between three and five days to get from the earth and you're right about. The tourism spacex already has a fide a japanese businessman. If i remember correctly who has bought a A ride not the surface of the moon but to orbit the moon on a spacex vehicle. Sometime in a in a few years but the it'll be in a three to five days to get to the gateway and then Another day to get down to the surface. So i fully expect by the end of the decade especially given the accessibility to the moon by the private sector and by isa companies That they will be selling seats to wealthy individuals to spend a A summer holiday on the moon is so if the if the gateway is expandable perhaps Taxpayers can make some money nasa. Well it might be. Yeah but but once again this is. The transportation for the most part is probably not going to be through nasa but by these individual companies who own their own rockets their spacecraft and now they will sell seats to to wealthy tourists. yeah and so You you mentioned the european space agency. You mentioned the canadian space agency of so. Is this like the space station. A larger collaboration or those are the three major ones. Yeah it is and you're right. There are Oh gosh there's probably a dozen or so. Companies countries rather involved in the international space station and nasa envisions this much the same thing And i to. I order all the countries that are involved in. The international space station have been invited to become involved with the gateway And so as i mentioned several have accepted with With enthusiasms others are still keeping that around and take a quick break jack. Benny come back to talk about the radio. Frequency of savitri on the far side of the more that you're designing you bet sounds good. This is a scientific sense. Podcast providing unscripted conversations bit leading academics and researchers on a variety of topics. You like to sponsor this podcast. Please reach out to in full at scientific sense dot com back Jack you're talking about upcoming missions to the moon Some of the manned mission some of some of the technology that you're sending up there there is a gateway bridges like the space station but attested propulsion its zone. Sorta are based entity source. And it's more dealer things could be attached to it. That may be subject is imploding. Creating that a launchpad so to speak to go to mars perhaps habitats that a large announced a mining for water mighty for hydrogen and other things and so he the program is called autonomous. So could be portal light program and underneath optimists. There are various things being planned right. So what are the The primary objectives all of those radius approved betas projects. I should say under under optimus. Yeah we'll go. let me let me start off by just looking at the difference with The apollo program because the apollo program ended fairly abruptly once the political goals were reached and it was never Really a sustainable program so Nasa and i think all of the governmental space agencies are looking for is for arsonist to be the beginning of a sustained presence on the moon and in space and using the moon as a stepping stone for human and robotic exploration of the solar system including getting the mars so the philosophy of artists is really quite different. So you're there the stay So you need to figure out how to live off the land. So that does mean as you're saying mining's water being able to grow crops being able to manufacture Equipments the habitats themselves from the From the of the regular or the soil material so using the the kind of advanced manufacturing capability three d. printing Electrolysis so that's a really different approach. And it means that what will be worked on is not just get there but a flag in the ground rather in full of soil and return on instead it means You know how do you figure out how to be there for the long haul so that means than learning how to to excavate how to build How to really maintain a life in a in a certain sense of independence. Part of the reason you want to do all that is because that's exactly what's going to be

Nasa Eappen Jack Boone Department Of Ece Colorado Boulder Gill Laura Gin Boeing Company Nassar Spacex Harrison Schmitt United Launch Alliance Israel Jeff Bezos John Grunsfeld Landers Hannity Andrade Damasio
NASA reveals 'Artemis Team' astronauts, includes first woman, next man on moon

WBZ Afternoon News

00:20 sec | 3 months ago

NASA reveals 'Artemis Team' astronauts, includes first woman, next man on moon

"NASA selected 18 astronauts for arguments the program that could establish a sustainable presence on the moon to prepare for future trips to Mars now, says 18 Artemus astronauts range in age from 32 2 55. Include flight test pilots, geologists and a former Navy seal. Half have never been to space. Half are women

Nasa
The world's highest mountain officially just got a little bit higher

Here & Now

03:59 min | 3 months ago

The world's highest mountain officially just got a little bit higher

"Today. China and appall agreeing for the first time announced that Mount Everest, which straddles both countries, is now 29,032 FT. Tall, slightly more than Nepalis previous measurement. About 13 ft higher than China's BBC environmental correspondent Levin saying Khadka joins us from London on Skype Levin, How do you measure this thing? How they do it? Hmm. Now that's the question, isn't it? How do you do it? How do you measure the highest mountain in the world? All right, So look, I don't want to confuse your audiences. It's lot off lot of technology a lot off complications there. But basically what they told me was, it is easy to find out the top of the mountain. But what you need to find out is the bottom of the mountain. How do you find at the bottom of the mountain and that will help them to find its height. So that is where you know the sea level thing comes in, so the Nepalese authorities they used the building goal as the base And then from there, they call this precise leveling again now that sea level needs to reach in the Everest region. Okay, so that's illegal. You know, visibly, you have to reach using your tripod. You know every 50 m or so they did for 250 kilometers and reach the Everest region and that watch as if The mountain is standing on the sea. You know that? Yeah, they calculated. That's one of the ways of doing it. But there are other ways as well well, but I understand that the two countries have argued about the other side how high it is. So when China and measure the mountain in 2005 it found a mounting was 8000 Internet 44.43 M So that it said was the rock surface. Now That's why there was this disagreement and China back then wanted Nepal to agree to this. This hide that found and appall disagreed because the Nepalese How did the snow on top of the summit? You're right. So yes, the the figure of Nepal government was using Woz, including the snow cap. They had this difference all these years. And then finally, you know, Nepal told that okay, This has to be decided once and for all, And then, in the meantime, if you remember in 2015, they were just major earthquake. So many geologists believe that that might have impacted on every side and therefore they have to find out if there was any change. Look, we understand that there's a Almost like a competition among these great mountains, which is the greatest, which is the tallest, which lends itself to the competition among climbers who can climb. You know these peaks and you've just explained that this extra footage really comes from below, really where that climb starts. So just this is really make any difference. When I speak to mountain is what they say is well, it doesn't make any difference to us. But then clearly, you know when countries are using these figures than definitely it becomes a huge issue and also quickly just to remind you when the two countries China and Nepal announced the height this morning, they didn't use the word Everest even once Nepal stuck to it its own name Sagar Mata and I know the Chinese kept on talking about trouble. Oma all these years, you know, Everest, the name itself and the height that was given out. You know it was it was initiative during the British colonial era and so on and so forth. China strictly believes that you know it owns up that mountain to some extent with the park. Everybody feels they own it in some way, But you know nothing. Hearing this news. I've just decided I was going to climate. But now I'm not 13 more feet. That's a bit much by China's standards. BBC's environmental correspondent Levin Sing Khadka on the new height of Mount Everest. The world's tallest mountain is a little bit taller Now, Naveen Thank you, my president.

China Khadka Levin Nepal Mount Everest Skype BBC Everest London Sagar Mata
Music Week Morning Jokes

Chompers

02:31 min | 3 months ago

Music Week Morning Jokes

"It's music week on chompers and today. We're tickling the ira's and your funny bone. So what is a geologist. Favorite type of music rock music. What's a geologist. Geologist is a scientist who studies rocks. They also studied the earth. I guess you could say they're kinda rockstars switch you're brushing to the other side of the top of your mouth and make sure to rush the inside outside and chewing side of each. Here's your next joke. What's the alphabets favorite kind of music. I know r. and b. r. and b. stands for and the police. It's a type of music that's been around for a long time. You might know our nba musicians like john. Legend and beyond say switzer rushing to the bottom of your mouth. Your tongue brush to. Here's another joke. Why is everyone afraid of the orchestras string section. Because they're so violin you may have heard of violin or you may have heard of. They're basically the same thing but violins are often played. Like this and fiddles are often played more like this switcher brushing to the other side of the bottom of your mouth and make sure to brush the molars in the way back. Okay here is your last joke for the day. What is cornstarch favorite type of music. What is it pop. Music jumpers. Today come tonight for more jokes and until bad make sure to rinse and

