17 Burst results for "general assignment reporter"

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

10:57 min | 3 months ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on Post Reports

"Earlier on in the pinnock as mentality of everyone. Stay home to flatten the curve. Was I think just starting to really sink in for people a lot of what you saw about the younger generation in the news? Was these people who were on their spring break and they didn't care that there was a pandemic going on. They were partying on the beach in Miami. Having a good time whatever happens happens with the bars being closed. No we'll find. Alternative does suck at the bars and restaurants are closed. We'll find ways. Iphone and people were justifiably really frustrated about that. This cannot be a normal for our community. There is a lot of anger and I think it played into this stereotype of generations. E which people born from nineteen ninety seven to two thousand twelve as kind of like self absorbed but I mean Jesse. Isn't this like Monolithic? Spring Baker Block but I mean they're the generation that is behind the march for live movement there behind this giant worldwide school straight for climate movement that gratitude bird founded and so they have become this political force. My Name's Hannah Knowles. And I'm a general assignment reporter for the Washington Post. And how is that political activism? Been TRAINED ON THIS PANDEMIC. The pandemic might just kind of underscore this emerging political identity. They have which is again. They're not imagine his group but they're fairly politically liberal and the oldest one's supported Bernie Sanders by huge margins more than their parents and their grandparents. They really think that government should be doing more to help people and so they grew up carrying about a lot of these issues that we see now let exacerbated and really coming to the forefront in the krona virus pandemic and so they see this as kind of a moment. That's just sharpening these issues. Already cared about and so you see a lot of young activists who you know. Even as their schools are shutting down like promise canceled their graduations might not happen. They are really busier. Ever there on zoom calls. They're organizing in their incorporating this crisis. We're seeing right now in to some like the broader messaging about these political movements. They've been involved in for a long time. And what are some of the issues that they're advocating for in the context of the pandemic? Yes so one of the young women. I talked to emory hack. She's she's a high school student in New York City who've been working on like affordable housing and a lot of other issues there before the corona virus hit and so now she's hearing lawmakers talking about You know we need to halt evictions. We need to end utility shut offs in the context of this pandemic And she's on the one hand her response. She wants them to go even further. She wants them to just wipe out a few months rent. I don't want to speak for anyone else's experience by definitely for all of my friends or neighbors who you know are considered nonessential workers and have kind of job that they can't do from home jobs. Were putting already in a position where you have to struggle to pay rent. And you're living paycheck to paycheck faces and struggles like expanded. She believes that you know. There's no way a lot of people in New York City will be able to pay that back given the massive unemployment right now and then on the other hand. She's also seeing these like trillion dollar rescue packages that Congress has approved all these drastic measures. That are now suddenly politically viable. And she's kind of wondering. What can we get in the long term? Some more attention in more action on these issues that. She's already been advocating for a while. These packages and recovery legislation has been made on this community support behind it if it's just a matter of approval and implementation. One thing that I think is interesting about. This is that yes. There are a significant number of younger people who have gotten sick from the current evaluation and a number who have died but this is primarily a thing that is affecting older people elderly people and that you see numbers of people who were hospitalized who die skew very much toward the older generation. So what do JEN's ears see in this fight for themselves or why does it feel so kind of potent for them you will? I think first of all they definitely do see themselves as affected by the pandemic I mean even as they feel like they are less likely to have a serious health situation as a result of virus they do see it as a big threat to society as a whole and a see it personally. A large like economic threat because young workers are more likely to be part of those like service sectors. That are going to be really hard. Hit so they definitely are feeling like a effects of this personally but then also like they said. I mean they see they. They care a lot about issues like inequality they care about this idea of like big drastic changes in our society in our government in the way that we help out of average Americans and so I think they see this very much like not just a passing crisis but for activists in this generation. This is kind of a potential opportunity where maybe people are a little bit more open to their ideas where maybe this could be a political turning point. They want to see some longer term change from this and members of the conversation that you had with with younger people about how this fight has changed their life not just the the reality of the pandemic and the fact that they can go to school in are stuck at home but but that the activism that they're participating in has kind of reoriented their life one activists. I talked to she a best. He does. She's a fairly prominent young climate activists. She's been called like gratitude bird of the US and her family. I mean they left New York City A few a few weeks ago because they lived in this apartment where you know young people old people were sharing the same elevator and they were just really worried about getting people sick and stuff. So they've been uprated. Her parents are here on work. Visas and so their jobs are eighty still have jobs but they're kind of newly uncertain and if they lose those jobs than they would not be able to stay in the US. So I mean there were all these ways that you know for her. It was about more than like losing prom and I think a lot of young people are feeling those effects. Emma the affordable housing activists. I talked to WHO also works on a bunch of other issues. I'm eighteen and I've been trying to file for unemployment to all the things that are happening. I think impact the young people just as much. She just lost her part time job. Mix It with a teaching job the school closed and so she was like like millions of Americans. She was trying to file for unemployment. She wasn't able to get through. She kept trying. She woke up like all these different. Like wacky hours trying to see if she could get through and wasn't able to admit it so Definitely they were like seeing the effects of close. So what does it mean that? This younger generation is fighting so hard to draw attention to things like income inequality and sustainable healthcare in the context of a health crisis. Yeah I mean. I think the experts that I talked to felt like it really was a reflection of some of the conditions that grew up in like inequality in fully was rising in the US. Coming of age as Bernie Sanders is really becoming political force. You starting this huge political movement in shaking up the Democratic Platform so it made sense to them that they would be approaching the pandemic in this way that a lot of them would be seeing it in that bigger context and I think the big question for like one of the researchers. I talked to WHO Studies. Young People's political engagement was like as this incredible like worldwide defining crisis shapes this generation. Right as they're entering adulthood lake will that translate into participation at the ballot box right because they are this? I mean young. People generally don't turn out his high numbers they will be agency will be you one. In ten eligible American voters in November by the big question for them was like. Yeah like do they show up. Especially as the corona virus kind of disrupts a lot of the traditional ways that campaigns would reach out to first time voters and would get them on those mailing lists and stuff. They weren't really sure what will be seeing their Hannah. Knowles is a general assignment reporter for the Post and now one more thing on Monday night. Joe Biden's presidential campaign posted its fund raising numbers. For the month of March. He raised nearly forty seven million dollars. That's the biggest amount. Since I started the campaign. The majority of that cash was raised the first two weeks of the month after Biden series. A primary wins but once the campaign went fully virtual because of the corona bias things got more challenging typically high end private fundraiser is a very fancy event where very wealthy people get super dressed up and attended person they pay in advance usually the maximum amount that you can pay to donate to a presidential campaign. They mingle over cocktails or a nice dinner and they usually doesn't to the politicians speak I. Sometimes it's an extremely intimate event with these politicians. They can shake their hand get photos with the politicians they can ask them questions have one on one conversations. Michelle ye he Leonid cover money and politics Washington Post. I am in my tiny closet which has just enough space for me to cross down on the floor. This is not how fundraisers are running anymore. They are pretty much typical. Zoom call. Now people get an individual code that you can use to sign into a zoom call. Some donors at first weren't sure exactly how they should dress for these zoom fundraisers. They weren't sure if they should wear the usual cocktail attire. Like in a Tuxedo or a suit or a nice jazz. Do you put on makeup. What you do and then Wade you sat up in your living room and then you see the politician and and you're not really used to seeing yourself in this sort of a setting so. Some donors are getting frustrated about the angles on the video call. I mean none of Karan's 'em calls. Let's be honest. This logistical limitation has definitely lead to less money flowing into these campaigns typically in the spring of an election year. This is a busy time. They may have daily fundraisers and they would be crisscrossing the country hosting appearing and talking to donors but now they're limited to hosting virtual events and it's a little hard to get people to RSVP and send donations at this time and then there's the added complication of the fact that it's quite sensitive to be asking people.

