37 Burst results for "four decades"

125 Killed in Western India Landslides, Monsoon Flooding

Red Eye Radio

00:33 sec | 9 hrs ago

125 Killed in Western India Landslides, Monsoon Flooding

"More than 100 people have died in torrential rains inundating parts of western India. There has been widespread flooding and mudslides as a result days at the heaviest monsoon rainfall in four decades, unleashing destructive floods and landslides, killing at least 125, with many more feared dead over 1000 rescued so far. Some clinging to ropes as India's disaster response force helped them to safety, others fleeing to rooftops and waiting for assistance. Some areas receiving 23 inches of rain in just 24 hours. A B C's Lama

India Lama
Fresh "four decades" from WBZ Morning News

WBZ Morning News

01:04 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh "four decades" from WBZ Morning News

"The other eight million citizens in the country. The death toll climbing quickly in western India. Here's ABC is Lama Hassan days at the heaviest monsoon rainfall in four decades, unleashing destructive floods and landslides, killing at least 125, with many more feared dead over 1000 rescued so far, some clinging to rope as India's disaster response force helped them to safety. Others fleeing to rooftops and waiting for assistance. Some areas receiving 23 inches of rain in just 24 hours. Gushing floodwaters sweeping away home submerging vehicles are Putin Teresa unblocking. Hundreds of villages and towns now are without electricity and also no drinking water. More than 80 wildfires burning in 11 Western states in our country. The largest of them is the bootleg fire in southern Oregon, which is already scorched more than 400,000 acres. De Buchanan lives in Summer Lake, one of the communities currently under a mandatory evacuation order, and she says, watching the forest burn. Devastating the places I take my grandkids, fishing is probably gone. Takes forever for things to come back. So far this year over 36,000 wildfires have burned. Some 2.7 million acres in the United States have been devastated. That's an increase. From the same time one year ago. 6 2070 degrees clouds in Boston. The AccuWeather forecast with Brian Thompson check the roads with David stuff next The loop is a quick rundown of the biggest stories of the day from WBZ. NewsRadio have major developments on a number of stories and it in a.

Brian Thompson De Buchanan Boston United States Summer Lake WBZ David One Year Ago Southern Oregon Hundreds Of Villages 23 Inches More Than 400,000 Acres More Than 80 Wildfires Four Decades Over 1000 Western India 2.7 Million Acres Over 36,000 Wildfires Newsradio ABC
The Sacred Band of Thebes

Queer as Fact

02:35 min | Last week

The Sacred Band of Thebes

"As minor way often discuss houses before we actually start telling you about the thing. We're talking about the infamous. Lit review lit review. Every costs needs one episode. In this instance. Actually not really gonna talk much about us is at the start of the episode. I used a lot of like little sources for all of the different sections so will discuss them as they come up and talk about. What's wrong with them with one exception. being i wanted to talk a little bit about a book called the sacred band by james rome. This book is. I'm fairly confident. In saying the newest scholarship that exists on the sacred band because it came out in early june of this year and we decided to do an episode on the sacred band because the publisher of the book reached out to us at austin advanced review copy. Thank you for that. I must pay for that copy and talking about as the title suggests james rum's the sacred band is about the sacred band of thieves which you'll hear an awful lot about a minute. I'm genuinely very interested to hear about the benefits. I literally but the book also more widely explores the political and social and military context of the roughly four decades in which the band exist in unusually for us. You have also read this book. Alice what did you think of it as someone who didn't then go raid ten other books about the area. I feel like michael two little cloudy. So how did you feel about it as a ruin peasant To a great person. So i deny much background about the second band of thieves or ancient greece. I'm not going into the person who knows nothing. Because i have studied disappeared. But i definitely wasn't being like i. I know this. I wanted to give you an idea of how i went into this book so probably like about where most people pick up. The book would be like if you're interested enough to pick up the bulk. You probably have a vague idea of that was athens. They were at Thieves was also he unite. That's the general context. Obviously a will give you a good version of that later in the episode crest. Where is the do you know what happens. Yes it's north of that Grace it's it's grace. It's quite central to grace. And it's like roughly to the north of athens quite close to athens within like a day's ride will a couple of days walk all right so even like quite course Travel yes this will come Will between these.

James Rome James Rum Austin Alice Greece Athens Michael Grace
Fresh update on "four decades" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:42 sec | 8 hrs ago

Fresh update on "four decades" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"It's a first Jayla Jackson and Imani Stanton are the first black female duo to win Harvard's international debate competition. This is in comparison to the average cost of college being nearly $36,000 person They trained every weekend for a year to do it. It was amazing to do you have to be able to do something that is just intellectually amazing to do it for the culture, and it feels so amazing to be a catalyst for change in a catalyst for recognition, So I can be that girl that another little girl can see and say, I want to do what she did. Hundreds of students from 15 countries were part of it. Steve Captain, CBS News He was a rabbi turned comedian on television and in clubs, four decades popped up. Hey, tell the boy I'm talking to you. Jackie Mason has died. He was 93 years old Tom Foti, CBS News. Business.

Imani Stanton Jayla Jackson Tom Foti Steve Captain Jackie Mason 15 Countries Harvard Cbs News 93 Years Old First Hundreds Of Students Nearly $36,000 Person Four
Mainstream Media Cannot Underestimate Who Iran's President-Elect Ebrahim Raisi Is

Mark Levin

01:49 min | Last month

Mainstream Media Cannot Underestimate Who Iran's President-Elect Ebrahim Raisi Is

"Racy is also likely to succeed the ailing Ali Khamenei. In other words, run the whole country is the supreme leader. Is deeply describing record in mindset, Warren Close examination. So who is this guy racy? Has it been reported on any cable news program has been reported on any network news program. Course not. Raisi became an Islamist ideologue as a teen studying in the seminary in Qom. After the revolution when he was only 19 years old and lacking any university education. He was appointed as a prosecutor. Rising over the following four decades to fill the positions of attorney general keep a deputy chief justice and, most recently, chief justice. Iran's theocratic dictatorship. Most notably racy, was one of four members of a death committee. Responsible for the 1988 execution of thousands and thousands of Iranian prisoners of conscience in the space of a few months. The ideologically motivated mass executions constituted both at crime against humanity and genocide, a cleansing of religious infidels, according to international human rights expert Geoffrey Robertson. It was a massacre, he says comparable with those that shrimp Branca And Kate and Forest. Raisi would typically spend only a few minutes with each prisoner. Some young Children. Asking them questions to test their allegiance to radical Islam. The prisoners, mostly leftist revolutionaries, who would help bring the regime to power typically refused to feign loyalty, even after prolonged and brutal torture. Which in some cases, was personally directed and overseen by racing himself. It's estimated that a minimum

Raisi Ali Khamenei QOM Warren Geoffrey Robertson Iran Kate
President Biden, Galveston And Texas discussed on AP News Radio

AP News Radio

00:35 sec | Last month

President Biden, Galveston And Texas discussed on AP News Radio

"The nation has a new federal holiday commemorating the end of slavery June nineteenth eighteen sixty five the day known as Juneteenth when sleeves in Galveston Texas learned they were free president Biden has signed into law a bill making get the twelfth federal holiday this is Dave profound in my view profound weight and profound power a day the nation remembers when he calls the moral stain of slavery and its capacity to heal it's the first new federal holidays since Martin Luther king junior day was created nearly four decades ago Sager

President Biden Galveston Texas Dave Martin Luther King Sager
Uncovering the Story of the Online Serial Predator "Antisense"

Unraveled: A Long Island Serial Killer

01:48 min | Last month

Uncovering the Story of the Online Serial Predator "Antisense"

"The cyber world is the latest frontier of human interaction. But for all the good at his brought it remains dangerous territory revengeful personalities an unstable mines have the ability at their fingertips to toy with people's lives to the point where they're victims have no place to hide in no laws to protect them. We've got a small taste of this ourselves a few years ago during our early days of podcast hosting for brief period i was stocked online by a stranger and it was scary. I'll give some details on that later. But made billion curious about the dark and even deadly world of cyber stalking. We wanted to export deeper over this past year. Alexis and i have spoken with dozens of victims of cybercrimes along with the professionals who investigated these cases pursued these offenders we encountered horrific stories of lives upended disturbing tales of extortion and psychological terror an unbelievable cases that ended in murder. And we uncover the granddaddy of them. All the predator. Who not only targeted vanessa. V but of fifty other victims over the better part of four decades. I decided to tell a story because every male friend. I talked to told me not to do it. They said i should stop investigating and stop inserting myself into this world. People are scared of these criminals and not enough people are speaking out because of it. And i'm telling the story because having now investigated it. I came to realize that you'd rather face a guy in an alley with a knife than an online predator with a keyboard. You know you might get hurt in the knife fight. At least you'd have a fighting chance against the cybercriminals you're fighting with hands tied behind your back.

Alexis Vanessa
Trudeaus Liberals Promised to End the Blood Ban

The Big Story

02:00 min | Last month

Trudeaus Liberals Promised to End the Blood Ban

"Jordan heath rawlings. This is the big story. Justin length is an investigative reporter. The canadian journalist who has been covering the blood banned for how long now just Like six years. Maybe longer many many enough years too many years i think. Why don't we just start at the beginning For people who heard this of like a talking point in a political fight over the last decade or so. How old is the blood band. And where did it come from right so you you go back about four decades in and you've fair confronted with the really disquieting reality of the blood of the tainted blood scandal right. You had cases the hundreds of cases across the country Where folks received blood transfusions that were not adequately screened that ultimately led to sero conversion for hiv that ultimately impacted them With other new hepatitis diseases as well as other infectious diseases And it was a national scandal. It was absolutely shattered. People's illusions about the blood system a better health system right it. It it fundamentally you know weakened trust in a meal what governments ought to be doing to ensure the health and safety of people who rely on government services so you go back to that point and you realize the sort of risks inherent in what protecting the blood supply you know actually means and unfortunately from that you know there was a good thing came from that. Which was we actually had a conversation about what Ensuring safety of the blood supply actually means but on the flip side you also started to see This really sort of reactionary and knee-jerk blame placed on the queer community in canada. Who of course have historically faced higher hiv rates of that other

Jordan Heath Rawlings Justin Length Hepatitis Diseases Canada
NYT Reporter Said Americans Acted Like ‘Selfish Pigs’ During COVID, Unlike Chinese

The News & Why It Matters

01:54 min | Last month

NYT Reporter Said Americans Acted Like ‘Selfish Pigs’ During COVID, Unlike Chinese

"A new york times writer called Americans selfish pigs. In comparison to average chinese citizens speaking of china of who behaved heroically amid the pandemic this a former veteran writer for the new york times. Not and this was in an email to anthony fauci in february twenty twenty as the coronavirus pandemic was just beginning to become An international news stories so By the way this is he was fired from the times but he worked for the paper for more than four decades. He wrote to anthony. Fauci and sad Let's see i was just watching the hhs briefing online and thinking about an article. I read this morning. And bruce aylward description of what he saw in china and a lot of videos. I've watched on the south china morning post website they're doing great coverage he puts in parentheses And then he says you know to china. They behaved incredibly heroically in the face of the virus. Twenty-five thousand doctors nurses went into wuhan to help knowing they might die and by the way meanwhile in america people tend to act like selfish pigs interested only in saving themselves. How can i afford a mask. Where's my vaccine this morning. I read an appalling article from alabama and He says this behavior is unacceptable from From americans it's interesting. I don't think it matters much. And i know we only have a couple of minutes left. I don't think it matters much from this. Nypd for you know. it's like okay. He wrote for the new york times now he doesn't anymore. But i do think it is indicative of this greater push that we have seen during the pandemic that i think will linger on which is to call americans who want to prolong their freedom. Who wants to make sure that they don't see their freedoms go away to call them selfish and they want to condition you to think that oh well just engaging in your own personal freedoms that you have. Because you're an american is in fact

The New York Times Bruce Aylward China Anthony Fauci Fauci HHS South China Wuhan Anthony Alabama America
Naked Mole Rats: The Key to Slowing Human Aging?