Switzer NBA John
"geologist" Discussed on Your Online Coffee Break

Your Online Coffee Break

02:07 min | 4 months ago

"geologist" Discussed on Your Online Coffee Break

"Infrared astronomy has confirmed the first time water on the sunlit surface of the Moon previously NASA had discovered evidence for water in Shadows of craters. But this new discovery has incredible implications for the possible loss of water as a resource as NASA returns to the Moon joining me. Today is lunar geologist. Dr. Sarah Noble as she discusses this incredible Discovery and its implications for the future of space exploration online coffee break. Thank you so much for joining me. Really? Appreciate it. Great to be here. We always love to talk to our guests about their space journey where their passion for space began understand years around ten years old. You wanted to become an astronaut. Can you test just wage more about that? What inspired you there? Yeah, I you know, I don't know it just it would just one day it just popped into my head. Oh, maybe I could be an astronaut and it just sort of stuck. You know, I mean, I grew up in the rural Minnesota there was not a lot of you know spaces pre-internet. I'm very old and and there wasn't a lot of you know space And scientists and and whatnot around me, but I was just I was fascinated by space. I started to climb onto anything I could find about space anything I could read about space manage to go to space camp when I was a teenager and that sort of really cemented a lot of things for me. So now I love how you had sort of a personal experience with the moon when you're a graduate student. Can you tell us a little bit more about that? Sure. I I was working in late in the lab one night. I'm working on some lunar samples birth. Lunar soils and and I was I was walking home from from the lab and it was a full moon and the moon was shining down. I looked at my hands and they were sort of sparkling and a few grains of lunar soil sparkling. I'm on my hand wash my hands and up at the moon and like this dirt came from there and like I had this like Epiphany about the moon as as this geologic place that's you know, not just you know up in the sky, but it's a place with rocks and dirt sand like a place we've been and can go back to and it was just a a real moment..

Dr. Sarah Noble NASA geologist graduate student Minnesota
Sea Hunt - It's Still Alive - Cave Diving

Scuba Shack Radio

06:09 min | 5 months ago

Sea Hunt - It's Still Alive - Cave Diving

"Off It's time for another installment of Sea Hunt. It's still alive. And today we're going back to season 2 episode 21 for cave diving cave diving Premier package on May 24th 1959 in this episode. Mike is working with a geologist George Brian who is searching for uranium in an underwater cave. George has been doing his diving with his wife Susie up until now but needs Mike helped to explore further and do more work. They're diving off the boat Olympia with its Captain pops. Mike and George hop in and swim down with her watertight geiger counter. Mike has a doubles and George's in a single tank as they approached the cave. They put the ear pieces from the geiger counter into their ear and they take out the probe Mike's off the Geiger counters chattering like magpies. All of a sudden things start to shake Mike is spinning around. George is at the cave entrance. It's an underwater landslide. When all the turbulence is over, there's a huge Rock blocking the entrance to the cave and George is trapped inside under a pile of rocks. Mike shines his light and injured signals back. Mike can't budget Iraq. So he heads back to the surface. He says he has less than an hour before Susie becomes a widow. Mike tells pops. He needs the ship-to-shore radio to call the pier and they need to bring out some big hooks to pull away the Rocks. He's talking really fast. George only has 46 minutes left now. He tells Pops that it's real bad. Now they're desperately scanning the surface for the help from the pier the boat rounds the point and gets there within 14 minutes Susie is on board in her scuba gear bag ready to help George is down to thirty minutes Suzy insists on helping Mike despite his objections. Now Mike and Susie make it to the caves entrance and struggle to get the anchors attached to the large Rock. Finally. They get them in place and Mike's ends up a flare for the boat to pull the rock the boat strains when suddenly the anchors Breakaway failure Susie is desperate trying to get into the cave. Mike is trying to calm her down and he said she has to be rough with her in the commotion Susie's air hose gets fouled and they have to Buddy breathe to the surface. Susie climbs on board the hooks won't work. She's crying pops is trying to comfort her. What will Mike do now? Here's where things really get interesting. Well, Mike just happens to have some Dynamite on board just in case you know, pop says that's kind of risky. Mike says there's no other option but like pops was in the Seabees in World War Two and says they use Gophers to carry a line through a pipe. So they concoct a plan to use a fish to thread the line off The Rock. Well, it just so happens. There's a barrel on Deck with a live fish might takes out the fish and ties a line around its tail and heads back down to the cave with the fish house and a speargun. He checks to see if George is still alive looks at his watch time is running out. He lets the fish go into the cave ties the fishing line to the heavier line and tries to log the fish back with his light like tries to grab the fish. It's too fast time for the speargun. He's got one shot takes dead aim, and our hero fish is a goner my calls in the fish pulls the line through and now has the heaving line around the rock ties the bowl and shoot a flare to the surface and Lifeboat cranks up its engine. Finally The Rock is pulled from the entrance my crushes in freeze George and brings him to the surface. Mike yells out. I got him and pop lets out a big Yahoo back on the boat. George and Susie are reunited. Mike is lounging now. They say George's leg will be okay. They're talking about the fish that saved George Susie says that were fish was Mike Nelson. As the episodes ends, they're talking about pops idea from when he was in the Navy and Pop's final line is I wasn't in the Navy. I was just the Seabees. Hm wonder what my CB friends would think of that now you might recognize George if you're of a certain age, that would be Herbert Anderson better identified with Dennis the Menace his father Henry Mitchell. Well, that was certainly not what we think of when we think about cave diving using a fresh to thread a line around Iraq is a little out there but if anyone can do it, it would be Mike Nelson on Sea Hunt. off

Mike Nelson George Susie George George Brian Iraq Sea Hunt Suzy Geologist Henry Mitchell Navy Herbert Anderson Gophers Yahoo Dennis
Greenland Melting Fastest Any Time in Last 12,000 Years

60-Second Science

01:56 min | 5 months ago

Greenland Melting Fastest Any Time in Last 12,000 Years

"Greenland is the biggest island in the world and the ice sheet that sits atop it is massive. The pile of ice is so thick that it extends more than ten thousand feet above the ocean, and if all the ice were to melt and go into the ocean global sea levels would rise by twenty four feet everywhere around the world, Jason Bryner, Geologist University at Buffalo the ice sheet is melting of course but just how much compared to the past Brenner team did a computer simulation of. The southwest portion of the Greenland Ice Sheet, which he says is a pretty good proxy for ice melt across the entire ICESHEET. The researchers plugged past climate data into that model to hind cast rather than forecast the past activity of the ice sheet, and they then checked the predictions of the past shape and size of the ice by looking at piles of rocks and boulders and dirt on Greenland, today, which outlined the edges of the ice and the simulation was in good agreement with the actual situation. Using that require. -struction of the ice sheet over time the team could then compare the ice sheets historic losses to those happening today under human caused global warming, and they determine the greenland is contract to lose more ice this century than during any century in the past twelve thousand years possibly four times as much ice. The results appear in the journal Nature. Ultimately it's up to us how much ice melts you know humanity has the Knob the carbon knob and that knob is going to influence the rates of Iceland. Greenland. Ice Sheet. If the World Goes Net Carbon Zero by twenty, one, hundred, for example Bryner says ice loss could stop entirely at the end of the century according to one model that was what kept me from being completely depressed about our study. Dozens of countries have already announced goals to go net zero by the middle of this century so far the US is not one of them.

