35 Burst results for "freakonomics"

Guatemala searches, Eta regains storm status, heads to Cuba

Freakonomics Radio

00:22 sec | 3 weeks ago

Guatemala searches, Eta regains storm status, heads to Cuba

"Is back to tropical storm strengthens heading for Cuba, which is bracing for a torrential rain and flooding this weekend. Forecasters say it is expected to make landfall along Cuba's southern coast, and tropical storm warnings are up for southern Florida. Meanwhile, rescue crews continue searching for those missing and Guatemala or torrential rains from then hurricane at a sparked landslides.

Cuba Tropical Storm Florida Guatemala Hurricane
Michigan Governor Disturbed by Trump Criticism and 'Lock Her Up' Chants

Freakonomics Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Michigan Governor Disturbed by Trump Criticism and 'Lock Her Up' Chants

"And as the presidential race heads into the final stretch, President Trump is campaigning in critical swing states. Tonight he's holding a rally in Carson City, Nevada after attending a fundraiser in California and is NPR's Barbara Sprint. Reports. Michigan governor Gretchen Whitmer is accusing Trump of inciting domestic terrorism over comments he made in her state this weekend. Trump held a rally Saturday in Muskegon, Michigan, where he blamed Governor Gretchen Whitmer for imposing what he sees as to severe restrictions during the Corona virus pandemic. His criticism led to a chorus of locker up chance, which Trump did not condemn. In fact, he seemed to egg on his supporters saying, quote, lock them all up. Trump will travel to Arizona Monday, where polls show him trailing former vice President Joe Biden by several percentage points. BARBARA Sprint NPR News

President Trump Governor Gretchen Whitmer Barbara Sprint NPR Michigan Vice President Joe Biden Carson City Nevada Muskegon Arizona California
Jaime Harrison, Graham challenger, raises record $57 million

Freakonomics Radio

00:49 sec | Last month

Jaime Harrison, Graham challenger, raises record $57 million

"Democrat Jaime Harrison shattered congressional fundraising records for a single quarter is NPR's Joel Rose, reports Harrison brought in $57 million in his campaign against Republican incumbent Senator Lindsey Graham. Jamie Harrison's campaign says the $57 million Hall was the most in a single three month period by any Senate candidate Lindsey Graham's campaign has not released fundraising totals for the latest quarter. Graham told Fox News. He was quote getting killed financially unquote by Harrison. But Graham's campaign questions whether the money will make any difference. South Carolina hasn't elected a Democrat to the Senate since 1998 No polls show the race is very competitive. Graham will be in the spotlight this week as chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee, which will consider the nomination of Judge Amy Cockney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

Senator Lindsey Graham Jaime Harrison Senate Senate Judiciary Committee Judge Amy Cockney Barrett Joel Rose Supreme Court South Carolina NPR Fox News Chairman
Questions remain about Trump’s health and return to the campaign trail

Freakonomics Radio

00:54 sec | Last month

Questions remain about Trump’s health and return to the campaign trail

"The White House doctor says President Trump is no longer considered a transmission. Risto others NPR's Franco Cardona's reports on the latest update from Dr Sean Calmly, Dr Connolly says the president has met CDC criteria to end his isolation. He says the president after 10 days and symptoms first appeared has remained fever free for over 24 hours, and that there is quote no longer evidence of actively replicating virus. Dr. Connelly doesn't specify that President Trump tested negative for the virus. Doctors memo comes as the president prepares an aggressive returned to the campaign trail after having been hospitalized for the Corona virus. The president is down and most major polls and his campaign is eager to shake things up. After hosting an event at the White House. The president plans to hold rallies in the coming days in key states, including Florida, Iowa in Pennsylvania.

President Trump Dr Connolly Dr Sean Calmly White House Franco Cardona NPR Dr. Connelly CDC Fever Florida Pennsylvania Iowa
Is NYC on its deathbed?

Freakonomics

09:35 min | Last month

Is NYC on its deathbed?

"Last month executives from more than one hundred and sixty of New York City's largest employers, banks, and law firms, sports, leagues, and Real Estate Developers sent a letter to the Mayor Bill De Blasio. They warned that his poor management of the pandemic was threatening long-term damage. There is widespread anxiety the wrote over public safety cleanliness and other quality of life issues that are contributing to deteriorating conditions in commercial districts and neighborhoods across the five boroughs. The five boroughs of New York. City to see you know are the Bronx Manhattan Brooklyn Queens and Staten Island. Also just so you know Bill de Blasio is Democrat who even before the pandemic was almost comically unpopular. We don't need to get into the details, but if you want to read up on him, just do a search for de Blasio that's DB L. A. S.. and. Then arrogant or hypocrite even schmuck. Considered this campaign ad from a fellow Democrat. The less bill de Blasio is the worst mayor in the history of new. York. City and that is. Rose. Congressman. You don't sound very happy about that. Blacks Rose Macau. Grossman now you and I happen to know each other a little bit through a family connection. My son, has worked on your campaign in in your office in DC. Do you saw me swear to not let that relationship influence this interview I solemnly swear rose represents new. York's eleventh district historically the only congressional district in the city, the votes Republican it includes all of Staten Island and parts of southern Brooklyn one of the highest rates of unionization of any district in America cops firemen. Teachers. Nurses. First. Responders Sanitation Workers, folks who we just recently started calling essential workers but quite frankly, they were always essential like every member of the House of Representatives rose is up for re election in. I don't care about politics my friend. Not Right now. On employment skyrocketing the economy in disarray people fearful further. Fearful. For their future of their families the time to be thinking about how to help people making government finally work again, people are so disgusted with their government that's on the left, the middle and the right. You recently said there is no reason that every single teacher in New York City should not be tested at least every other day as far as I know that's not even close to happening. It's not happening because a failure of leadership a failure of imagination nobody has confidence in this city right now there's no plan there's no solidarity. There's no resources with a system of pool testing with a system with New York City is acting almost as if it is a venture capitalist, it comes to figuring out the most innovative ways to beat the pandemic investing in them early on with private partnerships and then dramatically scaling them. There's no reason we couldn't be testing every single teacher every other day we asked Mayor de Blasio for an interview but he declined there are at least two reasons why in political circles de Blasio is considered particularly unskilled last year he spent a lot of time outside the city for president even though he had virtually no constituency. He's also managed to annoy the one person a New York City mayor can't afford to annoy the governor of New York Andrew Cuomo. New York mayors have a history of acting like the most powerful person in one of the most important cities in the world which to be honest it's not entirely inaccurate. A lot of the city's leverage runs through Albany the state capital what we need, and what this has not done is we need someone who's willing to exist in reality. Guess what if you want the city the prosper you need the governor. If you want the city to prosper, you shouldn't be at tagging housing them. You should be working with him but as Max rose season, the Basel Administration was failing New York long before covid hit in some ways the mayor and his administration took up a new form of laissez faire economics where they said well, we don't have to invest in the future of this city because people have to stay here, people will need to stay here. People will always come here and build their businesses. We don't have to do anything. Well, that's of course, not the case this is a competitive country and it is a competitive world. During the pandemic New York City's been competing with neighbors like New Jersey and Connecticut, and New York suburbs also Florida and Arizona in Nashville Austin those at least are a few of the places that some New Yorkers have fled to. But how many? The truth is no one really knows yet. Pre pandemic the city's population was eight point three million. The New York Times analyzing cell phone data from that four hundred, twenty thousand people had left the city between March and may most of them wealthier residents with a second home. But that measurement has an obvious limitation leaving the city with your cellphone doesn't mean you won't return especially if you own your home since right now is not the easiest time to sell a New York apartment. Here's another probably better metric since March, roughly two, hundred, fifty, thousand New Yorkers have filed with the post office to change their mailing address. That's about double the number from the same period last year. So that suggests roughly one hundred and twenty-five thousand higher than normal outflows that goes with a significant decline also hard to measure in the number of people moving into new. York. Still in a city of eight point, three million, this doesn't seem to qualify as a mass exodus. To. Get a slightly finer greened look at population outflow. We called up Nancy Wu I'm an economist at St Easy where I look at the trends about real estate and then create analyses to tell stories about the data street easy is listing service used by landlords and renters, buyers, and sellers and real estate agents. It manages a pretty impressive database. I have access to all of the market data on the sales and the rentals listings in the universe of real estate listings in New York, city and what has seen since the. So Manhattan rental inventory as of July there's been thirty seven thousand listings on the market that is a sixty five percent growth from last July and how about in say Queens and Queens you should now has two point, two, million people whereas Manhattan has only one point six, million in Queens there six, thousand, six, hundred listings on the market, and that's a twenty six percent increase from last July. So inventory grew everywhere when looking at the borough level but grew way more Manhattan. So that's some rental data. What about home sales in July? There's thirty seven percent fewer Manhattan. That went into contracts than in the same month last year there's largely been a fast forwarding of the natural attrition of the City so New Yorkers were planning on moving to the suburbs within one to two years are doing. So now instead so these New Yorkers are taking advantage of the low mortgage rates to move to the suburbs. So that's another hint that the outflow may not be as apocalyptic as some people think at least not yet that may be more of a one time acceleration of constant trend. Although of course, those outflows are usually countered by inflows will keep moving into New York. There are a lot of reasons to suspect not particularly in the short term, the city is diminished and it remains relatively expensive especially housing although that too is changing at least a bit in Manhattan rents fell by three percents year over year since last July that's the biggest decline we've seen since agree recession when rents fell ten percent but Wu says, we may be seeing only the beginning of this trend we do expect Manhattan rents could fall by more than ten percent because there's a lot of factors where the pandemic has more impact on rents than the great recession did. That may be especially true for two reasons. The first is that a recovery from pandemic is likely even more uncertain than recovery from a financial crash. The second is that the pandemic isn't done doing its damage on the economy just last week, we saw tens of thousands of new layoffs and furloughs announced by firms like Disney and united and American Airlines and even when jobs aren't based in New York City, there is a trickle down effect on the financial services and banking industries here on consulting and accounting firms on commercial real estate and the hospitality sector. A recent audit by the New York State Comptroller reported that over the next year between the third and a half of New York City's restaurants and bars may close permanently.

