23 Burst results for "front end developer"

How has React changed web development?

Software Engineering Daily

02:06 min | 5 months ago

How has React changed web development?

"Rush. Welcome back to software engineering daily things having me again. We're about six years into the release of react. How his React Change Web Development? I've been saying for a while. Now that I think broadly the most exciting paradigm shift of react has been moving away from templates into components. If we had to summarize the great innovation I think has been to create a workflow for teams to see the rise of the signed systems to give people greater ability composition power and ultimately empowering the front end developer. I think before especially with templates were confined to servers surrendering things that would do. Spin Abacha. Jvm Box and write some temple leading language and then just not care about the front. That's much anything. React has made people gravitate in the opposite direction. You know even teams that were not that fun of J S Realize. Hey to build a world class front would probably have to use this reacting the development of react application has gotten easier over time. What was the boiler plate that was historically needed for starting a react application? How have they gotten simpler? That's a great way to put it. I think there was a lot of boy to play in fact when we started next Jay. S which was solving the problem of making react application top to bottom entire experience. We are seeing a lot of GETUP repos floating around that were basically copy paste of boilerplate. S- they weren't providing a framework on an altogether solution. They were like hey clone this boilerplate and then started making changes. And then you'll diverge from the border played at some point because you're not merging changes back in so we created next year. Solve that problem. Exactly it was okay. Reinserted as a as an embassy was kind of like component specific library and wanted to create an entire obligation with react. Next year it's kind of became that

Spin Abacha Front End Developer JAY
Sam Selikoff - Building Production-Ready SPAs Fast with Mirage.js

Full Stack Radio

12:00 min | 6 months ago

Sam Selikoff - Building Production-Ready SPAs Fast with Mirage.js

"Think Someone would hear that pitch and it would be easy for them to assume that Mirage is a library that you use when running your tests and that's that's kind of its main job like. Oh Yeah it's like a plug in for just or something you know. It almost feels like it fits in that category but from kind of like learning more about by the project from you over the last couple months where you've been kind of hacking on it I think the real powerful part of it is kind of like the actual front end development workflow in enables rather than like how could or could not be used for testing. So do you mind talking a little bit about like why. It's a useful useful tool even for Bob not even four. But why is it useful to justice. Part of Your Front End Development workflow completely ignoring like the whole writing automated tests side of things. Yeah definitely so it. It did come from testing world but what it is today is different. And like you said it's really the development workflow so it enables which is one of the main value propositions mirage and that is kind of this front and I work flow. Where Team that is working on a fat client APP you know a a an spa or you know even teams that build like native IOS APPs those kinds of APPs have a data layer. They have have these really nice boundaries between kind of the client interactions and the server piece. And so what happens when you're building apps like that is. There's a hard dependency between the front and the back end and with a lot of APPs we've built and the teams we've worked with That you know pendency can be difficult and slow either the front end or back end team down depending on which ones ahead of the other and so what Mirage does is it. lets the front end team team. Basically mock out pretend make a mirage of the back end. That's where the name comes from so they can build out a front end against something that acts like a faithful reproduction of that back end a Pi enough so that lets them build out the entire feature all the different states without needing to rely on that back in team. So I guess can you walk through an example of what it actually looks like to implement a feature using Mirage instead of having to rely I on a real server like what is actual workflow. Look like Yup so it's totally a like a front end development workflow so basically assumes that you are working in a Java script modern javascript environment with a package manager you know using N. p. m. yarn with mpm packages so MPM package. We do have a you. MD build though so you can use use it if you're not using them build tool but it works best with that and Basically when you get to the point in your development let's say you're building react up and you need to fetch a movie a list of your favorite movies at this point in your code. You're going to be making fetch request store. You're going to be using graph. Well you're GonNa do something that's going to query the server for that list of movies this and this is the point at which you basically have to decide like. How are you going to actually get that data? How's the front end? Developer can and get the data into the APP so they can keep developing the UI. And there's a few options that they have they can. Just you know right. Some Jason Data Down Right in their front and Kobe's they can point to an existing Tapio server that and Mirage. Takes this approach that you stay in your code base and you basically import Mirage right in like your bootstrap file L. Whatever's rendering your react up and if you're in development you go ahead and stantione server it starts intercepting all those requests and then you can define find your points based on if you're writing against arrest. Api or graph Q agrofuel API and so in this case you would just say like Oh this dot get to slash movies. I should return these three job script objects and in a way and so The benefit is that you're mocking at that. HTTP layer and so the application code. Oh you right in your react up. is exactly the same even as it will be in production when you're talking to a real HP server so that's kind of like the hard boundary boundary that we were talking about before. God it so one thing that I thought was interesting about Mirage that to me is actually like a pretty pretty exciting selling point even so maybe it doesn't sound like such a huge deal at I. Is I think when someone hears about this they might be might have this assumption in their had had like okay so this is another thing. Where like I start up my actual front end application server on the command line? Right like my N.. P. Am Ron serve for whatever that boots up like my actual spa. And I can click on your web packed of Serbia all that crap. And then in another Terminal Tab tab I'm going to go like N. p. m. run Mirage and that'll boot up like my mirage. Scherer that's running on like another port and then in my spa. I've got awesome environment. Variable that saying what the URL is supposed to be pointing everything to when I'm like making API calls but the way Mirage actually works is is it's all integrated into the same thing. There's no actual concept of like another server. There's not like some other web server running on some other port. It's just you boot up your react up for your view APP or whatever the same way you normally would and it kind of lives in The same process so it doesn't feel like you're like if compare this to like I guess the workflow that I expect people to be taking When they're doing local development a lot of the time they have a copy of the API code base? That's maybe a rails APP happen. They have to go and like pulled on the local version of that and run like rail serve or whatever to serve like the local rails APP and then run like there are dashed out of roxy local. and that's like the normal local development workflow and if you think of Mirage is being something that you have to spin up in a separate terminal tab it doesn't I feel like it's great competition for that necessarily in terms of like the economics of it. I guess in some ways at a superficial level but the fact that it's just literally it's it's just your your front end code base. It's the same serve commander always reading. You're not changing anything in your package. Dot Jason Scripts stuff. It's just literally part of importing 'em or importing hoarding Mirage into your kind of startup scripts or your app the main entry point or whatever And it just kind of all just magically works as part of one thing and for for some reasons something about that just like makes it so much more compelling to me because something about it makes it really feel like you are still just working in the one project. You're not trying to like do multiple things you know what I'm saying absolutely I mean that is one of the reasons. I'm still working on the project to this day because you know I'm a rails developer. That's how I've written all my back ends for my Java scrip- Front ends and even though I'm comfortable with that there's just something about that extra step like you were saying. Oh I forgot to run by database migrations. Oh I need to run bundle install. Oh I need to open up. This thing thing in run rail serve and then make sure my proxy is configured correctly. And then also especially when you're working with someone who's new to development if you have to introduce all of that complexity complexity it makes it way way harder so Despite being comfortable working in backend systems Maraj was always just that much simpler simpler. It was just so much simpler that that all the benefits were worth it For that that little cost but To just be able to run serve. You've and like you said that the bootstrapped processes is super easy writing super fast. Because it's just Java scrip- memory alongside your code is all in the the same single process running in your browser but Even if like the setup to get your proxy environment was a one time thing with like a rails. Api you still need to make changes changes to the API and maybe changed the data on the server. And so even still you are thinking in two different environments. Maybe you're going into rails console or changing the database database data. Were returning some something from Ruby Code but because Mirage runs right alongside your view code in react code You're just Java Java script already like you're already mapping over raise and and doing filters and stuff you can drop to bugger in a mirage handler and hit it right in the tools the same. Oh you would if you were working on rock component and so to me like I have a very low cognitive like threshold for context switching. And I'm I'm just eager to get all unnecessary things out of my brain as fast as possible and so for me that was always one of the benefits of working with Mirage. Is that it was just. It felt like so much less. Think about when I was just focused on the. Ui Yeah Cool. So if you're building a feature with Mirage what is sort of the workflow that I guess it. competes against if that makes sense like To sort of like help set the stage I guess for people people. The sort of be able to relate to the problems that react is trying to solve like. What are you seeing people normally doing when they're trying to build a feature if they don't want to deal with the API or anything and and they just WanNa see like okay? Well I know I'm going to have a list of these things. They need to like. be able to render like what do people normally doing there. And what are some of the kind of pitfalls that people run into that. Make trying to incorporate something like Mirage. Really good idea. Well there's I think there's a few ways you could look at that I is like you're adding a new front end. Only feature meaning the back end already exists for it so maybe you have a more general purpose back in. Maybe it's a graph q all back in with enough flexibility that you you can actually build an entirely new front end feature and query and mutate the data you need to with the existing endpoints and that happens sometimes for sure when you're building apps like this because you're back ends tend to be pretty generic but in that case you can even in that case. Actually it's still true that you might want want to put that. Api Server to different states so even if the API points exist you might want different database states so that you can see what it looks like when they're zero movies or one hundred movies for pagination right things like that. So even let's take spoke very simple case where you're actually not modifying the back end. You still have a stateful back in and so what do existing folks do well like you said that either locally so if you're comfortable enough running your API server locally then you can do that and you know this can be anywhere from running a not a node or a rail server to running a whole docker image or You know to bootstrap this environment that has like a database setup. Maybe maybe it has read a setup and so again this is where really the benefit some raw. Start to shine because the APP doesn't really care what's running back there but if you need to change it all of a sudden you have to understand. Stand all these moving pieces but if you do get that running locally then you can put the database in a different states and you can build your feature and and then maybe you write some tests for it and maybe the test you kind of mock things out. statically just worn off mocks for those requests that the power of the future Other times we've seen people point to the proxy servers they have shared proxy shared staging environments. That people use to to develop features but again like if you're working in a really data driven APP This breaks down pretty quick. Like if you imagine trying to build like budgeting software it'd be very hard to have a single shared staging environment maybe make different accounts with different setups. But again you can see this really breaks down pretty quickly so Again this is where Marash signs shines because you have all these different scenarios defined they live inside burning code base but it's essentially stateless and so each front end developer team can kinda make whatever scenario they need to power all the different states of a new feature local Without worrying about the back end at all.

