20 Episode results for "founder and president"

Paulo Magalhes, Founder and President of the Common Home of Humanity

Common Home Conversations Beyond UN75

36:02 min | Last month

Paulo Magalhes, Founder and President of the Common Home of Humanity

"Welcome to Common home conversations Beyond you and seventy-five a series by the planetary podcast in common home conversations. You will hear from leading Global experts on how the proposal of recognizing the existence of an intangible Global common Without Borders can change our relationship with our planet the common home of humanity has proposed an ambitious New Globe pack for the environment the adverse effects of climate change span across borders and Beyond territories recognizing the Earth system as a common Heritage of humankind is the first step in restoring a stable climate a visible manifestation of a well-functioning or a system this proposals cascading effects would be systemic and tremendously impact international relations and economics opening the doors to restoring a well-functioning earth system, and home conversations is the place to discuss a new social contract between Society wage. Economy and the Earth system now here is your host founder and CEO of the planetary press Kimberly White. Hello and welcome to Common home conversations. Today. We're joined by Paloma founder and president of the common home of humanity. Thank you for joining us today Pollo. Thank you so much for your invitation. So kind thank you. So Paulo. Can you tell us what inspired you and your organization to launch This Global call for a legal framework off the main idea that the the starting point was when I saw a leg of this function one the capacity for love to explain the wall and this this happened on 2002 when the oil tank oil tanker that crashed near the border between Portugal and Spain the north of Portugal and the Crash was on Spanish Waters and the first reaction of the Spanish authorities was to push the boat for Portuguese letters they try to push and after our are me send the bolts and the reality was that there were several boats on the water off in the middle of the the highest split and the whole go to both sides. This is when this reality of having one line that is abstract that is illegal obstruction that divide them received the package. We cannot provide the C you cannot we can divide the space of the C, but we cannot survive the water. We cannot rewrite the system. We cannot provide the quality of their work or the fishes. So this is really one in capacity of law to explain the reality of this planet of these interconnected permit for so when we do lose the connection between abstraction and the Lego figuration and the reality of the page. We have to look for Solutions. This is what you need a new Lego extraction that is able to represent the interconnections of the climate. So we have had agreements to address the climate crisis such as the Kyoto Protocol and of course the Paris climate Accord, however, we're still struggling to move the needle the annual wage Gap report from the UN environment released last year found that Global greenhouse-gas emissions Must Fall by more than 7% each year over the next decade if were to limit warmer 1.5 degrees and we recently learned that we have failed to achieve any of the global biodiversity targets set a decade ago. What do you believe as prevented us from moving forward and finding a solution? One of the many mistakes is to consider and now we're mental inability to address the global you understand 12 to except we can say but to accept and to view all the things are all interconnected. The question is the same problem that I talked before about the the absence of one level of abstraction that is able to represent the interconnects. The box office planet is the same reason or is the strut for a reason for not receiving any result in my view on the climate emergency brake biodiversity. The question is when climate for the first time enter on the UN discussions in the eighties. The first question that was raised was what is Kathy from a legal point of view climates as you can imagine. It's something absolutely different for international law because climate is not a territory is a system off. Is more than a system is a well-functioning system is a pattern of ability of the function of this system that is predictable. We can if Seasons well defined seasons and all the years defined pattern repeats and repeats again, and we have envelope of temperatures that stuck inside these limits of temperature climate is for so it's a function well function that system is a way of function of the system that is for young woman's another species and this mode of operating. Both of the system is intangible is a software. It's not a territory is not a hardware issue is the software the great question is that from a lot of point of view we still look at the planet as we live in the in the eighteenth Century in the 77th birth. In the sixteenth Century or long the question is we still looking this planet only as a Territory divided between states where wage leftovers of the territories are the global comments. And this is not true. This is not absolutely to what make this planet different from all the planets that we know is the system all the time. It's able to be Tori bigger or smaller than Earth or all the planets have a territory what the other planets to motels and we have here in this place is the system that supports life the system that system in a well functions. The