New York City US Bernie Sanders Washington Post general assignment reporter Hannah Knowles Joe Biden pinnock Jesse Miami emory Congress Karan JEN Wade Michelle Emma
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on Post Reports

Post Reports

02:43 min | 7 months ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on Post Reports

"And now one more thing about new questions from teenagers about the selective service after president trump announced that a high ranking Iranian general had been killed in a US air strike. The website for the selective service system suddenly started to get a lot of traffic because people were starting to worry about the draft. I'm Kayla Epstein and I'm a general assignment reporter for the Washington Post so tensions with Iran have been high for quite some time and the US has also been embroiled in the Middle East for a long time And so when it was announced that a general named Kacem Sulamani had been killed in an airstrike. Think a lot of people's minds went to the worst case scenario Dario for what that would mean they started wearing the. US might be drawn into another conflict and as can happen on the Internet. People started to get a little hyperbolic about it got drafted by the NBA. The war there were memes. About the the impending start of World War. Three people started making jokes and memes about getting drafted into that hypothetical conflict. I wo- everyone. Here's a list of all the people that deserve to be drafted before I do anybody. That has a peanut allergy people who dipped their pizza and ranch. And this happened on Tick Tock on on instagram. But at the same time we saw spikes in Google trends for things like conscription the draft selective service so people actually did have some and questions about what could happen if we got involved in another conflict right now. The entire military is a volunteer force and so people have to actively sign lineup to join even if you opted into something called the selective service if you are a man citizen or not documented or not residing in the United States it's near between the ages of eighteen and twenty five but doesn't mean you're going to get drafted it does not enlist you in the military. All it does is put you in a database of people that could theoretically be called upon in the event that a draft is required. But that's very unlikely it would take legislation relation by Congress and the president signing it to reinstate the draft. We haven't had a draft since nineteen seventy-three even after conflicts like Iraq and Afghanistan War So even though World War three is trending and Google searches for the draft are spiking. There really isn't a chance that you are going to be drafted anytime certain Kayla Epstein writes.

Kayla Epstein United States president Google general assignment reporter trump NBA Middle East Washington Post Dario Congress Iran Kacem Sulamani Afghanistan Iraq
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on How to Money

How to Money

15:20 min | 1 year ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on How to Money