Mirage Front End Developer BOB MD Serbia Developer HP Kobe Scherer DOT Commander Maraj N. P. M.
Tech roles dominate Glassdoor’s list of 50 Best Jobs in America for 2020

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:46 sec | 7 months ago

Tech roles dominate Glassdoor’s list of 50 Best Jobs in America for 2020

"Glassdoor is list of fifty best jobs are twenty twenty released and quote front end developer tops the list that's essentially a web developer that creates the look and feel of website analysts Amanda Stanzel says it's one of many lucrative jobs in the feel of technology tech definitely dominates listless twenty out of the fifty rolls are technical roles however that doesn't mean they're only found at tech companies companies in other industries such as retail healthcare also hiring for those tech rules as well close to a glass door about when the job was placed on their availability of the starting salary of the worker's satisfaction the top tell us seven jobs on the list are all related to tack the highest ranking non tech job nursing manager occupational therapist program manager and human resources

Front End Developer Web Developer Amanda Stanzel Program Manager
Tech roles dominate Glassdoor’s list of 50 Best Jobs in America for 2020

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:46 sec | 7 months ago

Tech roles dominate Glassdoor’s list of 50 Best Jobs in America for 2020

"Glassdoor is list of fifty best jobs are twenty twenty released and quote front end developer tops the list that's essentially a web developer that creates the look and feel of website analysts Amanda Stanzel says it's one of many lucrative jobs in the feel of technology tech definitely dominates listless twenty out of the fifty rolls are technical roles however that doesn't mean they're only found at tech companies companies in other industries such as retail healthcare also hiring for those tech rules as well close to a glass door about when the job was placed on their availability of the starting salary of the worker's satisfaction the top tell us seven jobs on the list are all related to tack the highest ranking non tech job nursing manager occupational therapist program manager and human resources

Leslie Cohn-Wein & Rafael Conde on Designing the User Interface at Netlify

Full Stack Radio

09:07 min | 11 months ago

Leslie Cohn-Wein & Rafael Conde on Designing the User Interface at Netlify

"Leslie you identify as a front in an engineer at a you focus more on design. But how much would you say your skills like sort of crossover like do you. You feel like you have really good design chops to in Rafeh. Do you do any like programming and stuff analysis to or are you mostly working in design tools and was mostly just implementing the design center like Kinda built or sorry designed by the designers maybe Leslie can answer. I yeah so you know design was actually Kinda. What led me into development side definitely have like a personal passion for the design side but I will say I spend most of my time in code or share on our react primarily and that's really where I do most of my work however I'm no stranger discussion abstract on some of the designed to us and and I would say is that we while we work in our own tools we do a lot of collaboration and have a lot of kind of day to day touch points with each other to to be talking throughout the entire life cycle? There's not like a hand off. Where design gets you know given to me to be implemented? It's like a constant conversation. Yeah Yeah Awesome makes no sense Rafael are you Do you consider yourself to be a programmer to or do you stick mostly to sort of design side of things I don't I don't aw I don't call myself a program but I know how to code in especially for side projects that usually code all the things but another another Fai thank God we I don't coat anymore as I used to do some light front and work but today a even I might play around with some pen or something quickly. I write the code for it but then I don't WanNa push code directly. Sometimes I do but it's like there's no need there's way more talented front end developers although we don't so lesbian the the Front End Engineering team. They don't really do a lot of design work in innocence of in in in design tools in also designers are not really touching the code but we are all talking about the same thing so we don't go over the details however design mockups are how we write the code but we are present in all the in the in the conversation about what we're building right yeah so we overlap a bit there yeah awesome that makes sense so I think maybe something that would be interesting to sort of walk through would just be taking maybe like an example of recent feature something that you've built and shipped analysis and maybe telling the story as to how it got started started and how much back and forth was and how the team collaborates and what it looks like actually ship something so we talked a little bit about this ahead of time and I know like one of the it features that recently was Kinda deployed and Nahla Fi that I know everyone analysis is really excited about is the new NETLA FI analytics feature. So what do you think about walking through that story. That'd be great yeah. analytics is our suicide analytics dashboard. you can activate for any any sites on nullify leave at nine dollars a month or site we will we when we were concept in this one of the things that I can really exciting was that front end was really sort of a part of the design from the beginning so the designer who is working on this sort of kicked it off with his own research so he he spent a Lotta time kind of brainstorming not not so much competitor analysis looking at existing dashboards collecting sort of visual usual you I examples of analytics and did some deeper analysis right. How did other solves the problems that we're trying to also trying trying to solve but how does that also different from our meads? Intellects is awesome but it still sort of at the very beginning of its life cycle as a product so it was also you know something like Google. Analytics is a lot deeper than than maybe what we were going to do so there was some complexity and the existing tools that we didn't necessarily need to need to copy over and one of the things that that that designer and I really did together with writing user stories about how people are actually gonNA use the future so that was something we started from the gecko rough. I don't know if you have anything the ad so I guess what I'm curious about. What did it look like to like? I kick off the feature from the very beginning so you mentioned that you know one of the first steps was kind of just sort of taking stock of the landscape and seeing you know what sorts of things are people doing. I'm did you have sort of a list of goals or anything like ahead of time like what are the problems that we're trying to solve by introducing this analytics feature yeah for sure Francis this berry man I have to give her a shoutout who's our head of product design in U. X. And she sort of helped concept the bigger picture of what are the stats that we want to show on the dashboard. What's what's feasible technically from our platform teams to be able to implement and then sort of figuring out how deep into that we were going so we had pretty specific nick ideas about what what we were showing a thirty days of data in particular at least to start off and then from there it was pretty open ended right so we we had to figure out what's the best way to display this data? What what type of chart or type of visuals asics my sense an go down that whole hope halfway so what did it look look for that I guess you could sort of call it a list of requirements to be like presented to the team? I'm did Francis present in any sort of like visual way or was it just more or like you know here's what we think is important and then someone on the visual design team sort of takes a stab at sort of trying to figure out what looked like to present that information or how does that sort of work well I can answer this usually like when we presented new features or a new projects that we're working on usually it doesn't come out of the blue like we as a team we are aware of what's in a roadmap and we were all align and we know what we were going to build a starts with a just a brief. What exactly are we trying to do? A why how does has at fit in our own you know our whole product roadmap and strategy but then we try especially in the beginning to try to be a bit free with what what we WANNA do. We don't WanNA impose too many. you know limitations in the beginning of the we'll get there because eventually when a ship writer there's some freedom to also go back and forth and also challenge a little bit some of the some of the brief as well but like I said we at the end of that we need to ship so eventually we close is that just try to fix the problem or whatever ship design the feature in this right at the beginning. We have a kickoff with everyone involved so that will be the design team in the front end team in the back in team in someone from support always so there's everyone is aware everyone has a voice voice in especially in the beginning of the project was talking about a collaborative process Khanna. Yeah it makes a lot of sense so so I guess like digging into sort of the the actual workflow and implementation of this thing does when you're building a new feature like this does it get like fully designed in a tool like sigma or sketch or something something before like the I j Sachs's written or whatever for the react components or or does this sort of like gatorade on like intend like Leslie when you started like actually writing the code for this sort of thing like how fleshed out did it feel like the feature was from your perspective yeah so sometimes it differs depending on what the product is for analytics in particular we had pretty solid mocks before we started to get too deep into implementation and a reason for that was that we sort of had to prioritize ties what it was we needed in the U I in order to be able to choose some of the technical decisions that we were making rate so with analytics we needed some sort of charting library. we could have written things ourselves we could have done it all on SDG. We talked about d three right. There are all these options can technically to how we wanted to go about implementing we also had deadline and we wanted to get this into people's hands more quickly we wanted as many engineers on the team as possible to be able to contribute to the feature Matt means people who made not have deep Sag Knowledge even though everyone on our team is very very smart you know all of those things kind of went into this particular feature so it made sense to sort of have that you I design kneel down a little bit more before making those decisions once I had a those designs I spent some time prototyping a couple of different versions with different charting libraries to sort of figure out what was going to work but us four sign cool so I think that's actually an interesting point something that I I wondered a lot about teams like the team had natalie by as someone who works on personal projects and open source and stuff you see like there's all these great libraries for solving all these different problems but most of the time these libraries come with a lot of like baked in sort of U.

Leslie Francis Rafeh Front End Engineering Engineer Nahla Fi Google Netla Fi Rafael Writer Matt J Sachs Programmer Nick Gatorade Head Of Product Nine Dollars Thirty Days
"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