way of function is our main character's name is Howard 9 and most value think that we are going to because support life and supporters. And for the wall. This system does not exist. Does not exist because isn't eligible because you cannot divide it because we cannot appreciate it. We cannot properly privatised these things off and if we can divide the space of the C as we have made on the particular our Waters, we can divide the space but we cannot provide the system that operates inside the water of oceans. We cannot provide the system that operate on the airspace. We can divide space we cannot provide the system. Okay, and this is not the greatest issues because we do not accept that we have a global, Without Borders. We do not manage climate as a global, This is the great wage when climate is on in the UN negotiations in the eighties. The first proposal from Malta was to propose to recognize a stage. Climate is a common Heritage of mankind. The question was in nineteen. Ninety two in the in husum. It's the season was to consider them a change as a common concern of of mankind and this makes all the difference. This is the main reason why we still do not have any results intake linked technically climate change because with this decision decides that climate is not a common good you decide that climate is issue issue like any any issue and some level but no one's know. What is a concern from a lack of view in terms of flights and and in terms of the lease and the main question because we do not accept The climate is a system that exists in the real world and not issue. We do not accept that is a global comment and we do not manage it off the clock of comment and the great question is again because we do not do not fake Nuys the stable climate as a global public who's all the benefits that maintained and produce a stable climate do not exist for the world and four. So do not exist for economy. For example off the question of Amazon. I call it the Paradox of everyone knows that the forests of Amazon is one of the Key Systems on the planet that maintain and produce a stable climate. This Forest is the highest level affirmative a great question. Is this value Thursday. Everyone should necessarily everyone knows about these value but usually is not visible for economy. Why because when we talk about the value of of Amazon, we are talking about the invariable work that VIN is a consistent another Echo seems around the world make on the function on the issue of creating of their system on the intangible work of nature on the chemical changes that the forest made on on the air on the water on the soil and leaves changes. Anything tangible work does not exist because the common does not exist from a legal point of view. This work is made in a global Lego get off. The global does not exist slow confusing guava comments are only The Leftovers of the territories. Sorry. Sorry. This planet is more than a territory dead. No, Jewish in the world know like Alex Perry though. I can say that that is not true. The true is that this planet is now than a territory off and they'd show is not wrong. What is wrong is the law the law is wrong without changing this it will be totally impossible to restore the system because we do not take it off from work to his dorm a global, No one will make improvements on a global comment that does not exist that we will not be compensated for this. No doubt. No one will produce benefits on electronic. This is the good question and the results of concerned approach is not a decision to menage a global, that implies a conquest Conquest between the rules of appropriation of the global economy. And also the Congress dead. From Apple with that provided the gullible Public Schools. We need rules for providing providing the the global public group and for the procreation the reserve because usually do not have the global common. The result is when system of mitigation between states and the system of mitigation is we will try to make less patience the team and this is and negative some game. We will continue to make the emissions and this is the only way our economy works. Because to make positive to make benefits on that system to his started system. It's invisible for economy without sensing these Lego framework. We may not restart the system. We will not sure the food for Next Generation now when discussing an intangible Global common Without Borders One initial misconception regarding this deals with national borders and sovereignty. Can you address this? We must understand some way explained that these are these two different realities. What is the division of the space? Another is the system to different realities and this is the great secret somehow for the convenient. Why in the convenience it's possible to have common property inside the space of private property. Because they have different things one is one thing is the space is my apartment. Another think is the system of electricity or the system of what page are the system of the elevators. This one is a function of division. And now that is a space disease and we can consolidate both this is what we need to do in the planet. We need to consider the system as a global common that exists inside and outside of the seventies and this month. I do not mean that we have to to finish with the borders with the seventies to be honest. The only way to keep sovereignty and the territories goal is to keep the system in a well function way. We helped a well function at system. That is not