New York City Bill De Blasio The New York Times York Manhattan New York State De Blasio Staten Island Bronx Manhattan Mayor De Blasio Nancy Wu New Jersey Rose Albany Responders Sanitation Workers L. A. S..
Lebanon PM-designate steps down amid impasse over gov’t formation

Freakonomics Radio

00:55 sec | 2 months ago

Lebanon PM-designate steps down amid impasse over gov’t formation

"Lebanon's prime minister designate, has resigned less than a month after his appointment is at home See reports from Beirut He's stepping down amid a deadlock over forming a new government in the small, crisis ridden country. Prime minister designate most of a deep attempts to form an independent cabinet drew the ire of political parties and Hezbollah. They demanded the finance Ministry be assigned to a Shiite candidate of their choice. Deep been endorsed by a majority of political parties, as well as French President Emmanuel Macron. Cronus pressured Lebanon to form a government quickly in order to unlock international aid required to bail the country out of a severe economic crisis. Deep was designated in the wake of a massive explosion in Beirut sport. That explosion caused by almost 3000 times of ammonium nitrate cause popular anger and Lebanon after it was revealed many of Lebanon's politicians knew about the unsafely stored material for years. And did nothing.

Lebanon Prime Minister Beirut Emmanuel Macron Hezbollah Finance Ministry
Iran Executes Wrestler Accused of Murder After He Took Part in 2018 Protests

Freakonomics Radio

04:28 min | 2 months ago

Iran Executes Wrestler Accused of Murder After He Took Part in 2018 Protests

"For his life to be spared. 27 year old Naveed of Curry had been convicted for the killing of a security guard during anti government protests in 2018. Mr Curry said he'd been tortured. Into making a confession. Among those who called for the Iranian of thought is to show mercy where President Trump on the International Olympic Committee, which says it's shocked. By the execution. Tara. Separate FA is the researcher on Iran for human rights. What she's been telling me more about Navid of Curry and his standing is arrested in Iran. Naveed Afghan, participated in several national competitions and had run up position and the adolescence and youth national championship in Iran. Few years back, and was he taking part in anti government protests in 2018? So there have been several rounds of protests over the past 2 2.5 years in Iran. The protest that Naveed was prosecuted for took place in summer of 2018 in several cities, including in Shiraz, where he lived. So how did he come to be accused of stabbing to death? His security guards and so, according to documents Reviewed on DH news articles have been published about the case on the evening off one of the days that the protest was ongoing. Mr Torre Common who initially was reported as a security officer, but later was introduced as just an employee off the water Waste management company was stabbed to death close to his home. Naveed and his brothers were arrested about a month later. Naveed in one of his brother was also been implicated. And in village murder, were arrested in September of 2018, according to hand written letter by Naveed and that has been published, He experienced severe torture into different detention centers where he was detained. In issue Ross. He was facing dozens of charges in ST separate cases, but the criminal court sentenced him to death in October of last year. 2019 the evidence used against him was mostly confessions. Of him, his brother and a friend, And they all alleged that those confessions were obtained under torture. And in April off this year, the Supreme Court uphold the death sentence and quickly brushed over the serious allegations of torture and failed to investigate that, so there were no independent witnesses who Tied, Mr AFC hurried to the scene of the stabbing a cz faras, you know, according to authorities and footage is that been released? There's footage from one security camera. It is unclear if if the person in the video is exactly Naveed, and if that proves anything, anything beyond reasonable doubt, why do you think that the Iranian authorities decided to make an example off him? If you like on DH to execute him, even though there was this into A national outcry. I think that the rush nature off this sentence because Iranian authorities disregarded the procedural rules that they need to abide by and when executing someone shows that it had a political motive behind it, And I would say it's probably an attempt to defy the international and domestic outcry against the death penalty. So was there a campaign inside Iran to have him sped? Since July of this year, there has been an ongoing campaign. Online, mostly with the hashtag don't execute against the death sentence that have been issued in relation to the protest that have happened over the past two years. And it is a growing a domestic movement, and many people also try to raise awareness and work in different capacities to save Naveed is life arranging from people who were working on convincing the Supreme Court for a retrial to the ones who were hoping for. Give nous y and all the other activists who were trying to raise a very innocent and informing international institutions and authorities, hoping for coordinated pressured It was Tara separate far a researcher in Iran for

Naveed Afghan Iran Mr Curry Naveed Supreme Court Researcher Ross Mr Torre International Olympic Committe President Trump Mr Afc Murder Officer
Mali junta agrees to 18-month transition government

Freakonomics Radio

00:38 sec | 2 months ago

Mali junta agrees to 18-month transition government

"Government until an election Khun take place following last month's coup. Emily Hola reports. Over the past three days, the military leadership has held talks in the capital, Bamako with opposition and civil society groups. Mali's military rulers said the interim government will be led by either an army officer or a civilian. But the coalition group that started the anti government protests in the run up to the coup, has criticized the possibility off a military leader even if it's only a temporary arrangement. West African nations have also said they want a rapid returned to civilian rule in Mali. Women supporting the opposition in Belarus have spearheaded the