Kottke Ride Home

01:54 min | 2 months ago

Naked Mole Rats: The Key to Slowing Human Aging?

"Rodents only live a few years. Maybe six at the most for some of the common ones. That's comparative biologist. Russia buffet stein was stunned in the late nineties. When the naked mole rats that she'd been studying just wouldn't die. She was working with some that. Were more than fifteen years old and one naked mole rat who she first met while doing doctoral work in the eighties. A pink and wrinkly dude named joe. He is now thirty nine years old and officially the oldest living naked mole rat on record. He's barely aged at all in nearly four decades and there is every expectation that he'll make it to the big four. Oh thanks to the work of buffon's stein and increasing number of scientists studying naked mole rats and various capacities. We now know that the creatures have an astonishing lifespan of around thirty years. Joe is an anomaly of the anomalies. Of course anyone who's read. Harry potter knows what's going on here. Joe is clearly a shape shifting wizard who faked his own death after joining a colton murdering his best friend. so he's been hiding out as a naked mole rat for the past few decades. I'm onto you joe. But magical explanations aside naked mole rats. It turns out are fascinating. In addition to living exceptionally long. Lives for rodents naked mole. Rats unlike other mammals aren't susceptible to many diseases like arthritis cancer and alzheimer's they can also withstand long periods without oxygen and are impervious to pain from acid. There is so much about naked mole. Rats that is absolutely wild and researchers still trying to figure out the reason for a lot of it but we're starting to get more information because a lot more players have entered the ring in recent years due to the naked mole rats relative lack of aging and low occurrence of age associated disease. They've become a hot subject of study for cancer. Researchers and anyone interested in

Buffet Stein JOE Russia Arthritis Cancer Colton Harry Potter Alzheimer Associated Disease Cancer
Samoa Is Set to Have Its First Female Leader

BBC Newsday

00:24 sec | 2 months ago

Samoa Is Set to Have Its First Female Leader

"For AstraZeneca. The tiny Pacific nation of summer is almost certain to have its first female prime minister on Monday and its first change of governing party in four decades. It comes after the Supreme Court overturned an edict by the head of state aiming to block the swearing in of parliament. After very close elections fee army Naomi Marta offer has shown

Astrazeneca Supreme Court Parliament Naomi Marta
IMF Upgrades Forecast for 2021 Global Growth to a Record 6%

The Property Couch

01:02 min | 2 months ago

IMF Upgrades Forecast for 2021 Global Growth to a Record 6%

"The i m upgraded. Its jd db forecast to predict it the best global growth in four decades. That's not a bad way to start the presentation. The has predicted the lightest numbers in its world economic outlook. It lifted its twenty twenty. One world growth j. p. forecast to six percent from five point five in his as january. Is she the full cost of the. Us growth was lifted to six point. Four percent from five point one percent previously and china two point four percent from eight point one percent and the forecast restrain. Gdp growth was increased to four point. Five percent up from three point. Five percent the outward revisions reflect additional fiscal support in some large economies. The anticipated vaccine driven recovery in the second half of two thousand twenty one and the knowing adoption of economic activity in the face of mobility restrictions. As we move out we get to be out of spain and that moves the economy forward

China United States Spain
Ethan Hawke on His Book 'A Bright Ray of Darkness'

Design Matters with Debbie Millman

01:40 min | 3 months ago

Ethan Hawke on His Book 'A Bright Ray of Darkness'

"Yes i know. Ethan hawke is a famous actor and hardly means it introduction. He started more than eighty movies. Many of which have made their mark in geist. You've seen him in everything from dead poets society in reality bites to the before trilogy and boyhood ethan hawke is also a writer. In fact in high school he wanted to be a writer before becoming interested in acting over his nearly four decade career. he's managed to do and then today. I'm going to talk with him about his latest novel of great ray of darkness and his revert performance as john brown in the showtime series. The good lord burnt. Ethan hawke welcome to design matters. Well thanks for having me. It's a pleasure to be here even. Is it true that when you were growing up. You had fantasies of becoming a merchant marine. That is very true. Well i was a big jack. London fan you know and i had a kid who lived down the street from me than i was nick and he liked jack london and he was really cool. You know when you're sixteen. Seventeen year olds just feels like he's got the world by the scruff of the neck and He went off to be a merchant marine and live off his jack london fantasies. I have no idea what happened to him. But we used to read books together and talk about them. And i thought he was. You know. I wanted to be just like him but i also want to be just like jack london and so i thought that might be a great avenue to chase down an interesting life to disappear into the seas the comeback. Somebody interesting pretty boring. As i was

Ethan Hawke Geist John Brown Jack London Nick London
George W. Bush on Need for Comprehensive Immigration Reform

WTOP 24 Hour News

01:02 min | 3 months ago

George W. Bush on Need for Comprehensive Immigration Reform

"Former President George W. Bush. Who has mostly stayed out of politics. After the White House has re emerged with criticism off Donald Trump is he advocates for a sharply different immigration policy from Trump. Mr. Bush sat down with CBS News correspondent Norah O'Donnell to talk about immigration and his new book of paintings Out of many one Portrait's of America's immigrants. Deep in the Heart of Texas is the former president, 1600 Acre Ranch. Come on in where he's mixing his new passion for painting. It's an issue he's cared about four decades immigrant Shin. The problem with the immigration debate. Is that it it one can create a lot of fear. Yeah, they're coming after you. The former president hopes his voice makes that debate less fearful. After four years of anti immigration rhetoric more than two decades ago, George W. Bush rat is a compassionate conservative who wanted to pass comprehensive immigration reform. His failure to do so, he said, is one of his greatest regrets and part of the reason he is rejoining the

Norah O'donnell George W. Bush Donald Trump Mr. Bush Cbs News White House Texas America
Google Earth's New Timelapse Feature Shows Chilling Effect of Climate Change

WBZ Midday News

00:40 sec | 3 months ago

Google Earth's New Timelapse Feature Shows Chilling Effect of Climate Change

"Not just global leaders are focusing on climate change. Google Earth is adding a new video feature on climate change is well, Here's Thanh Aunt. The tool was unveiled Thursday build is the biggest update to Google Earth and five years the video feature draws upon nearly four decades of satellite imagery to vividly illustrate how climate change has affected glaciers, beaches, forests and other places around the world. Google says they worked in concert with several government agencies, including NASA and its European counterpart to put the project together. One climate scientist preview the video and believes this will get people to understand the scope of climate change and could change many people's minds about the scale of the impact. Of humans on the environment.

Google Nasa
"four decades" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

The Diane Rehm Show

08:28 min | 3 months ago

"four decades" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

"Is the main pillar of the bay turkey. What is the future. It's a system of oppression that gives supremacy to the male gender over women nature other species and many other men too because not every man is an alpha male in the patriots on what feminists it is in up. It's an uprising against that system so we are fighting the system not the made gender because of course we need men and we like men is not about that. It's about the system needs to change the system of oppression that that is based on violence. Greed and competition and women are the first victims. How much progress are we really making. We are making progress in my lifetime. I have seen the progress of you of seen. Diane and there is progress. But because i work in the world with with organizations in other places in the world i know that what we have achieved here is not all women have at all. We are far from that far. And what we have here is not enough either so we still have a lot of work to do and i will not see the end of the patriot in my lifetime. But my granddaughter's might so my job is to make it happen for them. Here's another question from a listener. Who says your first novels house this spirits in a balloon magic realism. Some of your later. Works including long pedal to see are more historical fiction curious why you change styles. What prompted a change. Were there specific challenges to do so. You know all my books different. I have tried different johns. I have tried historical fiction literary novels with magic realism without magic realism. I have tried young adult novels. Even even book about a for fiction nonfiction. It even a crime novel reaper. So i'm always curious about new things and magic realism was very in latin america. It between the sixty seventy eighty s on then The literature moved away from that style. Big game like too much and the thing is that magic realism is not some latin. American literary device. Sort of shake. No it's a way of seeing the world of accepting that the world is a very mysterious place. We don't have all the answers. Don't control everything. And we have manifestations of things that appear to be magical because we don't have the explanation. If we didn't have an explanation for electricity any electrical phenomena would be magical so in latin america. Because we have that feeling that we don't control anything really. We have more the idea that the world is magical. But think of the united states think of the conspiracy theories. I'm magical thinking think of astrologers and horoscopes and crystals and gurus on those crazy preachers. All that is magical thinking. Most religious religions are magical thinking so why attributed only to latin america. I don't know. And then i have some elements of magic realist in some of my books in most of my books but running all of them in a in a book like long battle of the c. Which is a very particular. Yes the story of twenty two hundred spanish refugees escape from the civil war. in spain. i ended up an ended up being refugees in cheery and they traveling ship goal. The winnipeg that the board babylon bought for that purpose. it's very particular event. There's no place for bicycle realist. Model except the magical thinking that that the character might have but that's meaningful here is another question. What is your thought about. What's going on at the. Us southern border. My foundation works in the southern border. We are helping organizations that are trying to protect the kids that are in detention centers on the ones that have been separated from the parents but we also work on the other side of the wall in the refugee camps in mexico where the situation of women would be more vulnerable on terrible where people people kidnapped assassinated where the narcos are in control and crime is rampant violence against women. Also so we work there on. I'm telling you we know ten percent of what's really going on there that we see images of kids engages but the extent of it. We have no idea in this country. Who would we our tax dollars. A bang for it is appalling. It is shameful and we will remember this in later generations as a terrible time is shameful time shame full time and we hope that poor long aren't new president can address. What's happening there and make things better in the countries from which those for families come exactly. Diane that's the whole point. You'll have said exactly would start the root of all this why people leave. There were no syrian refugees. Ten years ago when the war the civil war in syria started refugees started to get out because they were running for their lives and now we have more than five million syrian refugees in europe. Because they had to get out. Now why do we have refugees that come from central america because of the terrible conditions in central america especially in what is called the triangle of the north. The what they're mala on dudas on salvador and those conditions were created by general site that gainsaying digital people and in the with idea of fighting in the cold war against communism all democratic governments that where leftist in those countries where eliminated with the help of the cia which also find nines. The military that took care of killing the song people so now we have countries with fail governments that have been taken over by the gangs and by the articles on people cannot live there they can survive so they get out in despair and that is the reason so unless the conditions in those countries are improved so that people can live with some safety. We will have refugees. Well my friend isabel. I hope ones this. Pandemic is beyond us and we are all able to travel safely again. I hope you and i can sit down across the table. Have a cup of coffee. Yeah with each other in person. Yes that would be has been wonderful. It's wonderful to see you justice you wear twenty years ago with the same spirit on the same.

europe central america isabel mexico spain Ten years ago Diane twenty years ago twenty two hundred more than five million sixty seventy eighty s cold war latin america salvador ten percent syria civil war first novels American first victims
"four decades" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

The Diane Rehm Show

03:40 min | 3 months ago

"four decades" Discussed on The Diane Rehm Show

"Me of course is very inspirational but now i just want to stay put in my little house and enough is enough. I have seen the world. i don't want to see any more of it..