11:42 min | 11 months ago

"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

"We're using typically psycho or eighty M. My question is what have you found is the best way to keep the front end developer and back and develop a role separate while avoiding maintaining two completely separate code repos Thanks so that's that's A. I didn't expect that to be where this was going so they're trying to. You're trying to work less together. They don't like other or maybe it's like. They want to keep working on the front end. You know it without all the legacy back end stuff like like how do you do anything like that. you yeah. I mean I ah it's just trying to wrap my head around it also you know Zach does html see assists and javascript and then and then does that I I for whatever reason and then says here you go back and developers make this thing work in the cms and so like he wants to keep doing that. It sounds like in doesn't WanNa like so you gotta start somewhere you know and you can't just keep all your coat on your computer. So what do you do with it you know. Do you have a repo. That's that's called like you know my project and then Dash F. E. D. or something because it's just the front end parts and or what you know. I don't know this is Bread Red Frost had post recently friend in designed react and a bridge over the great divide. can't talking about the great divider kind what we learned here on the show and it's like a anyway he kind of he's advocating for things like react or viewer angular whatever you have kind of being the bridge between the design tool and the markup like the preceding markup and then the back end integration and and the idea here is somebody can take your react friend in code you'd and make some minor modifications and make it back end ready. If that makes us they can just plug it into the back end. where maybe you're or using dummy data at the designer experience you can just plug it into the back end and this makes no sense to me. This is sort of where we're going doing in our code and design systems and things like that but would be great if you could just do. html what they yes it would but you can't chance so you're kind of looking at the the Java script have to leverage that into everything so and might be solution for you. Kinda tricky delivering designed system might be you know that's just Kinda the root of it right you build that it'll be useful wherever yeah and I was GONNA and say stick on the cloud for blog and I'm live googling here. He had an article about aw club for is doing design systems in Pwa's and things like that and he had a really good post and I think I like really like it but it's tips for portable patterns trump a link in the show notes but he's kind of like organizes his code code base like a react or an angular view projects where where like you you make components and those are in like components folders you know and then you inside like my whatever component buttons you have a button. CSS Button digests in a button dot handlebar. You're like he just has the template. Java script and CSS needed to render lack opponent and I find that to be a pretty good way to do it and that way. Everything's pretty self contained. You're kind of you're separating concerns but you're also bundling components. You're kind of doing component driven design. take a look at this. Maybe for me. It was like the like this kind of what I've been trying to do. In it was very much like a this is this is kind of our doing it and then you know if they implemented in reactor A. M. or whatever they can do whatever they can modify the patterns. You know if they see a change to whatever pattern dot. CSS Nanda change to pattern handlebars than they know. Oh this is just the CSS change not a markup change so I can just drop that file and you know so maybe that helps so Christian null says here I'll come when you're installing dependencies in a project like you know an PM install. The command might spit out a thing that says like thirty eight warnings and three errors in the terminal even at high profile project repos. Doesn't anybody have a stable group of dependencies. Should I be nervous about this. This is a good question. I n. p. m. warning you so they do their own an audit right so yeah m. p. m. audit as a thing like it's like security. Warnings like very like like these are known vulnerabilities in these like packages like they have they used snack or something like like that like find out like a package vulnerability database some May and man I had sixteen thousand the other day. He was from jest just testing framework. I'm sure they patched it since then but man sixteen thousand like vulnerabilities. He's those pretty serious but I have seen like when you you're knowing you install and it's like error couldn't install whatever some plug in skipping and have you ever seen that like we're just like tries to install something and then just discussing skipping but then like the project still works and compile. I also is like this weird like optional dependency or something. I've never really understood that yeah I don't understand early either and also that like a lot of times when you so just for the core of it here I feel like if you run that audit fixed command in my experience it just fixes it all all of it and then it changes some version numbers in your package chasing and lock and you just committed a near back to normal in the only reason you're seeing 'cause whoever for has the repo just hasn't done that the last week or so yeah. Maybe it's more serious than that. Usually not I mean I feel like I've seen this a million times run. The command that upgrade some dependencies chip it in this is so weird. I didn't know you could do optional dependencies but yeah that's there's a flag no obstacle till. I skip optional dependence. Is it like if it used as I see it on windows because insurance to install like S F s events file system which is the only thing so like like so it's so some things try to use that and they are built off of that but it's so weird anyway acid and I know I don't know oh how you like specify optional dependency. You know what I mean because I have Dev and anyway. I don't know there's because there's there's a bunch of different different types right this. We went through all this while we're still after all this time developing some n. p. m. features echoed pen and it's just a you know it's a Hornet's nest nest of difficulty of course but we'll get there but anyway. There's like there's dependencies independence these right like those those are pretty clear and you know the idea is. I understand that yeah that was clear but then there's another kind right that are but they're not optional though there there's a middle kind. I forget what that's once called test or is it no TESCO's into the death I think in the the truth is the people get them wrong. All the time and it's kind of like doesn't matter you know even like pretty big reposed just have the wrong stuff in the wrong section and I will tell you man. I will never forget the day I I I wanted to get. AM PM package counter package so and an PM installed package counters thing like that and at an end installs it was a whole bunch of stuff in at some point it starts recompiling SAS for like a command line utility that counts the number of packages in a folder and like I just was like Oh man. I'm out of here like I just wanted you to like. Parse my package lock or something or like just give me a rough number but Surg like recompiling SAS and so I just I quit out of it but it's also say somebody had some dependency in there that triggered it another dependency that didn't need to be there so dependencies are rough. It's pure that's the one I was thinking of which is just like here dependence yeah. It's like ten John Shaw. Maybe even what's your what's an example of Dave J. Query plug in like fit or some bids. You might j queries appear dependency because it's like like it needs J. Query but it's not it's like it's peer. You know I don't know. I don't know if that's a good okay yeah. It doesn't Need J. Query to run to execute it but it Kinda. Does I guess so maybe it is. It's a tricky one but I think of it as like. It's a it's just something else that you probably need to go with it but it's not not necessarily a dependence. yeah that's wild that is definitely is used so good luck yeah. I can't even yeah live here on the Puck as I can't. I'm trying to like be like win. Would I use that exactly am mm-hmm. That's tough anyway well. Is that our last question. let me read one more. I'll just pick one off of our of our Trello trello integration here. Why Not Evan Minto writes in I can't remember if you've talked about this but what's up with customized built in elements chrome sixty seven recently enabled them and fire foxes working on an implementation but far as safari seems fundamentally permanently opposed to them. Do you know what he's talking talking about. What's a customized built an element like a a web component. A yeah like the is equals syntax on customer uh-huh right right right like button is my button and you as a bunch of behaviors and bind a bunch of stuff so you can you get all the benefits of button and you you can write your own Java script and stuff to it. Yeah instead of like your top level is basically like the top level rapper of this is going to be a button. Mike Mike and then I want you to modify sounds shadow dom inside of the button do everything you know. I could see everything inside a scary but also cool okay like the means stopping people from implementing their own buttons like L. and if you think about like audio or something like that like audio is is podcast player or something in has like the you know one x two x three x buttons or whatever you think like that like like these would be like ways to extend extend native elements and even like the show dom to give your own. Ui and like can or select is custom select you know like like like I'm going to take a segment box and making my own thing so these are kind of common use cases for that.

PM front end developer J. Query Zach Trello trello TESCO Dash F. E. D. Pwa Evan Minto Mike Mike n. p. m. John Shaw Dave J. eighty M
Building the State Departments Website with Tracy Rotton