Mali Emily Hola Khun Belarus Officer Bamako
Sudan declares state of emergency over deadly floods

Freakonomics Radio

03:59 min | 3 months ago

Sudan declares state of emergency over deadly floods

"Sudan has declared a three month state of emergency after unusually heavy seasonal rains that have led to flooding and loss of life and left tens of thousands of people homeless. Tenaga Chip Coto is deputy director of the UN's humanitarian agency Gauche in the Sudanese capital Khartoum. They're flooding has affected over half a million people and then houses that have been totally partially damaged or collapse was over 100,000. So you can you can tell this quite big is affecting the whole country. But it hasn't to say this is the flood period for her, too, But they say it has been way above the norm. So that's why I'm having this impact currently, and it's the flooding caused by hours of torrential rain or or the flooding of the river Nile. It's both. It's both. So if you look at the western parts of the country that's been affected is more your your flash flooding and you get rain's coming incident but also upstream and when the action for blue now is utopia so intimate, so Pia impacting us quite a lot. AM River Banks being briefed, for instance, the Luminal midst the wet now, which is in factual, that area is overflowing and affecting a large area in hunting itself. And those people who have lost their homes, both local residents, and of course, I would imagine lots of refugees and internally displaced people who've lost their shelter. What provisions is being made for them. So before the rains is mentioned, we have joined season so every year we prepared beforehand we preposition our stocks in strategic areas. So areas where you have your displaced people. As you know, Sudan is about more troubling people at this place because ofthe conflict we have drifted. Jesus. Well, bumping one million refugees in Sudan is well and also in certain areas where we know that flood in the regular basis. So the stocks have them The only challenge you having these days that the rains have been way more. Then we expected so as a result, this talk that we had preposition now running law. We all scores a second. And imagine the health system mistress as well. When you have your reins, people need your your medical medical support, but also looking at issues around your your cholera. When there's rain get cholera. You also have your malaria. Making sure people get water to drink is also a big issue in some areas that are flooded. Schools have been flooded and Children to go back to school. So there are a lot of things that are going on most people who are affected along the river. Now they're seeking shelter with strangers, relatives and then is only the ones that do not money to go to friend's urges, or we're friends relate to that as well. Those are the ones that have been sheltered, using tense or you know the concrete buildings. Is there? Um, any silver lining to this particular dark cloud all the rains welcoming away after a period all the drought. The rain's always always bring in good myself. Agriculture. And also for animals. It means that I wasn't able to have grazing land. But right now we don't know what's more. Is it away the stage where it has caused a lot of damage for the compliments because there are some crops that underwater so The impact is yet to assist. As you can imagine. The focus right now is to measure that lives are saved. But that said, I think this is all happened in a country where the economy is that performing too well. It's been in decline for quite a while. We have coffee like any other country. There's competition in the cases of over there around 13,000 cases and slept over 800. Kids were also having a not breaking polio, so a lot of things that are going on and this is adding a layer off neat. We have not seen the end of the rings, so we expect more flooding for the next two or three weeks. Soldiers stop point is really required.

Sudan Chip Coto Am River Banks Khartoum UN Deputy Director Polio Gauche Malaria
Trump tours damage from Hurricane Laura in Texas and Louisiana

Freakonomics Radio

00:43 sec | 3 months ago

Trump tours damage from Hurricane Laura in Texas and Louisiana

"President Trump is in Orange, Texas this afternoon touring damage from Hurricane Laura. Earlier today, he visited Lake Charles, Louisiana to see hurricane damage there. Cleanup is underway and NPR's perk. Siegler is in Hackberry, Louisiana. He has more trying to get around parts of Southwest Louisiana is a challenge to say nothing for all the people who have lost Nearly everything. Power lines down. Ah, whole huge old growth trees completely uprooted blocking roads. I'm on a street off of the highway here, where multiple mobile homes have been completely flattened. Frankly, it looks a lot more like you might see after destructive tornado comes through than a

Louisiana President Trump Siegler Hurricane Laura Southwest Louisiana Hurricane Lake Charles Hackberry NPR Orange Texas
American envoy joins Taiwan president at military memorial - POLITICO

Freakonomics Radio

00:40 sec | 3 months ago

American envoy joins Taiwan president at military memorial - POLITICO

"On. Official U. S envoy to Taiwan attended a military memorial service today alongside Taiwan's president, the appearance of American Institute director William Brent Christiansen. During the annual memorial comes amid tensions with China, which does not recognise Taiwan's independence. US has no formal ties with Taiwan. But the Trump administration has been making gestures towards Taipei as relations with Beijing fray over a number of issues, including China's response to the Corona virus pandemic. China has not commented on Christians of participation. But earlier this month Beijing protest visit by Health and Human Services Secretary Alex

Taiwan China Beijing William Brent Christiansen United States Taipei American Institute President Trump Director Secretary Alex Official
Portland Protests: Local Leaders Urging Feds to Leave

Freakonomics Radio

01:40 min | 4 months ago

Portland Protests: Local Leaders Urging Feds to Leave

"In Oregon Governor Kate Brown and other officials are calling for the removal of federal law enforcement officers from the city of Portland. The Trump Administration deployed those forces, saying they are there to protect federal property in the city amid ongoing protests. But this week, officials from across the city and state and their congressional representatives have raised serious objections to their tactics. After camouflaged federal agents went into the streets with tear gas and tactical gear. Arresting protesters and taking some away in unmarked vans without the protesters have said explanation among those critical of the federal deployment in Portland, Oregon, Senator Jeff Merkley and he is with us now from Portland. Senator Merkley Thank you so much for speaking with us today. You're welcome, Michelle. Good to be with you. Well, you and three other members of Congress wrote last night to Attorney General William Barr and the acting Homeland Security secretary, Chad Wolf calling for these agents to be removed from Portland. Tell us briefly why you issued that calling. Have you gotten a response yet? This is an extraordinary circumstance. The customs and border protection and the marshals are deploying people to the streets of Portland. They're doing so at least the CBP forces, customs and border protection. They are marked just with a generic police. You have no idea who they who they represent. And then they're outside beyond the boundaries of the federal buildings, grabbing people on the streets, throwing them into unmarked vans, not disclosing even at that point, what agency they represent. This is the type Of unmarked paramilitary presence that you would expect in a dictatorship, not in a Democratic republic. It's absolutely terrifying to people. It's unacceptable. It has to end.