"We spend a lot of time when we're planning our travel so we're certainly not fly by the seat of our pants type of people. We put a lot of planning intuit just so we can make it that within our budget nice as far as far as seeing the countries in the u._s. Are y'all flying to different cities and kind of going on little little john's there or are you actually wrote tripping and and taken like r._v. Doing that whole thing because that's something i've been actually thinking about doing in the near future with my family. We have flown to destinations and we have driven. We have not done the r._v. My husband wants to so badly. Mccain really wants to read one. He's talked about buying when i'm like no. We're not buying an r._v. Think about how many trips we could take for the amount we'd have to spend for an r._v. He's still hanging onto that idea i am. I am not on board with it. Even though i do like a good road trip i'm not super excited about the cost of an r._v. Even becomes comes to renting one because i feel like if we take our car stay in hotels versus the cost of the r._v. The rental costs the gas. I don't feel like we would actually come out ahead. That can't be true totally depending on on how much you use the weather how old the r._v. is that. You're buying if you're buying stuff like that so i love hearing about your travels also but i want to kind of start talking about the book here in just a second before that can you tell us about how you started writing about money for a living what would drew you into that. I became amy journalist right. Out of college was a journalism major but i was just a general assignment reporter at daily newspaper and had no oh experience writing about money or business. I didn't take a single course on business or money so i just happened to fall into chew it. I had been a reporter for several years and in my late twenties i landed a job dow jones newswires as a business reporter and thought i wanna stick with this line of reporting for a variety of reasons but because i had not taken any business related courses during my undergrad undergrad years. I decided to get a masters at american university. They had a program where you could pick a specialty and i chose economic. Journalism took took economics courses business courses and it helped that i had a free tutor my husband who is getting his doctorate in economics at the time and cebrian. I was like all right. If i get stuck pass someone who can help me out. That program lasted for a year and when i graduated waited i graduated into the beginning of a recession. It was two thousand one. The economy was starting to slow and dow jones had a hiring freeze so i couldn't get my job back there. Other places had hiring freezes where i wanted to work but kiplinger's personal finance was hiring an editor for its website which was pretty new at the time i mean this was two thousand and one and really web webbed journalism. Online lissom was a very new thing. I had always written for print and really didn't know much about writing for the web and didn't know anything thing about personal finance but they took a chance on me and i stayed with it. I i really enjoyed it. I still enjoy it and and i realize how much i have benefited from the job. I didn't really know much about personal finance before i got started writing about it and learn so so much that has helped me in my everyday life things i probably would not have learned if i hadn't gotten job what better way to learn than just could get thrown right right in yourself into yeah yeah exactly a- only hear more about your book. It's called mom and dad. We need to talk and just in a nutshell. Can you describe for our listeners. Just what your book is. All about. My book is encouragement for people adult children to have conversations conversations with their parents about their finances. I go through the reasons why you need to have these conversations how to get over your fears of having these conversations some tips on starting the conversation how to get through to reluctant parents what sort of information you need to gather and what to do if you're parents is refused to talk to you yeah cameron. I'm actually in this book. I make a little appearance which is crazy cool so thank you for having me in the book and i kind of told my story worry about talking with my parents about money and what that was like for me so tell me about the folks that told their story in this book like what what were some of the most interesting things that you heard from the people that you invited to participate. I feel so fortunate that people were willing to share their stories with me. Because i got lots of great stories they range from from people like you toll who had parents who were very reluctant to talk about their finances to some people who had the conversation and were surprised iced by how easy it was they had a lot of fears about having bringing it up and when they actually did their parents were really willing to talk to them and i found there were or more people in that situation fortunately than people in situations like yours where the parents were reluctant to talk which i think hopefully the reader so the book are going to come away realizing that these conversations are scary as they think they might be even sometimes when parents parents push back if you are patient and you continue trying you can get through to them probably the my favorite story. Is this kind of worst case scenario nereo story. What happens when you don't have the conversation. I really don't want people to skip this chapter. I interviewed a man named doug nordmann who is a super financially actually savvy guy. He's a personal finance blogger and he's written a book about money. It's geared toward military members. He had not talked to his father her before he developed alzheimer's and his father ended up in the hospital for an emergency surgery and then ended up in the nursing home for rehabilitation for awhile doug who lives in hawaii had to go to colorado when his dad was getting the surgery and ended up in the nursing home and and wanted to make sure his dad's bills got paid but he couldn't he couldn't get access to his bank account because his dad had not named him power of attorney in so dog ended up spending nine months and ten thousand dollars going through the court process to get legal legal access to his dad's financial accounts and then he also had to spend all this other money out of pocket covering his dad's bills until he did get access to who's bet his dad's bank account you know and it's so important for people to realize that your parents need certain legal documents before you can step in and start making financial decisions for them or healthcare decisions for them. If an emergency arises you can't just go to the bank and say you know hey my dad. I just had a stroke or my dad has alzheimer's m. He's in the hospital. I need to sign checks for them to pay his bill because the bank is going to say no way not unless you're attorney in that story in particular highlights some of the things that can go really wrong. If you don't have these conversations soon enough with your parents uh-huh yeah definitely highlights that necessity yeah i mean i'm sure some of those worst case scenario stories like that. I mean they're just i opening cameron so let me why is it though that you wanted to actually the book. Was there a moment in your life and you realize that this just needed needed to be out there or that. What was it for you that that kind of let the fire and view. It was my mom's situation. My i mother was diagnosed with alzheimer's when she was sixty. Five and i was only thirty five and i had to step in and get involved with their finances and i had had not had detailed conversations with her before she started having memory problems. I did talk her into going in to meet with an attorney to update oliver legal documents and this was this was right around the time of the alzheimer's diagnosis her dementia a had not progressed too far. She was still competent enough to sign those documents but because i had not talked to her and had to start getting involved loved you know trying to figure out someone's finances when they don't have a clear picture of them themselves because they're having memory problems was incredibly difficult difficult for me and i was at a point in my life where i didn't have any friends who are going through a similar situation. I mean i was thirty five years old. You're young. You're your mom was young to receive that diagnosis and then on top of just all the emotions that you're feeling the difficulty of processing this change enj- in your relationship with your mom. You're having to sort out the financial piece to write and i didn't have anyone to ask for advice like i had to figure this all out on my own. Even though you know there were some things i certainly knew that i needed to do as a financial journalist but several years down the road when my friends started coming coming to me and asking me for advice anada talk to their parents and they started having you know some of their parents were having issues with their own health or memory. I realize that by sharing my story my experience my mistakes in a book. I could help other people do to what i had to figure out on my own. So that's what prompted me to write the book. I think hearing that story about you being thirty five and your mom being sixty five that's so so young and that's so hard but it makes me realize like i'm a thirty five year old sitting right here and so these things can happen at any time and the longer we prolong long these conversations with our parents about money just the more likely that we might have to wait through something even more difficult with our parents so i want to ask you camera. What do you think is keeping most of us it from having those hard conversations with our folks and how do we move past the fears that we have to get the conversation started. There are a variety of reasons uh-huh why people don't have these conversations with their parents for a lot of people. They don't realize that they need to be having the conversation and that was my situation. It wasn't that i was afraid to talk to my mom about money. I just didn't realize how important it was to have the conversation even though i was and still am a financial journalist. It just didn't dawn on on me that this was something i needed to talk to her about. So first of all you might not realize it's important and i'm telling you right now that it is of course you might be afraid because you were brought up to believe that you don't talk about money. My father told me you don't talk about money. It's impolite and my father was always very reluctant to talk about money and he died at the age of sixty one..