"four decades" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

03:37 min | 3 months ago

"four decades" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"Way worse. worse. yeah you have so much to share. We had women in this country. Because at what you've been through yourself and the life you've lived and the books you've written you as devilish your foundation. As i recall after your daughter powell died. Tell us about paula. Of course the death of my daughter is the worst thing that ever happened to me ever. It cannot look to anything. Has she died. Poor veria she died of neglect in a hospital in madrid for fia did not kill her ross neglect and should not kill anybody nowadays because about it there is treatment. Yeah i have to two granddaughters with affiliate one of them had four crisis in six months during the pandemic now. She's on achievement. As she has not had any other crisis how pointed happens is manageable biting foulis case. They didn't manage it and she ended up unicol To comb so. She ended up with severe brain damage. It was a very tragic thing but my life is not tragic. My life is a happy life in spite of all the things that that scene so tragic you were asking about how the foundation started. After she died. I wrote that book powder and after the book was published i fell in a sort of void. My life had no meaning. I had all this time in my hands. The time that i had spent with her and now she wasn't there and i had no desire to write anything. I was just empty. And someone said you have to fill reservoirs. You aren t so. I ended up going to india with my friend. Taber and my husband then willie and we rented a car. And we're wearing graduate stan On rural trip with the driver the was very hot. The engine got very hot. So we stopped to cool the engine and my my friend taber and i. We walked toward a group of women that were underachieved. Very poor women with a bunch of little kids and we had bought ray slits in in market and so we gave the women the bracelets we couldn't talk but we touched. You know we smiled and we bless the kids and then it was time to go back to the car because the driver was honking so we walked back to the garden. One of the women ran behind me as she gave me this little parcel of rags on i. I thought was trying to give me something back for the bracelets and i said are not not not not necessary. But she insisted and so. I opened the rags and inside was a newborn baby. I don't think the baby was more than a day old or had the umbilical cord raw air and and. I kiss the baby. Bless the baby and tried to give it back and she wouldn't take it and in that moment the driver king. Running these big man with a turban..

india madrid Taber paula six months willie taber two granddaughters one One veria more than a day four crisis women powell
"four decades" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

Diane Rehm: On My Mind

03:21 min | 3 months ago

"four decades" Discussed on Diane Rehm: On My Mind

"I would never marry again. And what happens but three years later a man wrote to me and said he had known me many years ago and we begin corresponding and i met him on book tour and here we are now right. How long have you been married. It will be our fourth wedding anniversary. Lavi lowyou will. I hope my marriage lasts for years. That'd be nice. i hope it too. I have to tell you. I adored this for this off because it speaks to me. It speaks to all women. It's speaks from truth and from the heart and you talk about yourself as a feminist going back to the earliest years childhood. How did that happen. Or it wasn't called feminist. Then i was born in the forties. I'm seventy eight years old at four. You see to all ender ladies to be good wages and I was living in my grandfather's house with some bachelor uncles. Because my father abandoned my mother after four years of marriage and she had three babies he walked away walked away. We never saw him again. And but it's not that he disappeared. He just walked away from the family and And my mother had to return to live in her father's house. My grandmother died so it was a household of males where where my mother was in a very vulnerable position. She was sort of charity case. She was not prepared to work. She had three babies and she had no money. No independence and about time in cina. There was no divorce. Divorce happened in chile in two thousand or can you imagine so my mother will separated and that meant that she was like a single mother with three kids very pretty also sort of flirtatious so she had to take very good care of her reputation which meant that she had no freedom at all so no freedom no resources no nothing no husband and i sold my mother so fragile so dependent. I'm so poor. I didn't want to be that way. So i was very angry at a situation. Angry at the mayo sorority of my grandfather and ankles and angry at fair. The situation was for women for my mother. I'm being made in the house at the time. We got several mates the house and they live like slaves so i i was angry kid. It terribly angry kid rebellious defiant and God wasn't called feminism in of course but it was very very particular anger against mehta for eighty..

chile three babies cina three kids two thousand fourth wedding anniversary three years later four years Lavi eighty four single mother seventy eight years old many years ago forties years God several mates mehta
U.S. suicides dropped last year, defying pandemic expectations

The Gee and Ursula Show

00:45 sec | 3 months ago

U.S. suicides dropped last year, defying pandemic expectations

"A toll on mental health G. So this may come as a surprise to everyone. The number of U. S suicides fell nearly 6% last year that is actually the largest drop in at least four decades. This is according to preliminary government numbers. It's hard to say exactly why suicide deaths dropped so much last year, but some are saying that maybe it's an increase in the availability of tele health services and mental health screenings. And some experts is suggesting another factor. Maybe because of the heroism phase, something that you see in the early stages of wars and national disasters where Everyone bands together and expresses support that we're all in this together. You think that's there's something to that?

Carbon dioxide levels highest they've been in 3.6 million years

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:34 sec | 3 months ago

Carbon dioxide levels highest they've been in 3.6 million years

"Says carbon dioxide and methane emissions went up in 2020. Despite coronavirus lockdowns, Ryan Shook explains. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration explained the global surface average for CEO to went up by 2.6 parts per million last year. It represented the fifth highest rate of increase in Noah's 63 year record. The agency also noted CEO to levels are now higher than at any time in the past 3.6 million years. As for methane, it saw its largest annual increase recorded since systematic measurements began nearly four decades ago.

Ryan Shook National Oceanic And Atmospher Noah
Key takeaways from Biden's first White House news conference

WBAP Morning News

02:10 min | 4 months ago

Key takeaways from Biden's first White House news conference

"His first press conference since taking office earlier this week. Deputy babies Clayton Nevel says the commander in chief was pressed on issues ranging from violence in the U. S to Cove into a recent influx of illegal border crossings. It's the longest, the president has waited for an official meeting with the media and about four decades It wasn't your typical press briefing, either. Reporters were massed in their chairs were spread out. The briefing lasted just over an hour, and President Biden spoken a variety of topics. The first being the cove it pandemic. He touted the progress of vaccinating Americans and how his administration shattered its goal of 100 million shots in the 1st 100 days of his presidency. He announced another ambition, and that is We will buy my 100 Day in office have administered 200 million shots. The president praised his American rescue plan for providing needed relief to the American people since it was passed. Majority. Majority of economic forecasters. Have significantly increased their projections. The economic growth is going to take place this year. We're now projecting it will Exceed 6% 6% growth in GDP. President Biden made clear that he's open to eliminating the Senate filibuster, which requires 60 votes to pass legislation in the Senate. He said the rules being abused in that he's open to changes, but he wasn't specific. President also called legislative efforts to limit voting rights UN American But the issue that brought most of the questions was that of a recent influx of migrant Children at the southern border. He doubled down on his administration stands too close the border to families in single adults, but not two Children. The idea that I'm going to say Which I would never do. A lot of company child ends up with the border. We're just gonna let him starve to death and stay in the other side. No previous administrations that either except Trump I couldn't do it. The president addressed the need for more facilities, toehold migrant Children and promised media members will eventually have access to those facilities. In the wake of recent

President Biden Clayton Nevel U. Senate UN
Biden gears up for his first official White House press conference

Chris Salcedo

00:36 sec | 4 months ago

Biden gears up for his first official White House press conference

"Today corresponded Rachel Sutherland has more watch for the president to field questions of the southern border new spending initiatives, including a proposed infrastructure bill that could cost $3 trillion and gun control. The White House has signaled the executive orders on guns could be coming in the aftermath of recent mass shootings. The news conference comes more than two months after the president took office later than any of his predecessors and four decades the president has been preparing with AIDS grilling him during a mock session. Reporters will gather in the East Room of the White House for the event during the one P.m. hour Eastern Rachel Sutherland. Fox News

Rachel Sutherland White House Aids Fox News
March Madness recap: NCAA Tournament is off to a historic, upset-riddled start

CBS Sports Eye On College Basketball Podcast

03:17 min | 4 months ago

March Madness recap: NCAA Tournament is off to a historic, upset-riddled start

"We are here to talk through the third full day of the two thousand twenty one. Ncaa tournament is a wild. That'll be remembered for a number one seed losing to an in state opponent and for three double digit seeds advancing to the sweet sixteen. We'll get the top seeded illinois lose loyal chicago in a bit. But i want to start with the double digits. In that one on sunday number eleven syracuse upset number three west virginia. Jim bejon against all odds is in the sweet sixteen number twelve oregon state upset number four oklahoma state wayne tinkle against all. Odds is in the sweet sixteen in number fifteen oral roberts upset number seven florida. Paul mills against all odds is in the sweet sixteen dead-leg makes sense. What in the world is going on in indiana. You want me to make sense of this. No shot and need you to make some sense. I'm not gonna make any sense of this. It's been a gloriously. Chaotic and we are knocking on the door of historic and double a. tournament so with these Upsets in addition to others. First of all eight teams from eight separate leagues are now into the sweet sixteen and with the other obviously on monday The most is that could If that could happen Also we have had so the instable a and shops the david warlock who's obviously the media coordinator of all the stuff. He tweeted this about twenty five minutes before we started podcasting so we define an upset as a team seeded five spots or more lower than their opponent we've already set the record with eleven such occurrences were midway through the second round. We have the so another way of saying that is. We're not done the second round yet. The already been eleven games in which a team separated by. At least five seed lines have seen the team lower seeded when it is history. And it's it's just wild man. I actually think we're also on pace. I haven't had time to research this but are. Cbs sports hq team is researching it. I think we are probably on pace. Because of this to have the highest collective number for all the seeds meaning like we've got fifteen in their plus a twelve and oregon state plus eight with loyal. If you get what. I'm saying like when we get to the sweet sixteen. If you add up all the seeds it's going to be the highest total we've ever had there and i can't make any sense of it. I don't know if because like if we'd had this enormous setting with fans and stuff would it be the same. No i mean every single tournament x exists unto itself. If you played this thing again you're going to have all sorts of different kinds of results but is it because it's happening in the pandemic in one location in the venues it's happening at is that allowing for more chaos. I'm i can't say that. It is and i can't say that that's not the reason so i'm loving this parish. Get enough of all of this. Although i will say Oregon state is maybe the most random and congrats to the beavers man. It's the most of sweet sixteen. Maybe ever this team was nowhere. Near the bubble it has not been relevant in its own conference for most of the past four decades and has come out of nowhere to get into the second week for the first time since one thousand nine hundred to

Jim Bejon Wayne Tinkle Paul Mills David Warlock Oregon Ncaa Syracuse West Virginia Roberts Illinois Oklahoma Chicago Indiana Florida CBS Beavers
"four decades" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

05:35 min | 4 months ago

"four decades" Discussed on The Book Review

"Celebrate the one hundred and twenty fifth anniversary of the book review. Hi tina pamela. So today i want to talk about one of the book reviews very i features which was called authors at home which began in late eighteen ninety seven and i feel like the sounds like an actually very modern thing. I mean i think we all love those sort of writers at work features that show people's studies and where they work. I think neil gaiman works in a tree house or whatever but we were doing the very beginning which i find fascinating and although we weren't running photos the descriptions of writer studies and homes and where they worked. Were actually incredibly detailed. Do tell this was so popular by the way that the times was turning it into books in the early twentieth century. So i'm going to take you inside. Arthur conan doyle's house. The times had not always been a conan doyle fan and in fact had run blistering reviews saying things like appreciation of doctor. Doyle's has to do with one's personal zest marvelous care for one detective story but when there are a dozen you may get fit of indigestion but they actually backed off that and so when they visited arthur conan doyle at home in england. Here's what they said. When at home he lives in a modest brick residence with many gable and many balcony. Those who have made his literary acquaintance chiefly through the medium of his detective stories would probably find him a totally different appearing individual from the man they expected to see. There's nothing of the links. I detective about him he's just a happy homely genial man tall broad shoulder with a hand that grips you heartily. He has brown and bronze for he enters. Liberally into all outdoor sports goes on to talk about his love of tandem bicycling but it goes on in details like talk about the paintings painted by his grandfather. You know on the walls the kinds of furniture he has. It goes back into his past and honestly sort of follow the rules for features that we now follow in the times like talking to as many people as possible including his old medical school professor. And i think to me. This is the beginning of the author feature story as we know it now and it was called authors At home i love this. I want one of these books. These books still available are the imprint. You know they're in print. Interestingly the times does not own one. I see that they are in special collections at the new york public library and post pandemic. It's one of my goals to go over there and be able to sit down and one of the rare book reading rooms.

neil gaiman england early twentieth century today Doyle tina pamela late eighteen ninety seven Arthur conan doyle new york conan doyle one hundred and twenty fifth a arthur conan doyle one of the rare book reading r one of the book one of these books one detective balcony a dozen one gable
"four decades" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

01:40 min | 4 months ago

"four decades" Discussed on The Book Review

"Four decades of success. Excess and transformation. If you're a business owner you know that running a business is tough. Don't make quick books and spreadsheets. Slow you down anymore. Now is the time to upgrade to net suite by oracle the world's number one cloud business system net sweet gives you visit and control of your financials hr inventory commerce and more join the over twenty four thousand companies using nets sweet right now schedule your free product to a right now at net sweet dot com slash and y. T net sweet dot com slash. Ny t like it or not..