sovereignty that can say I do not agree with climate change. The climate change is that the system is that this is the reality of this planet and this is not under the the sovereignty of every state. This is not under the jurisdiction of church and state. The only way to manage one common is as as Professor alien or often tell us the first step is off cuz we find the, what is the comment that is a strike we have to manage in this is the first step and I think is to define the system as a common Heritage of mankind and now we have the certificate tools that are needed to Define. This comment have attached the search for the safe operating space for mankind. I think is specific to to Define these intangible, narratives of mankind that support life. The second step is to cross like Congress between the rules for a population and the rules for provision of the common group without these. It's impossible to have a collective action in a series destructive conditions for a collective action climate change is not a problem of CO2 climate change before being a problem of CO2 age or economic problem is the problem of comments of Malaysian comments without creating the conditions to be possible a successful management common. We will not address. We will not clean this work against climate change because this is a problem that no one's talked about that is behind all the problems and people consider take as long as something even that climate change is a common concern with or whatever without no one knows. What is a concern so climate change is essentially a symptom not the root cause of the illness. It's a symptom. Yeah, you are right this difficulty of accepting from the 70 feeling that we have a common in size of territory independently if you accept or not the comment is there. Is function we we have no sovereignty under the common the common system and our future the features of the next Generations depend on this comment page now historically economic growth has come at a devastating cost to the Earth's natural systems or Global comments, essentially when we destroy the environment we create wealth with no penalty, but at the same time there are no incentives in place to reward nature Positive Solutions and recent Studies have found that nature could create trillions of dollars in annual business opportunities the system that dysfunctional how do we reconcile Economic Development with growing environmental concerns? And this is again a legal question. I like of casting that is behind the conception of Valium. The conception of what is the creation in our society if we accept that we have a common Without Borders intention that is not a threat to the sovereignty. That is the only way to keep the solvent. He's working at for the future and Rising footage if we accept this and we accept that the climate package is in fact my country depends on what others made on the other side of the planet depends on the aircraft systems that are in other countries. If we accept this, we put some competencies in one institution that will manage that I think should be United Nations wage. She's Manish. What are the positive impacts that each one make and negative impacts that each one made on the comment system to create the system of accountancy of these extra tax to create Global public policy of the maintenance of this of this climate. We can change the rule of the game when the wealth creation the wealth creation in our society only happens. If we destroy nature, if you hit nice the comments we can give value to the work of nature. We can give value to the intangible work of nature. And we must distinguish that Amazon the the rainforests. I only spoke of about Amazon because it's the biggest. Okay. All the ecosystems are this is the song speaking up for that the rest of the systems but I talked about the result because it's the biggest one the lungs of the Earth. Yeah. The question is the forest of Amazon. We want them to the nine countries that this place on Earth the work that is made is, because there is no borders for the world of nature. There is no borders for the evapotranspiration. There is no borders for the the sources of CO2. There is no bothers four boxes and there is no borders for that organic wage goes to the water that after all the organic material that goes to the data and after she's all the oceans there is no horse for this but these forests in its belong Used to the current is that are there the question is we need to make one account to see of system that compensate this work for the benefits that list territory be nice to all the system that we all share the value if it's we all share the benefits of these ecosystems in the same way that we all share the damage that the commission or the emissions of of who else all over the place the place we share the benefits and we share the damage. So the only way to remember that this question is 2:15 as the common and after to make a system of governance of the use of his, and to think I fully accept the benefits see if you introduce the benefits of the accountancy. All the compass you will change it will discuss effects on the emissions on the logic of the emissions on the logic of what is what took on the GDP of countries without changing this rule. We will continue on the negatives on some game where you try to reduce emissions that we will never get installed at the system because we will we will not create one carry activity of the system in the country's off and the Camry activity of the system should be