alzheimer attorney cameron reporter Mccain american university john general assignment reporter dow jones doug nordmann kiplinger editor oliver hawaii colorado ten thousand dollars thirty five years
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on Hit Man

Hit Man

03:34 min | 1 year ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on Hit Man

"Bother you being the smell of rare steak and aged whiskey. Excuse no carolina that doesn't bother me. Listen to the ron burgundy podcast on apple podcasts or on the iheartradio app or wherever after you find your podcasts you don't really expect the suspected murderer to call you back and confess. I mean that's just not what happens. <music> kevin sullivan senior correspondent for the washington post <hes> down at the poster twenty eight years and in nineteen ninety three. I covered the murders sir that lawrence horn was involved with on march third of that year milly horn her eight year old son trevor and his nurse janice saunders they murdered back then sullivan was a general assignment reporter in montgomery county maryland bureau montgomery county is not the kind of place for we have a lot of triple triple murders. It's a sort of affluent relatively peaceful kind of place so this was a big deal for us. Sullivan was assigned to track down millie's ex lawrence <music>. Who's living out in los angeles. I ended up finding a phone number. I called the number and i heard you know this is lawrence. Armies leaving a message and a few hours hours later my phone rang. This is lawrence aren't you. Were trying to reach me. I said i'm just calling about what happened happened and i wondered if you had anything to say about. It is what happened. What are you talking about and i said you haven't heard from the montgomery county police and he said now. I have one message on my machine. It was from you. What are you talking about. What happened so i said mr horne. I'm sorry to be the one to tell you this s. but there's been a murder here and your wife millie and your son trevor had been killed <music> and there was silence on the other end of the phone for a couple of seconds and then i heard him say millie trevor forever and he started crying a lots of other details about this that i've completely forgotten that i will always remember a few weeks after they spoke on the phone. Sullivan flew out l. a. to see if he could interview lawrence person he came to the door and i said mr horn and he said yeah. I said i'm kevin sullivan from the washington post. We've been we've been talking talking on the phone and he looked and he said how did you find me. The most remarkable thing was that he opened the door and let me in. I was fully prepared appeared for him to say. I really can't talk about this. I have nothing to say in close early face in his article he described lawrence's quote dark and cramped one bedroom apartment off grungy hollywood boulevard. I remember walking down the hallway thinking this is kind of a creepy place and and when he came to the door he he himself was kind of a mess. He was very heavy. He was wearing an old sweat suit. He looked kind of shelby in baseball cap on and he had this tight little brat tail kind of you know sticking down from the back of the cap but he just seemed sort of worn down by okay life. He didn't look like the kind of high flying in a motown record executive that he portrayed himself as on the phone lawrence.

lawrence horn kevin sullivan montgomery county washington post general assignment reporter trevor iheartradio ron burgundy milly horn carolina murder los angeles mr horne shelby millie baseball janice saunders maryland executive twenty eight years
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

02:40 min | 1 year ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on WGN Radio

"Reporters, and I am so excited tonight. We have a panel of two Courtney Guzman and John chase. I'm calling this the investigative reporters panel. Thank you guys so much for being here. Thanks for having me. Thank you so much absolute. Studios pajamas. You guys. I so keep well you glam up every single day for WGN TV where your morning reporter. And how does it feel not having to glam up at three o'clock in the morning? Actually, it's it feels pretty good. I put on a little something something for you. Andrea. But yeah, it actually feels pretty good. I was like, oh, I'm still kind of working, but I don't have to worry about you know, all the all the glitz glamour the morning except WGN radio dot com right now. We are on camera. People will be calling in and asking to zoom in on both of you. Now, David Jennings. Sorry, David, John. And again, I'm glad you addressed up as well. This is my regular everyday outfit, which is always khaki pants, and the the the collared shirt, and that's about it every day. Well, I'm so glad that you guys are here. There's so much to talk about we're going to delve into your background and how you both became reporters as well. I know John you are the director of investigations at the better government association, but you spent nearly twenty years as a general assignment reporter for the Chicago Tribune, Courtney, of course, with WGN TV. We see you every morning, I get the pleasure of spending some weekday weekend mornings with you as well. Stories we love having you. Well, I'm very excited to have both of you here because I said, you're both investigative reporters. And this is your passion at Hartselle. Without further ado, let me have you guys introduce yourself. Tell us a little bit about where you've been where he went to school where he grew up Courtney. So I've been at WGN for almost five years now. And prior to that I worked channel to CBS Chicago here there for two years doing freelance in prior to that I worked in Saint Louis and started off in the small markets like Evansville, Indiana, originally for Chicago grew up on the south side, a product of CPS schools, Whitney young high school or academy was is a magnet elementary school. And you know, I I still I still live here. I still love my city. And I'm so glad to be home. So absolutely glad to be home. We're glad you are home. John tell us a little bit about the years that you spend to the Tribune and before that. Yes. So yeah, I grew up where all Chicago natives here, I grew up. Right. I grew up on the northwest side northwest side, lots of cops and firefighters up in Edison park neighborhood. Although I'm the White Sox fans. Yeah..