How I Built It

28:04 min | 1 year ago

Building the State Departments Website with Tracy Rotton

"Then there are aspects of the state department's work that maybe i'm not a particular fan of of and so maybe i will you you know opted not participate in particular sub sites or whatever but that remains to be seen the next the next goal on this overall project project is to take all of the <hes> embassy websites for united states embassies around the world and move them into this new design and just one more common. I know this was like a small question with a very big answer but what are the first <hes> tweets tweets that i saw when it when it was launched but nobody made any announcements is is somebody who oh they redesigned the website to be part of the administration's propaganda or something along the way and that tweet ended up getting deleted but that sure that kinda hurt because we really didn't design zayn this with any particular political view administration ethos in mind. The design is really meant to be agnostic hostak. The content is whatever the current administration is going to put in as content you know in in two years. We may have another administration. Their priorities are gonna shift and we're going to have different content or it. May stay the same anymore who knows what the future bricks but the goal of this was not to support anyone political view support any particular party eighty ninety nine point nine percent of the people who work in the federal government in this area are career civil servants who served through the trump administration the obama administration situation bush administration back to clinton in some are in some cases so it's really not a political objective. It's <hes> you know. Let's <unk> promote. The priorities of our particular agency and the state department has priorities that i can support whereas other agencies not so much. This episode is brought to you by pantheon starting a new project looking for a better hosting platform pantheon is an integrated traded set of tools to build launch and run websites. Get high performance hosting for your wordpress sites plus a comprehensive toolkit to supercharge your routine and help you launch faster on pantheon you get expert support from real developers best in class security and the most innovative obata technology to host and manage your websites. You can sign up a new site in minutes with a free account. You only pay when it goes live. That is my second favorite feature to pantheon only to the easy ability to create dub staging and live servers and push to get hub. It's very easy to set those things up on pantheon so you can head over to pantheon dot i._o. Today again to set up a free account pay only when it goes live thanks so much pantheon for their support of this episode and this season of how i built it people think that every federal agency adopts the face of the current president didn't but i mean it's not like you put any presidential like any campaign slogan on the website right. It's this is the state department. These are like you said people like you and me. Maybe people slightly better than me 'cause they've dedicated their life to to civil service and they're they're serving the they're serving the cause and the constitution and <hes> i think that's <hes> that's a very admirable viewpoint. I'm really glad i asked that because i was hoping you you would enter in that vein and you definitely did so <hes> that's fantastic <hes> now as far as let's talk tech now right. That's why we're both talk. Talk about all absolutely so you are the technical architect for a federal agency's website <hes>. This website is probably existed since the clinton administration. I'm gonna gas in some way shape or form. What was that <hes> just in general what was that like well as i said they had a proprietary customized cms <hes> that looked look like it had been built in the clinton administration to be frank <hes> and so basically if if we just scrap that the whole thing and started from scratch there was a lot of content migration that happened because some things got preserved but you could actually see what the old sites lights look like because they archive after every administration they don't take the site down so you can go back and see the obama era <hes> website. It's all it's all archived on on sub domains and then go back to george w bush etc <hes> so those sites will still exist and will continue to exist permanently in their existing form <hes> from you know as of last week in may fifteen twenty nineteen onwards. It's it's going to have this new design. <hes> they've poured it over a lot of the content <hes> into the new format but that was a very painstaking process. There was has no automated like migration tool. It was really a bunch of people on the state department just going over documents. Ten thousand of them ended up getting moved over <hes> so that was an entire atlassian task on its own to do that well. That's wild <hes> as as you were talking. I managed to find some of the it looks like it's a year range. <hes> rights for example nineteen ninety-seven hyphen in two thousand and one dot state dot gov is the archive for the most recent clinton administration state <hes> state department website. I'm so that's that's super interesting. I think i caught the last one before your redesign which looks very interesting. I want to say big improvement. <hes> your design over the most recent one <hes> but that's not so that's a very interesting thing that was archived and i guess they hired you knowing that you were wordpress person so did did you have to make the word press cell or they knew they wanted to use where now they had they had picked the word processing technology before hey come and then had found me out because of my association with bert press part of the driving factor was that the embassy websites that i am mentioned before actually are already on wordpress and that's actually a multi instance so one sub site for every embassy around the world so about two hundred give or take so kind of using that synergies to use fancy buzzwords was one one of the driving factors of moving this word press because they had the competency in place they actually already have contractors who are responsible for the maintenance of the embassy sites so it was kind of leveraging known technology on that front gotcha and that makes sense if they want to bring the new design into the fold presumably it'll be a little bit easier since they're both on wordpress <hes> and <hes> we will talk about that when we get to the title question but <hes> as far as <hes> the research that goes into this position right because they had already chosen wordpress for a number of reasons <hes>. I'm sure they had other contractors but what how did you prepare for this job. What kind of research went into. I'm about to do a redesign. I'm going to help the redesign for a government agency. How's that going to work so a lot of it was handled by the firm that hired me and i am purposely not naming names because of all the contractual issues you know some companies are allowed to take credit for things and others are not so. I don't want to step on any of those issues so the firm that had hired in me at all ready started doing the u._s. Work a lot of the visual design work and they what they did is they were working like one sprint ahead at the tech team <hes> when that came in and this is like april of twenty eighteen so this has been thirteen months works yeah it's definitely the longest project checked ever been near us like three months move on but they had some contractors hired for for the positions that they needed so the couple of back end developers couple of front end developers who were staff of the agency and they were like looking for one more and the goodness of friend of mine who i had worked with at a previous agency <hes> was available and came on board <hes> and he was like like just instrumental so we basically that was most of the early work was putting together the team <hes> through the mixture of people who were already working for the agency and people who were brought in as contractors like myself <hes> and then it was just basically you know. Where do we start. What do we use as a starter theme well. That's where kind of it was less research and more of while you hired me so i'm going to do things my my way and that's where we used underscores as the starter theme and we used sas as the front end <hes> c._s._s. kind of processor and a lot of those kind of decisions. Were were just kind of driven by this is the way i always do things so it's going to be quickest if we just kind of keep those practices involved because they've worked for me for for years and might as well stick with what works yeah that's great and i mean you're basically coming to a blank slate right because you're switching content management systems so it's not like you're like we need to support these plug ins or we need to support. There was no legacy code to have to deal with at all the plug ins that we brought in were the ones that i've used in the past or or we researched and and we're the ones that met the needs <hes> again i we can we can dive more into tech now or we're gonna die more into tech later but i'm some other early decisions. Were not to use gutenberg which was ask actually got that question on twitter yesterday the reason in for not using who was a this was before wordpress five point zero was released. <hes> in gutenberg was not stable and for the amount of development. We had to do <hes> it. It was just not going to be a good choice to go with something that was still so much in flux and so instead we used a <hes> heavy heavy use of a._c._f. Pro advanced custom fields pro to build custom templates that the state department needed they meet a variety of different aren't templates to meet their content type so different template for bureaus which would have a particular information that we have you know different template for landing pages ages or policy issue pages or those kind of things that each require different information so it was just a better better way of sticking with the classic editor and using a c._f. Perot as basically or continental system for most cases yeah. That's i mean that sounds like an incredibly good approach approach. <hes> and i know it's something that i've heard other agencies doing right like they'll. They will generously use a._c._f. Pro- <hes> or some other her <hes> custom fields thing but i'm a big fan of a._c. Of pro- <hes> and they'll just straight up in some cases hide the editor <hes> and they'll have of you know these boxes that are specifically designed to display this information and to your point right. If you started this thirteen months ago that is when enberg and five point out we're supposed to launch and then it got delayed so kind of making that decision early on in the process tesla was probably a good one right <hes> do you do you have plans to support gutenberg in the future or not at not at this point joint. I mean at some point we can re re. <hes> you know come back to that. Maybe we also as i said we have to. The embassy see sites to work on neck. So do we go but also the amount of content just even today i have worked on other projects since then <hes> one of which i'm using gutenberg and one of which i'm not and i just find that the the content entry process using gutenberg a lot slower than it is for the kind of the old fashioned continents are classic editor way so you're dealing with the volume of data <hes> they had to migrate over slowing down if it took twice as long to enter in one page of content that was going to significantly impact further. You're not that we did have some impacts in schedule. It was the one month furlough did not help his is that state department was one of the agencies that got furloughed so that was not conducive to the time line obviously but anyway any any kind kind of slowed down like that would have just introduced more delays and at some point you just say no more delays yeah absolutely i i mean i think it's it's <hes> gutenberg is in this weird middle area between like content editor and page builder and it's it's certainly good for some things but <hes> again i it's a case by case basis and i think in this case it probably would have hurt the project more <hes> so as as we're talking talking about kind of the tech stack you mentioned underscores in sas tools. I'm a big fan of a._c._f. Pro another another great tool. <hes> let's get into the title question. How did you build it and as you answer this question. I m curious to know if you designed with the multi site project it in mind if they told you up front hey we're going to do this next or if they told you that like halfway through the project or whatever okay so first of all. We're gonna have to change the name of your podcast because because it's not how i built this. It's how we built this. This was a team a cast of dozens we had u._s. Designers continent architects rex front end developers back end developers full stack developer such as myself so it wasn't one person and i really we don't want to fall into the the the hacker news like she should like ten percent of the work. It takes one hundred percent of the credit. I'm not taking hundred presentiment presentiment anything. This was a huge team effort and so again. It was an agile process. The designs per template were happening. A sprint ahead of the development work which i really wasn't a fan of because as designers honors moved onto next template. We didn't really foresee certain modules being reused that ended up getting reused because they decided okay this macho macho works for this page in this context and so we had named things in a certain way and and <hes> constructed the file structure in a certain way and now we have to go back and change it because something that is specific one template is now shared across multiple templates so would've loved a little bit more or of a holistic approach in terms of the design but you know you we did go back and retrofit things as we had to so so so that was that part of it as far as designing with the mission and the multi site in mine that was even the cards and then was a little bit because of how the structure of the contract worked so this agency that initially hired me came in and all they were tasked with with state dot gov and not even to get it to launch basically the initial build. The contract ran until like the end of of last october. I remember going into a meeting the tape before halloween as basically this is my hand off. This is how it works. This is where the code is. This is my email if you we need to reach me by sia. I thought i was done. I thought that was it my contract with the other agency and it and and i was off to do my other things under tokyo studios then about a month later i got a call from the contracting firm a federal government contracting firm firm who had taken over the contract and they were like well. We have this project redoing the state dot gov website and we won. Ah we heard your name and we thought you might be good for this project. I'm like well. Let me tell you something about the history of this. You know i was on the team that built that right and ed. I think they were just a little coy so they ended up getting hired by the federal government contracting for that was taking this to launch and then they were the ones who were told like in the future after the state dot gov launch. You're going to be working on the embassy sites so that was my first inkling like ah after i thought i was done with this thing i was going to move on to my next thing. I'm coming back in michael corleone everything every time. I think i'm <music> out. They pulled me back in yeah yeah so so that's where we are now and actually now one of the things i'm working on. Actually in the next brand is like a piece of the site that the original agency never actually got to we just didn't have the time <hes> kept kicking connect down the road and now it's ending back on my play and guess what i'm going to be coding in about two weeks. Is this piece of functionality still being done so take with

Gutenberg Clinton Editor Clinton Administration United States Obama Administration George W Bush Atlassian Barack Obama Technical Architect Michael Corleone Content Editor Perot President Trump Twitter Wordpress
"front end developer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"front end developer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"But also make it come to live with not so much effort. You're mentioning this emphasis on the front end developers access and ability in a quickly with the deployment tool. So what's the modern interaction between a front end developer? And the back end developers. We still do have back end code yet. That's an excellent question as well. So they're many ways that you can sort of architect a front application, the most popular one that has emerged is that you're fraud and application consumes a series of API, I n points. So the front. Developer can start by working against existing API. If there's one available would was seen some organizations is that they didn't go yet through the process of untangling the front from their API or back in code. So an example of this. You have a PHP script that say that talks directly to my sequel, an outputs HTML's result. So that actually works extremely well. Because there are no hops in. No, there's no network latency. There is no machinery between go to the source of truth in out putting with the user wants, which is some piece of HTML with some data is interested in. We're that breaks down is that you say, okay, I'm going to create a mobile application now. So how do I access the source of truth? Well, you have to breathe a new series of back in once that query your data in the out put it in a way that the mobile app. Nation in use in the reason that this breaks down is that now we have to sort of coin volving ways of clearing your back end. So most organizations in some form or another are thinking about okay, let's separate the raw data exposure, namely, the bacchanalia beyond points from the front system that consumes it in by doing that we can continue to or front and independently or even go to more platforms. So you're asking how does the find developer than interest in deploy? Well, one of the best ways is that this front developer will iterative on their re angular view location. And then they'll know that there is some API documentation that they can use to sort of query their data for a company that super important because by having that AVI than the expose API documentation other consumers or third parties that might want to build on top of your. Company's data and API ability. So this is where we also see the emergence of graph Curiel. This is where we see the ability for the front of develop produce worry about their job in the best possible way. Now, what's unique about our platform is that we give the developer. Also, the ability to define some of the functions that go into the back end in even translate this spectrum of pliant only rendering also server rendering, which has a very important advantage. When it comes to minimizing latency in increasing access to search engines on so this idea that it can build a really really modern front application without making any concessions interests with performance and scale ability for the modern needs. You're describing a lot of trends. Here are the major cloud providers like Amazon web services or. Azur?.

front end developer developer Amazon fraud
"front end developer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"front end developer" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"So there are frameworks like unity three d and they are out there to push really immersive experiences on the desktop. So if you're developing for Oculus, if you're developing for HTC, you're developing effectively, what is the three d game? And you're using pretty heavy duty, rendering engines and desktop software. And you're pretty much developing in C, sharp or. Uva so sort of more traditional desktop applications with a focus on graphics and three d math. So if you're interested in that stuff that's pretty much where VR is at right now. But if you're a front end developer there are ways to get around that react three sixty and a frame are the two major web platforms for developing three d applications, and these are sort of like the next level abstraction on top of the three d graphics engines. So you have something like three which is a three d graphics library for handling three games in Java. Scripts react in a frame or effectively built on top of those with the mindsets of the front end developer. I've done demos in both a frame and react. And it's amazing. How basically with a few lines of code. You can put a cube in front of your face. And it actually looks three d so I think what's cool about these frameworks is that they have severely reduced down. The. Earlier of entry for someone like a front end developers to start getting involved in these things I made a demo for a talk one time. And I think I wrote five lines of HTML didn't even write any JavaScript, and I had a Hello immersive world application to demo people on their phones and people were just blown away. And they were saying, wow, how long did that take you to write how much code is there? And I was like, well, I know this is going to sound embarrassing, but I wrote zero JavaScript for this. It was all based on the framework, and people were blown away the fact that you could do so much with so little was amazing. So then think about what how it would happen. If you actually started developing a real application. I mean, the sky's the limit for front end development in VR..

front end developer HTC Uva
"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