Portland Senator Jeff Merkley Senator Merkley Oregon Governor Kate Brown Trump Administration CBP Michelle Attorney General William Barr Congress Chad Wolf Homeland Security Secretary
Cuomo hails dip in New York daily coronavirus death toll to low of 32

Freakonomics Radio

00:38 sec | 6 months ago

Cuomo hails dip in New York daily coronavirus death toll to low of 32

"Governor Cuomo says New York recorded its lowest one day coronavirus death toll and hospitalization totals since the early days of the crisis in March the state tallied thirty two virus related deaths yesterday that's a slight decrease from the day before after some recent fluctuations in the daily toll wanna said today in the western part of the state and the capital region are poised to enter the third phase of re opening next week the daily death tally peaked at seven hundred and ninety nine on April eighth on Friday there were one thousand seven hundred and thirty four people being treated for the disease in hospitals across the state that's the fewest since March twenty

Governor Cuomo New York
Brazil's COVID-19 death toll becomes second-highest in the world

Freakonomics Radio

04:06 min | 6 months ago

Brazil's COVID-19 death toll becomes second-highest in the world

"Those death toll from cove in nineteen has surpassed that of the UK and is now second only to the United States more than nine hundred people have died in the past twenty four hours according to Brazil's health ministry taking the total number of fatalities to forty one thousand eight hundred and twenty eight the WHO's says some intensive care units in in Brazil Brazil are are at at a a critical critical stage stage having having exceeded exceeded ninety ninety percent percent of of capacity capacity because because of of the the high high number number of of covered covered nineteen nineteen patients patients saw saw South South America America correspondent correspondent Katie Watson now reports from sao Paulo another could be cool out in Brazil's biggest in the center of the content the traffic flowing to these days because of quarantine but distance is still significant in the city of twenty two million and the roadster is bad as I thought talk to Francis knows him not to and drive it to attending a woman in her nineties cave in nineteen seventy percent of that call out and now related to the virus the university hospitals emergency ward dedicated to cope with nineteen patients health services here a badly coping the patience to make it a hospital all in a sense the lucky ones and also says the same three times as many people die in combat to life before the pandemic for a nickel Mister Ford became known Ching eyes to keep enough as it and then he started all we were doing was registering that's at home people interest leap and never woke up they didn't even have a chance we can come and get them to the hospital so we can give their family we arrived and they were already dead the motion Saddam Spinoza but for me to check out this story of a topic off to every patient they clean down the anti begins and change that protective equipment his close them down the not taking any risks they've been hit pass me by this virus a colleague many in the fourth looked up to pasta way home code nineteen in April the cross town in Sampaoli's eastern suburbs one of the worst hit areas of the city the virus is all too visible I had a vague but I bought out the whole Josie tells me how fond she was of her dad and Tanya hardworking in his sixties he passed his high school exams it had long been a dream of his to finish his education until you passed away last week as did his daughter chose to Kelly admitted to hospital the same day treated next to each other in intensive care they passed away within days of each other the case they said only the family called quite believe it they thought it was just panicked by the media fast nobody they knew had had the disease the president Jaipal Singh are of course his credit and we flew something that just absolutely disagrees with Hassan also courted he said just getting to the ball three was a struggle to brief nobody's taking this seriously they say well this is family mourns on tell you and Kelly cities like sao Paulo and Rio a starting to re open this despite a thousand people dying every day at the moment it's a strategy that many people fail to understand back in the ambulance Francis finishes a cool night his children's house so he decides to swing by the fact that you can only way through the gate the psychological toll he says is the most difficult he's not hog seven year old auto for more than two months such as his fear of passing the virus on he jumped in the ambulance and turns the siren off to this little game has to make do for now the end of the evening W. auto stretches out his arms to show how much he loves Francis and then he's off this is someone

Dragon capsule achieves orbit, heads towards International Space Station

Freakonomics Radio

00:42 sec | 6 months ago

Dragon capsule achieves orbit, heads towards International Space Station

"A new era in space flight launched last hour from Cape Canaveral in Florida I thank god NASA astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley are now heading to the international space station the first to be carried into space by commercially owned and operated spacecraft SpaceX's crew dragon propelled by the company's falcon nine rocket today's successful launch and the nine year gap in human launches from U. S. soil the last four aboard the space shuttle in two thousand eleven weather threatened the launch all day but it cleared in the last forty minutes of the count down the launch was scrubbed Wednesday because of

Cape Canaveral Florida Nasa Bob Behnken Doug Hurley U. S.
Western Australia braces for worst storm in a decade

Freakonomics Radio

00:17 sec | 6 months ago

Western Australia braces for worst storm in a decade

"Western Australia preparing for what's being called the worst storm to hit the region in ten years officials say heavy rain strong winds and storm surges are expected across the entire coast as the remnants of tropical storm combined with a cold front emergency officials are warning people not to go out on the water through

Australia
Félicien Kabuga arrested near Paris for role in Rwandan genocide

Freakonomics Radio

00:54 sec | 7 months ago

Félicien Kabuga arrested near Paris for role in Rwandan genocide

"The man accused of being a major funder of Rwanda's genocide in the nineteen nineties is now under arrest Felicien cougar allegedly financed the militias that massacred some eight hundred thousand people the BBC's Willbros reports Phyllis young computer a businessman from the Hutu ethnic group is accused of being one of the main financiers of the Rwandan genocide paying for the militias that carried out the massacres he also founded and funded the notorious Reggio Emelia Colleen the Rwandan state broadcaster that actively encouraged people to search out and kill anyone who is from the Tutsi ethnic group the fact that he's being found on the outskirts of Paris living under a false name is surprising for many years Phyllis Jakob that was thought to be living in Kenya where powerful politicians were accused of thwarting efforts to get him arrested more than a quarter of a century after the genocide Mr cougar will go on trial at an international

Rwanda Felicien Cougar BBC Paris Kenya Phyllis Young Reggio Emelia Phyllis Jakob
New York Gov. Cuomo announces initiative to expand testing in minority communities

Freakonomics Radio

01:05 min | 7 months ago

New York Gov. Cuomo announces initiative to expand testing in minority communities

"Governor Andrew Cuomo's is two young children and a teenager in the states have now died up from a possible complication from the corona virus involving swollen blood vessels and heart problems at least seventy three children in New York have been diagnosed with symptoms similar to Kawasaki disease a rare inflammatory condition and toxic shock syndrome Cuomo said today the state health department is in close contact with the centers for disease control so anything learned about the condition can be shared with other states the CDC has asked New York to develop national criteria for this so that other states other hospital systems can also be checking into this and looking into this Cuomo called it a developing very serious situation and said there's still a lot to learn about the virus Cuomo also announced an initiative to ramp up testing in low income and minority communities across the five boroughs through a partnership with Northwell health and twenty four houses of worship it's in response to data collected from the diagnostic testing antibody testing survey of fifteen thousand new Yorkers showing those living largely in communities of color low income neighborhoods are more susceptible to contracting the

Governor Andrew Cuomo New York Kawasaki Disease CDC Northwell
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

02:36 min | 1 year ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"I have a real good line of sight into what the reality of a situation was and I was totally wrong and I had had this hit me right in the face by going to East Palo Alto so East Palo Alto is a place that serious he'd go out now communists what they think about EPA and they'll tell you it's it's it's terrible they listen to the podcast obviously but if you listen to the podcast you find out and that podcast was a real life experience for me. the podcast dailies referring to is her own show zip code economies and a couple recent episodes called resiliency is is a mindset and can you love yourself when the world's against you in this episode of Zip Code Economies. We return to East Palo Alto. We're going to sit down with the the pastor earning a homeless shelter leader principal and our students and meet police chief. They're all going to talk about something that I was surprised about. They're gonNA talk about love. I have to say I'm a little skeptical oftentimes. When I hear people talk about love in these settings I think what does it really really mean isn't just a decorative word but there it's not I went to. EPA and I found out that the data told a picture that was more of how we feel about it that how they feel about it and as soon as I saw that I thought Mary you just been wrong for a long time. I'm about a lot of things probably so at the beginning of the interview you asked me about the data and the study of people and that's how I came away with just the strong conviction that ultimately economics of it's going to be really good has to be about people because we simply study things as data points from a satellite light perspective we will lose some of the context so I was totally wrong about that and the context matters that was married daily. CEO and president of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco and I'm Steven dubner coming up next time. Steve Levitt my freakonomics friend and CO author is on a crusade high really think that we we would do an incredible service to society if we rethought high school math and turned it into something that was actually useful the new new math that's next time on freakonomics radio. FREAKONOMICS.