John chase WGN Courtney Guzman Chicago Tribune Chicago David Jennings Hartselle reporter general assignment reporter Edison park Andrea Sox magnet elementary school Indiana Evansville Saint Louis CPS better government association CBS
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:53 min | 1 year ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"WBZ Boston's News Radio. I'm pretty big delays out there on the commuter rail. This morning, he'll is says they used every piece of equipment. They had the problem is simply more people coming into the city right now, then they had available trains and combined that with normal commuters who come in for work. Just a lot of people out there right now, not helping things by the way. There is a derailment on the green line d branch. This is happening right now at Beaconsfield right there in Brooklyn's if your parking west of town, trying to take the deep branch in maybe trying to leave you're like that woman who left a little bit early shuttle buses right now running in both directions on the green line. Deep branch. You can expect severe delays might want to consider the sea or the b branches of the green line as an alternate. This twelve thirty six and today, we're remembering a friend colleague and member of the WBZ family, Gary LaPierre he passed away yesterday. Due to complications from leukemia at his home on the north shore from the Beatles. Visit to Boston to forced busing to the blizzard of seventy eight and the. September eleventh attacks for more than forty years. There wasn't a story that touched Massachusetts that Gary Pierre did not put his Mark on including when a Senator from Boston John Carey made it to the national stage, the junior Senator from Massachusetts centerstage last night to accept his party's nomination and this morning the heads out on a cross country tour Gary began his career WBZ as a general assignment reporter back in the early nineteen sixties eventually becoming chief investigative reporter. And then morning anchor. His calm, steady voice conveyed, the news and conveyed a sense of friendship and trust. According to longtime colleague, and friend, Peter me. I believe words, you're overused. So when you say unique giant he's set the pace she was. Broadcasting in New England, Gary LaPierre's died peacefully surrounded by his family..

Gary LaPierre Boston Massachusetts Senator morning anchor Gary Pierre Peter Gary chief investigative reporter Beatles general assignment reporter Brooklyn New England John Carey forty years
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on The Big Story

The Big Story

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on The Big Story

"Lurch of dread for the city's LGBT community for the families of the missing and dead men for Toronto which could only stare in horror the specter of a public trial loomed. Like, a gavel all the evidence will be laid bare the vultures of international media would swoop down on a grieving community. Imagine all the columns and opinion pieces, and the creepy fascinated voyeurs learning about how the victims were stocked and preyed upon it would have been a circus, and it would have broken Toronto in a very real way. So yes, the guilty plea that came Tuesday meant attentive shaky ex now the city will be spared at trial, though. So a different question needs to be asked. Maybe it won't get worse. But how can it get better? How does the city recover from a crime that fractured and already tense relationship between the police vulnerable community? How does the space lake Toronto's gay village that has served as a beacon for so many people fleeing prejudice and judgment start to feel safe again? I'm Jordan heath Rawlings. And this is the big story moment Karachi is a reporter at six eighty news. He has been on the ground covering the MacArthur trial since the arrest been to almost every hearing. He's had since then I met him is to one or two along the way, but pretty much everyone and made many visits to Mallory crescent. Yes, there were a lot of whispers well before the arrest that something was happening as someone who's who's a general assignment reporter for for a newsroom, we'll kind of whispers, we're going on around there. And what have you heard? Well, I mean, it was it was definitely something that was being talked about a lot particularly in the gay community in the village here in Toronto, you know, men were disappearing from that community people were feeling unsafe. There was a lot of talk about their potentially being a killer. The community was calling for kind of pushing police to look into it. There's some push back from Toronto police against it. And then, of course, their worst fears realized when MacArthur was. Rested of the we'll realized before that. But they came to fruition of being a real thing. When when the police finally arrested MacArthur, it feels like that was a moment that something change in the relationship between the city's gay community and the police, you know, it's it's definitely a relationship. That's been inflexible. We see evidence around this case. And then if you look at the ongoing back and forth about police in uniform participating in pride, right? They've definitely had a fractured relationship. Over years. You go back to the bath house raids that happened a few decades ago. So the relationship between the gay community and Toronto police has certainly been fractured overtime..

Toronto Jordan heath Rawlings MacArthur general assignment reporter reporter Karachi
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

03:50 min | 2 years ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on Bullseye with Jesse Thorn

"I thought of my high school friend, Jason Whitney who loves sports and would not want to be bored by listening to NPR and hearing stuff that he already knew and hearing phrases like the three point line in basketball, which confers three points upon a made basket. And literally early on one editor who wound up not being my actual editor said that I need to define what the three point line was. So this is where we were. But I thought of this guy and I thought of I will never bore him with a spa. Sports report. But then I also thought of my NPR listening cousins who care nothing about sports. And I said, and I will always interest her with my sports report. Now, how do you do both those things? I had some tricks. I had some techniques, but that's what I always tried to do with the sports report. And it's very easy to say on MPR. You know, the audience is a sports audience. It's okay. If you slow down and hold their hand, you don't wanna lose them, I guess. But that really, I think gives you too much slack and too much leeway to disappoint the person in the audience who is a sports fan. So the way to do sports on NPR his a little bit is definitely different from the way to do sports on ESPN, but it's not just taking out the jargon or the advanced assistants. It's not just the Olympics technique of telling a gauzy feel-good story about the person. There are a lot of other ways that the NPR audience really response to sports to sports belong on NPR definitely because they're a very important thing and. Society, they're a glimpse into into well, their a passion of people. They are a great metaphor. And the other reason is just from a real practical standpoint, you can have two hours of ATC all things considered and just just never ending relentless downers of stories. And then there comes three and a half minutes where something exciting and interesting and newsworthy and nonfiction happens, and it is such a respite. I found that my reports were really valued in the days when people would only listen to all things considered a morning edition as a radio show. So the concept was you were getting how long you're listening period was, but could be up to two hours. It could be forty five minutes and peop-. And so you would program the show to have different programmatic elements. And the element that I offered with sports report was just different. It wasn't always uplifting. It could be a very serious report, but it was just different in tone in the in the same way. That you know. So sometimes it might be a sorbet. Sometimes it might be a salsa. Sometimes it might be just a different cut of meat than what was being served all the time. And that's really important if you're programming an interesting and diverse radio show, why don't you work at NPR anymore? I loved working at NPR and it was very satisfying to have that Utah audience, but I would. I felt I was a little bit underused. I don't know if I was under appreciated. I had so many friends from NPR and I felt the boss is definitely like me. But you know, there were just more things that I wanted to and could say that were off the beat of sports. I could've chained my beat and reported on I dunno, some, you know, water usage in the west. Okay. Then I would have definitely quit, but I could have. I could've changed my people. Then I'd have to report on that beat. I suppose I could become a general assignment reporter in New York, but it was all still limiting. And then I went to this show the gist. I created this show and just. Talk about the two or three things. I do an interview every show and they talk about two or three things that are currying to me every show one's a short thing, and that at the ends along thing, which is called the spiel which would be considered a column, if it were in a newspaper or a host piece, if it were on the radio, I didn't know if I could generate enough ideas for this..