"Which is as you can't really learn from other people's problems as much. Yeah. It's it's like. It's like good like bathroom reading or something. You're like, oh, that's I see. Yes. Yeah. So. Connected to the other code, and then he killed a work. And you're like, I can't do any of that stuff. So what about you know, too much time left show? Let's do really quick you like to know like like if you've been involved in hiring a little bit like, what do you what do you think of if you were going to snatch somebody up from a team year on what's like, a really good trait? You would look specifically about you know, a front end developer. What's what makes for a good one that you would higher up? I don't really get involved in thin hiring because it stresses me out. But I like to work with people that are smart. I don't care about what you know. Now, I care about what you can learn in like this is why like all of the questions like new react. Really? Well, I don't care like do, you know, how to like do, you know, how the web works and the dumb where can you learn react in a week if you had to you can cool we're going to get along. Great. And then people who are sort of open to suggestions. I don't really all of the things that I like in an engineer our personnel like human traits, not engineering traits. I think inherently all of us have the ability to be a good engineer. I think not all of us have an ability to be a good co worker, and I care more about that one as a result. So like people were open to other opinions other solutions like being able to take your, you know, no as an answer. Like, do you think I should do it this way? No. I think that's wrong. That's not a, you know, something personal about you is just like. We can do this better. You shouldn't get like panicked about this or like overreact or anything like that. But again personality traits all of them be nice humans. I wanna work with nice humans. We just Bill JavaScript is not. Not you know surgery. We'll be fine. All right. Let's take the last little part to do. Some do our play. Our little our little game here in this series. I think this is the second or third time we have a somewhat new batch of dribble shots, we're going to look at and and we're just gonna I looked at them. And they're all pretty I don't know what to say you're not supposed to look at them yet. Just kidding. You can look at it. So big deal, but the but the idea is to just to click and look, and then let your front end developer brain churn a little bit and like Intel us what you see right away. And it could be anything it could be structural or Desiigner. Like what's going to be a pain in the ass, or what's gonna be fun or anything at all? But just you know, related to like what you would think with your developer brain. So this first one is called progress board interface for education platform looks like little Kanban thing look at this. And I thought they were all the same screen could Trent translate from them. But is it like a trailer where you? Dragging it appears to be kind of Trillo e. Yeah, combine well, you're going to have to drag and drop and that is the biggest nightmare the universe. So good to have fun. Doesn't even matter. Just use the app you. Thing works in most of the cases, unless you're gonna have like a shadow rid or something. Where it goes on an ipad. Yeah. Yeah. You can't drag her. Yeah. Anything that has to do with drag gives me also it's not accessible because you have to drag good luck is going to be great. Do you push back on stuff? Like that. Do you kind of say like I pushed back on things if they're like hard engineering problems. But I think they're good good thing to work on a allow it. But if it's a like this if I think the thing to push back here is to make sure that it's also acceptable. Like if I can drag can I still use your thing? Then if we haven't thought about this problem, then I think we should think about first big on accessibility. Okay. Next one..

front end developer engineer Intel developer Trent
"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

"Like, the back in person doesn't care about the user or doesn't care about websites 'cause they kinda do to right? There's hopefully allowed not to right. Like if you're the person who's writing the SQL code for the database. I think you're totally allowed not to care about the user, this is your personal choice because at that point. You're like delegating responsibility. So what I'm trying to say is that I think is totally fine to not want to call yourself a front end developer too. I liked okay. Now, we're getting to a little bit that you can be this back into you can care about the user if you want to, but your job cannot include that because you're so busy worrying about other stuff user might be. You know, the front end developers. We need to use your stuff who going to get upset. If your stuff is really slow, like whatever services, you're building. And you know, python or go or whatever it is that the front end developers are going to use their your users at this point. So you know, everybody has a user wherever you are in the stack. Somebody's your user. Your we're engineers except for in Quebec, you're only an engineer engineers, you pay your taxes. Really? So I graduated from an engineering degree, but I'm not allowed to call myself. An engineer exa- pay my engineering gilded dues. Oh, oppressive Canada. We can impact that. Well, that's been a. Yeah. I mean, so that's that's fascinating. I mean, certainly that's been talked about over the years. Like, I what you'd literally called yourself engineer in the beginning of this show bit. And maybe I don't know. But in Quebec, it means something for real, whereas not that officially your job title cannot be an engineer unless you're part of the guild, and you've paid the money dollars. It's mostly about the money dollars feeling. Yeah. But as a hold on pause pause. If Dave Rupert starts guild called front-end guild. You can't be a front end developer unless you pay Dave Rupert that is that is a fact. Okay. Well. Teams. We're starting to nil see here. Start a little business here side project. Gosh, that's a great way to wrap up the series. Chris if you just pay us, your friend would be a twist certainly would be like the podcast, I will send you an invite male hope gate keeping because. Chris, no. That Chris bed. But so what you know. Like, I mentioned the beginning of the show. There's a bit of this. I don't know. Thing that we've been hearing from different other developers we've interviewed for the series where there's kind of a a split almost in the in the you know, that you can be this kind of a I don't know I'll call it like a hard core Java script engineer, and that that's just kind of a different person and a different role and a different job in a different everything than than maybe somebody in your word, like a Justice, kind of exclusive the pixel e you know, that just kind of thinks of you. I you X land a little more heavily. Yeah. But also if you're jealous is going to live on site, though, you have to, you know, consider the place where your job is gonna live like if you're going to completely ignore that, the fact itchy CSS exist. And you're gonna write everything Java script and also deliver that to the user..

engineer front end developer Quebec Chris bed Dave Rupert Canada exa
"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

03:45 min | 1 year ago

"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

"You with your creatively. Stuck it doesn't make you any less of an artist's though are we past that? Yeah. I hope dont if you think that art is like having to make your own cotton for your canvas. Then I think we're going to disagree on that term anything anything that helps you make the thing that you have you have a vision to do something. Whatever helps you get. There is totally think we should be working out for where we from me like being able to say like yo DJ drop a beat. And like just based on. How how I said beat the robot says, okay, I got this. Like, very bad mouth sounds fairly close. It not about like how you say beat. But we totally have these models where like if you give them like a like a little bit, though, a little beat then it's able to sort of try to to drum Q drummed, not how like everybody else is drums, but like how your jumps in particular or in again like this was really boring because it all depends on what you're training your want alone. If you're only training your model. I don't know the works of Chopin, obviously, only going to sound like Chopin. But if we train your model, and like how Dave Rupert makes music than it's gonna make deeper music, which is kinda dope. If you're a musician. You're like, I'm stuck creatively in this thing. Like, what would you know, what would better Monaco do right now? And it's like, I can't us better Monica. And then he gets this like you idea, and they can use it to make music on. So okay. I would like to see the robot with robo Jay Z. If you're into able to I don't know in this is this podcast is airing. But this weekend we're going to the conference where when announcing this like set of able to plug ins, so he can use our models inside of able to drug in drop little clips that are made with machine learning. So, you know, future listeners this these kids are out now go check them out. Somewhere on the magenta. That'd page hasn't been made yet. You are L is you are L chair. Yeah. So we asked you on. Because what I mean, you know, people listening to this series. I'm sure they're like, oh, this is going to be a different approach to this thinking like a front end developer. What about you? Do you self identify that way? I mean, certainly right Java script, right? That's a front end thing. Isn't it? I write the Jarvis curbs the pixels. That makes me a friend in developer. Yeah. Things on the web. I get upset when they're slow. It's totally developer. Yeah. Oh, yeah. Getting mad about performance. So this you get him come team. But you have a meeting, and you're like going from zero to seven when you look at this trace how much do you hyperventilate seven? Welcome to the family. You too can working. That's what I was going to ask is, what do you think? What what does that mean to you in a way if you had to think about those like what's a front end developer? I guess is that it is just hyperventilating up at performance scores. Think you are the person in charge of getting the pixels to the user. And then like here, you can be the person that makes the job is behind the pixels. Somebody else makes an when I say pixels, really patronizing. I mean, like all of the dominant the styles or I'm just summarize them as the pixels. But if anything to do with that I think if you're like in any way concerned about what a user's experience on the web. Is that makes you a front end developer because that's the front end. Right. You do the things to the front end. It's a made up. It's a made up term rain. This is the problem with all of these terms we've made them up like ten years ago. And then we caught up, and we're like turns out the web isn't just east documents. Now what? And then, but you always if I struggle the phrase in in a way, that's like doesn't sound..

front end developer Jay Z. Dave Rupert Jarvis ten years
"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

03:35 min | 1 year ago

"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

"You're listening to another episode of the chef touch. Oh fuck. I thought about front end web, design and development. I'm Dave Rupert in with Chris queer? Hey, we are continuing with our series gosh where a whole bunch deep in their all called how to think like a front end developer. And then we have a special guest in we dive deep into their brains and minds and find out about stuff because the thesis that starting to develop is that is that maybe just maybe front end web development despite it being such a common job title out there in the world on the job boards across the world. It means very different things, and the people that have that same job title or self identify that way, or whatever do extremely different things and think about think about their jobs in extremely different ways. And it's just weird and we're going to dig into that. Little bit. We have Monica here. Hi, Monica decline. Practice. Dinka Lesko is just rolls off the tongue. We should that before the show. But where are you? What do what do you? What's up? What do you do your at the Google right Google? I'm an engineer. I work on a team called magenta, which is under brain, we do machine learning for music generation, and Arjun ration- and all sorts of creativity. And a hand seen tools that is fascinating. And it sounds like right up your alley because I know I've seen so many demos from you. That are like I made a sweet drum machine. And you know, everything you do is seems to have some element of art to it seems like, yeah, it's a really great team in like it works really well with everything that I want to do which is make awesome. So is the output. You know, when I think of machine learning in front and Java scrip- stuff, I think of I dunno tensor flow. I guess, but is that output from your team, or is that some of the else's thing? Or do you have your own version of that we wrapped tensor flow? So we use tensor flow for the Matthew bits machine learning you bids and then on top of. Did we have extra sugar like the web? Why'd you EPA, which is, you know, new levels of pain, I'm experiencing on the web now. And then at the end, we put them all together, and you have like little models where you're like, hey model. Give me a new drumbeat that sort of sounds like my drumbeat, and the model goes dope. Here. Wow. So is it are there is there are artists out there that are I went to. Here's a story over the sorrow to a quilt show. And I learned this story about there's this thing that helps you make a quilt called like a long arm or something like that. It's like a it's like a quilting with literally as a really long arm on. It helps you helps you quilts. And now, it's like almost assumed that you use what I'm sure there's like old school people that like do it the old way or whatever. But it's like not rare to have a quilt that was crafted using alarm thing. But in the, you know, the first quilt shows that were showing quilts like to be appreciated as art that were made from long arms. There was like uproar in the world. You know, like, I can't believe that this machine made quick possibly be shown next to my hand quilted quilt. Oh my God. Then musical example of that is tarred pedals. Right. Like there used to be a time before Qatar petals guitar sounded really pure, and you held them really weird. And then somebody was like. We're going to destroy this instrument and everybody uses it. So that's kind of what we wanna do. You wanna make smarter, you know, data powered gator pedals that make your instruments sound better that help.