"four decades" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:25 min | 4 months ago

"four decades" Discussed on The Book Review

"Everything was wonderful and changes. That took place. Were actually great in many ways and many went too far and became toxic. But we have to look at it with a clear mind. Out as a sort of four-decade. Morality play of good or bad and you know facility of people versus the neo liberalism. I mean we were all involved in it somehow. All right i need to ask a basic math question with regard to your title and subtitle. You've got new york three times. You talk about three. New york's but it's four decades of success access and transformation. Well it seemed like saying three and a half decades was going to be a little bit too cute you know but the three the three new york's comes from a wonderful quote by holly white who was herbalist who was instrumental in getting jacobs. Her book deal for death and life of great american city and who is one of the fathers of the back to the city movement. That was going on at the same time. As people were rushing out to the suburbs kind of started that long back of how are we gonna regenerate cities and in white fell into the orbit of the rockefellers worked for lindsay. And he was kind of the father of the idea that what cities need to survive and thrive is people so a lot of the choices that were made to bring the city back had to do with opening it up to people like in bryant park in the parks and stuff so at one point white was asked. What are your three favorite american cities and he said new york new york new york and i thought that. Just kind of some dubbed the Crazy devotion that you have to the place at a certain point and certainly that he had personally to new york well speaking of devotion and perhaps love you start on valentine's day in one thousand hundred seventy eight. Why did you choose that date. What's that starting. Point is a great confluence of things happening. I made its koch's only been ed. Koch is only been mayor that point for a month and a half city is still in very precarious kind of state and at tavern on the green. There was a wonderful party wonderful party. I wasn't there. But that governor hugh carey throws right seemed like it was wonderful. I know you're already upsetting me with all these other tests. Because i am a celtic person. So like the ritz and tavern on the green. It just go through there and a kavulich. Oh tavern on the green party for the launch of i love new york commercial for broadway which i still remember you know. The cast of chorus line singing. I love new york. And so it was a party with yul brenner. and diana. ross and koch and carrie in andy warhol's they're sort of this big new york they launch it and it just seemed like a great stepping off point because.

holly white yul brenner diana hugh carey new york New york valentine's day ross Koch three four-decade bryant park one lindsay american koch a month and a half three times andy warhol four decades
"four decades" Discussed on The Book Review

The Book Review

04:32 min | 4 months ago

"four decades" Discussed on The Book Review

"About lying and deception derek. Delgada will be here to talk about his new book immoral man alexandra alter we'll have an update from the publishing world plus my colleagues and i will talk about what we're read it. This is the book view. Podcast for the new york times. It's march nineteenth. I'm pamela paul. Thomas digest joins us now. He joins us from the north fork of long island but normally he is in new york city and that makes sense given the topic of his new book. It's called new york new york new york four decades of success excess and transformation. Thomas thanks for being here. Thank you so much so. I guess it's not unusual that you would be outside the city during quarantine times but are you normally. I'm assuming a fulltime new yorker. Were you born and raised here. I was born and raised in. My wife was born and raised in new york. But i came to new york in one thousand nine hundred eighty for college and basically have been on the upper west side for all but two years i think of that. So since nineteen eighty. That's a pretty healthy experience of new york city. You married into native new york. Which gives you a whole other level of connection on a whole family. That already has school in in church and friends and all these other aspects that you can immediately plug into so it's been great to experience that as opposed to just being a transplant but your last book was about chicago. The third coast chicago built the american dream. Had you spent a lotta time in chicago. That's where i was born and raised so. That was a book about really the party that i thought i had missed. You know being born in sixty two. These are all these wonderful things that had happened really in chicago up until nineteen sixty so that was kind of tried to walking into a room and seeing all the cigarette butts in empty glasses of a party that ended right before you were born so coming in kind of moving to new york was really in a way looking at another phase of my own life. Everything everybody writes kind of autobiographical. Anyway and i think in both cases i was able to bring sort of a sense of lived life to it is instead of just the facts and just the ideas to kind of know what it was like to live in these periods as well is i think very important so i totally understand. City nostalgia in place nostalgia but new york in the seventies and eighties. I cast her some stoller for aspects of it though. It seems to me having been there at that time that it's not necessarily well. Founded nostalgia is not necessarily a good thing. I think the stahl jr is something that's about loss. It's about romanticizing things and very often..

pamela paul march nineteenth two years chicago one thousand Delgada seventies new york alexandra new yorker Thomas both cases eighties stahl jr new york new york nine hundred eighty nineteen sixty american sixty two third
"four decades" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

07:59 min | 5 months ago

"four decades" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Is with travel court that you could be arrested and charged their state court or federal court where a non and would just go under state court you know The jurisdiction problem here has been like for my house to the casinos. Ten miles of beliefs on that road and tribal police tribal police in the state. But he's gen ticket me a recipe but their tribal put. It can only arrest me and not a non in and it just seems so. Are they get to this point. It's just so confusing and mixed up. You don't know you get charged with the court gonna end up in bed roll state or tribal and really a confusing system in place. I hope we get some rules. Set get help break. They make us understand what the rules are newark. Did your diction is my right. Melvin could hear your voice. Thanks for giving us a ring. Let's take more. We have tova in albuquerque new mexico tuned in on. Thanks giving us a ring go ahead. You're on air. My question is what would your guests think about. Amending the indian civil rights act to provide a right to appointed counsel for persons who are facing incarceration and tribal court systems are indigent and of course funding. We'd have to come with that as well. But now everyone in a non-indian court whether a federal or state court Even for misdemeanor. Who's facing any jail time. Who's indigent is entitled to appointed counsel in non-indians who are in tribal courts when the tribal courts take jurisdiction under vishwa Have a right to pointed council but native americans. Don't have that right. So that's my question. As long as tribal courts have adopted the mainstream methodology of incarceration Should people facing incarceration and tribal court. Who are indigent. we don't have money. Have the right to appointed counsel under the indian civil rights. Act right thank you for that. Tova matthew goto you anything for our caller absolutely i. I completely agree and You know the the ending civil rights act was You know primarily passing nineteen sixty eight and they're an initial draft of it put in But gideon versus wayne rain right Ruling which was You know everybody is entitled to appointed counsel if they're you know they can't afford an attorney and the federal government was the department of justice in particular said no take out of there I suspect because they thought they could still get getting overruled. And they didn't want congress to ratify The principle of gideon which was at that time was only four or five years old. But i want you to know. And i'm sure you are aware that in lots of places in india country tribes to provide appointed attorneys or Indigent defendants and agency is in the tribes at work with here in the lower peninsula of michigan is often defined as twice the poverty rate. So it's much more expansive in parts of indian country then you would see elsewhere but you raise an incredibly good point which is under thirteen. Not indians get the best Civil rights criminal rights protections of any person in the united states prosecutors. You know there. they're judges. That are prosecuting people in state courts. That are not even lawyers Thousands of them around the country and You know that's a requirement under volatile thirteen judge. Be law trained And you know. That's it's ironic that in so many places where vala twenty thirteen has been incorporated and implemented by tribes that the non-indians get better protections then that the tribal citizens do And also nonmember indian so I i completely agree with you. That there's sort of the structural equal protection problem with vala twenty thirteen as well. Thank you for that in tova. Thanks for calling in now. Go to roy. In alaska tuned in on kyi ruin. Thank you for giving us a ring. You're on air yeah. Good morning Exactly previous person mention of racial equality seemed like that really sticks out. It's like We get recognized for being tribes yet not recognized because oh the difference in color and equality issue really shows out Long your certain color You get more rights in the face of the judicial system. Seemed like how can it be your thinking to your guests. Make that more equal approach into recognizing like we all recognize. Ya not recognized. What's your response to that. Thank you Thank you for giving us a ring. Roy moore catherine anything for roy. Sure you know. I understand These concerns and and very much emphasize defense And i agree with professor fletcher. This is an important issue. i do think however. There's a lot oftentimes a lot of misunderstanding and and people seem to think that You mentioned any time in jail you know. I think our caller mentioned anytime jail. If you're in state or federal court you get an attorney. And that's that's actually not the case You know it can vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and the supreme court has spoken in terms of what the bill of rights provide. And i believe it's six months incarceration. But i'd have to actually go back and look and that may have changed but anyways in any event it's not just one day in jail you get an attorney You know and it's it's just not quite that simple and so i think That's just important to keep in mind that It's not as black and white as as folks might present and i certainly Represented a lot of native client who have been Arrested and incarcerated in federal or state jails and not released and not giving an attorney For for for a bit and it's very concerning so Again i do. Think our tribes need to provide You know effective assistance of counsel and provide ended indigenous people with attorneys And i think that's the question of tribal sovereignty as a citizen of charity nations. You know i i mean. That's my job to advocate for those policies and my nation and i do you know I do hesitate a little bit with this idea that the federal government should be telling a tribal government how to affect you wait justice. I don't think that are tribal. Governments are incapable of figuring out how to solve these problems. But i will say a lot of federal laws have tied their hands You know the indian civil rights act for instance the amount of sentencing that tribes can Issue for different sentences. And you know we also have a lot of different. Federal laws out there whether it's from congress or the supreme court jurisprudence limiting the ability of tribes to tax in the same way that state and local municipalities can and so. I also agree that that it would need to be funded right like we need a federal duty and responsibility to fund tribal governments and tribal.

india alaska four congress Melvin six months five years Roy moore catherine Tova matthew twice indian civil rights act fletcher wayne rain newark thirteen judge civil rights united states Ten miles albuquerque new mexico indian civil rights
"four decades" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:06 min | 5 months ago