Greenland Jason Bryner Geologist University Brenner United States Iceland
Scientists discover nearby 'diamond planet'

Innovation Now

01:16 min | 5 months ago

Scientists discover nearby 'diamond planet'

"TWINKLE twinkle little star how I wonder what you are like a diamond in the sky. That familiar nursery rhyme may actually have a ring of truth. This is innovation. Now, bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave our future geologists explain how diamonds are formed carbon and other carbon based materials are put under tremendous heat and pressure over millions of years and are then pushed up from Earth's mantle through volcanic eruptions. But recently, scientists are talking about a new form of diamond one that. Exists in outer space scientists have discovered a super earth. They believe is a diamond planet. The star system located about forty light years from Earth is primarily made up of carbon iron and silicon millions of years of pressure and heat have slowly turned the planet's carbon. Mantle into diamond. Now, as much as one third of the planet's mass may be made up of the crystalline stone and as NASA exoplanet. Program continues the search for planets beyond our solar system. It is safe to assume we will find other shining examples of geologically unique worlds in space

Mantle Nasa
1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

Miss Information: A Trivia Podcast

06:20 min | 6 months ago

1980 eruption of Mount St. Helens

"So my episode today. is about the nineteen eighty Mount Saint Helens eruption. So now, we weren't alive then even though we were not alive, then it was you know years until Jillian. Many years. Until we were born. We are in our. Mid Twenty. S. So we're very youthful. Yeah. We say what's a CD or whatever I don't know anything I couldn't even pretend to be a teenager because I have no idea went technology. Don T TIKTOK ON THE TIKTOK You know on the TIKTOK so. Nineteen Eighty Mount Saint Helens eruption has a lot of parallels to what's going on in the world today, but it's an interesting story. So to to start with for our non US friends and Non West Coast friends, I didn't know the details about this when I started researching it but Mount Saint Helen's which is known as a lot lot to the indigenous lets people and Lou wit. Luella cloud to the click a tat is an active stretch of Okano located in. Skamania. County. Washington in the Pacific Northwest region of the United States I. Apologize to the Washingtonians. If I pronounced Skamania county your Skamania county incorrectly. I'm sure I will get an email about this. Fifty miles eighty kilometers northeast of Portland Oregon Ninety, six miles or one hundred and fifty four kilometers south of Seattle Washington. So to get a sense of where Mount Saint Helen's is. If you're thinking of both Washington state and Oregon is roughly like. Square ish rectangular ish in shape with Washington, in the north and Oregon just below. Mount Saint Helen's is in the lower left quadrant of Washington state near the border of Oregon. and. She's roughly halfway between Portland, and the Portland Oregon and Olympia Washington, which is the Washington state capital. Okay. also relevant northeast of Mount. Saint Helen's is what's called Spirit Lake. And there's a bunch of little rivers and creeks in that area just due to like the geology of the area but almost directly north of the mountain is the north fork toodle river. River toodle or Poudel T. O. U. T.. L. E. Title River. So. Also? Mount Saint. Helen's takes its English name from the British diplomats. Lowered Saint Helen's is a friend of explorer George Vancouver who made a survey of the area in the late eighteenth century The volcano is located in the cascade range is part of the cascade volcanic arc, which is a segment of the Pacific Ring of fire that includes over one hundred and sixty active volcanoes and for the record before the explosion mount. Saint, Helen's stood at nine, thousand, six, hundred and eighty feet high. So. They knew it was part of the ring of the ring of Fire Okay Yeah Yeah So. They knew as part of the ring of fire. It had experienced some activity throughout recorded history but it. It remained dormant basically from its last period of activity in the eighteen, Forty S and eighteen fifties. So by one thousand, nine hundred had been more than one hundred years before there was any like really significant activity that includes ash like little burps and like any kind of flow or anything like that. So. At this point people were pretty complacent thinking nothing's going to happen anytime soon it's fine like it's a dormant volcano for all intents and purposes until we get to the spring of nineteen eighty. Okay. So, there were several small earthquakes beginning on March fifteenth of that year indicating that magma may have begun moving below the volcano also just as an f. y. we talked about natural disasters on episode sixty one which was called here I am rock. You like a hurricane I talked a little bit about that about volcanoes in that episode. So if you want to refresh your memory about the basics of what's in a volcano check that out episode sixty one, it's very good. Thank you. So on March Twentieth Three Forty Five PM Pacific Standard Time, which everything will be NPS T. Shallow magnitude four point two earthquake centered below the volcano's north flank signal the volcanoes return from one hundred, twenty three years of hibernation. A gradually building earthquake swarm saturated area seismographs, and started to climax at about noon on March twenty fifth reaching peak levels in the next two days including an earthquake registering five point one on the Richter scale. A total of one hundred and seventy four shocks of magnitude. Two point six greater were recorded during those two days. That's a lot. Yeah. So geologists in that area are like look is no not a great sign. Initially. There was no direct sign of eruption but small earthquake induced avalanches of snow and ice were reported from aerial observations. So this mountain is shaking and you know stuff is falling off. It's not it's not nothing. At twelve thirty, six PM on March twenty seventh phreatic eruptions which are explosions of steam caused by magma suddenly heating groundwater. So that's like a quick like spur. Of, like Ash and Steam K ejected and smashed rock from within the old summit crater. Excavating a new crater, two, hundred and fifty feet wide. And sending an ass column about seven thousand feet into the air. So you yeah, knock. Great. So by this date along, east trending fracture system had also developed across the summit area. So there's cracks forming in the summit. This was followed by more earthquake swarms in a series of explosions that said ash even higher above there. And most of this ash fell between three and twelve miles from its fendt. But some was carried hundred fifty miles south to bend Oregon or two hundred and eighty five miles east to spokane Washington. So the ash went pretty far and those who were like what the What is happening here? So? then. A second new crater and a blue flame were observed on March twenty ninth.

Mount Saint Helen Mount Saint Helens Eruption Saint Helen Washington Oregon Portland ASH Mount Saint United States Skamania County Mount North Fork Toodle River Jillian Pacific Northwest Don T Poudel T. O. U. T Tiktok Luella Cloud Olympia Washington
Isabel Wilkerson Talks About 'Caste'

The Book Review

04:34 min | 7 months ago

Isabel Wilkerson Talks About 'Caste'

"Isabel Wilkerson joins us. Now she is a Pulitzer Prize winner and the author of the warmth of other suns which she came on the podcast to talk about a little bit when she reviewed Michelle Obama's becoming. She is back now to talk about her new book cast the origins of our discontent Isabel. Thanks so much for being here. Thanks for having me. So as I alluded in my intro, the last time you came on this podcast, you did come extensively to talk about one book in particular, which was Michelle Obama's becoming which I used as an excuse to talk about book of Your Own the other sons, and I don't have to have that excuse to talk about a book of your this time because you have a new book, let's talk about how you got from the warmth of other suns to this new book cast because you wrote in your book something sort. Sort of intriguing, which is that you didn't seek to write this book, but you felt like you had to write it and I'm curious what you meant by that. Well, with the warmth of other suns, had spent fifteen years looking into trying to understand the great migration and and why that happened, and so that meant that I spent a lot of time looking at and having to investigate and understand wife as it was during that era from the end of reconstruction until the nineteen seventies essentially and what I discovered was that the word. Racism, which is the word that often is applied to descriptions of the warmth. Sons did not actually apply. It was not sufficient. It was not the precise or comprehensive word to describe the structure of repression that was in place from the end of reconstruction. Until till essentially the civil rights legislation of the nineteen sixties, and so I found that I was using the word cast. Cast was the word that anthropologists until geologists and others of the era who had gone into the South during the time of the depth of Jim Crow. They had emerged from that era and that region and that time using the term cast in. It intrigued me when I came across it in the research for the one of the sons and decided that that was really the only way to describe it, and so the word racism does. Does, not, appear in the warmth of other suns and in the intervening years especially with events such as Charlottesville, I have been in a forced to have to think about the language and think about how we remember our history, and so it's as a result of that that I felt I sort of felt, I had no choice, but to dig deeper into what I had begun with the warmth of other signs and it led to this. So in those intervening years. Did you start to think about another book, but you kept coming back to this idea of cast and sort of switched gears or was this the project you went into immediately as a natural outgrowth of the warmth of other suns was the former. You're exactly right I actually had other things that I was working on and was very excited about and very deeply wanting to get into and this this phenomenon helped rearing itself in the news kept prodding me and poking me to look further at what I had already begun. Would not let me go essentially. And an I, at every turn, I was seeing things that were manifestations of what I had written about. But no one was using the language. We we actually need new language to better understand the era in which we live. The old language may not be as efficient as it might have been. Say You know during the Early Twentieth Century? Such words, it's racism, which is a very fraught word means many different things to many different people and is often conflated with personal animus hostility, hate What we're dealing with now goes beyond that because actually it's the underlying infrastructure that we've all inherited that, and that has been here all along since the since the founding of the country actually since before the founding of the country and so this, the the recent events kept drawing me back to what I was not wanting to do, I was not wanting to write this. I really hasn't. And yet, it kept pulling at me