East Palo Alto FREAKONOMICS Steve Levitt Mary Steven dubner Federal Reserve Bank principal CEO San Francisco president
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

03:54 min | 1 year ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"FREAKONOMICS radio is sponsored by capital one capital one knows life doesn't alert you about your credit card. That's why they created iino. The capital one assistant the catches things that might look wrong with your credit card like over tipping duplicate charges or potential fraud than it sends an alert to your phone helps you fix it. It's another way capital. One is watching out for your money. When you're not capital one? What's in your Wallet Seek Capital One Dot Com for details there Stephen Dubner the episode you're about to hear features relatively rare appearance by my freakonomics friend and CO author Steve Levin? If you want more Levin Mark Your calendar on September twenty six in Chicago he'll be joining me for freakonomics radio live event on the state of Counter Terrorism and international risk management for details. Go to freakonomics dot com slash live <music> when you think about unintended consequences when you think about two stories that would seem to have nothing to do with each other. It is hard to beat the stories. We're telling today the first one if you follow the news even a little bit should be familiar to you it concerns concerns one of the most contentious issues of the day developments in the escalating battle over abortion. The last clinic in Missouri on the verge of closing today and battle goes back at least to nineteen seventy-three when the U._S. Supreme Court took up a case called Roe versus versus Wade the Supreme Court today ruled that abortion is completely a private matter to be decided by mother and doctor in the first three months of pregnancy a few years before Roe v lead abortion had been legalized in five states including New York work in California Supreme Court made it legal in all fifty states but lately several states have been pushing back hard the Ohio governor signing today would critics condemn as the most restrictive abortion law in the country nearly a dozen states dates are now imposing new restrictions this year including John Issue that appeared to be settled for and a half decades ago is once again so raw that it's a prominent feature of the twenty twenty presidential campaign only candidate here who has is passed a law protecting women's rights and reproductive health and health insurance. I just wanted to say their three women here that have fought pretty hard for women's right to choose meanwhile. If you go back thirty or thirty five years there was a totally different story dominating media coverage and the political conversation but US roll up our sleeves to row back this awful todd of violence and reduce crime in our country. We must take back the streets. If you weren't around then it's hard to remember just how bleak outlook was crime had begun to rise in the nineteen sixties continued onto the seventies and eighties by nineteen ninety. It seemed that everyone was scared. Everywhere all the time robbery assault reader murder every play shoplifting vandalism truancy crime became a top priority among Democrats it doesn't matter whether or not they were deprived as a youth and Republicans to there are no no violent offenses that are juvenile. You rape somebody. You're an adult you shoot somebody. You'RE GONNA GO experts. Call them superpredators. Everyone agreed that violent crime was out of hand that the criminals are getting younger and the problem is only going to get worse tidal wave of juvenile violent crime right over the horizon but the problem didn't get worse in the early nineteen nineties violent crime began to fall and then it fell fell and fell some more in many places today violent crime is historic lows but issues New York City as an example in one thousand nine hundred ninety there are more than twenty two hundred homicides

FREAKONOMICS Steve Levin Supreme Court California Supreme Court Roe Stephen Dubner fraud New York City Counter Terrorism Missouri Ohio rape New York Chicago robbery John
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

04:46 min | 2 years ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"I would suspect that again thinking about the mechanisms that explain this effect that kind of the need to prove yourself might dissipate. The more someone who's not you're a member of your own race, the more that person gets to know you in which case, ideally, the the need to to prove goodwill by engaging in this competence downshift wouldn't be a strong. That's what I would predict. But I haven't run that study yet. So I find the idea of competence downshifting as you call it. So interesting just because it's a couple of really interesting things at the same time. It's kind of idea that you are consciously controlling or presenting your competence for one. And then also, you know, altering it, and I'm just really curious if you've seen it or if it's been seen in context that have nothing to do with race. So let's say it's a work situation. And that's everybody's. Same race that say everybody's consider themselves. All part of the same in group. Whatever that is do you see that still when there's different levels and so on and if so does it seem to signify the same thing there as in the situation that you've been describing on the initial answer is yes, there is some evidence that suggests that we're really talking about kind of a status differential. They're so your idea about kind of there being this their existing this hierarchy, and and trying to kind of cross the status divides in ways that encouraged collaboration and connection and affiliation. I think that that's true. I'm there's actually worked by jillions wants Yoenis that suggests that managers talking to workers, for example, they may engage in a similar strategy essentially trying to dumb themselves down to appear more likable. But it sounds like you're thinking the racial stereotypes are stronger. I think they could be yes. An interracial contact. That's absolutely true. Such an interesting idea, Alexandra p try can you look up our liberals, actually patronizing, please. My aunt sent me. A great Email forward about them. I'm going to try to look it up with like extreme competence, though. I find fascinating the whole like warmth versus competent scale as a way of interactions, which I feel like does explain every female rom com protagonist ever. Thinking more about warmth versus competence. I started thinking about invading Russia in winter. Because that's the exact opposite of being warm incompetent. So don't do it. But a fun fact is that Napoleon didn't actually invade in winter. He just forgot to leave by winter. So that's a somewhat relevant fact. Is there a polite way to ask people to intentionally downshift their competence when talking to me? No idea the burden of people assuming you know, what they're talking about all the time. Sydney. Thank you so much for coming to play. Tell me something. I don't know. Great job. And we get one more hand tonight to all our guests task. It is time now for our live audience to pick a winner. So Hulu it be Joseph do from NYU with everything, you know, about fear is wrong Kate marvel from Columbia with good, clouds and bad clouds, Alison Schrager, our economists writer friend with the tax policy behind inbred thoroughbreds, Michael Holdsworth from the behavioral insights team talking about how to nudge, nudge IRS or Sydney do pre from Yale with Petra nizing liberals while our live audience is voting. Let me ask you a favor if you enjoy freakonomics radio, including this live version of tell me something, I don't know. Please spread the word give it a nice rating on apple podcasts or Stitcher or wherever you get your podcast. Thank you so much for that. Okay. The audience vote is in once again. Thank you so much to all our guest presenters, and our grand prize winner tonight. Thank you so much for telling us about wicked wicked clouds, Kate marvel eventually. And he. Kate to commemorate your victory. We'd like to present you with this certificate of impressive knowledge. It reads in part is Stephen dubner in consultation with Christian Finnegan, and Alexandra p tried do hereby vow that Kate marvel told us something we did not know for which we are attorney grateful. Thank you. So very much. And that's our show for tonight. I hope we told you something you didn't know huge things to Christian Alexandra to our guests and thanks especially to you for coming to play. Tell me something. Thank you so much. Tell me something, I don't know. And freakonomics radio

Kate marvel attorney Napoleon Alexandra p Sydney Christian Alexandra Russia jillions Columbia NYU Stephen dubner apple Hulu Alison Schrager Petra nizing Michael Holdsworth Yoenis IRS Yale
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