"four decades" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Support by roswell park who tribal communities face persistent challenges in health equity such as cancer and higher death rates the centre for indigenous cancer research at roswell park. Comprehensive cancer center is dedicated to advancing cancer research that will lead to translatable science medicine and cancer care for indigenous populations worldwide. Are you at high risk for cancer. A no charge online assessment tool is available at well park dot org slash assess me. You're listening to native calling. I'm tara gatewood from subtle pueblo. And we are talking about all verses sequential today. It's a forty year old supreme court ruling that strip tribes of the right to prosecute non native people in tribal courts. If you have something you'd like to share about this give us a call. The number to join is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight with us on the line. Out of mclean. Virginia is mary. Catherine nagel. She's a partner at pine stem pipe stem and nagel. Pc cheese a citizen of the cherokee nation. Also here to is matthew fletcher at a traverse city michigan. He is a law professor at michigan state. University's college of law and author of the turtle talk blog. He is from the grand travelers ben of ottawa. And chippewa indians. Thank you both for being here and when we think of this case there is a lot to consider in. So let's get straight into the case. What are some of the highlights or some of the things that stand out Even from testimony that was given matthew anything. You wanna share. Well this was. This case was decided at a time. When you know you didn't have the internet and nobody really knew anything about what was going on in the country. So it's apparent. Knew nothing about the sequential tribal court system. It was a relatively new tribe. And what i mean by that is. They had just recently had their treaty. Rights acknowledged the boldt decision They had really been ignored by the federal government for a long time. And we're we're starting to put together An actual governing structure within the port madison reservation Additionally the court spend a lot of time talking abou how very few people are actually citizens of the superdome strive and. I'm not sure where they got. That number from there were only fifty citizens and several thousand non indians living out on the reservation and they just as a matter of policy. That's not acceptable to us. us i mean. Of course the supreme court saying this. I'm not sure. I got the number from and i know that there are certainly more than fifty tribal citizens out and when i worked there briefly in two thousand one. There's certainly more than fifty citizens so A lot more i would say and So the court really took the worst conceivable point of view factually from From country to try to adopt a much broader opinion on what You know tribal courts are like if this case had arisen say like i mentioned with longstanding court system and a fully functioning government. With a lot of capacity it would have made it would have been incongruous say that navajo of west virginia couldn't prosecute a bunch of people who who were on the reservation They picked this case on purpose A small tribe that was heavily allotted Much of the land on the reservation at fort. Madison had been leased out by the department of the interior for pennies on the dollar for you know basically as a give away from the us to private citizens not indian citizens in washington state so the court pays no attention to this background. Other than to say we have tiny tribe but just getting government started There's only a few tribal members they don't own the land etcetera etcetera. There's another interesting side point to this. And i'm not sure how it cuts but there was a co defendant in this case i guy named bell guard and All the time it was actually arrested twice you mentioned. He was arrested during the summer. During chief. seattle days is also arrested in the fall with This guy belgarde. Bogart was an indian So there was a co-defendant who was an indian. He probably was an indian tribe. You know and think those of you are your listeners. From north dakota or montana Probably i probably know people who are native her name daugaard. I know i did. When i was out there so I'm assuming co defendant in. This case was actually indian and The trial court sorta just pooh-poohed it and said it doesn't matter i'm not a member and we're just gonna treat them as a non indian The other the final thing. I wanted to bring up about this case. Is that the court. When i say the court is Abbott evincing racial animus I think they were in a way that that the justice that wrote the opinion thought was funny He was known to be humorous. Guy is also known to be an overt racist and he wrote into an opinion into the olifants opinion several quotations from The eighteen eighty three case. I mentioned before. Crow dog where The court said that indian people are ignorant and savage. And there's no way they can understand what's going on he out all the parts abou- indians and put Olifants into there and say there's no way to all the a sudden could understand what's going what's going on in travel or not because olifants as a white person wasn't was with savage during civilized unlettered because he is just somebody who wasn't able to participate and the politics that sucre and To to to take that crow dog case of the language of incredible virulent racism and flip it on its head to apply it against travel. Jurisdictions really is quite disturbing And again i'm pretty sure that our justice who wrote this opinion. I thought it was kinda funny to it. That way and Because it doesn't make much sense do that in here we are today and matthew also about when this decision came out and you think of the temperature of the country also some of the needed power movement that was going on during the time did any of those things you think have an influence And seeing natives as radicals in you know how could how could somebody be tried in in the radicals court did any of that. Did anyone ever think that or that. Come into play. i have no doubt it did. And it probably came into play in the same way that you see And other decolonize countries where an african country where a lot of the property a lot of the business activities conducted by the colonizers Who complained virulent. All the time that they're having their property taken away from this new government this indigenous government You know the justice who wrote the opinion justice rehnquist wrote an opinion a few years later. That is very un that that is sort of under reported and it's hard to find a copy of it where he just comes right out and says i don't think tribes should have civil jurisdiction over ninety or because tribes will take back the property that they lost and That's really at the heart. I think of The unspoken heart so to speak of the olifants opinion and some of the opinions from that generation of supreme court jurisprudence. It's really about making sure that you know the people you lost it fair and square your conquered shut up and accept it and move along and we know how that message goes over. Go ahead join us getting more details on this and know you're thinking something so go ahead. Dial in one eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number and mary catherine just thinking of the history of this case. Anything more you want to add or things that have really impacted you thinking as a practicing lawyer.

ottawa north dakota washington montana Abbott Bogart fifty citizens today michigan more than fifty citizens twice both more than fifty tribal citizen port madison reservation eighteen eighty three case Catherine nagel rehnquist daugaard Four forty year old
"four decades" Discussed on Native America Calling

Native America Calling

08:00 min | 5 months ago

"four decades" Discussed on Native America Calling

"Walker l. l. p. a national law firm dedicated to promoting and defending tribal rights for more than thirty years. More information available at hans strauss dot com native voice. One the native american radio network. This is native america calling. I'm tara gatewood joining you live from my homeland. so share. Who had dewey via skype should tribes be allowed to prosecute non natives in tribal court. That was the question before the supreme court more than forty years ago this month. The case was called often versus sequoia amish in one thousand nine hundred seventy three commish. Tribal police arrested a non of man named mark. David oliphant for allegedly assaulting in in in resisting arrest. Ullivan fought his rest saying tribal courts have no jurisdiction over him. The case when to the supreme court indian the court ruled in favor of allah front. The decision has sweeping implications for tribal jurisdiction since the ruling native legal scholars argue. It diminishes tribal sovereignty. Something that only congress can do today. We're going to dig into this case and others that deal with criminal jurisdiction on tribal reservations and we'll also talk about how the violence against women act is intended to fix part of the ruling but with limited success. And we'd like to hear from you. Phone lines are open. The number to join us is one eight hundred nine six. Two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native. And we're going to start off in traverse city michigan with today's matthew fletcher. He is a law professor at michigan state university's college of law and the author of turtle talk blog he is from the grand traverse band of ottawa. And chippewa indians matthew. Think thank you for joining us for another native america calling. Thank you very much. Thanks for being here. Also here on the line from mclean. Virginia is mary. Catherine nagel partner at pipe stem and nagel. Pc and she is a citizen of the cherokee nation. Thank you for being with us today mary. Kathryn thanks for joining us for another native america calling great. Thanks so much for having me good to be here and so we're going to depend on to the both of you to tell us you know just kind of how huge of an impact this decision head on our native nations so it's kind of a history lesson but also applying to what native nations are facing today and so matthew before we get into more of elephant versa. Kwamash let's get a quick history of criminal jurisdiction in need of america. What would you like to share to kind of. Set things up so You know. The united states intervened in indian country criminal jurisdiction in seventeen ninety in the very first congress under the us constitution where it criminalised the act of trespassing into indian country by an american citizen and In in that statute Congress basically it was hurting the power to control and country kurt criminal jurisdiction but it really didn't extend much federal criminal jurisdiction into indian country until the eighteen eighty. The eighteen eighties are incredibly. Momentous decade in federal policy is also the beginning of the allotment era and a series of supreme court decisions. That were really very important. most notably in eighteen eighty three supreme court said that 'cause federal government could not prosecute an indian because the indians were to uncivil. They were two savage to be prosecuted in federal court. It wouldn't be fair for indian people to face justice in front of federal judge Congress quickly fixed that with the major crimes act in eighteen eighty five and What that did effectively was stripped. Tribes the ability to prosecute serious crimes That occur on their reservation but flu. Lower crimes misdemeanors less serious crimes. Were still under the jurisdiction of the tribes. We thought until And even in nineteen sixty eight. When congress passed the indian civil rights act it just came out and said more or less when tribes prosecute people whoever they might be it didn't say indian or non indian They have to follow the indian law rights and provide basic constitutional rights protections so again until nineteen some until it was fair to say that congress had never done anything to strict tribes or the ability to prosecute nine indians for lesser offenses But the supreme court said in nineteen seventy eight that it doesn't matter that nobody in their right mind would have believed that indian people or indian courts could prosecute non-indians that's why Congress never acted to take that ability away or that power away from tribes because nobody would have thought in their right mind that tries had that power. The court uses phrases like unspoken assumption. Which you know for a lawyer is kind of a joke. in an embarrassment to jurisprudence It's pretty apparent that the court believes that congress never stripped tribes of that jurisdiction because Tribes or indian people are inferior and they just couldn't stand to have the idea that Couldn't stand the notion that a tribal court would prosecute non-indians and Decided to strip that power as a policy choice away from any interest in so matthew when you think of this case in just how much impact. It's had a decision that was made you know decades ago. What are your thoughts. If you could just switch things around you know. Wh what would you want to change. Is it time for this to go back to the supreme court. I i think it might be Here's a couple of things that happened because of all the phone. First of all the sticks out Horribly and all of the bad decisions with any open. Mike by quite possibly the worst It reverses presumptions of like you said at the beginning only congress or try agreement can strip or the try of its powers to do something as a government. Our congress never did that. This was pure judicial fiat by the supreme court and unelected undemocratic body of you know the federal government They did so because of their long standing animus racial animus toward indian people and tribal governmental institution. So it's bad enough with what that case Set a precedent for a methodology at the court records surges. Think we don't have to listen to what congress things about determination. We don't have to listen to the executive branch in you know and it's for enforcement. Trust responsibilities rue the core. We could actually do anything. We want an indian law and for the next several decades The court had basically done exactly that. And we're starting to see now. Mcgurk versus homa and a few the cases like michigan versus day. Meal and harare versus wyoming. In fact the supreme court is starting to realize that the last few decades of indian law jurisprudence that have followed olifants. I really embarrassing to them. And i think they're starting to walk away from that then. Going back to the whole presumptions these Understanding that it's the indian landscape is to be negotiated between congress and the tribes themselves matt dictated by by.

Congress Ullivan David oliphant Kathryn nine congress ottawa more than thirty years Mike major crimes act indian civil rights act tara gatewood Walker l. l. p. decades ago Catherine nagel america nineteen today eighteen eighty both
"four decades" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