Suns Michelle Obama Sons Isabel Wilkerson Jim Crow Cast Charlottesville
The search for ancient civilizations on Earth ... from space

Short Wave

07:35 min | 7 months ago

The search for ancient civilizations on Earth ... from space

"Okay. So first off Sarah Park is kind of a big deal. She's helped uncover prehistoric commented fossils in eroded canyon lake beds, an ancient amphitheater under an airport in Rome and Egypt, which is her specialty. She's uncovered thousands of settlements including more than a dozen pyramids. Are you tired the perpetually, but it's okay. She's written about those discoveries by the way in a recent book called archaeology from. From Space and yes, Sarah does go to sites and do some real digging in the dirt archaeological excavation. But her superpower is analyzing satellite imagery and data to know where to dig in the first place. Most of the imagery I use is called optical satellite imagery. So so it stayed essentially taken from light that's reflected off the surface and looking for changes in patterns we're looking for. How things relate to one another, and hopefully, that will indicate where there could potentially be archaeological sites or features with insights, and then we get to go out on the ground and do serve mapping and excavate them. When you say you use satellite images, what are we talking about a week? Where do those images come from and kind of how do you manipulate them? So it's a, it's a range of different satellite images. So if we're interested in looking really really large landscapes, we use data from NASA but if we're looking. Looking. At very high resolution satellite images, we use the essentially the imagery that you see on Google Earth, which is from a company called Knox our technologies that challenge with that data is that we can't see through trees. I'm dealing with rainforests, of Central, America or Southeast Asia or forest say in New England. Then we use Technology Coal Ladar which tends for light detection and ranging, and that's Eliezer mapping system that you put on an airplane or a drone or a UNLV essentially allowing you to remove trees and see what's there. In your book, you also explain how archaeologists now have the ability to detect temperature differences below the ground. Why? Yes. How first of all cool second of all, how does that work and why is that important? So one particular part of the light spectrum that is really really useful for for the work that we do is the thermal infrared. So if you have anything that's buried and is a chamber or avoid like a room, a tomb a very passageway, you know if it's kind of. Of like when you go into a basement or a wine cellar, you know the temperature drops a couple of degrees. So by using thermal infrared, you can see these very subtle differences in temperature, and if say an area shows up with a lower temperature, that's the shape of a rectangle. Okay. There's something that's there that we may need to check out right in Salt Lake. You're like cake in archaeologists out of business, right? So it's like you still end up going in there. It just kind of. Of helps like going in there and digging stuff up and looking at stuff with different techniques. It's basically just giving you a good idea of like there might be something here, right ex-. Exactly I mean the coolest part of my job I think is the actual physical excavation and that so time consuming and so what the satellites allow us to do is not just fine sites, but also track over time potential threats to them. So whether it's rising water whether it's urbanization or development, maybe there are. are other issues that could be affecting. The sites would allows it's a tool that allows geologists to help, monitor and protect sites right, and and so you even kind of tried to estimate like obviously estimating how many more archaeological sites might be out there, and it's in like the millions right I. I think I estimated and I'm probably I probably not going to give the right number guy the book even though it was the summer, it was Sarah, fifty, fifty, fifty, fifty, sixty, seventy. Eighty ninety. So. Yeah. So so basically I think something like forty, million, fifty, million sites left to find. But like I could be wrong, it could be one, hundred, million, it could be ten, million North Y'all just yet has written me an angry email saying how dare you? Thank, like I think I was pretty on the mark. So. There's another thing that I kind of wanted to talk to you because I don't talk to that many archaeologists, you know what I mean, but now at my own show and they can't stop me, Sarah. So. Can we talk a little bit about how colonialism and archaeology have intersected in the past and and maybe how it still does now, and what we can do about that? I? Guess that's a big question for you. The big question and it's something I and my colleagues think about. A. Lot. So first of all I, have to acknowledge that that archaeology especially, egyptology. It both those fields as well as anthropology, they have deeply racist colonialist routes. All of them, you know Westerners parachute in. Do their projects were essentially archaeological tourists that were probably rank. rankle a lot of my colleagues I. don't care someone needs to speak out about this and they leave which is, which is appalling. You know I pay guards around at the site where I work at list. I have very close relationships with the village My. My education course staff. I speak to them every single week and and at the end of the day, it's about those relationships. So I think we all have to do a lot of hard stares in the mirror at ourselves and ask what are we taking and what are we leaving? Are we training? Are we providing equipment and materials? What else should we be doing to create some more parody and the in the work that we're doing and I'm not the only one doing this by there's so many colleagues both in Egypt and elsewhere are being which were intentional. But I think we have to ask a lot of hard questions. You talk in the book about the importance of discoveries in how a few small discoveries can impact a field more than like a headline worthy discovery, which I. Really like because I think as a person, who's you know been a part of the scientific process. It's frustrating when you know only the big kind of discoveries. Get credit for changing fields. When in reality, it is those little findings you know what I mean. So I'll get, I'll give you an example a colleague and friend of mine few row him a fee. Fi is currently leading excavations in an area near the Valley of the Kings in Egypt and he and his team just uncovered a new workmen's village. So it's a place where men would have stayed and lived as they were constructing tombs in the Valley of the Kings. and kind of compared to other discoveries, not just in Egypt, but but elsewhere, it really didn't get much play but I think it's one of the most extraordinary discoveries in. Egypt. In the last twenty years, we only know of one other workmen's village in West Bank in Luxor. It's an unbelievable fine because it's going to tell us about the daily life of the people who lived and worked. You know three, thousand, three, hundred, three, thousand, five, hundred years ago, right up and to me, it's those discoveries that are most interesting. All Right Sarah. Park. We appreciate you. This is a lot of fun likewise. Thank you so much. Go go go to bed I I. Learned. They're GONNA pay you. Thanks to Sarah. Park. You can read about her work and her book, which is called archaeology from space, how the

Sarah Egypt Sarah Park Salt Lake Rome Eliezer Nasa Unlv Southeast Asia America Westerners New England FI Kings. Luxor West Bank
Mexico Caves Reveal Ancient Ochre Mining

60-Second Science

03:01 min | 7 months ago

Mexico Caves Reveal Ancient Ochre Mining

"Sometimes, discoveries seem so simple. You know basically we've found a bunch of holes in the ground that's Edward Reinhard he's an archaeologist and geologist at McMaster University in Ontario Canada, but you know ultimately very important holes in the ground reinhard on colleagues believe they've found some of the first clear evidence of mining activity in a system of caves in Kintana ru on the peninsula the fine dates back to between ten and twelve thousand years ago. These are some very early people that have come and migrated to the Americas via the during straight. But getting to what remains of these miners and the tools they laugh is a challenge like cave divers you got to be so careful you don't get lost. These caves systems in Mexico, which were once dry are now completely filled with water. Thanks to a warming climate and sea levels that rose over time winding passageways are narrow and dark, and the walls are made of unforgiving limestone porous and with sharp edges. Reinhard says the water that filled the caves has preserved everything. It's basically almost like you know somebody working at a factory, they turn the lights off and they went away and nobody ever came back when divers started telling reinhard about what they were seeing inside the cave. He decided to go for a dive himself. He found concentrations of charcoal meaning that the people who walked here thousands of years ago probably used fire to light their way and there are stone. Cairns which Reinhardt believes the people built as navigation markers. Also says lots of tools remain and they were made from the stalagmites that hung from the cave ceiling breaking off and then using use hammer. So you can see the percussion marks where they were banging up the you know breaking up the stone on the bottom. The discovery is in the journal Science advances. So what were these ancient people mining and prospecting for there is a little bit of sediment still on the wall of. The pit. So I grabbed a vial and my sampled island, grab some of the sediment and underwater the red light gets attenuated. So Look Kinda Brown I was thinking well, maybe it's ochre you know is thinking about that but it's like well, looks Kinda creepy of that's what it is but then I got got out of the cave into the sunlight and it was just like this spectacular bright bright red. So then I knew. What they were after ochre it's among the earliest known pigments employed by humans and it's got many uses for sunscreen to preserve animal skins and burials and ceremonies, and people still use it even today in artwork. It was you know it's a prominent in used Gio material if you will through time for your end and dates data usage for thousands of years prior to around the world.