Dinka Lesko front end developer Google Dave Rupert Monica Qatar EPA engineer Chris
"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

"It seems like that's kind of on top of your mind as a front end developer. How do you kind of approach? So so I think like the the first aspect of performances, obviously like measuring like you want to you. You can't improve performance unless you know, where your bottlenecks are. So so that's kind of like why we have Apollo engine the cloud service that will give you like field by field metrics, and they're also definitely some precautionary measures. You can take as well. So, you know, we have our clients I'd cashing that I talked about earlier, but then we also have cashing layers on the server so with Apollo server, there's this like data sources API that actually sets up a cash it's in memory by default, but you can swap out like redness meme cash, or whatever so it hooks up to rest API's now were planning ones for like sequel g. European the future, but it will actually partially cash your your resources for you and use existing caching logic from your rest API's, so it's kinda hard to visualize. But if you think of like, a graph Q L query, maybe for like, a Netflix like site or something where where you have movie data and usually that that movie data static right like things like the title and the summary. Those are things that aren't updated that often see you would want to cash those for longer than say, you know, a movie playback rate like a users like watching a movie or whatever. So with this partial query cashing, you're able to like automatically cash that static data and only fetch the the dynamic data. So so putting in precautions like that also like, I think it's just you know, taking precautionary measures with that. And then also measuring in just falling up. Where your bottle next hour. And then, you know, working to improve them, Google XML to graph Q L for you. See if there's any plug ins there. Yeah. No. It's nothing nothing. Really? But it did. But it graph for whatever reason is to is has inspired a new generation of click baby headline technology writing graph Q L will top top five. Grefe Q plugging. Here's the top three..

front end developer Netflix Google
"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

03:50 min | 1 year ago

"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

"Is that kind of a pitfall? I mean, I know like Facebook uses this so probably not. But how does that work? Yeah. No, absolutely. That is a valid criticism of graph Curiel. And that is what will happen if you don't take the proper precautions in place to, you know, make sure that you're limiting your query depth, for example, because you know, it's graph. You don't want to endlessly in like traverse, the graph so many levels down. So you can limit your query depth. You can limit your query complexity. It'll kind of there's plug ins that you can use to analyze the complexity of your query, and you can place limits on those you also want to be smart about you know, when you're writing your queries and making sure that they're not too expensive. So that's kind of why we have our cloud service Apollo engine that gives you field by field metrics for, you know, resolve timing. For each step of the query. So that way, and then that integrates with like VS code tool, for example, which will tell you as you're writing your query out how expensive that query isn't how much time it takes on average for that queried tourism seriously that's fancy right in VS code when you write a little graph y'all various like that's probably gonna take zero point two five milliseconds. Yep. Yeah. And it uses real it uses real data. So that's something that were were announcing at like, it's like technically had we've had a Bill of it for a while. But we're trying to make it perfect before we announce in two weeks. But yeah, if you're using Apollo engine, and you're using the VS code extension. You'll literally see the query timing right there in your editor. And I think like our intention is really to use these metrics to help front end developers make smarter decisions about the queries that the writing. So that way, you know, you're preventing bugs before they happen. And. Will eventually be able to make smart suggestions on you know. Hey, this queries to deep pay the squares too complex it takes too much time. So that way, you know, you're eliminating problems before they happen. And I think that's really kind of our goal with graft ya'll is is making it safe because you can do a lot of things wrong. If you're if you're just, you know, implemented yourself and your kind of cobbling tools together. But that's really why we have this complete platform. So you as a front end developer don't have to worry about things like caching and performance when you're developing because another empowering thing to you like just right? The query and adult something else will handle the fancy performance. Magic of it. Does make me think like we have like, you know, I can think of one area that were like nine components that all have pretty similar queries on them right in the component. Because they all need to know the username. So it all needs to user query returns, the username because they all need it or something similar to that. You know, even though they all say like, oh, while the that particular query takes this many milliseconds, it's not like it runs that query nine times. That's also part of the magic of Apollo isn't it that I like kind of like smashes all those similar queries together. And and just makes it once. And then sprinkles that data out to all the components that need it. Yes. So that's that's kind of like the client side cache in how we normalize the data. So like, essentially, you can kind of think of graphical query in her mind is like this nested structure, but the Apollo cash will split out any entities with type name in an ID. So like say, you have a list of movies, it'll split each movie out into its own separate entry into the cash with like, it's idea. So that way like say, you were editing something on like a movie detail page than it will also show up for the query of the list of movies because of the normalized cash that's kind of something that we do..

front end developer Facebook Apollo editor two weeks
"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

"It's hard to really define what exactly a front end developer is because there's so many different specialties. Right. Like, you can be a specialty a specialist in SPG animations and be a front end developer. And not write any Java script at all. Or you could be more working on the data layer like I. I am not writing any CSS, for example, and still be considered a front end developer. So I think it's kind of you know, as long as you're touching you. I are touching something like data layer that's tangentially related to you. I think you know, you can identify as a front end developer. So that's the tie that binds, though, is that like touches something the user touches. Yeah. Yeah. I think that's a pretty good qualification because it's it's now expanded to more than just websites, right? Like before I was working in a Paulo. I was a UI developer working on react and react needed. So because I'm working on react native. Does that make me a mobile developer? Like does that make me a front end developer? Because it's Java script and reacted. I'm sharing components with the web as well. So it it definitely I think Java script, and you know, react in and really everything that's kind of popped up in the past. Couple of years of really expanded the definition of what a front end developer. And I think that's really exciting. Because there's you know, there's always something new to learn, and there's so many awesome things going on in the system. So there's different specialties. You know, I like that you mentioned like an S Fiji animator. I don't think people a lot of people would bring that up as a as a friend and special be totally is, of course. And so, but the biggest divide we've been seeing so far I think is is specifically between people who are like quite good at and specialize in and like in our hired to do and work directly on that Java script Jimmy ring layer, which is like I deeply. No react. I bring my react skills to my job. I built components I deal with data. I engineer this thing. Maybe I'm even performance focused, and I care about that and work that but what I don't do is is necessarily like really dig into like excess ability or or scaling out are designed system or things like that. Like, they just that's just not what they're interested in. It's now they're hired to do. It's not what their job needs them to do. But they're both front end developers. You know, like, that's. Do you see that around because you're in it kind of interesting position, you work on developer tooling, and you know, go to conferences and such. That seemed to be like divide right now or do you see it differently? Yeah. I mean, I think it's it's pretty accurate. I do think though like as a front end developer like, you should have basic fluency and accessibility, regardless if you're building you I you should know basic principles of accessibility. And not just leave that to a specialist, but I think. Yeah. I guess maybe there is probably a little bit of a divide between people who are working constantly and HD mountain CSS more people who are doing like Java script engineering working on a data layer, you know, working on state management that sort of thing. But I think the important thing is that we should all try to be you know, fluent and in all aspects and just try to learn from each other as much as possible and not say that anyone is superior to the other. Because even though I work on like more Java scrip- data layers stuff. I still really respect people who are awesome bet CSS and SVG and stuff because it's it's really really tough. I think you know, the more that we can kinda share ideas from each other. I think the better off we're will be love it. So process wise is kind of a question we've been asking people likely Canada if you were involved in a project, let's say rather than just stepping outside of being. Engineering manager at a tools kind of kind of places in it looks like in the past..

front end developer developer Engineering manager Fiji engineer Canada
"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

04:05 min | 1 year ago

"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

"And that's something that's really important as a front end developer. Yeah. It's it is really a cool thing. If you asked me, I'm pretty pretty stoked on it. Lately. As we've we've started using it echoed Penn. But I, you know, I think some people are kind of become aware of graph Q L, and they see the maybe their first exposure to it is that like vaguely Jason like syntax curly brackets. But with no commas or colons or anything where it's just like describing this piece of data that you. Want? You're like, I want movies and movies have directors and in the you know, whatever any and you can see that. And then you like that somehow magically turns into Jason data that has that stuff. Like, that's the query. Is that first thing I described in the data that comebacks is that second thing, and you're like, wow, that's cool. But then maybe you're just like, well, I don't I don't know. How to you know, whatever. Like, that's interesting. It's I like the syntax what do I actually do with that? Like, I have a maya's Q L database sitting here or something that like, it doesn't speak in that language, you know, and then and then to find out that, you know, through various tooling and stuff like, no, you this can be yours very much have killed database that code pen and through various Apollo products that have you know, can build in react and wrap our stuff. Inquiry components and get that data out of you know, the now I'm rambling, but it's just been like. Holy cow. Like, this was this was closer within reach than I than I thought it was. And so it's been it's been sweet to work with an I find it particularly kind of empowering for for our front end developers. No longer. Do we need to build out a component? And then like ask somebody for a rest API. It's kinda like no, it's it's just there. There was some configuration for us. But once that date is there, it's just kind of there forever. And it's kind of like cyanide arrest. Just cool. Yeah. Totally. I love what you said about empowering front developers. Because that's kind of where I see it as well. Like, I think Apollo and graft you'll really like lower the barrier of entry to building really complex data driven apps. Like, I actually sent out a tweet like a couple of days ago, just asking if any like bootcamp students, for example, had any experiences using graphene Apollo and I was like so blown away by the responses that. These students who were like new deprogramming were able to complete really complex apps and learn graph Q L in two weeks. So it's it's really awesome to see. I think oftentimes getting data into your is one of the most complex parts of fronted developer of development and Apollo is. Really what makes that easy? Very cool, and you know, very pleased to find out that it, I guess Apollo is what brings this particular power to it. But that it manages your your client state to things that aren't in our database and don't need to be in. We'll never be like what modal is open which tab is open like just things you kind of think of as local clients state. It handles as well and handles it kind of like at a global store level. So we had some stuff in reduction are Eappen. We're just like, oh, cool. We get to ditch that because it's so much easier to just like write date right data. Right. Client, data to it. And have that heavy kind of behavior. In the same way that changes to that data kind of trickle down to wherever needs it as long as you're subscribed to and I was like, this is great. It's just been feeling really great. So thanks for your work on Apollo. It's pretty cool. But this series is kind of you know, this show is an exactly like, let's just talk about Apollo the whole time. Although maybe we'll end up anyway. But it's kind of you know, the series is called how to think like a front end developer. So I guess we'll start with this. It sounds like you do because I I heard you say it in the pre show a little bit. Like, do you consider yourself? You think of yourself as a front end developer. I know it's not your job title. But is that your your job to some degree? Yeah. I do actually I think like front end developer is such a broad term..