04:12 min | 2 years ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"I wouldn't have asked you that. Because I wouldn't have expected you to know. And now we're doing a whole different show which. Attended was he a fast running horse won big races city win a triple crown didn't win the triple crown. You win parts of it. He wanted Irby or something. I can't remember I think it is. Is that something to do with who the owner is does the owner like as he he or she financially cornered that market in some way has nothing to do with the horse specifically, right? All right. I think you should put us out of our misery. Why are so many horses? Inbred now dating back to northern dancer nine hundred eighty six tax reform. I was mind. So you're saying that Ronald Reagan is responsible for the inbreeding of all the horses. Are you interested in taxes as well? I have a background in public finance. So how did the tax reform nineteen Eighty-six affect the horse breeding industry before you could write off a lot of your capital gains, your long term capital gains, which is an investment you held for more than six months or a year. The nineteen eighty six tax four wiped that out. So there really wasn't an incentive to hold investments for so long and breeding a horse and training to race takes three years before you realize your investment, and it's really risky. So once they changed the tax structure the benefit of holding a horse for three years when down so the breeding industry changed instead of breeding horse to race people would beat horses to sell them after one year and after one year, you don't know, you don't know how good horse is going to be. Yeah. You only have two data points. You have who its parents are. And so and there's only so many desirable. Sires the pool shrank and prices went up, and you also can sort of start to see muscle tone and sprinters have better muscle tone. And if you breed two sprinters together, you get a sprinter, and they actually can trace back the concentration of sprinters to northern dancer's sprint, gene. So here's my question. If it's gotten more expensive and they've gotten less fast. Why? Why isn't there competition to that inbreeding model well because everyone sells at one year, but there's a hope that this might change. Because now with genetic tests, they just sequenced the worst genome a couple years ago, you can maybe at the one year Mark now, see how good a racer it actually will be and the hope is that that will align incentives. Saw what they say a horse that can sell in a horse that can race will be the same thing. I don't I still don't understand because obviously tax reform affected everyone in obviously, you know, the the ultra rich. There wasn't just one of them. Why would it all come down to this one horse? What when probably thirty or forty people were, you know, major horse people at the time. Well, it's just timing northern dancer died in name was the guy at that. He was a pretty popular sire. And so then you had his offspring and everyone wanted to. In breed Alexandra p try Ellison Schrager has talked to us about tax reform in change in horse. Breeding anything. Further you can tell us. Well, I can't tell you that when I googled Ronald Reagan and horses. I got Mike Pence is tweet that I've often said there's nothing better for the inside of a man than the outside of a horse. You do not want to invert that. And I also did a little looking into horse names. Because apparently, there's there's a long list of restrictions for what you can and cannot name thoroughbred horse. And there is a horse named Allison's Powell just for you and apparently horse named freakonomics. But they also have a thing that says there's a restricted list where you're not supposed to have suggestive or vulgar or obscene, meaning names. But some owners do try to get around that like there's a horse named hoof hearted, which if you say that wrong, you get a fart joke. Yeah. I think we should stop now. Alison, thanks for playing. Tell me something. I don't know time now for a quick break. When we return more guests will make Christian Finnegan tells some things we don't know and our live audience will pick a winner if you'd like to.

Ronald Reagan Alison Irby Christian Finnegan Mike Pence Ellison Schrager Mark Alexandra p Allison Powell one year three years six months
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Take a magical diet pill. Maybe it'll work, but there could be really really bad side effects. In the meantime, we've made the world Scotland, essentially. So what are you doing about? It are figuring out. Was that route? She's a climate scientist. That's what we pay her for two part question number one of all the known things to be known about clouds. How much do you? Meaning you and your your peers, no other words, is it still a pretty big research question and number two, assuming you get to know as much as you need to know. Is there any kind of? Behavior mitigation etcetera etcetera that could take advantage of that cloud knowledge to help. So we're getting close to sort of nailing down the role of clouds and a warming climate, and it turns out to be bad news. It looks like we're actually going to lose a lot of those low clouds, especially over the Southern Ocean near Antarctica and were pretty pretty sure that those high clouds those warming clouds are going to get worse in the future. So basically we shouldn't count on clouds to save us from climate change. Like, I think we're actually going to have to do that ourselves. Can it can I ask when you say it's going to get worse over what timeframe? In basically, right now, and in the future and in the future and in the future. I believe the title of the show is telling me something, I'd rather not know. So Alexandra p try Kate marvel has come in here from Columbia University with seemingly scalding indictment of clouds and us and a seemingly despairing prognosis. Even with the best cloud. Scientists on the job. Can you help I cannot help? But it does seem to be factual. And I was in fact, so depressed by this information that I just started looking at Joni Mitchell's clouds entire discography and how how did that originate because like you? She's looked at clouds from both sides, both good and bad. Yes..

scientist Joni Mitchell Scotland Antarctica Alexandra p Kate marvel Columbia University
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

03:28 min | 2 years ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Alexandra is a Washington Post columnist who's also a past champion of the Ohio pun off, Alexandra. We know that you were once baptized into a Colt just because you didn't like to say, no. And that your father was a US congressman from Wisconsin. Which explains most of the things I just mentioned perhaps. So what's up with you? These days Alexandra. Oh, well, not too much. I did just get married which was fun. And I learned the origin of what tied the knot is. Apparently when the priest wraps his stole around your hands, you've tied the knot. But this is also from a minister who said that a Piscopo Lillian marriage means that there's one morning when you're gonna wake up and look at the other person and realize you no longer love them. And when that day comes you have to keep being polite to them. Before the wedding. We're like all right. Well, so we'll we'll see how it goes cocktails. Well, we love you, Alex. We love boasts the Alex's. It's time now to play tell me something. I don't know. Would you all please, welcome? Our first guest, Pete Malinowski. Pete. It says here that you live in New York you work on Governors Island. You look to be I'm going to put you roughly early thirties mid thirties thirties thirties. Okay. All right. So I'm ready. So our LX Cornish Shelley and Alexandra p try what do you know? That's worth knowing that you think we don't know. So before pizza and bagels. What was the original food that made New York City famous put New York City on the meth, you sure should know that chef lady, yes, I have no idea pickled herring. Gus. Hearing. Pretzels. Is it wasn't rats rats rats? Not pretzels. Is it better in nature? It's not the sort of universal nature. They're everywhere. The rush of people from New Jersey. This is this is pre New Jersey for the darkness is the little later. Can I ask you a leading question? So I don't know much about del Monaco's. You probably do Alex. I do in fact, all the dishes that were famous that that were made famous there. Yeah. I mean, for example, a dumb Monaco steak, which is a rabbi famously they used to deliver the meat almost whole right out in the street and cut the del Monaco steak for money goes, which is just a fancy way of saying rabbi. But it sounds cool lobster Newburg so Domonkos as I understand it Lasca the first or one of the first fine dining restaurants in New York. And I assume the US. Yes, great still. So would this food have been served at a place like that? Absolutely. So it's a dish. It's not a dish. So it's an ingredient or you can be an ingredient usually. Served by itself at places like Domonkos. What do you mean by? It's a dish. What does that mean? Meaning it's a composed dish like lobster Newburg or baked Alaska or creme brulee you're saying it's not that it's something that served on its own. It's not that. And it would have been served at del Monaco is and at at fine dining restaurants and at carts throughout the city posters wasters. Hey. Well, that makes sense now that my smart friend here says it so do you have anything to do with oysters? I do so I give you a little background on wasters in New York harbor. Can't say no to that. Yeah. So four hundred years ago when Europeans first arrived. The New York harbor was totally full of oyster. So there was hundreds of thousands of acres of oyster is in New York harbor and those oysters provided habitat for all kinds of different animals and that available animal protein is what made New York City so successful to begin with those oysters became famous..