Edward Reinhard Kintana Ru Mcmaster University Mexico GIO Ontario Canada Cairns Reinhardt
Volcanoes of Life

Stuff To Blow Your Mind

04:56 min | 7 months ago

Volcanoes of Life

"Hey welcome to stuff to blow your mind. My name is Robert Lamb, and I'm Joe McCormack in today, we're going to be talking about something that I've been thinking about doing an episode on for a while ever since I read an article while back that really interested me, and that is the surprising and kind of counterintuitive link that has been proposed by many geologists now between life as we know it. It on earth and the fires of Mount Doom, specifically, the the most violent and scary of geologic processes like volcanic eruptions on the movement of tectonic plates. Yeah. This is a great topic to get into. We kind of had a I guess a preamble to this a couple of episodes ago when we were talking about eggs and we talked about the volcano birds and the idea of a volcano being seeming. Almost. Paradoxically to be something that can nourish. As opposed to something. That's just a purely destructive force. Oh, I. didn't think about that comparison at all. But yeah, the the way that the volcanic sand babysits the egg for for the megapode so that it can just run off and do its own thing. Yeah. Raised by a volcano. But so I thought a great place to start here might be with a brief reading from volusia. It is a famous old norse epic poem from the collection that is known as the Poetic Edda. Now, this is a synonymous work. The author is unknown, but the volusia tells the story of the norse Gods culminating in their destruction in the fiery doom of Ragnarok can I'm just GonNa read a couple of Quad trains here. In Anger Smites, the water of the earth forth from their homes must all men flee nine paces fares the son of Jurgen and slain by the serpent fearless. He sinks the Sun. Turns Black Earth sinks in the see the hot stores down from heaven or world fierce gross. The steam and the life feeding flame till fire leaps high about heaven, itself Nice and one fun thing about this poem. It's bit of Tolkien Trivia Robert Tell me if you've heard this before, but the name of the wizard Gandalf that first appeared in Tolkien's. Tolkien's the Hobbit and then of course, the best character in Lord of the Rings, the name of Gandalf comes from the Veloce token, actually borrowed the name from a section known as the tally of the dwarves from this epic poem. Originally, he was going to apply it to the character in the Hobbit, who became thorn oaken shield the leader of the Dwarf Party. But then he decided later on that, it made more sense to apply the name of Gandalf. The wizard. I think because again, Dal means something like magic staff l.. and. I think he made the right choice like, Gandalf. That makes more sense for the wizard than for Thorin. Think. So but cool thing that happens in this poem sort of part of the RAGNAROK. Myth is that there is a rebirth that follows this fiery doom know after the fire leaps high heaven and the Kingdom of the Gods is destroyed. Earth is not just left in cinders instead, there is a renewal from the fire and the author writes now do I see the earth new Rizal Green from the waves again, the cataracts fall and the Eagle flies and And Fish, he catches beneath the cliffs. So there's this great link between Fiery Cataclysm and rebirth and renewal of life in norse mythology, and and of course, you know these are symbolic elements. I'm not suggesting that they had some kind of scientific insight with this is something that I think is taken as a metaphor largely about human life itself, but coincidentally, it ends up kind of ringing true with things. We're finding out about geology and nature. Well, it's something you see in a lot of different mythological cycles, right I. mean you see it in Hindu mythology? In. Various. American mythologies. Thinking about. Meslin. South America in particular society that things will rise things will fall that there will be cataclysm that whole world will be destroyed, but new worlds will rise out of them and have risen out of them before. Yeah. I was thinking about themes of fiery eruption in the greening of the earth together or sort of a creator destroyer duality. One that came to my mind that that I thought, you might know something about because I know I've heard you talk about Hawaiian mythology before was the Palay myth. Yeah. Yeah. The Hawaiian got his Palay is an interesting example, a deity of fire and Volkan Ism I was reading a book titled Pay Volcano Goddess. Goddess of Hawaii by H are low nemo, and he points out that when Polynesian voyagers I arrived in Hawaii, they brought their gods with

Volusia Robert Lamb Tolkien Mount Doom Joe Mccormack Hawaii Hobbit Thorin Jurgen South America Rizal Green DAL Dwarf Party
"geologist" Discussed on KCRW

KCRW

05:24 min | 10 months ago

"geologist" Discussed on KCRW

"Martin watched as a geologist on a ridge two miles closer disappeared in an avalanche of ash and smoke in Martin's radio went silent tie in Marianna Kerney were listening and watching from another rich they told me in nineteen ninety nine that they sped down narrow dirt roads we left our van when the service nothing but ash clouds of all these columns there was one nine felt like gosh maybe we won't get our hearing we were very fortunate to have survived and have a clear road and other people of course I had a really are bad rough time out of it like Mike Moore who was camping with his wife and two young daughters thirteen miles away in nineteen ninety nine more showed me photos of a colorless landscape smothered in volcanic ash our major color that we saw was our Tim when we camped that night after trying about eighteen hours to get out not being able to make it eighteen hours trudging through deep bash climbing up and over fallen trees still Moore told me our situation doesn't compare to what other people went through because he and his family were rescued to me the most pathetic story is of the gentleman that was an extremely good physical shape and he made it fourteen miles before he finally collapsed and went to sleep and the body was found with his lungs and his trachea and his mouth and his nose just filled with ash in all fifty seven people die the timing magnitude and direction of the eruption surprise geologists it first blew out sideways with more energy than an atomic bomb Seth Moran is the chief scientist now with the cascades volcano observatory there was no sign that it was going to happen at eight thirty two in the morning of may eighteenth there was no short term indication and there've been a lot of optimism that there would be signs and so it was actually pretty devastating in the days following that folks were thinking that they'd missed something they hadn't according to their data so they have to be ready for sudden eruptions with little warning at mount St Helens in other volcanoes vulnerable communities have been identified and warned and there's more monitoring now that's a lesson that we certainly learned at mount St Helens and for sure it's influencing the putting out instruments on other volcanoes that you know in some cases have interrupted in thousands of years but there's the potential for them to do so if that volcano wakes up back in nineteen ninety nine tie Kerney was philosophical about surviving the nineteen eighty eruption it's something that doesn't happen very often in a in the lifetime of a human being and in this nature it's nobody can stop it the last big scare at mount Saint Helens began in two thousand four and lasted nearly four years but eruptions were relatively minor the watching and the waiting continue for the next one for NPR news I'm Howard Berkes and now we have a story about a survivor she was born in nineteen eighteen when the Spanish flu had begun in Europe she survived that of course and World War two the depression after all that so few Boris immigrated from Greece to New York City in the fifties and then in March a few weeks after she turned a hundred and two she was diagnosed with corona virus her daughter Effie stress CD's didn't have much hope we just didn't think she would be able to make it the doctor told us we couldn't come to visit her but if it gets really serious and towards the end they would allow us to come and see her so we were prepared for that the forest was it Mary manning Walsh nursing home in Manhattan where she was already familiar to her doctor tamer Merson and she's very talkative lady Huskies the person that will often come up to the desk and start up a conversation with the nurse or with myself she speaks Greek only so in my case I use Google translate on my phone and when she stopped doing that is when I got worried she got a fever that day she tested positive and move to a covered floor through phone calls and video chats her daughter saw her get worse the second time I spoke to her she kept saying how sick she felt and that she couldn't even talk on the phone the CDC says that eighty percent of people who died of covert nineteen in this country are sixty five or older but despite her age and despite her congestive heart failure of voice got better after two weeks Dr Mircea has no idea why but he gives her the credit she is just a very strong patient and she had a big part in her own recovery here even when she was like really sick the doctors said she was still kind of spry she would joke around a little bit our smile he would come in and I thought yeah that's my mother her daughter and her doctor marveling over Sofia Boris who survived covert nineteen at the age of one hundred and two this is NPR news.