compensated and he can't achieve become visible on the GDP of of the countries and we must find a balance between the positive impacts and the negative impacts. And the question is if we introduce the positive impact what will be the consequences the cache cache conscripts or on the negative because this will change the rule of the game is to teach in One initial condition of the system that really studying checks that will end probably no effects in all the economy. You know, there's a lessons between not and so involved relations inside the countries that it's a paralegal shifts and to any results. I think it's inevitably that we need a paradigm shift. We have so many police chief. How long does History Month why we cannot another one and think on this we have already freaked nice the question of where Lego steps for the dog. And it has Ultimate Guide we have already recognized leg of objects of flow in vegetable Acres of objects of flow in outerspace flow. We have already defined the safe across the space. That is this space when we are talking about the safe operating space with the planet plan this framework. We are not talking a space. This space is not a theory class place is a quality space of the system. We have the quantity and quality parameters that Define a well-functioning system. We took all the tools that we need to recognize the global common to measure the impacts to define the global common to change the only abstract that we took in our heads in our ideas his to accept that we have a global common, you know posters. This is the only of stock we have wage. The abstract between to give the opportunity for next Generations to drive and to live or to be in in the description in the climate these hoops. And the only obstruction in this moment is one long-held belief that we have borders and we do not have a global common result workers. The question is we are not talking about to hit earliest. We have to leave our mindsets from the territory and to embrace the idea of the system that we need to keep the borders on the territories 12-piece. To maintain the peace that we can get that at the same time who we need to build a Lego framework that is able to represent the global function of that system. We need something a level of abstraction that is not old system. When we proposed to recognize that sisters akong ritaj is not saying that the commentators will be the system this this will be a good presentation of the system with the knowledge that we have now. That is the safe open a space. That is the best knowledge that we we have now. The reality is what we can have for sure is that this planet is not only a predatory and we need to be present the functionality of the system from a legal point of view and after to build a system of global dead. Ms of these Global, so by introducing in our account to see in our GDP the work of nature we can make a paralytic shift in what is value and by doing so we we can build one economy not only to reduce emissions month that we are already starting to hit but also when you going to be of restoring that list Okay, the countries that have used ecosystems the key across systems of the planet, of course, they must be compensated. Okay dead but they must be compensated because they are providing one services that support life for everyone and this will create new jobs new ways of wealth creation and you know, you have to work on both sides reducing the impact and the story The ecosystems. And they will work together but to work together and to work on both sides you leave that via the results. Outcome of this work the outcomes of these activities, you can visible in the economic system in a global economic system and do not forget when you you are investing in less than a emissions in the equipment's with less emissions. We are capturing tio2 you are working on intangibles natural intense Force brat reducing benefits on a system or less emissions or negative or capture and feel too so you we are always working when we are reducing his best offer with new technologies to to to avoid emissions. We are reading with internet. Well intangibles. We are leaving to avoid emissions of natural attention off. What we are talking about is about 1 economy of natural intangibles more than Commodities that are support of life. And we should build this new economy around this soap. It's a new economy that realize new jobs new economic activities that are different from the previous one. Okay, so long there is no account eviction between the economy and actual the contradiction is between what we conceive wage as value what we consider as wealth creation and nature economy is not in a position to Nature. What is in a position is our concept of what is value for nature. What is really funny can be what is the concept of wealth creation? Now, I think that's a really great point. And I know that the world economic Forum recently came out with a report on how nature Positive Solutions are good for our economy. So essentially shifting away from his usual which is a Hot Topic right now with covid-19 and the green recovery and adopting these nature Positive Solutions to create trillions of dollars in annual business opportunities and create nearly four hundred thousand jobs over the next ten years alone. So this will be a very beneficial for us. It's a global community and also our local communities. Yes. We with some great great Advantage Kimberly very good Technologies with their emissions or capturing CO2 with no damage. So nature