New York City del Monaco Alexandra p New York Alex US New Jersey Pete Malinowski congressman Alexandra lobster Newburg Piscopo Lillian Wisconsin Domonkos Governors Island Newburg Ohio Cornish Shelley Alaska four hundred years
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:34 min | 2 years ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Good evening. I'm Steven dubner. And this is freakonomics radio live tonight where Joe's pub in New York City joining me as co host is the comedian writer and actor Christian Finnegan. Thank you. Oh, they're certainly to have you here lovely to be here. Thank you for having me Christian. Here's what we know about you. So far, we know that you grew up in Massachusetts. Yes. I did that you became a comedian because you had no quote marketable skills. Still true. We know you've performed all over TV and the world. Yes. TV and the world in order, and we know that you once lost seventy pounds in nine months, which is a person. Yeah. Yeah. You know, it's you learn how to hate life and accept that. And and I've slowly gained it back. So you're such a lie. You can lie on the radio. But usually people lie in the skinny direction not in the fed or no, you're right. I mean, there's there's picture for a long time when you would Google me literally just started typing Krisher fitting, it'd be Christian Finnegan fat. That would be the first Google search results. Yeah. So christian. That's what we know about you want to tell us something, we don't yet know about you, please. Well, I have a man of many talents. Stephen thank you for asking. And I am capable of playing either. The William tell overture or shave and a haircut by banging on my own human skull. Wow. Really? Yep. Let's can we take an audience or question which song they want to hear and you'll play it. Yes. Sure. William tell overture. Shave and a haircut. Okay. William's, okay here. Okay..

Christian Finnegan William Joe Google Steven dubner New York City fed writer Massachusetts Stephen seventy pounds nine months
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

02:56 min | 2 years ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Yo is saying that you can tell how people are feeling by looking at how they interact with their phones. True. Yes. So we hear that Tinder is this hookup app. Right. Because it takes so little effort, and you're just wiping left and right now that may be true at the beginning of a relationship. But it doesn't tell us a ton about what it takes to get into a relationship because by the time people are able to actually meet and hook up. They will have had to have engaged in some more committed behavior, like texting phonecalls, etc. And so what a peers is that it's not necessarily the results of how much effort someone takes throughout the time to get together, physical or otherwise. But rather it's how the relationship starts. And so something that may indicate what that means for us. The Atlantic has reported the couples who cohabitate before marriage tend to be less satisfied with their marriages and are more likely to divorce. So the issue with with Tinder may not be the human movement overall rather whether human movement says about the desire for commitment from the very beginning of the relationship Angela's does that make sense to? I mean, I think that when you say that people who live taking this personally. But anyway, why would someone who lives together with another person be more likely? To divorce is that the fact yes, so as a as a certified non marriage counselor. I think the idea is that if things start out without a deep level of commitment. Then the research shows that were less likely to stick to it. Now, you're the person that studies, grit, passion, and perseverance I'm not going to fact check you on whether people stick with things or not. Well, okay. So I'll just say this whenever you find a correlation like people who drink diet coke live. What like the you have to worry as a scientist that like lots of things are correlated with his vision to live together. And those may be the things that are driving the marriage, you know, statistics also so what we really need is an experiment or half the people get assigned to live together before they get married and have this half of the room to the left, right? And then have to be then then we'll know speaking of spurious correlation, though, I do think it's important to know that the number of people who die becoming tangled in bedsheets almost perfectly correlates with per capita cheese consumption. Make thank you so much for that. And and thank you for playing. Tell me something. I don't know we're gonna take a quick break when we return more guests. We'll make Angela Duckworth. Tell us some things we don't know and our live audience will pick a winner if you'd like to be a guest on a future show or attend to future show, please visit freakonomics dot com. We will be right back. Welcome back economics radio alive..

Tinder Angela Duckworth scientist
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

02:27 min | 2 years ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"That it's not necessarily the results of how much effort someone takes throughout the time to get together, physical or otherwise. But rather it's how the relationship starts. And so something that may indicate what that means for us. The Atlantic has reported the couples cohabitate before marriage tend to be less satisfied with their marriages and are more likely to divorce. So the issue with with Tinder may not be the human movement over all, but rather whether human movement says about the desire for commitment from the very beginning of the relationship Angela's, does that make sense to I think that when you say that people who live taking this personally? But anyway, why would someone who lives together with another person be more likely? To divorce is that the fact yes, so as as a certified non marriage counselor. I think the idea is that if things start out without a deep level of commitment, then the research shows that were less likely to stick to it. Now, you're the person that studies grit passionate pers- veer inside. I'm not going to check you on whether people stick with things or not. Okay. So I'll just say this whenever you find a correlation like people who drink diet coke live. What you have to worry as a scientist that like lots of things are correlated with his vision to live together. And those may be the things that are driving the marriage statistics. Also. So what we really need is an experiment or half the people get assigned to live together before they get married and had this half of the room like to laugh, right? And then have to be then then we'll know speaking of spurious correlation, though, I do think it's important to know that the number of people who die becoming tangled in bedsheets almost perfectly correlates with per capita cheese consumption. Make thank you so much for that. And thank you for playing something. I don't know we're gonna take a quick break when we return more guests will make Angela Duckworth. Tell us some things we don't know and our live audience will pick a winner if you'd like to be a guest on a future show or attend to future show, please visit freakonomics dot com. We will be right back. Welcome back to freakonomics radio live..

Angela Duckworth Tinder scientist
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Freakonomics radio is supported by ibm by twenty fifty the world population will reach nearly ten billion and food production will need to grow by seventy percent what if artificial intelligence could help farmers are already using it to help increase crop yields watson and the ibm cloud provide access to whether data and analyze satellite imagery to help them monitor soil moisture levels and reduce water waste so as the population grows more food can be put on tables let's put smart to work find out how at ibm dot com slash smart frigging radio is supported by progressive here's a lesson on car insurance progressive make saving money easy in fact customers who switch to progressive can save an average of six hundred sixty eight dollars a year on car insurance bundling home with auto is another way to save plus you could qualify for one of many discounts lake a safe driver discount get a quote online instead of the phone and you could save more visit progressive dot com frigging radio is supported by swell investing impact investing platform you vote with your dollars when you shop what if you could do the same when you invest with swell invest in high growth companies without checking your values at the door it's a market opportunity linked to global progress in clean water renewable energy and medical breakthroughs get a fifty dollar bonus when you open your account swell investing dot com slash freak.

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"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Population grows more food can be put on tables let's put smart to work find out how at ibm dot com slash smart why did we make this episode about the costs and benefits of lawns mostly because of you occasionally we ask freakonomics radio listeners for story ideas especially for what we colloquially call our stupid stuff series that is things we do or use or submit to that are on some level kind of stupid well last time we asked for your stupid stuff ideas quite a few of them concerned lawns pat alan from trinity florida wrote what is up with the american addiction to lawns john faulkner of arlington virginia complained about noisy smelly lawnmowers then there was alan turner i've from new castle delaware my of formal training my initial career was in landscape architecture and right now i'm looking the highway median at the rest stop on i ninety five just south of wilmington delaware turner's pet steve is what's in that highway median grass and it looks like this grass gets mode three times in the summer let's say it's not just in highway medians but also those cloverleaf interchanges a standard cloverleaf takes up about sixteen acres of lawn turner understands why these are all graphs brass's cheap grass's the cheapest ground cover you can install the problem with grass is that it's also the most expensive ground coverage maintain and it has to be maintained mode especially for safety for good sight lines so you've got all that mowing and all those traffic delays when the mowers are out there in the medians turner's ideas to plant highway medians with plants that don't require maintenance like grass does the seed might cost slightly more but that's the only difference and then you'd get a permanent ground cover that needs no mowing.