Martin geologist
"geologist" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

04:59 min | 1 year ago

"geologist" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"A geologist talking about covert nineteen about well let's find out so in my book in my writings I've done a lot number lot commentaries on the relationship between warming temperature related deaths related to warming versus cold and then we see that there's somewhere between fifteen to twenty times as many people die due to cold as due to heat and that's it for this is related to my research on climate change global warming because of course the powers that be in the I. P. C. C. and the U. N. panels all say that it was going to get warmer we're all going to die and it's going to be really bad famine pestilence and engine I've heard I've heard the the opposite is true this is coming from medical professionals now that they're they're looking forward to it warming up yeah yeah and that's what I'm the end of the commentary I just rode in your listeners can actually go it's the lead blog story at my website which is inconvenient facts dot X. YC in the study that was just released here earlier this week that relates to the state categorically well they're they're proposal it's still early in this process but that it's a warming they were experiencing coming from spring this really leading immersing into Wuhan area has been the spread of the virus to stop in there relating that to warming temperatures in the fascinating thing with this story is there a plug and play a game these hot spots around the world from a wall in France northwest United States Wuhan and others are all located in a fairly narrow band of the same latitude and relating it to both temperature and humidity well north northern Italy actually thrive northern Italy was the source the epicenter of the hot spot in that country up near the outpost right end which falls right into this band and I've got a I've got a map that I've included on my blog post today provided it's fascinating to see this this band so they they're speculating that the viruses actually somewhat limited by temperature and humidity what know pretty soon if they're white but they linked it back to the laboratory studies on corona viruses in the narrow band of temperature and humidity in which they thrive for their their thesis is that animal warming of course this band that they mapped out a couple weeks ago and warms that'll move northward in the northern hemisphere but that they're also saying this is it this time of year warms we start getting warmer temperatures pretty rapidly and that it is a band of liability for the virus will actually move up it as we move forward there nor can and the less populated areas so you can you can look for more cases in Alaska and Canada for example then are right present right now as the rest of the continental U. S. warms up is that what you're saying well that's one of the things they foster speculated about but if managing art a lot of these are very sparsely populated areas and for this virus to to thrive and prosper you need to move L. A. B. it needs to be spread in highly populated to host it needs a warm breeze right yeah right so this is this will all play out but again we know that we know that the cold periods the other thing they said was the original hot spot also we're in this narrow band of temperature these areas none of these areas of the original hot spots ever got below freezing nor were they in much higher temperatures one of it when they first started and it all started during the lowest temperatures of the year all of these things contributed they sank to the to the the spread is for the good news is if they're right this will be this will probably act like other coronaviruses that have strong seasonality effect he stated with with the other coronaviruses that it's it's virtually nonexistent in the summer period well which means that we could see a recurrence of this next fall and winter and course it might it might mutator who knows what's going to happen by them but but you're right at least we get a respite here and maybe prepare for this when we went to the into winter next year a little bit I thought not none the less it's it gives us nothing but doom and gloom about this haven't we now for weeks and you know this is I think it's welcome news.

geologist
"geologist" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

04:27 min | 1 year ago

"geologist" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"Of all time don't prepare a paleontologist and geologist put it this way we are geologic force in and of ourselves mankind's overall impact on planet earth has been so dramatic that some scientists think a change to the geologic time scale is in order according to them we should be classified the very recent past as a new unit in time defined by communities long lasting marks on the world's climate geology and biological make up posted it has a name interpreting apoc meaning the age of human it's about four point five four billion years old I'll just have split history into large blocks of time called eons which are further subdivided into those in turn are made up of smaller units called period finally the divisions within a period are known as a box so right now we're living in the coronary period of the Cenozoic era which is part of the federal so icky on the question is what's the current apoc if you'd asked someone a hundred years ago that said the Holocene epoch but there in lies the debate earth's most recent ice age and it's eleven thousand seven hundred years ago that point in time is recognized as the end of the Pleistocene apoc which began just less than two point six million years ago and the dawn of the Holocene epoch the dividing lines between a box correspond with important moments of earth's history like abrupt changes in the climate evidence for these events is typically found within the layers or Strattera on our planet ice core samples may also contain clues are there explained nowadays books are defined by section of rock that has distinctive boundaries at the top and bottom she added that specific I box are also sometimes characterized by the presence or absence of key fossils hello note that larger changes like the mass extinction of the non avian dinosaurs are marked by changes in eras our son is like era for example is the age of mammals the end of the last ice age marks the beginning of the Holocene and established its lower boundary it's traditionally been thought that this particular box is still going on today but in the year two thousand Nobel laureate Paul Cranston helped popularize an alternative viewpoint that year he biologist Eugene F. stormer argued that recent UN activities have pushed the world out of the house scene and into a new epoch earlier stormer had coined the term anthracene derived from the Greek word for human as a possible name for this hypothetical new unit of geologic time its stock the international commission on stratigraphy is the body that standardizes the geologic time scale it has yet to recognize the interpreting it as an official app Bach although the topic has been discussed as of this writing the commission maintains the Holocene is still ongoing but maybe scientists will feel differently Sunday there is heard it argued the geologists living in the far future perhaps even tens of millions of years from now quote could tell when humans were here because we left so many traces in the rocks chemical traces as well as actual physical objects like trash the water absorbs about one fourth for carbon dioxide emissions this is led to widespread ocean acidification which will doubtless leave telltale limestones behind dissolved carbon it's in the settlement are going to be another one of our calling cards future paleontologists may also noticed the sudden disappearance a great many species from the fossil record we would also expect as yet unborn researchers to discover the radiometric signatures of nuclear weaponry all around the world plutonium to thirty nine which is uncommon in nature was embedded inside of instantly exposed to the air during the nuclear tests of the nineteen forties and that brings us to a bone of contention about the interpreting it really is a legitimate geological epoch what moment in history should be recognized as a starting point one argument is that the enterprise he began in the nineteen forties when the first atomic weapon technicians occurred like the famous Trinity nuclear test of nineteen forty five another option might be to define the interpreting it as everything that's happened since the industrial revolution kicked off there is that others have wanted to push the lower boundary date all the way back when humans really started transforming the planet at the beginning of civilization agriculture at least ten or eleven thousand years ago regardless geological community ever officially split up the Holocene and re brands these past few decades century or millennia as the intricacy in a potential benefit might be the jester symbolic value Kristen and many others hope it would send a powerful message governments and private citizens alike they're upset when.

geologist
"geologist" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"geologist" Discussed on KGO 810

"All the time. I've posted pictures on behind the black repeatedly showing this. But the problem is that the atmosphere and temperature of Mawes are such that it's impossible for water to flow on the surface. And so that means the atmosphere and the temperature had to be different in the past and geologists planetary geologist. Have not been able to come up with a good model to make that happen. And this is a great this is a fundamental geological mystery it once was possible for water to flow on its surface. But no one can figure out how that was possible there in the atmosphere. Once thicker and therefore Warner warmer, but none of the data. We have so far provides enough information to structure a model that would solve this mystery. And that's really what we got here. It's just just accentuating that mystery have photographs of sand dunes on Mars Bob one from Toronto seven one from twenty nineteen. They look exactly alike. Yes. Adult day. Well, this is one of my post on behind the black. You know, I do this all the time multiple in, you know, I'd find an interesting image in the Mars reconnaissance orbiter, high resolution database, and I post it. And so I came across a picture that was labelled a monitoring changes doing changes said, well, let me go see if there's any images at the same place. And of course, I found one a dozen years earlier. So I posted in both of them behind the black to show little change has occurred in those dozen years. And what this really tells you is that things do change on the surface of Mars, these days, very, very, slowly if at all doing on earth you. Expect doing to actually change on a yearly cycle wind rain and the seasons would make it move. They could change. Well, that's not happening here and on March things are generally pretty stable the atmosphere is too thin to really change things quickly even with the light gravity. So that tells us something.