visit Solutions off the problems of natural registration. You need a legal framework that capture. What do they are positive externalities? Okay, trust many to invest in nature with Solutions. Okay. No, one will put millions and millions and millions of dollars in nature of the solutions because the outcomes of nature with Solutions are in network intangibles benefits on the system that that needs bit cock-eyed. Okay, so to talk about none conflict between economy and and later is absolutely Madness off in the sense that the problem is not economy in the problem is what is value and I ask again. What is value for humankind more eyebrows or more communities or more videos of physical conditions that support week whenever or something continue to prove communities. We need to prove communities that we need to produce less communities and to produce more touchable Network test was that super flight because we're not in he's in the end one will earn money because the system will collapse So the problem is the system of what is what is value for us? What really matter for us? Okay. This is the question about the value to what and the value is invented for us, but the system do not change. The only one that concerns is economy. The only that can change is the law that the laws of nature will not change. So the only solution is to adapt our laws to adapt our economy to what support wise and the next Generations there is no risk excuse to do not do it. There is no excuse. I like that we must change because the laws of nature will not change. Thank you Paula. This was enlightening. Do you have any final thoughts to share with their audience? We can manage the system without undermining the territory the sovereignty of States. This is from a legal point of view from a political point of view one use of Illusion because this is the time also to connect the new science about the function of that Cisco Unity of the system with the concepts quiz electrical sites with the political Solutions with the designing of policies and the designing of organic institutions of Institutions designing Global governance. So only connecting of all of this song with law with the cost places in the economy by freaking Rising the work of nature that support life. And also connecting with that political and institutional solutions that we need to manage the system. This is the new society that we need the evolution that we need to have one hundred percent where we can leave when the next Generations can live off. We cannot think that in the anthropocene. We will leave on the same way with the same clubs that we live ten years ago twenty years ago five three years and do not forget all that is that we are seeing now then let you know is and so on and off also one outcome as not having solution for this fact of being we are all collect. We will depend on each other in a global scale and because we have no solutions for these we have no designing with no governance designed for this reality of the planet that the outcome is dead. Each one is trying to close themselves in their borders thinking that this is the best solution for them and we know that this this is not true climate change that damage did not expect any bother for so only building something that represents a wall Without Borders The systemic approach and keeping the borders on the territory and the rowing the system to exist Without Borders. We can find new Solutions. All right, and there you have it. Our planet is more than a territory and The Great quest moving forward is to recognize the existence of the earth system as a common Heritage of humankind dead. By recognizing our Global Commons, we can give value to the intangible work of Nature and take the first step to restoring a stable climate a visible manifestation of a well-functioning earth system. That is all for today and thank you for joining us for this episode of common home conversations Beyond you and 75 Please Subscribe share and be sure to tune in next Wednesday to continue the conversation with our special guest Carl Burger co-founder and managing director of one Earth and visit us at ww.w the planetary, press, four more episodes and the latest news and sustainability climate change in the environment.

UN Amazon Paris climate Accord founder and CEO Congress founder and president Paloma Portugal nature Positive Solutions Alex Perry Kimberly White Paula husum Spanish Waters Kathy Carl Burger
Ora Nadrick -- founder and president of the Institute for Transformational Thinking

Living Regret Free

26:08 min | 1 year ago

Ora Nadrick -- founder and president of the Institute for Transformational Thinking

"Hi, everyone. This is Dr Carson, welcome to living regret free a program that shows you how to live a better and more joyful life. As an added bonus. I invite you to listen to an introduction to my mindset matters program, which ties into this sub. Well, go to WWW dot SOB, mindset dot com, it's free. And I know you will enjoy it if you'd like to contact me personally drop me a line at Gail Carson thirteen at g mail dot com. Or go to my website, WWW dot spunky old broad dot com and sign up for my weekly newsletter. Hi, everybody. This is doctor Gail Carson. And you know that we are talking about living regret free today. But I'd like to offer you an invitation to have a private consultation with me if you would like, and if you go to spunky old brawd dot com and sign into my contact page there and request a conversation with me, we will do that. No obligation just