12:24 min | 1 year ago

"four decades" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Nine hundred ninety nine and moved to the Senate in Nineteen ninety-one for the last eleven years. He's been president of the Senate where one of his first acts was shepherding through the impeachment of former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich in that role. He helped end the two in your budget. Stalemate under Republican governor. Bruce Rounder and worked to give fellow Democrat. Jay Pritzker a string of wins in his first year from legalized marijuana to a gambling expansion engine to a graduated income tax proposal that goes to voters later this year. I sat down with John Color Tin and talk about his long career in Illinois politics and how he feels to be stepping away away from Springfield after four decades. Well I got elected when I was thirty. And I'm seventy one so it's my whole adult life. It seems you know we've been down there and it's really been fun. I mean there's been so many Really Neat things People I've served with nine hundred and and eighty seven people Past five hundred eighty three bills What was achieved sponsor? And it's just been amazing. I mean everything the thing from When I first started you know getting involved in in Believe it or not the first big bill had had to do with car seats. We had this marriage in seventy nine and we had babies ninety one eighty two eighty three and the first one carried. My wife carried her home from the hospital. there's only one state in the nation that had a car seat bill Soon as we had that baby home we realized we got to put the baby in a carseat so we my wife started loaner program for car. Seats are how found out what about I passed a bill to require people to wear have their kids in car seats and it was a lesson because it was a bill that was very limited just just the parent in just their own Car knowing that that's what you have to do and later later you kind of improve So that led the seatbelt law. Believe it or not there was only fifteen percent of people wearing their seatbelts In the early eighties. Pass that bill. Not Not easy again was a secondary fans just to get started so that's been very rewarding and bunch of More bills after that as well as a lot of interesting people if you had to narrow it down to one or two pieces of legislation. You're most proud of what would they be anything where you literally save people's lives as pretty par for you know you press a button and you know that certain number of People are literally the fatality. RATE'S GONNA fall or even in the I've I've never been a smoker. I kinda hate tobacco. I bet after those people the only people that are really happy that I'm retiring are the tobacco industry because I just I just think that the the lives and the money that it costs so I've been pretty proud of those things as well The you know there's been a lot of things I mean. I worked on death penalty reforms before for we abolished the death. Penalty am worked on the school funding. Formula have pretty recently which allowed for Chicago to get started to get a fair amount of money that they but they that they have? In fact I was around. We stabbed the Chicago school reforms in the first up local school councils back in the late eighties. So it's been fun But it's also time to to move on when you first came to springfield lie. Deciding was a much more bipartisan affair. Air and when you look at the at Springfield today do you think the pendulum has swung too far well. I'd like to distinguish ourselves from what's happened happen at the national level Especially this last year now You know we've had forced bipartisanship because the first twenty eight years was Republican governor and democratic legislatures. Six all but two years one there was one two year period where they control it But then After that we we did have the Begovic cheers and Quinn Years And and so we were One party going around four years. Four some bipartisanship This last year though we really did come about at the end of with a lot of support from the Republicans and we had a budget that was balanced. We had to take some votes on some tough taxes with Republican Republican supporters on so And I my experience having been in the minority in the Senate for ten years was When I got to be Senate Senate President I just said you know what we're not GONNA get outvoted. We're a super majority. Why not work with these guys some ideas from the other party? You'll get a bit of work product art. And so I've I've tried to try to keep that as a principal when you think back to the time when governor rounder was an office of course there was a seven eight hundred thirty six day budget impasse during that period of time. Where would you rank that budget? Impasse when you think about the biggest challenges you face during your time in spring oil. It's it was it was horrible Because what we did people say. You didn't have a budget. Well actually. Unfortunately we did have a budget because we we were funding schools rules. We didn't like stop in force ourselves to get a balanced budget. We overspent for two and a half years some six billion dollars each year which ran Hannah bills. The income tax fell from five percent down to three point seven five. We never made up the difference. We kept on spending so so it was. It was really bad and we tried to you know. The speaker didn't even meet with the guy I did. Try to meet with the governor. On a number of occasions we just he just had such animus towards the unions and Madigan himself and spend all that money demonizing Madigan. It was it was horrible and eventually we did actually get the grand bargain with Christina. Donio my Republican counterpart who both of us got elected the same day. I work with very well. We just said you know what we're going to start doing our Our stuff independent of the speaker and the governor and it led to eventually A balanced budget Over the objections of the governor time time many people say it was your unique set of skills that finally broke the budget stalemate. How did you see your role in that case? Well it wasn't just just me was senator rebellious matter of factually initiated. The idea of working together to pass bills on these bills were the these were bills that that Republicans didn't like and the Democrats didn't like there were things dealing with tort reform or workers comp changes that are party didn't want their taxes of their problems and we just wanted to show. Oh that this is crazy what we do is you know we were underfunded higher. Ed People were leaving our state to go to other schools. I mean it was. We weren't paying social service providers. I mean it was just horrible and we didn't need to do that. It was unnecessary so that was a big deal to get people to come together at the end. I think it was so tough to do but in once it happened then when we had governor Spitzer commend. That's how that's what led to this. Bipartisan phenomenal year. We had last year of of of those major pieces of legislation. Where do you think Illinois will continue to fill the fallout from that budget impasse? Well well if you look at our budget We had to borrow a whole bunch of money to pay our vendors and built into the budget every year is like a mortgage payment jeff to pay for the legacy of those past the past years. That's why the governor's proposed and passed All Forty of the Senate Democrats voted for the constitutional amendment. That's it's on the ballot which will if passed a lead to since we also passed the rates to be included Lead to money and that money would be used directly to pay down Those all those all those bills Former governor Rauner was a political neophyte. We have another political neophyte in office now governor Jay Pritzker. What's your assessment of what he how's he's doing so far and what he still needs to learn? I was surprised when he ran for Governor Primary We had one one of our colleagues Daniel. BISS running I did not get involved in in that primary but I had members. I have dinner every night when we're in session with not not lobbyists but legislators to get to know people socially and everyone would would say you know it's interesting this Guy Pritzker who is really working and he's really league showing up and he's not Come across some billionaire. He's coming across. The Guy Really wants to learn and that was his attitude from the start It didn't hurt hurt tab all that money of course that he used the front his campaigns But he also really really think Impress people in the same thing was true true as a rookie and never having been a government. This last year I think he was willing to take advice. and I think proved that that We were willing after around a lot of leeway when you think about the last two governors in Illinois. These are both very wealthy men who are able to put their their own money into their campaigns. What do you think about the future of Illinois and the way money may play into? WHO's able to run for office? You know ideally really And the governor did provide money for the Democrats in the legislature. Ideally though I think to keep the independence of the of the General Assembly the Legislative Branch from the executive branch. It would be better if that wasn't necessary. And you know when we run campaigns both Republicans and Democrats got and And and try to raise money and we raise money from the traditional groups who care about the policies the unions care about the policies especially after governor rounders for years right so they donate dryer. Laura's I care about the policy so they donate And so there's there's enough money there for people to run campaigns and it would be best if it didn't You know come from Just super Wealthy people or even in this matter from a governor himself. You told France spillman at the Times Friday that Mayor Lori lightfoot and other Newbie to politics still has a lot to learn and in the spring legislative session. She didn't get what she wanted from Springfield. I'm a real estate transfer tax a final plan for for Chicago Casino. What do you think Mir lightfoot needs to master in order to be successful? I let me clarify I. I only pointed out that she didn't have the advantage. Just like we were talking about the two governors of having been in government before right and so and especially not springfield which is totally different than than Chicago Coggins City Council and. She's on learning her but she I think she's doing very well In some regards She she came down to Springfield right away from the start and she was a Rockstar It's just that it's tricky and it's tricky part is Chicago's doesn't dominate the entire state of Illinois. There's a lot of suburban urban town state interests. And so if you come in on a special deal for Chicago. That's not the way that's not going to do well What you need to do is make the argument? Sakaba just wants its fair share. And that's what we would be doing in the case specifically of the Casino I know from being there there and having worked on this the language in the agreements between the governor and the city are all worked out and it's fair for the rest of the state because it generates so much money and and it's used. What's it us for us to pay for the capital bills which benefit the entire state? So that's not what's going to be the hang up to hang up at Ben you know always people coming along asking for more gaming related issues. I think once those are put aside or negotiated that issue that can be worked so it sounds like you think that Miami fl agenda can CBS chief. I'm optimistic because again. State the state. The whole state needs the money would come from that that the casino and it's fair to the city because the study is going to make money as well. I want to pick your brain about the multiple ongoing federal investigations into Illinois politicians and their associates. What was your reaction when you heard the story? WBZ see broke about political lobbyists. Michael McLean and his two thousand. Twelve email. That refers casualty. I think it's fair to say to quote Jones's ghost ghost workers and quote the rate en champagne while it was very disturbing obviously because those emails referred to things which are crimes rape or goes payroll and and obviously doesn't recall..

Illinois Springfield Senate Governor Rod Blagojevich Chicago Jay Pritzker governor Spitzer governor Rauner president Bruce Rounder Ed People John Color Tin marijuana Madigan Chicago school Guy Pritzker Miami Lori lightfoot
"four decades" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

Reset with Jenn White

11:28 min | 1 year ago

"four decades" Discussed on Reset with Jenn White

"Nine hundred ninety nine and moved to the Senate in Nineteen ninety-one for the last eleven years. He's been president of the Senate where one of his first acts was shepherding through the impeachment of former Illinois Governor Rod Blagojevich in that role. He helped end the two in your budget. Stalemate under Republican governor. Bruce Rounder and worked to give fellow Democrat. Jay Pritzker a string of wins in his first year from legalized marijuana to a gambling expansion engine to a graduated income tax proposal that goes to voters later this year. I sat down with John Color Tin and talk about his long career in Illinois politics and how he feels to be stepping away away from Springfield after four decades. Well I got elected when I was thirty. And I'm seventy one so it's my whole adult life. It seems you know we've been down there and it's really been fun. I mean there's been so many Really Neat things People I've served with nine hundred and and eighty seven people Past five hundred eighty three bills What was achieved sponsor? And it's just been amazing. I mean everything the thing from When I first started you know getting involved in in Believe it or not the first big bill had had to do with car seats. We had this marriage in seventy nine and we had babies ninety one eighty two eighty three and the first one carried. My wife carried her home from the hospital. there's only one state in the nation that had a car seat bill Soon as we had that baby home we realized we got to put the baby in a carseat so we my wife started loaner program for car. Seats are how found out what about I passed a bill to require people to wear have their kids in car seats and it was a lesson because it was a bill that was very limited just just the parent in just their own Car knowing that that's what you have to do and later later you kind of improve So that led the seatbelt law. Believe it or not there was only fifteen percent of people wearing their seatbelts In the early eighties. Pass that bill. Not Not easy again was a secondary fans just to get started so that's been very rewarding and bunch of More bills after that as well as a lot of interesting people if you had to narrow it down to one or two pieces of legislation. You're most proud of what would they be anything where you literally save people's lives as pretty par for you know you press a button and you know that certain number of People are literally the fatality. RATE'S GONNA fall or even in the I've I've never been a smoker. I kinda hate tobacco. I bet after those people the only people that are really happy that I'm retiring are the tobacco industry because I just I just think that the the lives and the money that it costs so I've been pretty proud of those things as well The you know there's been a lot of things I mean. I worked on death penalty reforms before for we abolished the death. Penalty am worked on the school funding. Formula have pretty recently which allowed for Chicago to get started to get a fair amount of money that they but they that they have? In fact I was around. We stabbed the Chicago school reforms in the first up local school councils back in the late eighties. So it's been fun But it's also time to to move on when you first came to springfield lie. Deciding was a much more bipartisan affair. Air and when you look at the at Springfield today do you think the pendulum has swung too far well. I'd like to distinguish ourselves from what's happened happen at the national level Especially this last year now You know we've had forced bipartisanship because the first twenty eight years was Republican governor and democratic legislatures. Six all but two years one there was one two year period where they control it But then After that we we did have the Begovic cheers and Quinn Years And and so we were One party going around four years. Four some bipartisanship This last year though we really did come about at the end of with a lot of support from the Republicans and we had a budget that was balanced. We had to take some votes on some tough taxes with Republican Republican supporters on so And I my experience having been in the minority in the Senate for ten years was When I got to be Senate Senate President I just said you know what we're not GONNA get outvoted. We're a super majority. Why not work with these guys some ideas from the other party? You'll get a bit of work product art. And so I've I've tried to try to keep that as a principal when you think back to the time when governor rounder was an office of course there was a seven eight hundred thirty six day budget impasse during that period of time. Where would you rank that budget? Impasse when you think about the biggest challenges you face during your time in spring oil. It's it was it was horrible Because what we did people say. You didn't have a budget. Well actually. Unfortunately we did have a budget because we we were funding schools rules. We didn't like stop in force ourselves to get a balanced budget. We overspent for two and a half years some six billion dollars each year which ran Hannah bills. The income tax fell from five percent down to three point seven five. We never made up the difference. We kept on spending so so it was. It was really bad and we tried to you know. The speaker didn't even meet with the guy I did. Try to meet with the governor. On a number of occasions we just he just had such animus towards the unions and Madigan himself and spend all that money demonizing Madigan. It was it was horrible and eventually we did actually get the grand bargain with Christina. Donio my Republican counterpart who both of us got elected the same day. I work with very well. We just said you know what we're going to start doing our Our stuff independent of the speaker and the governor and it led to eventually A balanced budget Over the objections of the governor time time many people say it was your unique set of skills that finally broke the budget stalemate. How did you see your role in that case? Well it wasn't just just me was senator rebellious matter of factually initiated. The idea of working together to pass bills on these bills were the these were bills that that Republicans didn't like and the Democrats didn't like there were things dealing with tort reform or workers comp changes that are party didn't want their taxes of their problems and we just wanted to show. Oh that this is crazy what we do is you know we were underfunded higher. Ed People were leaving our state to go to other schools. I mean it was. We weren't paying social service providers. I mean it was just horrible and we didn't need to do that. It was unnecessary so that was a big deal to get people to come together at the end. I think it was so tough to do but in once it happened then when we had governor Spitzer commend. That's how that's what led to this. Bipartisan phenomenal year. We had last year of of of those major pieces of legislation. Where do you think Illinois will continue to fill the fallout from that budget impasse? Well well if you look at our budget We had to borrow a whole bunch of money to pay our vendors and built into the budget every year is like a mortgage payment jeff to pay for the legacy of those past the past years. That's why the governor's proposed and passed All Forty of the Senate Democrats voted for the constitutional amendment. That's it's on the ballot which will if passed a lead to since we also passed the rates to be included Lead to money and that money would be used directly to pay down Those all those all those bills Former governor Rauner was a political neophyte. We have another political neophyte in office now governor Jay Pritzker. What's your assessment of what he how's he's doing so far and what he still needs to learn? I was surprised when he ran for Governor Primary We had one one of our colleagues Daniel. BISS running I did not get involved in in that primary but I had members. I have dinner every night when we're in session with not not lobbyists but legislators to get to know people socially and everyone would would say you know it's interesting this Guy Pritzker who is really working and he's really league showing up and he's not Come across some billionaire. He's coming across. The Guy Really wants to learn and that was his attitude from the start It didn't hurt hurt tab all that money of course that he used the front his campaigns But he also really really think Impress people in the same thing was true true as a rookie and never having been a government. This last year I think he was willing to take advice. and I think proved that that We were willing after around a lot of leeway when you think about the last two governors in Illinois. These are both very wealthy men who are able to put their their own money into their campaigns. What do you think about the future of Illinois and the way money may play into? WHO's able to run for office? You know ideally really And the governor did provide money for the Democrats in the legislature. Ideally though I think to keep the independence of the of the General Assembly the Legislative Branch from the executive branch. It would be better if that wasn't necessary. And you know when we run campaigns both Republicans and Democrats got and And and try to raise money and we raise money from the traditional groups who care about the policies the unions care about the policies especially after governor rounders for years right so they donate dryer. Laura's I care about the policy so they donate And so there's there's enough money there for people to run campaigns and it would be best if it didn't You know come from Just super Wealthy people or even in this matter from a governor himself. You told France spillman at the Times Friday that Mayor Lori lightfoot and other Newbie to politics still has a lot to learn and in the spring legislative session. She didn't get what she wanted from Springfield. I'm a real estate transfer tax a final plan for for Chicago Casino. What do you think Mir lightfoot needs to master in order to be successful? I let me clarify I. I only pointed out that she didn't have the advantage. Just like we were talking about the two governors of having been in government before right and so and especially not springfield which is totally different than than Chicago Coggins City Council and. She's on learning her but she I think she's doing very well In some regards She she came down to Springfield right away from the start and she was a Rockstar It's just that it's tricky and it's tricky part is Chicago's doesn't dominate the entire state of Illinois. There's a lot of suburban urban town state interests. And so if you come in on a special deal for Chicago. That's not the way that's not going to do well What you need to do is make the argument? Sakaba just wants its fair share. And that's what we would be doing in the case specifically of the Casino I know from being there there and having worked on this the language in the agreements between the governor and the city are all worked out and it's fair for the rest of the state because it generates so much money and and it's used. What's it us for us to pay for the capital bills which benefit the entire state?.