NPR Jason Whitney editor MPR basketball general assignment reporter Olympics New York ESPN Utah two hours forty five minutes
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

WBT Charlotte News Talk

03:49 min | 2 years ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on WBT Charlotte News Talk

"Like. The facts that I've reported and they'll call it fake news just because they don't agree with it But I think that it is something to the news industry has to grapple with it is. Something that, we, have to. Come to a some kind of understanding in realized with our readers and our viewers in our listeners that there's something that. They're angry, about journals don't realize that and really start listening. To the people that were reporting on work we're going to be in some trouble but you know the the whole point of investigative journalism is we're not out to make friends were not out to be the most popular kids in. School we are literally out to challenge authority we are out to to shine a light in the dark that is what we do and if you can make peace with. That if you can, make understand, that this is going to be your your role is to, really ruffle, feathers than it's I I what I, consider to be a. Pretty noble profession well especially investigating. Investigative journalism I mean that's a whole other aspect of of the media these days and and the problem is the media use to report The facts but now it's more that they report let suits, their, agenda but when it comes down to invest the. Investigative, media journalism it's totally. Different because, they're really digging in they're going in and trying to find, the the accurate information whether you like it or not Sure and. It's and you're absolutely right in the sense, of you, know it is. It is what you when you. Look. At these reporters and you think, of what, they've exposed, this year. In cases like Harvey Weinstein and in tackling these issues that people for so long have. Been it's been an open secret and tackle them and, I it did change they've brought about is just incredible incredible I will say that I think and. I you know it's funny I. Was just getting this, criticism today on my own Facebook page where I had posted I was in New York a. Couple of days ago and the New York Times has this mantra that is is out on the, front of a building and it just talks, about that, the truth is uncomfortable and the truth is difficult at times. And I posted it and I got all of these I, have all these friends that are both leaning, left leaning right and it was all this criticism and there's, this real anger towards the people Believing news departments. Have this agenda now you can debate this as long as. You. Want to just know that I know journalists across the, world and, across the. Country in literally these men and women wake up every day and they just want to tell the truth and yes they're going to, challenge the powerful they're going to challenge the president they're going to. Challenge everything it's not gonna make them popular, but journalists, don't get into. This line of work to do. To. Sit there and try to appease, someone it's, it's part, of even. In my own fiction writing I want to challenge people and it's stuff that you guys. Do on a nightly basis with your in year other, programs you are challenging what people believe and it's not easy and it's not popular but you know. This is what we do and. If you can do, it and you can really influence people or show them something else that they may not absolutely. Believe in that I I think that's the the world that we, have to be and and I, think it's important as part of our discourse You know we do this Jeremy I think I know the answer to this. Question, but I don't want to hear your answer to it what's. The difference between a reporter or journalist and an investigative reporter So you like to all reporters are investigative reporters all good reporters are investigative reporters but the truth of the matter is an investigative journalists have a little. Bit more time to, again so a daily general assignment reporter that you read in the paper or online or see on the..

investigative reporter New York Times general assignment reporter Harvey Weinstein Facebook New York Jeremy president reporter
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

03:47 min | 2 years ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on KIRO Radio 97.3 FM

"In so your beat your beat is because we're going to do a couple stories that sort, of, are the oh the ven diagram of city politics and zoning and building in density and all these things because you've been following? This, for years yeah it's what I did was a little bit all. Over the map I was what was I to as sort of a. General assignment reporter but a lot of what I did initially in that pursuit was county and city politics and county and city policy a lot. Of boring meeting so we sat through a tremendous. Number of meetings and the funny thing is that the while they're very boring sort of. Collectively over time you can't help yourself. But, learn something and and in, this particular case watching the city in watching the city moved through police reform and move through police chiefs. Kind of rapidly it's been an interesting process And then moved through the. Selection process. That had a person who is in and then that person wasn't in, and then that person then became chief right so on a tap your sort. Of institutional memory on all this stuff because you've, been following a lot longer and. A lot more closely than I have and so this first story is in this came out in the, news, yesterday but I didn't get a chance to talk about it and it says and I know that folks living in Tacoma and? Living, in ever like are they're talking about Seattle PD this has an. Impact I think region-wide with just the ripple effect of of law enforcement. And the ripple effect of how things happened in Seattle tend to bleed out into other jurisdictions but they're saying that the the contract talks between. Seattle in the police union have moved forward and. I just wanna wanna give you wide berth on where this takes us but just go. Ahead on what what is actually happening. Behind, the scenes here well a, couple of things are happening these are the funny thing is that these are not the new chief in. Seattle which is Carmen best The interim chief and has been with the Seattle police department for twenty six years and what I. Was referencing earlier she wasn't even a, finalist. She was sort of, a top five finalist then she didn't make the final three a bunch of people got happy that she wasn't in the final three. Including weirdly enough the citizens reform advisory group and the police officers Gilbert both, unhappy that Carmen best didn't end up in the in the finals list, somebody dropped out of the running and then she ends up in the, finalist list even though even though. She didn't usually initially. Make the finals list she then becomes the chief of police in Seattle out you mean was given a different job different paycheck with the city which is not, really dropping out but we can leave that for another day and so so now she is, going to be the next chief of police chief of Seattle pending approval by, the city council so behind the scenes are do you think these things are. Tied, together because when I see SPD. In the. Streets yesterday dancing to macklemore video that to me speaks of a looseness, in the morale right Right now where it seems like they're going? Okay, we're we're finally getting to x. hail a little bit and it's. Hard to not believe that these things aren't tied together in some way well we. Had I mean if you can, go with the idea that. It's a coincidence of timing or you can. Go with the fact that they're related. I'm gonna go with the fact that they're related what we had was, that the Seattle that that there was no Carmen best wasn't initially finalised, and Carmen best becomes a finalist after a lot of internal consternation and then. Carmen best becomes chief of police, of Seattle and then the next day the union. Announces that we've moved the contract talks they've been out of a, contract for four years now they've this contract talks are. Getting close and maybe we'll get a deal so you think those things are not related you're crazy, because of course they are so the union. Basically behind the scenes like hey not necessarily that we're gonna make this concession or that's concessions specifically but we'll we'll we'll get. The logjam moving if you, give us the chiefs that you want is?.