geologist Mawes Warner Toronto
"geologist" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

KVNT Valley News Talk

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"geologist" Discussed on KVNT Valley News Talk

"Be an awesome summer rain or shine and i know you know that it's so awesome to be in alaska i know people that are in the industry feel that way when they discover oil and stuart varney one of my favorite on fox news there's actually an alaskan story and this is fascinating and i was reading it on fox news on online dot com and rick said hey there's a video on that they actually interview this guy isn't it yeah armstrong oiling gas the ceo bill armstrong sits down with stuart varney i think he's from denver yet they take a gamble risk everything cool guy i like he said we think there is a lot more oil than they thought where he was going to drill up near the north slope and so stuart sets down with him and kind of shares the good news imagine this a geologist roof a big chunk of his own money on a hunch he thinks he's spotted a large pool of oil in alaska it goes for it he spends the money he bills an is road to get the equipment across the tundra because you can't damage the tundra and he starts to drill bingo he hits what used to be called a gotcha he risked it all on a one i'm going to call bill armstrong abandon question an american hero well he's a friend of mine so it can be verbose great to be here take me through american hero yes use have you have a hunch well you you're a geologist profession an you just you'll going through some records and you have a hunch what did you say.

stuart varney denver alaska fox rick ceo bill armstrong geologist
"geologist" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

The Ken Coleman Show

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"geologist" Discussed on The Ken Coleman Show

"Do you have anybody that is that is that has been running the day to day with your dad is he still around what's the scenario now hey died in two thousand okay keep her and she's been running she's been on that you're run like this doesn't run like a typical business what is it at all it's where the his brother in law had a was a geologist and having people pay him it a check he'd have been give him an interest in the wells that they drill and so if it proved oil he got a check and so he did that over and over again over the years he did really well and so then those minerals all passed my dad passed my mom passed me well we don't have employees yeah and we have income we have bills there's counting the needs to record speak cats and there's a correspondence has in people calling asking to least minerals and that sort of stuff so listening to people talk about you know making widgets or whatever it's not specific enough to this well what got then is you just needed administrative system based on what i'm hearing correct i need to learn the business bracken talk royale gently about it and that exactly okay so this bookkeeper is the bookkeeper gone where's bookkeeper that's been kind of running things he's under seventy two retiring okay but my so my point is you gotta start with her and spend weeks and weeks with her getting all the processes written down or clarified so that you understand the current processes okay i wonder is there anybody else that's in your business you're not the only person doing what you're doing in the country are you well now no so clueless so my point is first thing i do if i were you and i'm in the same position you are i don't know much about it either you know just a little bit more than me i know nothing will find sit with somebody who has who is in your business and tell them your situation say hey i.

geologist
"geologist" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

Newsradio 700 WLW

02:43 min | 3 years ago

"geologist" Discussed on Newsradio 700 WLW

"Okay back underway here on a friday your weeks scott well getting set for the the hot weekend going to be a warm one as we mentioned in our travelers weather here just a few moments ago so we'll get things underway this hour a little more what's going on as far as some of our industry headlines from our friends at oh i d i did update on the the killer william after it's been a week now right up after the fishers is they referred to them started opening up on the big island geologist now warning the kilowatt could be gearing up for a major eruption a violent eruption shooting ash and debris into the air releasing toxic emissions sometime over the coming weeks geologist with the geological survey say if the receding lava were to actually seep below what what would be the groundwater level under the caldera of the volcano indeed it would then be at risk of an explosion you would essentially have you have a rush of water that would trigger what they call steam driven eruptions which could cause a blast of ash and steam and release of sulfur dioxide the similar to what happened in nineteen twenty four when there were at least were these large explosions and those are kind of more vigorous and there were there was more energy involves so larger fragments can be blown out for greater distances as a result hawaii volcanoes national park has announced a much of the park is closed today friday to keep visitors at a safe distance in the event the killer william has an explosive eruption at a nearby power plant they're they're expected to move more than sixty thousand gallons of pentane of highly flammable gas to a safer location today that plan actually closed last thursday after the eruption began but the gas removal did not start until like wednesday of this week residents near the plant say they're worried that some of this lava flow could reach the pentane which would cause a massive explosion so we've got the one particular neighborhood the.

william geologist scott sixty thousand gallons
"geologist" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

02:05 min | 3 years ago

"geologist" Discussed on Naked Astronomy, from the Naked Scientists

"Eight geologist geologist i think we see quite a lot in the landscape so firstly i think the present day landscape is not necessarily it's not a landscape that's been currently shaped by water it's a landscape that's being shaped by wind rozhin processes largely so most of the landscape forms that we can see the present day are shaped by millions of years of wind erosion basically but the rooks themselves that we're investigating and some of the landforms that we can see show clear evidence for water activity so that it's certainly clear that water played a major role in the early version of the sediments in gale crater so i've seen pictures of uc the these deltas almost looks like it show what you compare that to two on earth it's very very similar that's right i mean that's the model we use so you know the reason i'm on the team and other there's a lot of other terrestrial geologists on the team the people who study rocks on earth is that basically we're using our experience of reconstructing ancient environments on earth and playing that back on mars you know what i can do is i can say go down to the dorset coast look at a series of sedimentary rocks on that drastic coast and i can tell you a story narrative of what that landscape not only look like paint your picture of that but also tell you how that evolved how that landscape evolves through environmental change be at climatic change or just changes in processes and what's remarkable is that we can now do that on mars because actually the same physical processes applied i mean sedimentary particles are moved by physical processes physics and the same physics applies among us she was malls once a wet planet like earth a watery planet so that's a heated debate in march.

geologist gale crater dorset
"geologist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:19 min | 3 years ago

"geologist" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"The professor and we were walking down this stream bed with these rock walls and i just was amazed that here this guy could read these layers of rock like pages in a book and and know about earth's history not just over thousands of years but millions of years and i passed him with all these questions what are these rocks how did they form where did these layers come from and he was very patiently answered all my questions and i thought a job where you get paid for going around picking up rocks the this is a job for me and then a couple of years later my father was involved in another rocket launch down in florida we were there again but this time it was the viking missions that we're going to mars and i got to go to talks by people like carl sagan talking about why we're we're going to mars why are we were exploring this red planet where life just possibly at some point in the past headed volved and i thought okay geology plus planets nasa this is for me so i became a planetary geologist i studied volcanoes across the solar system trying to study volcanoes on these other planets and say how how did the their surfaces form how do they change over time and how can we bring that information back to help us understand this planet better i like to use the analogy of saying it's it's like if you were a doctor and you only had one patient you might start to understand why that person got sick but you'd never understand the progression of disease fees unless you had lots of patients so for a planetary geologist we study processes like wind and water and volcanoes that changed the surfaces of planets and we compare planets to really understand how they work now i've worked on a bunch of different nasa missions to venus tomorrow's to saturn to earth now of course i haven't actually gone any of those places i studied data that's return by our robotic spacecraft so i get to be an armchair explorer again inviting those rockets the favorite mission that i've worked on is the cassini mission to saturn i'm on the radar team and i study saturn's moon titan titan is this amazing moon because it's.

professor florida geologist carl sagan nasa
"geologist" Discussed on Omnibus

Omnibus

01:55 min | 3 years ago

"geologist" Discussed on Omnibus

"Harlan brits who was a kind of radical geologist one of those radical geologists fear is that in fact these geological formations had been caused by catastrophic flood or multiple catastrophic floods but that happened in recent time and by recent time how recent thirteen thousand fifteen thousand years end of the last ice age more or less right but certainly within the time of modern humans and is this controversial almost like some throwback to some youth pastor saying all the dinosaur bones come from the flood or right right and it was incredibly controversial it was he was drummed out of the rebel geology society while even the rebels you know he was he was too radical and he spent he spent many years trying to demonstrate his theory or trying to prove his theory and his theory was that as the ice sheet that had covered all of canada and portions of north erica retreated it left behind an ice dam which all i can do is is make reference to game of thrones because that's what everyone is thinking to future ling's of the game of thrones was a they thought they have their moms hbo password yeah i suppose it was a diversion that kept us from reading or acting with our children but a giant wall of ice giant wall of ice that was nine thousand feet thick like a a huge glacial sort of dam in a in a canyon that would have been like keeping this lake behind the rocky most two miles front to back and the lighter than game of thrones by the way.