Springfield Illinois Senate Governor Rod Blagojevich Jay Pritzker governor Spitzer Chicago governor Rauner president Bruce Rounder Ed People John Color Tin marijuana Madigan Lori lightfoot Chicago school Guy Pritzker Chicago Coggins City Council
"four decades" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

11:39 min | 1 year ago

"four decades" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"Obviously the beginning of that is defined by Obama and the great recession and the slow recovery from it and then also the the rise just like Clinton was partially defined by the the rise of the Republican opposition to him I think Obama and the Obama era as has been undefined. Also by the rise of the tea party Yeah Obama's ability to accomplish what he wants to accomplish. runs into brick walls in two thousand and ten in the midterm elections when he he loses the house and that is in biproduct biproduct of his attempts to try and pass obamacare to pass a cap and trade bill to climate change changing and his agenda for the rest of his six years is really defined by his ability to do things through executive action as opposed to congressional efforts and it does lead to the rise of the tea party it relates to you know the populism message that we see here with Donald Trump in two thousand sixteen but there in those early early two thousand and ten years over Damas ability to deliver on what he promised. I mean it is more of I think in a large degree I mean. He has big accomplishments on the executive front and in his international national Negotiations whether it be Iran nuclear deal or or the Paris accord and the Climate Front It is certainly not the The ambitious agenda that he wanted and I think that That is incompletely a part of losing the House to Republicans in two thousand and ten on and he would stay that way obviously until two thousand eighteen when the House finally folks back to Democrats and in between of course we get the the rise of trump and the the trump administration and now Dan I. It's it's a line that Winds around and and you know doubles back on itself in some cases but can you draw the line line for US between you. Know the the events of Obama's presidency and and the Republican reaction to it and leading into you and creating the trump era. Yeah I think that there was Donald. Trump is is a is a small figure in the Obama era. But it's an important one. I mean remember. Donald Trump is sort of trolling brock Obama. Saying he's not really born in America. The rise birtherism the rise of conspiracy theories in American discourse in Donald Trump holds holds a press conference. That's carried live on CNN. Where he's like demanding the release of of Barack Obama's birth certificate? And you know I think the mainstream three media has a hard time trying to I mean we they gave him obviously a huge megaphone to let him have these kinds of conversations on national television. But in turn when you see the media grappling with this and you see Americans grappling with. How do you deal with someone who's saying this guy is in blue? And that is the trump era in a nutshell And that is the you know. The the the success that he has had Winning the two thousand sixteen presidential election turning Very blue states you you know into Trump states and You know he's he's riding a wave that the tea party embodies riding away that actually if you want to back up a decade to Sarah Palin in two two thousand and eight as the vice presidential nominee that John McCain maybe unwillingly picks but he picks to sort of add to that ticket She's a celebrity in her own right after after after John McCain loses that two thousand eight election and she's the the fuel to the twenty ten and the populism that that you can send you continue to see for the next Several years into into the election were Hillary Clinton you know from the nineties goes down to Donald Trump here in two thousand and sixteen. I mean you know it's fascinating because Donald Trump has his rise in tabloid politics in the nineteen eighties as well. So these four decades definitely are all connected in so many ways with so many people Who are you know continuing players throughout them? Darren do you think when when people look back on this decade that they're going to think more about Obama who who was president for more of it or about trump whose campaign and election Wrenched these ten years in a totally different direction. That's it's a great question. I think it's GonNa be a combination you can. I mean these two men are going to be connected in history forever and yes. Brock Obama was president for two more years than Donald Trump. We'll have been. Yeah I mean part part of like part of. It's a silly question right because no one. No one has to just look at the decade kind of cut off their consideration. I think in the eighties. You do see Ronald Reagan and I mean not. That is who we think about in the nineties you do think about bill. Clinton as opposed to George H W Bush kind of falls away but I think these two men are inherently going to be connected because Donald trump is a byproduct of Barack Obama and I'm sure with like his legacy to be left untouched by the DONALD TRUMP air. But absolutely. That's not the case. I mean everything that Donald Trump has been about has been ripping apart piece by piece. The Brock Obama agenda whether it be the affordable care act or the Iran nuclear deal the Paris accords words. You know the signature achievements of Obama have been one by one at every agency you know. Peel back and obviously as we think about the twenty twenties and whether it starts with a democratic or Republican president. We'll I find that out soon. Enough will swing back. Perhaps in the other direction with the Democratic president puts all those Obama policies back in place or its former years of Donald trump and much more you know a trump fingerprint. That will be left in both international and domestic politics so so let let's peer. Let's try try. And peer into the future tre little bit at the Two Thousand Twenty S. We obviously end this last year. The two thousand ten's with impeachment. We're GONNA start the next year with the Senate. Trial is big question of what exactly trump represents in the sweep of American history as he says he represents the continuation of a trend completely normal and aberration. I have no idea but but and then there's also some of the cultural things that have been happening at the in the back half the two thousand ten th that could pave the way for all sorts of things that could define the Twenty twenty s the metoo movement the rise of a new criminal justice reform movement. You could go on and on Crystal Ball For this one I I mean it. It is really fun to think about and we should come back in ten years and retail and think about our predictions here. So I mean you know I think. Technology has a theme throughout this whether be the rise of video games in the nineteen eighties and people all spending time in arcades to the rise of social media in the two thousands the Internet. I mean we just we consume news consume information. And we're all I mean. Just think back to when I arrived in Washington and you would ride on the metro and you look around. People would be you know looking up holding newspapers now. You you pull into any train station. In everyone's head is buried in their phone and we're all just kinda living our own world in our own personal channels Of course Darren one thing we do know about the twenty twenties. Is that at some point. During in the post trump era is going to start. We don't know exactly when Obviously obviously there's the election happening right now this year there's or could be in two thousand twenty four after after two-term presidency but we we don't know exactly when it will happen but we no it will happen And you know we have some sense of how the parties have evolved during his presidency. But we don't exactly know how that will come after each president kind of makes their own coalition in ways that was a little bit surprising. Bush Obama now trump. And so you know it's it's interesting interesting to think through where we might go. Yeah the the roads go in several directions and they all hinge on November of two thousand twenty. I mean we could end up in a all Republican World to start the decade or we could end up in an all democratic wrote. We just really this is this is going to be an election that will be defined obviously by what voters decide. Here come November. I mean and I mean if it is the trump direction and it is a Republican presidency with With Republican in House and Senate than I think the Democrats Begin the decade. Really rethinking. What they are about I mean they have just gone through a primary season and general election where they could not take out Donald Trump despite everything that donald trump has been about for the last four years despite impeachment mechanism in a constitutional process? That did not work The Way Maybe the Democrats would have liked it too and they will be grappling with who their fresh faces will be you know in another four years and you whether they really do connect with the same constituencies that they did previously the the blue collar voters Of the Midwest and you know is it is the Democratic Party just just a party of of the coasts. I think again if they win the presidency and that would force the Republican Party into some dramatic rethinking. That will either happen in two thousand twenty or it'll happen to twenty four but the it'll be sort of the post trump era and I mean no matter which party wins and loses the the twenty two thousand election. It's it's it's hard at this point to say that they wouldn't have been able to see the white coming right and maybe that's it turns on one hundred fifty people in Wisconsin. That's right but the but but it it seems like we kind of understand the The the political faultlines right now. It's just a question of WHO's able to best channel. Those concerns also weather whether people wanNA listen to them in the first place I mean. There's a razor's edge here that there's just going to continue no matter who wins the two thousand twenty election to it's a divided America two very different worlds that are seeing everything from politics to culture. Sure to world affairs in the role of the United States whether populism and nationalism that the way that the trump you know era it has been about or is it the era that the Democrats have been pushing the Obama era of larger government and the government trying to help international coalitions. And I think if it's very possible the twenty twenties are going to be defined by a continuing you know Divergence of these two Americas into this next decade. That's that's how it feels right now. I'll be really interested to talk to my two thousand twenty nine twenty thirty self to see if that if that indeed happens. I mean you know one question that. We're we're contemplating now as we deal impeachment and the fact that it seems like it's headed the way it is you know is our democracy in is in the United States no longer the global world leader and and I think that you you know the constitutional system that we have right now. People are certainly wondering whether it's equipped for a president like Donald Trump and that is something that we will be grappling with. I think for the next next many years you just. You saw it in the payment debate just now of just two completely different worlds operating and defining what the Constitution means what the founding fathers. I think two different versions of what Alexander the Hamilton was talking about in the pet in the federalist papers. And so you know you couldn't get much more divided as as we. We seem to be right now and I I guess It might you. You know require the the end of the trump era whether it happens in two thousand twenty or twenty twenty four. I don't know that we're going to get back to a quote unquote normalcy period. Or you know period of unification in the country. It doesn't doesn't seem like it But you know who knows what what what's around the corner in terms of domestic or foreign affairs that could bring people together in the Star Wars trilogies ending. So that's kind kind of going to do it. Well Darren thank you so much for hopping in this time machine for us and running through what we've done good half-century here it's not bad day's work. I feel very old but It is very fund has been a great exercise to just think through our.