Seattle Carmen best General assignment reporter Tacoma Carmen Gilbert twenty six years four years
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on WBSM 1420

WBSM 1420

02:21 min | 2 years ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on WBSM 1420

"The poll question what are the results thus far should google broken up yes eightythree percent say yes all right so as you know we talked about this on friday night kevin colin whose nickname is now complete fabrication because that's what the that's what the impartial observers are investigators discovered his columns or his appearances on on the broadcast media have been a complete fabrication of stories and sources etc etc making stuff up right and left he blames on his drunkenness or at least some of it so why he's been suspended for three months without pay then he goes back to being a general assignment reporter they're gonna keep him off the air for and then he goes back to his his his a piss poor column and i don't know how good it'll be now these going to have to actually you know use last names apparently so the kurkin callahan kirkman had actually discovered this and broke the story about his off being a pipe artist which means he's making stuff up that's an old time war alltime phrase for newspaper men who make make up stop pipe artists so kirk and callahan have been saying that maybe call in now that he's been suspended can spend some time on putting together a tv show you know kind of like i kinda like the stories about hoods like you know the people in providence the two brothers that were like bolger there's a new there's a new series out called it's going to be outcome neighborhoods get it neighborhoods so they coming up with suggestions for four episodes of this of this new kevin kevin cullen his office is the straight as he likes to say his offices the streep here's one boston sports guide cullen is investigating a murder of a postal worker from a local watering hole where everyone knows his name all signs point to bodega on her alvarado but something doesn't smell right with cullen alvarado is the is the anonymous bodega owner that they can't find an east boston who was quoted here's one cullen agrees to help a out the bail was bail bondsman tracked down a mafia turncoat job was supposed to be a.

kevin colin general assignment reporter callahan kirkman bolger streep murder cullen alvarado boston google kirk kevin cullen eightythree percent three months
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:31 min | 2 years ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Emily's the democrats forced that law upon our nation i hate it but there is no such law which didn't stop the president from repeating his assertion half a dozen times it's a complete false attack democrats said what the president should change is a zero tolerance policy announced on may seventh by his own attorney general senator mark he calls the policy barbaric senator markey spoke at the jfk federal building and said attorney general jeff sessions saying bowing government as a reason for this immigration practice is actually barbaric these families are fleeing poverty injustice civil war they're coming here because they're desperate for their children to be safe to be protected what the trump administration is doing is adding an additional terror on top of the terror which they are fleeing in boston karyn regal wbz newsradio ten thirty the white house's walking back the president's comment earlier in the day saying he would not sign a moderate immigration bill now in the house now saying he would sign either of the two bills that republicans are working on the moderate bill would mandate children would not be separated from families entering the us illegally bail for former trump campaign chairman paul manafort revoked he's now in a virginia jail this amid witness tampering charges named freeman being held without bail tonight following his court appearance on charges including attempted murder newburyport police say robert gerard left anna jake's hospital naked broke into a nearby home and attacked a resident with a hammer gerard due back in court next week the globe suspends columnists kevin cullen without pay for three months citing significant problems with remarks he made following the boston marathon bombings when he returns to the paper cullen will be a general assignment reporter for a couple of months before returning to writing columns union representing globe workers plans to fight the suspension leftover munitions are causing quite a stir in hanover as wbz's kim tunnicliffe tells us a popular fishing spot at the site of an old fireworks factory now closed off hanover officials think there may be unexploded fireworks in the water at factory pond so the pond is now off limits to everyone they already closed off all walking trails around the pond that whole area sits on the site of the former national fireworks company which closed forty years ago but the factory left behind a number of unexploded munitions crews have been detonating the explosives as.

wbz kevin cullen robert gerard freeman witness tampering chairman white house karyn regal boston attorney kim tunnicliffe Emily hanover general assignment reporter anna jake virginia paul manafort us
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

01:33 min | 2 years ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"The new york times it's unconscious level like language of of power in what i think we've moved to is that informing yourself is something only the very richest americans can do right like there's a certain amount of privilege for me subscribing to new york times washington post wall street journal boston globe i don't think that's good and i think at some point we're gonna have to wrestle with the fact that the new media ad model is not sustainable subscriptions and community supported media really seems to be the only supported all model for media funding itself well we are going to take a break right now but we're gonna come back and talk about a story that was broken by my local newspaper the east bay times so i'm very excited to give them a plug when i started in journalism i decide if i was going to be a general assignment reporter which means you cover everything and a lot of crime or a niche reporter like business attack and i went on a couple of big general assignment stories one of which was a crime story and i ended up such an emotional wreck for days that i became a tech reporter because i couldn't handle stories but we are going to come back and talk about an absolutely fascinating intersection of crime technology and ethics so stick around we'll be right back excuse me pardon me leo and warning in here because i want to tell you about something i've used for so long i'm kind of the expert on it around here stamps dot com.