geologist erica ling Harlan thirteen thousand fifteen thou nine thousand feet
"geologist" Discussed on Nature Podcast

Nature Podcast

02:35 min | 3 years ago

"geologist" Discussed on Nature Podcast

"Nothing else orbiting a son resembles eyed green blue planet and until a couple of decades ago that was the end of the story the idea that there might be other planets out there some of which might resemble earth was she speculation then in the nineties all that changed astronomers lent spot planets orbiting of the stars sometimes that spot to stars brightness damn is a planet passed in front sometimes that siesta wobble eversoslightly as it was tugged by planet's gravitational pull today thousands of bees xl clennett have been discovered which begs the question are any of them anything like but these comments a light years away meaning we have limited information to go when we think about exit planets we kind of have to think about very few observable mass radius something about orbit and maybe down the line something about at that and that's it this is came in unto born he's an exile planet geologist so with those four parameters i have to build a plant and kind of understand everything going on understanding xl plans could teach us which ones are more like a and this would provide please ultimate quest to find life on on the world finding candidates for worlds that could support life requires astronomers to first observe whether an egg so planet is in its does socalled habitable zone where the distance is just right for the planet to be able to support liquid water but the habitable hoon concept is great for sort of a first cut rate is that planet in a habitable zone yes it's likely to have liquid water but there's a lot more steps after that that say well okay is it too much water well cannot produce continent that are sort of of the right composition to aid in these geochemical cycle um what is what is likely hood of having magnetic field these are all sort of secondary things that the more that planet has in its favour the more sort of the geologist in me would be comfortable with say yeah go ahead and invest a years worth observation really dig in if there's one thing that observations of told us so saw.

geologist
"geologist" Discussed on KELO

KELO

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"geologist" Discussed on KELO

"Work is called human by design from evolution by chance to transformation by choice greg looking forward to this this is a great work my friend or a thank you good evening for my prime good morning gore you are a georgia great to hear your voice come unattributed who were at the talk about this new work night you know this you you you answering questions that have plagued in perplexed so many of us who are we what are we worded did we come from and even though we might not have the definitive answers at least your scratching the surface in getting even deeper greg what would i i think important george we i don't know when we will have the definitive and her but what is very very clear right now i'm i'm a geologist a great degree geology and we are geologist anthropologist we've been looking at this question who are we where do we come from four hundred fifty years now and it's very clear that we're barking up the wrong tree and when we can free the scientific minds in the resources and the technology from be obsolete dory that is being part is fact in our public who today when it does georgia's it it for you to heart in the minds of the brilliant people so that they can follow the evidence wherever it may lead rather than crime kuffour the evident with being discovered into a preexisting idea greg what got that quirk important here what have we been taught in school in college what what have we been taught about our was going to 5050 in seventy were too hot to our young people would they have not changed much time when it comes to human guy i want to be very clear with uh with our listeners on where i stand with evolution in itself is the fat are the geology by fina in the proper record for many forms of of animal some forms of plant life it break down the idea of evolution breakdown when it comes to human evolution is not our story but we are being caught in evolution is our story uh that we are the byproduct of we a fluke of nature sure an accident of biology i entered a thinking it goes without jordan when work heart that we are the evac than biology we lose the uniqueness in the special note of of human life and we lose the.

greg georgia geologist four hundred fifty years
"geologist" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"geologist" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"He was just such a neat man but he was the county geologist some of giving y'all little lesson here he was the county geologist for santa clara county and he was a guy who had some it and he was eight you know he was a phd geologist he was a member of all these various geological organizations but he in addition to you know traditional geology he did some untreated none trudeau i shall things he would look back in the day this is 89 he would regularly go through the newspapers and he would look at the number of cats and dogs that were noted as missing because people back in the day would cash a cat's go my dogs gonna put an ad the paper so this is eighty nine right so he would regularly go through all the newspapers the bay area to note if there was an increase in missing cats are missing dogs so this is just before the 89 earthquake he's noticing noticing lot of pets are missing now cadets that was his first glow second clo he said because of the tides so when you have a strong like a king tide that water does place wait are the earth's crust i think we can all agree with this right so it's just an unusually large amount of water that's been displaced so to speak because of a king tied that's putting pressure on the earth's crust so he would look at the tides and then he would also look at highpressure weather systems because highpressure just as it denotes its placing increased pressure on the earth's crust so he would say you know.

geologist santa clara county
"geologist" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:45 min | 3 years ago

"geologist" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"He was just such a neat man but he was the county geologist some of giving y'all little lesson here he was the county geologist for santa clara county and he was a guy who had some it and he was eight you know he was a phd geologist he was a member of all these various geological organizations but he in addition to you know traditional geology he did some untreated none trudeau official things he would look back in the day this is abc night he would regularly go through the newspapers and he would look at the number of cats and dogs that were noted is missing because people back in the day with cash by cats gone my dogs gonna put an ad the paper so this is eighty nine right so he would regularly go through all the newspapers the bay area to note if there was an increase in missing cats are missing dogs so this is just before the eighty nine earthquake he's noticing noticing one of pets are missing now cadets that was his first grow second clue he said because of the tides so when you have a strong like a king tide that water does place wait are the earth's crust i think we can all agree with this right so it's just an unusually large amount of water that's been displaced so to speak because of a king tide that's putting pressure on the earth's crust so he would look at the tides and then he would also look at highpressure weather systems because highpressure just as it denotes it's placing increased pressure on the earth's crust so he would.

geologist santa clara county official trudeau abc
"geologist" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"geologist" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"Freshly fallen i think of youtube videos are things that people have seen of in a dash cams that have gashing that coming in and give it it makes you the wall why would why do we do this towards what what's the purpose behind it apart from being really cool crackdown on but there are several really good reasons to do this one is from a pure science standpoint of understanding these rocks so again i'm i'm an astronomer okay now astronomers are not the only scientists that nasa were just the best looking scientists that as an eighth but there are many many different types of of scientists here at nasa and in some of them are geologists and if you become a geologist you learn to be able to hear the stories that rocks have to tell knocks can tell you stories of how they formed when they formed where they formed the conditions under which they formed and it is very much in our interests to understand this planet that we live on very much we are very tied to this planet still to this day and so the better we understand it the better we do but as a geologist you would love to be able to find really early rocks from the beginning of the earth but we can't find those yeah because the earth is subject to wind and rain rose and plate tectonics all those really hurley rocks are gone we can't get those stories.

nasa geologist youtube
"geologist" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"geologist" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"Freshly fallen i think of youtube videos are things that people have seen of in a dash cams that have gashing that coming in and give it it makes you the wall why would why do we do this towards what what's the purpose behind it apart from being really cool crackdown on but there are several really good reasons to do this one is from a pure science standpoint of understanding these rocks so again i'm i'm an astronomer okay now astronomers are not the only scientists that nasa were just the best looking scientists that as an eighth but there are many many different types of of scientists here at nasa and in some of them are geologists and if you become a geologist you learn to be able to hear the stories that rocks have to tell knocks can tell you stories of how they formed when they formed where they formed the conditions under which they formed and it is very much in our interests to understand this planet that we live on very much we are very tied to this planet still to this day and so the better we understand it the better we do but as a geologist you would love to be able to find really early rocks from the beginning of the earth but we can't find those yeah because the earth is subject to wind and rain rose and plate tectonics all those really hurley rocks are gone we can't get those stories.

nasa geologist youtube