Donald Trump Barack Obama president Trump Hillary Clinton Darren Iran US Senate Republican Party America Paris Twenty twenty CNN Ronald Reagan executive John McCain Democratic Party
"four decades" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"four decades" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"Of the Senate changed by by decision in the summer of two thousand and one Thanks to one senator who flips the power dynamics and the nine eleven happens in the whole country Kinda does come together in this unifying response to this awful awful awful event that what happens on live television Where people are watching in real time? You know just tragic tragic events and you know the the whole we'll Political world changes in two thousand and one at the end of that year as as all of the attention shifts home security and fortifying. Your water systems your power. Plants here chemical facilities are transportation infrastructure in the TSA becomes a thing you no longer can go and check into an airplane and airport Right away and And that is the Bush years are defined by that and two thousand and two election is defined by that it is a launching of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars as well. Yeah Yeah of course and I was GonNa you know you mentioned the the unity of the country was feeling in that moment. I think a unity that led down Some paths that people regret. I can't remember another pack a unifying time since then and I've been in Washington now for twenty years. I mean maybe there was a feeling after Obama's elected at the end of the two thousands for for just a brief moment like you know America's transcended its history electing the first African American president. But other than that you know I can't recall something. That is quite the same as the way the country the you know the singing of I think God bless America on the steps of the Capitol the way the world series played out there in two thousand and one with the Yankees and the and the diamondbacks and Mayor Giuliani. Really onny. Throwing out the first pitch you know there was this feeling again that A lot of people say Bush squanders going into the Iraq and Afghanistan. We're actually it's not even realized sized at the time because I think people were were okay with it. We're okay with both wars and it wasn't until you know the years go on in the war start to drag on That you you really start to You have some major political questions because the especially with Iraq that it's seen as a or that wasn't necessarily started on the right premise. Yes certainly Afghanistan was more more popular to begin with in Iraq. Even by the time you get to the two thousand four presidential election. That's a main piece of of the presidential election but but obviously Neither either of those wars has Fared any better over time in the in the course of public opinion and of course. We're you know still involved Today and you know those those weren't going to be the only disastrous events of the two thousand. There was Hurricane Katrina. There was the rise of social media. Little joke there. We'll get back to that in a second. But then of course all of this leads into Brock Obama's election in two thousand thousand eight it's impossible to and and obviously he's historic in his own right but it's impossible to to to kind of get to that point without without all the the the warrant hardship of those preceding years and that's politics in presidential politics in a nutshell is typically. The next president is the exact opposite of the president. Before and Barack Obama is everything George W Bush's not and you could even see it. In Brock Obama Overcoming Hillary Clinton two thousand eight primaries to become the nominee is is transcending sort of The Democratic divides and looking away from the Clinton years To some hope and change was his mantra and that was that was the goal in the Obama is handed the keys as the economy is collapsing. The housing bubbles bursting I mean those are the defining moments of the end of the Bush presidency as because the congress is trying to bail out the banks and trying to come up with some sort of Economic recovery plans and brock a bomb with all these ideas bold ideas on transforming the country's healthcare and energy systems have to struggle for oxygen with keeping the economy from completely cratering tanking while also so ending the Afghanistan Iraq wars are attempting to. which is you know his? His campaign was largely driven by that. So it's amazing. Yeah how these the decades our findings stop points but things just bleed in out of each other well and the the especially when the two thousand it was it was a it was a hard decade. It was it was marked at the beginning winning by nine eleven. These wars national security hardships bleeding into economic hardships veer economic hardship at the end of the decade and that that leads us into the next one. Yeah I I think the American people definitely suffer at the beginning of the decade through you know fears of terrorism August. It was just a very painful decade to begin and yeah from an economic from bottom line standpoint standpoint the people who lose their jobs who you know don't see You know their careers going into director that they are. They're losing their retirement savings in the stock market. Collapsing does is. I mean. It's all kind of part and parcel of very rough two thousands decade. It's definitely not the uplifting experience that that you know came at the start of two thousand when the when the when the millennium changes over and also is Obama comes into the presidency with all these promises you know the reality on the ground is not the same and a couple of the just. We mentioned briefly. Some of the technological ecological changes in the two thousands of their the rise. Social Media the rise of cell phones and smartphones. especially in these. These are things again you know we can look back at it marked that decade but it becomes much more important the decade after as we get into the two thousand ten.

Barack Obama Iraq Afghanistan George W Bush president America Washington Senate TSA senator Hurricane Katrina Hillary Clinton diamondbacks Yankees Mayor Giuliani brock congress
"four decades" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

04:16 min | 1 year ago

"four decades" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"The nineties the and you know like like you said it starts with the Persian Gulf War and very popular George H W Bush. But that's not what defines this decade. Because as you said he goes on to lose reelection to Bill Clinton the first baby boomer president and sort of a new generation of American political leaders of the handing off from George H W Bush sort of seen as a World War Two You know Someone connected to World War Two connected to an earlier generation of Americans. Bill Clinton comes in as a very young president with with a young family with Hillary Clinton His Vice President. Al Gore is also very young and I think the countries are disease starts to look ahead to the again to the next decade into the you know the turn of the century okay but throughout the nineties Clinton brings a whole new bustle to government Ways to try and Redefine government. This is one of Al Gore's initiatives there in the ninety s was Reinventing government and you know. They had big ideas. They didn't necessarily succeed because most famous example would be Hillary Clinton's attempts to try and pass a major the healthcare overhaul that collapses of its own weight in the early part of the The Clinton administration and they also tried to deal with major energy issues there at the beginning of the nineties and and that runs into the Republican revolution that comes in in the mid nineties in the next ninety four midterms. And and you know. We're we see the rise of the Republican Party again with Newt Gingrich Richard and the GOP. Yeah in some ways. The one of Bill Clinton's enduring political legacies is the Republican revolution that was inspired the opposition to him. Yeah I mean we we learn of the The Newt Gingrich. He runs in one thousand nine hundred four on the contract with America which is sort of this pledge of things that he's going to to try and implement to direct the country in a different way. You have this. You know huge clash between Newt Gingrich and the Republicans in the House and Bill Clinton which continues all the Waif through the Through the entire decade. And you know there's Clinton is dealing with domestic terrorism The Oklahoma City bombings are happening. The the unabomber Atlanta Ends Olympics Atlanta Olympics Waco And David crush these moments that happened. These are sort of the first twenty four seven news cycle moments too. That people are watching In real time on CNN primarily You know this is still an era when NBC ABC and CBS would break into you know regularly scheduled programming to to tell us something that's happening but CNN is giving this this news in a in a constant way. And I think Americans are starting to slowly absorb The world that we live in today. But you know it's starting to happen there in the nineties and of course this leads into well absolutely and also so just at the end of the nineties. That's when we start at the Internet we start to get the and and the the the fears about kind of this new wave of technology also can manifesting in the Y2k concerns and stuff like that. We're starting to see that bubble up in the next decade will see a lot of that in the phases technological advancements. But there's there's a clash in the nineties because I I was. I was a journalism student in the ninety S. Still writing for a print newspaper and the beginnings of the DOT COM era of trying to get your head around. I'm writing for an online news service. What does that mean versus writing for a print newspaper with a deadline? And you know a thing. Stop at six o'clock in the evening and you couldn't get anything anything else in the morning newspaper after that. And so yeah the rise of the Internet. Obviously the drudge report is around in one thousand nine hundred ninety seven ninety eight ninety nine which breaks you know the Monica Lewinsky story in a way that print news wasn't able to so we saw the beginnings of the power of the Internet there At the end everyone starts to get their first email addresses. AOL is dropping. Its discs into your mailbox constantly. you you just have the stack of of leftover. AOL desks that. I'm sure a lot of people remember that You know mail mail literally and all this the the especially the chaos of the impeachment and that that kind of whirling dervish. A new cycle afternoon cycle after news cycle around leads us into the Bush presidency the second Bush presidency.

Hillary Clinton America Newt Gingrich George H W Bush Bill Clinton president Al Gore Republican Party The Clinton administration Vice President AOL CNN Monica Lewinsky Atlanta Oklahoma City Waco David
"four decades" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

POLITICO's Nerdcast

02:15 min | 1 year ago

"four decades" Discussed on POLITICO's Nerdcast

"A movie wargames hugely usually popular move. I remember them all nine years old at the time but Matthew Project You know basically stop computer from launching a nuclear missiles that are going to and the world as we know it There was another movie on. ABC News or ABC TV. That everyone remembers called the day after kid. Parents wouldn't let you watch it because it was so scary but that was sort of the mood of the eighties. The interesting thing about all this that we're bringing and this is GonNa be a theme as we now work our way forward through the decades all these things we're talking about. They didn't just define the that particular decade the way Reagan and Gorbachev Fall Communism defined the Nineteen Eighty S. But they also set the terms for of what defines the future decades cades Ray Regan and and the ideas around him dominated American politics And and both the Republican Party in the way Democrats. Let's set themselves up in response For decades to come. Yeah that's right. The Republican power of eighties. Reagan is the president. He's working with a Democratic Congress for that entire day which is a fascinating thing to kind of keep in mind. The Democrats would be out of power. coming out of Jimmy Carter years which was sort of an aberration there after after Nixon and Watergate and Ford And the Democrats won't take power. Get until the early part of the nineties with Bill Clinton when he seats You know a one term President George H W Bush rush who obviously had designed to be president going all the way back to nineteen eighty and losing to Ronald Reagan so yeah the the political dynamics and the power structures of the eighties. I mean the way I remember growing up is you know I didn't. I don't know the nine-story thought of Ronald Reagan as a Republican. I thought I'm GonNa just as the president of United States. I as a kid. You probably see things a little bit differently than when you become an adult adult but I think that I think Reagan maybe crossed over parties in a lot of people in the years afterwards. Didn't really necessarily see him as a Republican or Democrat. You saw them as a as an American leader as a as a TV star movie actor who becomes the President had states and a great orator who leads the country through these kind of very scary times at the beginning of the decade and and Obviously things get very harried as as the Decca goes on in the Iraq war The first Iraq war begins at the at the at the very. Yeah or I should say eh kicks into the early part of the nineties. Yeah well let's move right into.

Ronald Reagan president Republican Party President George H W Bush Nineteen Eighty ABC News United States ABC cades Ray Regan Iraq Jimmy Carter Democratic Congress Bill Clinton Ford Decca Gorbachev Nixon Watergate