front end developer Apollo Jason Penn developer two weeks
"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

02:07 min | 1 year ago

"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

"With me as Chris clear. Hey, it is. We're we're still in our in our series. How to think like a front end developer is the series of running here on shop talk show. It's been their first one of these series. I dunno have we ever run a series for. I don't know. I don't I don't mean to just ramble at the beginning here. But the the point is there's that time we did about forty two wraps. Fires. Real busy. Sure. And in the series, so far, and we've even had a little feedback about this is that we've kind of I don't know in the beginning of the series talked to people that are certainly more HTML and CSS focused or whatever. And in some people are you going to talk to any Java. Scrip- developers are developers within like a different type of skill set. And of course, we are you know, that's kind of the point of this series. So we have someone who is a front end developer comes at this job. I guess from a very interesting perspective Peggy raises, I get that. Right. Peggy. Hi peggy. Yes did. Hey, chris. Dave, thanks so much for having me on the show. I'm super excited to be here. Yeah. It's a it's it's our pleasure for sure. So the unique perspective I'm talking about it. So you are the engineering manager for Apollo graph Q L, can you tell us about that? What that job is what Apollo graph Q L is kind of set the stage for your I dunno position in the world of website. It's. Yeah. Yeah. Totally. So I am an engineering manager at Apollo where I lead a team focused on developer experience. So that's kind of a broad term by on any given day. You know, I'm helping developers on Twitter and on get hub resolve any issues surfacing any concerns. Writing documentation, speaking at conferences, giving workshops advising on some of our open source strategies. So it's it's really a abroad role. But it's very exciting. Because I feel like, you know, I'm closest to the developers who are using tools. Everyday Apollo is a complete platform for managing your data, and the technology that this platform is centered.

Peggy front end developer Chris clear engineering manager Twitter Dave developer
"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

"And then to ask them to do this or so it's not like the went and looked at some old project of theirs and be like, ooh, that's an old selector. So they're getting judged by some like old ask thing. No. I'm still this is right now, they did they made an eighteen select eighteen exactly. Yeah. Yeah. Because you know. What we like typical example was that you look at somebody CSS, and you find out that they will use in SAS something, and they were doing that thing of putting the unbe summed symbol to to sort of mimic, the the structure of the mental. So it's things which people just do. They don't understand the consequence of thought. And so you. That's a little red flag that you like, well, if they don't understand the consequences thought that probably know flooring. We long for me to be thinking about in the. Right. Because you are in a tough position here where you know, maybe that person is could be educated. And there's there's it's not like, they're that's what makes hiring so hard is because it's so personal. But yet, it's not, you know, it's one of those things like, it's cool. Like, you're going to be fine. Like, I'm not saying that you're a garbage developer. It's just that. I have to make this choice to hire one or a very few developers. And like I have to pass on you right now because you're just not far along enough along on this journey Kennedy. It isn't surprised just how many terrible developing all though, quite honestly. And the other thing that I think was caught telling us that a lot of people just refuse to do that right off the bat. And that's also quite telling that's, that's that's interesting. And then if you when you when you found this candidate to begin with, I would hope that I mean, I, you know, it's more interesting to hear you talk about this that you didn't just put up a role. That's like, hey, we're looking for a front end developer at this job. Please apply. Because that's where this. Need to be a little bit more specific than that these days because if it's person who's only skill in this world is just very new school react development kind of stuff. And you've asked them to see us thing. Well, they failed at it. And that's unfortunate that maybe they shouldn't have applied at all. Because their skill set is so is so off base from that from wounded whether the people have really strong with Simone CSS hide in the freelancing world because in the sort of the coporate will desk gills valued highly. No, I never cease to be amazed just how few very good CSS develop is they're all. And and I wonder if it's because. This kind of stigma will feel really go to h CSS. You're not really program. You don't really develop do you notice name, but they would have killed it on your test. Oh, shoe, and they was people that we were trying to find trying to find people would really strong sort of thing. So the vote was explicitly want, you know, the refugee people over to say, you still see us little bit Jove scripts great book, that's not Lissette of the core of what we're off to here. Yeah. It's tricky. I just overheard a conversation of somebody who was interviewing for a job. And it was react heavy, and they are feeling very positive about it. And they liked the interview process and they were asked to react question. They thought they did pretty well on. And it's almost seemed like it was a sure shot, and then I'll right. The end. They're like, no, you're not good enough. In the in the end question was something very very specific about a fairly new reactive PI of which they knew about articulated wide exists in. What it can do? But then got a question wrong about the actual just straight up syntax of it. And they were passed on because of that. And it just blew my mind like what kind of job like you're right there..

front end developer developer Kennedy Simone
"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

"Talk show all about front and web design development. I'm Dave Rupert. With me is Chris clear. Yeah. We still make mouth sounds to drum up excitement and this show. That's where we're at manpower amount mouth basis back at something. That's that's the that's the budget. We have around here. It's been very lucrative. This podcasting thing we are. We are we are dead in the middle of a of a series. We're doing called how to think like a front end developer and people have been really liking the series. So I appreciate that. There's been quite a few tweets said that they've enjoyed kind of what we're doing here. This is in in one sense. It's a big old research project for you know, let's see what this turns into. I think it's very likely that at the end of this that we do kind of a wrap up thing with David. I wear we where we kind of reflect upon what we've learned. Asking other developers. This kind of a similar set of questions about just where we are at in this world of and this I guess career of front end development are like are we at a crossroads and what other developers think so I'm David I always have our own opinions. But it's been so great to get the opinions of other wonderful front end developers. And we have one of those wonderful front end developers with us today. Mr Ben Frayne, how you doing Ben? I'm very good, gentlemen fact meets been about five and hoffy is lost on. So it's been a win. Yeah. We've we've talked to a lot of kind of repeat guests for this series, some new upcoming new ones too. But but it's been it's nice to catch up with with folks again. So what's what's been going on in your life? Then you've got. Well, thanks, less time. We spoke was mainly about SAS. So interestingly, no, Dona Bookham SAS. But then I probably haven't used sauce for about three is. So I I sorta don't don't move. move to. And so that's maybe something we could talk about lighter. So I'm still working bet. Three six five which the state of very different sort of issue to Gumbo, and the majority of states books, and that's very kind of complicated web op if you like so most this dividing dates as sort of very sort of finicky complex you. I I suppose it would say so you work on your your is your job title front end developer. What is do? Do. You have one the official title. Yeah. Is seedier from tend developer. So wow. You might be the first we've had on that actually had an official job title that involved the word front developer. That's good. Has joined they kind of didn't quite know what to cool it. So they said well you can and it was like well the proper tight list from ten developer. And so that's what they went with while tell you if you'd look around job boards, you will find this as a job title all over the place. I mean, we shop talk show has its own job board, and that is littered with them, of course. But anywhere, you look for tech jobs. There's lots of people looking for fairly clearly front end developers. And that's kind of part of this series is to is to dig into that a little bit. Because I think there's I think more people are. I wanna say upset, but like a little confused or flabbergasted or find that problematic in some way. Just because of how wide that spectrum is in a way. So we'll get to that in a minute. But your job title, literally is senior front end developer. And do you kind of self identify that way to do like think of if somebody's are you a front developer? You'd be like heck, yes. Yes. And could. Well, so what when you think about that word or that job title? Like what what is it? I think you're right. I think these days is sort of the brood special things that could encompass and a think I liked to sort of think of people. Do you have a things we'll talk Trump's over that Trump's colts. Do you know what I mean by the we have a President Trump? But I'm not familiar with a top Trump. Yeah. We'll base it. They're like it's a plane caused game. He you have a character, for example in the characters different attributes..

front end developer developer Trump Dave Rupert Mr Ben Frayne colts official Dona Bookham David Chris clear President
"front end developer" Discussed on The Career Insider Podcast