to getting to know you a little bit. And you getting no me. So I will forward to it. However, I have a great guest today, and she is aura niche. She is founder and president of the institute for transformational thinking and author of live true, a mindfulness guy authenticity. She's a certified life coach a mindfulness teacher. And she specializes in transformation thinking, self-discovery and mentoring new coaches as they develop their careers. Well, first of all welcome or how are you today? Hi gail. Thank you so much for having me. I'm wonderful. Great. Well, you know, the big buzzword now is transforming and transformational everything today is about being a transform Asian a leader or leave living a trimming formed life. So why do you think right now that you're? Message of living authentically, you know, especially now for the times, we're in is so important. Well, I think it's what you just said. I think the times that we're in you know, when we start to hear things like fake news, and people are really at a loss to know. What is real? What is not? What is you know, social media interpretation and people feel blitz creed. With just way too much. Do you know, it's it's just overwhelm and many people not only feel bombarded stressed confused. But they actually don't really know how to discern or delineate between what is real. And what is not? That's why I feel it starts with us. We need to know, what feels real and authentic to us. And are we living our lives that way? Because if we are and we're clear about who we are. And what we believe is true. It's going to help us be able to discern it outside of ourselves. Well, that is so true. And you're right on about. All the mixed messages. We get as a matter of fact, I was I don't know. I was just on not even on a, you know, anybody's website. It was just on. I don't even know where I was on the internet, and I saw the same article four or five times with four or five different celebrities, headlining it. And of course, I'm sure there weren't any of them that were endorsing this. But because it kept changing. So it's true. I mean, you really think that something is real. And it isn't so yeah. Yeah. You wanted to say Samak, and here's what came to mind Gail when you were saying that it's interesting. You know what I call him? I first book says who automatic thoughts thoughts that pop up in her mind, very instantaneously. And it made me think of when we were little I don't know if you remember this or you played it remember there was a game called telephone. And you would you would sit in a circle and. You would whisper something in someone's ear like a sentence. It could be a prompt. It could be lyrics to a song. And by the time. It went around to the last person. It had changed. I do remember that. I didn't know the name of it. I didn't know I believe it was called telephone. It could be called something else. But to me, and the mind you I we played that as children, and what was really the goal of the game was to make sure that you kept. What was said to you intact. Yeah. It was all about on. I mean, you were passing the sentence along you were reiterating. What was whispered in your ear? But really what came down the pike was very different more often than not. I think that's a great metaphor that by the time. Things are translated interpreted weighed in on in specially today because we are bartended. It's just too much too much. Yeah. You know, it's interesting. And then you talk about another buzzword of today, which is mindfulness. And I remember meeting someone gosh, maybe six seven years ago now, and she was all about mindfulness, and she was about bringing mindfulness into companies. And I thought oh man she is going to starve to death because they don't want to hear it. And yet today she is going strong. So what made you so passionate about the power? Of mindfulness and out of this come to you. Well, you know, I my trajectory my path, you know, very psycho spiritual for very long time. I've studied many teachings many modalities, many techniques technologies, etc. Because I've been on the path of you know, you said that we're transformation self realization, self actualization. You know, you know, that old quote knows I self, you know, I've been very interested in the workings of the mind, and for me in particular, my story stems from having a sister that was mentally ill, and which was very devastating and she's no longer with us. She was very very special soul. But, you know, her breakdown her mental breakdown really impacted me, and it really just changed my whole world around if you will so it so I went on a deep deep search for that meaning mindfulness with. That I discovered along the way and once I became aware of it. And also as a meditative because I started meditating young, you know, to sort of, you know, understand how to calm the mind down how to head observe it. And the mill thousands of thoughts we think in in that head of ours. When I came upon mindfulness, it just immediately resonated for me because it really was a way in which we could observe ourselves. And this isn't just about sitting on a meditation pillow or yoga mat where you sit for twenty minutes, and quiet the mind. This is about all the waking moments of our live and mindfulness for me was such a powerful, you know, understanding of the self and I became a certified mindfulness teacher in a mindfulness meditation teacher, and my work really is devoted to that. And it's an integral part of all of the work that I do