The new york times general assignment reporter reporter tech reporter washington wall street journal boston leo
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on Science for the People

Science for the People

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on Science for the People

"Because it was in the middle of a bunch of federal land and this was in the early nineties i've never a lot of high profile environmental issues popping up that time things like the endangered chinook and sockeye snake river sam and grizzly bear restoration wolfrestoration and so i was kind of drawn into those things just by the demands of the job and from there i moved to a newspaper over near yellowstone national park and and there's obviously lots of natural resource issues in that area and then i went down to salt lake city you know somewhat i tender into lose paper reporters are and i worked there covering a higher education and i did some environment recording but not a lot and then after about a decade being out west i took a job in my home state at the milwaukee journal sentinel and i had no job description really when i took the job other than it was called this is two thousand and two super general assignment reporter which you get to do longer feature stories on on pretty much anything that you want it was a very nice job sign but after spending the better part of or more than a decade i guess out in the desert or the high desert you come back and you look at the great lakes with a whole you know fresh set of eyes and and and the sense of appreciation so i just found myself drawn to great lakes issues and just started writing feature stories and within a year or so the the managing editor paper suggested that i just turn it into a beat and become the great lakes reporter which at the time and as far as they know now is is i think the only newspaper great lakes just pay per beep in existence so that's what got me started and you know all along i was never.

yellowstone national park milwaukee journal sentinel general assignment reporter reporter salt lake managing editor
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:16 min | 3 years ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Engaging characters in the world then kathleen her and has talked to a wide range of them for her new podcast mortals city in which she has done a shortage of with the likes of a retired sanitation worker who founded dead body in the trash a navy veteran who now serves as a cross dressing cocktail server and a former sex worker kathleen became one of my colleagues when she joined wnyc in two thousand in one and went on to win associated press in national headliner awards and she is also reported for npr pure i and bbc i'm very pleased said this mortals city has brought her back to wnyc studios welcome back thank you leonard did you grew up in new york no surprisingly i feel like i did i feel like i was hatched here bet i moved here seventeen years ago this month do you remember your first impressions of the city when you visited oh yeah what what as teaming pile of mass that i just immediately fell in love with it how soon after you got here did you come to work at a boom i see a lessening another seeming mess less than a year you know i was one of those people that moved to new york with two hundred bucks in my pocket slept on my friends couch hugh is also add a drag performer andrea the catering van and then volunteered here now i love it never left so eu meeting the kinds of people you've wanda focusing on on in mortal city from the start it i was starting to i need i moved here for the people i'm sure some people move here for the chrysler building that wasn't me you know characters are my chrysler building what surrey's will you focusing on when you're working in our newsroom while i was the general assignment reporter for quite a while so is really the news of the day but thankfully characters sauce the characters memorable people are are everywhere cell am i would often meet people and tuck their name and information in the back of my notebook for later and you've gone back to some of those people i have what led you to create your own podcasts uh i know this it's the hut new thing but had is this an issue that you had wanted to scratch all along it was the persistent at shabet of.

leonard new york hugh general assignment reporter kathleen her navy npr wnyc studios eu chrysler seventeen years
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on Hollywood And Crime

Hollywood And Crime

01:42 min | 3 years ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on Hollywood And Crime

"Women's clubs society pages advice columns what they called agony columns and they were sort of a collective known as saab sisters and what is saab sister was is generally a female journalist who would write overtly sentimental articles about something and i'm for is going to talk about aggie underwood up i think she's my favorite journalist of the of the period certainly in la and she disdained saab sisters i think that would have been one time when she would have been willing to take a punch in oak throw a punch viewed called her assab sister because she prided herself on being a a city side reporter a general assignment reporter but she was best known by people in los angeles ultimately as a crime reporter and it was it was aggie who broke a lot of stories in she arrived at the black dahlia murder scene ahead of the investigators right i mean she must have had a big advantage covering the story well when bell shorts body was found in lamont park and once they realized that would they didn't have was a drunk naked woman with they did have was a dead naked woman a reporter started to flock around the scene aggie in her autobiography said she was the first on the scene there is some dispute about that there's been several people who claim to be first in a case that big it's not surprising but you know it all timidly doesn't matter because she was there i have photograph of her there on the scene on talking to a cop near a car she's very near the body and what aggie did do was go over.

reporter general assignment reporter lamont park aggie saab la los angeles murder
"general assignment reporter" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

Talk 1260 KTRC

01:50 min | 3 years ago

"general assignment reporter" Discussed on Talk 1260 KTRC

"An anchor for fox business network and prior to fnc she worked as a freelance business correspondent for cnn primarily reporting from the new york stock exchange and she worked for cbs news path is a general assignment reporter she's the author of her first book called the comeback out today's moms reentered the workplace successfully it came out in may of this year available at amazoncom szoka sown is our guest cheryl good afternoon thank you for joining us more than a pleasure to have you with us how i love way of great pick it to talk to you want your show first of all we think you on my show you and i actually bumped into each other you had just john i think gretchen carlson's at real start with gretchen carlsson and then i was on and the eu walking down the hall i'll walking into the makeup room at fox in new york and you and i don't see each other much 'cause you're in new york nominee la and i had just listened to your interview with gretchen about your book which i had it known about until that interview and i said well i think that's a great topic ought to have a book about and then you know you and i were like asia come on my show in here euwide i'm glad that you are first of all it on you talk about in this book how today's moms reenter the workplace successfully on because there are living out there who really try it or not successful at reentering the workplace and there is unfortunately a lot of negative stereotypes with women who have a gap in their resume because uh they've left especially if they've left to care for children and for a period of time correct correct any other nearby a lot of the time the port years or ataur managers as well one here well you but out of the workforce in your your daughter right fit for the job at it that gap at all we get that but they is that it's almost like look you didn't become infected when you left her career what home to rate held in it doesn't kill your brain and and i interviewed over a hundred women it did this 'cause i want an along with.

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