The Career Insider Podcast

10:38 min | 1 year ago

"front end developer" Discussed on The Career Insider Podcast

"Podcast. This is your host Masada. This is episode one one one off the Meta sparked guest and this particular episode is part of the day in the life off series and if you this is the first episode you're listening or if you're joining us for the first time I have done in each of these episodes that conduct interviews news with individuals from a particular career or particular job and typically guests share that individual experiences how they got started in that particular field where the stand today some of the benefits some of the challenges of the struggles and and some advice for the audience as well and for today's episode I'm speaking with someone who is in accomplished front end developer and our guests name is Joe Casabona will find our mortar board fronton development and also about our guest as we go along but I hey joe welcome to the podcast. Hey thanks for having me. I appreciate being able to come on the show. I'm sure the audience and myself would love to learn more body union johnny but you know maybe you can help. I think it's better you explain. This is better than I do for. Those of us who are not familiar with waterfront and developer does pretty give up very high level overview yeah absolutely so when I first started making websites you were just a web developer or a web designer. You would would basically do everything yourself as the web has evolved being a web developer as kind of been not silos off but kind of divided up into different areas and so I'm a front end developer for which means I focus on building out what the user sees when they go to a website so if you visit a website you see the design you see some of the Cool Java script effects are or some of the interactions with the forms that's generally enderle. Would I do and a front end. Developer will work with H._t._M._l.. C._S._S. possibly P._H._p.. And Java script and the flip side of that as back end developer who works on kind of the under the hood stuff so a good analogy algae would-be a car. I'm the guy who details the car may be you know put the finishing paint on and stuff like that. The back end developers the guy who actually works on the motor so yeah. Thanks for giving the run. That's a great analogy so anyone can get that so so the next question obviously loved learn about your journey how he got started by you. Chose this particular field. They'll give their own in some insight on your journey yeah absolutely so I was kind of always a techy Jackie Person. I guess to give you a frame of reference. I'm thirty three years old so I got into computers in the mid to late nineties and I was big enough like fixing computers and working with the hardware side of things but I really understood the Internet we had the Internet since Nineteen Ninety eight in our house which is kind of early based on other people. I've talked to and we also had a C._D.. Burner really early on so I would like make mix CDs for people I would sell them for five bucks a pop so I got a reputation as being good with computers. Somebody at my church on the Parish Council came to me and they said Joe. We know you're go with computers. Can you make us a website and I didn't know how to do that so it was like oh I don't know like I'm never made a website before. I'm like fifteen years old at this point. I don't really know and they said we'll pay you and I was like Oh yeah. I will make you a website. So my first website was a paid GIG. I got a copy of Microsoft Microsoft front page two thousand two or something like that and I made a website using that and I really enjoyed it because it allowed me to flex my kind of creative brain but also my logical brain kind of laying out everything in so after that I was like well I'm going to let my friends and family know that I'm making websites now and I got in at the right point pretty much because it was still the early to thousands a lot of people didn't have websites and a lot of my friends parents parents where business owners new business owners and so I was able to make you know a good amount of money selling websites for between two hundred five hundred dollars a pop so what I'm hearing this is sort of an accidental career does not something that you're planned as you. When you're young just happen happen and you just jumped on it yeah so I really liked computers and I knew I wanted to do something with computers? I feel like every boy who is in my position in the early two thousand and wanted to make video games. That's like that's why they went to college and so that was kind of my thought but then I started making websites and I loved it so that was that was the path. I decided to take and I still do it to this day. So what is your typical day to day. Look like when I'm making a website so I guess I should maybe clarify here that I'm as well as a web developer. I'm also an educator and a podcast or and so I- divide my days up like that. I'll do a lot of educational content some days. I'll do my hi podcast other days but when I'm making website generally I am trying to make sure I know the latest because this is a fast changing field. I'm looking for clients and then I'm planning on a website. So maybe the best I think to do as far as my day to day goes I wake up. I get some coffee I check my email and I read a couple of blogs just to see kind of what's going on. Put some stuff aside for my newsletter and my educational content and. And then I'll boot up my code editor and figure out what project based on my project management software I should be working on say based on the time line and I use pre camp for my project manager so in there. I'll have some projects broken up by task. I try to break up my website projects pretty granular early so that I can work on one to two our tasks at a time. I find that that just makes it easy to to check the boxes often have measurable progress progress right if I'm just looking at full website and I'm like do website today. I'm probably going to get demotivated pretty quickly so I will work on a couple of projects in the morning. I'll take a break for lunch a comeback and in the afternoon the the morning is my most productive time a morning person for sure so in the afternoon. I'm usually a little bit sluggish. I'll maybe read a couple more blogs or all planned out some of the other things that I know I have to be working on and if I get a second wind I'll work on some some more of those projects in the afternoon so Josie. You're sort of living the dream right so you've been in this for years. I mean actually many years. You are sort of professional expert at that and now you're teaching others so that's that's an ESA great position to be in so you're you're reading multiple. People hats off all the things that you mentioned what are the top two or three things that you really enjoy over the others or you you would love you will do it over and over again. Compared to the other stuff to be honest. PODCASTING is probably my favorite part of my my day. I'm an extrovert or sure I work from home or myself so I don't get a lot of interpersonal interaction throughout the day except for when I'm doing my podcast so I get to talk to a lot of people and I really love having those conversations and and asking people questions and learning from them so that's probably my favorite part but if we're talking about the coding aspect men I love I get a bunch of different ideas. I'm primarily a wordpress developer upper so it's usually plugging ideas. I have and I love sketching those out and then starting to write the code. Getting started is maybe the hard part for me but as soon as I get the first working prototype I'm all about it and honestly I can fall into a rabbit hole of if I'm working on a personal project and I'm really into it. I can do that for just like several hours at the time until my wife is like hey are you ever gonna come down and like see other people and you know she. Kinda needs to remind me. Hey you've been working for a really really long time and it's Kinda late now so I think if I were to distill it until like one sentence my favorite part is solving problems with code so let me ask you this on the flip. Side are their tasks that you don't enjoy your find challenging that you approach that you don't necessarily law on the less for you in terms of enjoyment yeah. Starting a project is always really hard for me. It always takes a lot of mental inertia to take that first step and even though it's a lot of kind of minutia stuff that I could probably automate. It's just writing that first line I liked the sketching out part and like the writing the feature set and then to some extent planning it out. I have a master's in software engineering so like the software planning part is something that's been ingrained to me over about six years in college but writing that first line of code is just such a hard first step for me. I'll finish the planning. I'll go on facebook or twitter. I'll go back to my code editor. I'll start to write something and then I'll just do that cycle over but once I get that first line down I'm I'm good to go so you mentioned in a new kiss. You have a SORTA fun <hes> unconventional career path you started on your own you build it like a business is that typical are there situations where a frontal upper just wilkes for one the company and they're just creating developing for that one particular companies is that a M- assuming that is typical the most common path for a lot of especially young. Maybe like millennial developers is work for a company for a few years and and move to another company. You know my dad. He worked at Verizon while he worked at. I think it was Pacific next to it was New York. Tell for a while and then some Bell Atlantic and then verizon. He worked at that same company for thirty something years but today I think especially well maybe not especially in the development field. I've noticed that we do jump careers a lot the best advice that I never took in college because I knew I wanted to start my own business and I had done it. I freelanced basically from high school until until I graduated college and a little bit after college well time but the best advice I never took was when you graduate get a job at a company for a few years..

developer web developer front end developer Joe Casabona editor Verizon Masada Microsoft enderle Jackie Person New York Parish Council Bell Atlantic wilkes web designer Josie facebook project manager wordpress
"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

ShopTalk

03:57 min | 1 year ago

"front end developer" Discussed on ShopTalk

"Cool. Thing. I think it's cool. I school and then yeah, for to think. Okay. Well, I like that addresses like sketchy type typeface, so is an actual fog in need to render or is that just I'm hoping it's not for fun, not gonna, be like a PNG or whatever. Now. Other navy at the top. It's like that you're, I don't know the one of the very top. I'm like, no way that that's just an image, but then you know, but you need the fun because you use it throughout the page. So, yeah. Actually give me decent content like giving it would have to be at the brain that phone. Yeah, but it like angles up in a way that fonts just can't. They don't do that. You know. Oh, I guess maybe I could do like a maybe a little bit of a skew or a little bit of a rotation, maybe get that a little about. Maybe. Okay. Well, that's fun. Thanks for. Thanks for participating in our little. Let's look at dribble shots together as front end developers, happy hour on a podcast. Our. It'll be more fun for your listening in cars. You know, we're going to repeat those. So hopefully the front developers that we invite don't listen to backup so they can cheat and look ahead, but we're going to do those same shots. So if you've, you know, week after week, if you plan on listening next week to shop, duck show go, you know, in your free time, go check out the shot. So you have them up in your brain for the next time that we talk about them. This has been very great Meena. Thank you so much for coming on. It's great to hear like everyone's experiences in kind of how they start to think about how they think in approach building sites. We don't. We talk a lot about websites here on the shop, talk show, but we don't always get to like, can inhabit your brain. So thank you so much for sharing your process problem. Thank you very much in so for people who aren't following you and giving you money, how can you that wait people? Give me money money's is your chance to get one shot. What. We win saw Hamilton together. It's a, oh, yeah. Shot? Yes. So people who are not following me, I probably most prolific on Twitter, so Abby markets really what you can find me. I have my websites about codes, slim date of whatever. And yeah, those probably affected. You can get get hold of me and I, I don't have any links to give me money, but I mean it we can work something out just might please tweet at me. I will. I will figure out a way to take your money. So thank you very much for that. In your conferences mean a kiss. Excellent talks. Some I will Ouch for Meena. Sorry, good at it. I didn't have to do it, and yeah, yeah. I do love coughs. I actually my field trip or twenty nineteen is pretty wide open. So hey, look me. I like to come to deal. Awesome. Thank you again for coming on the show. We really appreciate it in thick you dear listener for downloading this in your culture choice. Be sure start favourite up. That's help people find out about the show. If you've been enjoying the series on how to think like a front end developer, please star heart or shared on Twitter mentioned us as shop. Talk show follow up on Twitter for tens of tweets month, and if you hate your job ever shop, talk show dot com slash jobs and get a brand new in because people hire people like you in Crist. Anything else like to say Joplin, Joe dot com.

front end developer Twitter Hamilton Joplin Joe dot Crist Abby
"front end developer" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"front end developer" Discussed on The Changelog

"Where does this fit in in terms of is i i don't know you that well i just met you today i'm a fan of what you've done over the years but do you have a fulltime job as this something you're pursuing doing fulltime is how does that fit into your motivation for doing this that's a really great question so when i started streaming i was a fulltime front end developer at a kickstarter which is the crop crowd funding platform yeah and i was doing quite a bit of open source and also public speaking in just side projects outside of that because i you know of his suits that would different to just what i wanted to do in my day job into this literally just started as another silly hobby that he just sort of tryout you see if it sticks in so what's interesting about that is i always kept it extremely separate you know i have my streams held every sunday so that's not a workday for me so i'm very strict about trying to keep like just postal projects for sunday to set a good example to people to to not work on the weekend if possible well at least on like your day job material in from the it actually called the attention of microsoft which is where i work now in my stream definitely made me stand out from a lot of other prominent program is in the community in especially within roles such as dev relations deb efficacy so that's what i'm doing it myself now and it was a big reason why they notice me and they reached out to me saying hey you can keep a stream on sundays like it's totally chill but we can see that you'll quite skilled at reaching the develop is so would you consider moving into dev relations as a fulltime job given that we can see already from twitch stream that you'll great at talking to other people so they didn't make it a requirement for me to stream you know microsoft related streams but it was great that that's.

front end developer microsoft