freakonomics florida virginia alan turner wilmington delaware turner steve ibm john faulkner arlington sixteen acres
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"The other is president of the pfizer foundation which is a separate legal entity today on freakonomics radio we ask grown about her industries reputation i will confess we don't have a lot of wind at our back about their mission our business and social mission is actually one in the same end we're reputation in mission intersect i mean look this is a complex issue that's coming up right after this then from wnyc studios this is freakonomics radio the podcast that explores the hidden side of everything here's your host stephen dubner pfizer based in new york city is a huge company with more than ninety thousand employees around the world it sells its products in one hundred and twentyfive countries there are a lot of over the counter brands you are probably familiar with like advil chapstick centrum dimetapp preparation age and robitussin but pfizer's big moneymaker is prescription drugs you've probably heard of lipa tour die flu can which is an antifungal prevalent thirteen which is a pneumococcal vaccine lyrica which is for pain and of course we also contributed viagra which was for a very serious disease the company was founded in eighteen forty nine by two german immigrants it considers corporate social responsibility or see are to be part of its dna and really the first i think significant contribution was unlocking the ability to mass produce penicillin and it was a wonder drug but nobody had sort of sorted out the specifics of how you take it to mass production and pfizer did that and at the time of world war two they actually ran the plant twenty four hours a day and partnered with the united states government to ensure that we had enough penicillin that our troops could take it ashore on d day.

president pfizer foundation wnyc studios new york city pfizer viagra penicillin advil united states twenty four hours
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

02:09 min | 2 years ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Freakonomics radio is supported by wordpress dot com helping you reach more customers when you build your business website wordpress offers twenty four seven customer support and plans start at just four dollars a month get started at wordpress dot com slash freak and get fifteen percent off any new plan purchase wordpress dot com slash freak frigging mix radio is supported by ziprecruiter hiring ziprecruiter is revolutionized how you do it their technology identifies people with the right experience and invites them to apply to your job they find great candidates for you try it for free today at ziprecruiter dot com slash freak ziprecruiter the smartest way to hire if i asked you to guess the least popular business sector in the united states what would you say here's a hint the very low approval rating of this industry nearly ties it with the federal government according to gallup only about a third of americans give this industry a positive rating it is so unpopular that even the very very unpopular federal government attacks it all the time politicians of every leaning from rand paul the republican senator from kentucky big pharma manipulates this system to keep prices high to elizabeth warren the democratic senator from massachusetts and a lot of that money that is fat lobbying congress is to keep drug prices high from donald trump the drug companies frankly are getting away with murder to bernie sanders been fighting the greed of the prescription drug industry for decades and as far as i can tell the pharmaceutical industry always wiz and here's an interesting twist the pharmaceutical industry is also the most charitable industry in america according to a survey by the chronicle of philanthropy the top three american companies for charitable contributions are pfizer gilead sciences and merck also in the top ten bristol myers squibb.

wordpress united states senator massachusetts donald trump murder pfizer gilead sciences myers squibb rand kentucky elizabeth warren bernie sanders america chronicle of philanthropy fifteen percent four dollars
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:52 min | 2 years ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Or anecdotal stories that you're saying are mostly not true in so many of the terms are abused or misuse their exaggerated what are you people good for yeah that's that's not a bad question actually yeah psychology is a bit of a double edged sword because it is so intuitively interesting to all of us and the positive side is that we're all psychologists everyday life we all know release think we know something about love and memory and friendships and dreams and things like that the downside though i think that you're getting at is that because something seems familiar it may sometimes seem understandable there's a very hungry very receptive audience for psychological books on positive psychology emotions love relationships and fidelity dot dot dot dot dot that's all good but the danger i think is that we can very easily push our wonder buttons and push our interest buttons using pseudoscience rather than science we hear freakonomics radio are totally in favor of people pushing their wonder buttons but we're also in favor of real science so today on the show what are some of these misleading misused and abused ideas from psychology so one that comes to mind his bystander apathy and the biggest error is to assume that these personality traits are unitary they only have one cause and that they're inherited and one of the most important discoveries in neuro science of the last few years has been at all that hardwired stuff is completely wrong and a lot of people will say oh has a really steep learning curve in fact i'm getting it backward.

freakonomics
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"From wnyc studios this is freakonomics radio the podcast that explores the hidden side of everything here's your host stephen dubner i've always wondered you you're productive fellow and i'm just gonna he's how a typical week or month i have no idea what the cycles are but how how do you break up your various duties do try to do some of everything in every day or their weeks where you go without operating or writing how does that work i've never figured it out to be honest every day is a problem to solve how i get the things i'm interested in doing get get done but i'd say it's probably on a daily cycle so i might have a day in the operating room or in the clinic but then the next day i'll be entirely focused on my work in public health and then i might be travelling in giving a lecture or visiting one of our research sites there's a dominant theme to the day and then i'm piling everything else around it and my main parameters are i really really work hard to have about twenty five percent of my time on scheduled and i make sure i get enough sleep most of the time and do you ever in the middle of let's say a surgery think about oh here's how i will be writing about this day you know i don't really i i'm in the flow one of the things that i love about surgery surgeries it is i have to confess the lease stressful thing i do because at this point i've done thousands of the operations i do ninety seven to ninety eight percent go pretty much as expected and the two percent that don't you know i know the ten different way.

wnyc studios stephen dubner ninety eight percent twenty five percent two percent
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:39 min | 2 years ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"Freakonomics radio is supported by ibm by twenty fifty the world population will reach nearly ten billion and food production will need to grow by seventy percent what if artificial intelligence could help farmers are already using it to help increase crop yields watson and the ibm cloud provide access to whether data and analyze satellite imagery to help them monitor soil moisture levels and reduce water waste so as the population grows more food can be put on tables let's put smart to work find out how at ibm dot com slash smart frigging amax radio is supported by charles schwab what do the battle of midway a box of crackers and your money have in common listen to the first episode of choice allergy an original podcast from charles schwab to find out hosted by dan heath choice exposes hidden psychological traps the comed too expensive mistakes listen at schwab dot com slash podcast or find choice allergy on your favorite podcast app freakonomics radio is supported by the old birds wool runner the world's most comfortable shoe made with premium natural materials like superfine merino wool all birds are shoes you will feel good in and good about plus they offer thirty day trial period you can wear your shoes out in the wild for thirty days and if you're not in love they will take them back no questions asked the soft cozy comfort of the wool runner is now available in classic and limited edition colors head to all birds dot com to find your perfect pair today.

ibm charles schwab dan heath seventy percent thirty days thirty day
"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

Freakonomics

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"freakonomics" Discussed on Freakonomics

"In next week's special episode you'll hear my full conversation with ray dallaglio founder of the gigantic hedge fund ridge water socio that's i think the basically life exists in three big phases in the first phase you're learning and you're dependent on others you're a kid secondphase you're working others are dependent on you and you're trying to be successful in the third phase the greatest joy you can have is to help others be successful also please keep your ears out for our regular freakonomics radio episodes which your podcast stream promptly at eleven pm eastern time on wednesdays thanks for listening freakonomics radio is produced by wnyc studios and w productions are staff includes alison hawkenberry greg rozelle ski stephanie tam max miller merit jacob harry huggins and brian gutierrez the music you hear throughout our episodes was composed by we skara you can subscribe to freakonomics radio on apple podcasts or any number of podcast portals you should also check out our archive at freakonomics dot com where you can stream or download every episode we've ever made you can also read the transcripts find links to the underlying research our show can also be heard on npr stations across the country check your local station for the schedule and we can be heard on sirius xm spotify even your better airlines we can also be found on twitter facebook or via email at radio at freakonomics dot com thanks for listening.

founder wnyc studios brian gutierrez facebook ray dallaglio alison hawkenberry harry huggins apple npr twitter