it was part of my first book says who which was having. Mindful awareness of the thoughts that we have. And with that mindful awareness, we can then change them. And that's how I created the says who method and now my new book live true, a mindfulness guy too often Tissot is really all about the understanding of who we are. You know, it's it's really getting to know ourselves better. I think it's really important to do. So so that we can be clear and healthy and wholesome and have healthy thinking habits, which is something I go in, you know, deeply into both books. Well, it's interesting. I have to confess I am not a meditative. I have tried. I've tried but my mind is just going all the time. And so, you know, when I sit there, and I I tried to empty my mind. You know, then I fall. Then I got this shows, you how relaxed your you get, you know. And then of course, you know, I just did a workshop at one four four multi versity in Scotts valley in northern California called mine mood and happiness with Dr Ron Alexander. And a woman came up to me because we were teaching meditation that was part of the workshop, and she said that very thing. She says, you know, I meditate a lot, but then I start to fall asleep. How can I stop that? And then that takes you to a whole other level of being aware of when you start to be tired. So that you can bring your focus and awareness to that. Like, oh, I'm about to fall asleep. And then you become aware of how not to do that. So and by the way, you not being a meditation imitator, and being honest that I think is great. There are millions of people who feel like you do they don't meditate. They don't know how to meditate they don't wanna meditate. But I really encourage taking time in are very very busy days. Even if you're. Someone who doesn't wanna meditate and that's perfectly. Okay. No judgment. But try and sit for at least, you know, I encourage like ten minutes just just sit quietly somewhere. Even if you're looking at the out the window and seeing, you know, the the leaves on a tree moving or, you know, a sunbeam coming through your window or anything that you can stop the business. We we need to really incorporate that enjoy day somehow, I agree with you. I think that's important. And of course, when I look out my window. All I see is water and boats, but I will fight. I tell pretty Gail it is it is. And then of course, when I fit my catch come on my lap. And then I love petting them. And that's very relaxing to me. But you know, you also talked about training yourself to become fully present. And I know that there's a lot talking about just the power. Power of now, you know, the power of being right in the moment. And right full have a really difficult time with that. And you know, that's well, it doesn't matter. What happened in the past? We don't know what the future is the only thing we can control is right now. So how do you tell people? How do you train them to become more fully present? Well, I talk a lot about that in in live true. And I say that we oftentimes spent more time than not in two timeframes that don't exist. We go back to the past which is already come and gone. And sometimes we lament what we wish we did differently or it happened different y'all. I think we ought to Louis we do, and that's a total waste of time and mind, you this is very different than reminiscent. Or you know, remembering fond memories, that's not what I'm talking about. Here. I'm talking about how we go back into the past. And we can stay on what I call the hamster wheel. And we we really do spend an inordinate amount of time there or we are thinking about the future, which isn't even here yet and our mind gets occupied with the what if what you know, what could happen. What might happen and it creates worry and concern? And exactly so where we. The least amount of time isn't the president. I mean, it's just amazing to me that we try to wiggle out of the moments of our lives, and what's really sad. If you will about that that life moves very quickly. And before we know we've wasted a lot of time. And you don't want to be taking your last breath. Wishing you hadn't done that. Do you know? So that's the power of mindfulness is really to bring that awareness to people. And basically say look the moments of your life are really important. And if you value them, you're not gonna want to hurry them along now that can be easier said than done. So your question. How do you do that well, mindfulness which its definition definition is being in the present moment with total awareness and to add to that is with acceptance non judgment, and I what I like to call the cherry on top with self love. And so if for when you're in a moment you and I are. Talking. We're engaged in this conversation. I know I certainly am. I'm not thinking about what I'm going to have for lunch or dinner. And I'm not thinking about what happened yesterday. I'm really here. I'm present. I'm in this conversation because I want to be you know, you have to wanna be present. You have to one of value. What you're doing enough to also what I call show up for it like a hundred percent. So this takes training this takes practice, and you know, not to go be hard on yourself. But like if when we're starting to get out of a moment, how often do we listen to people, and our mind starts to wander, and what I say is the minute you start to see yourself thinking about other things no to know to self. And I I have a lot of note to self in live true. Oh, my mind is wandering let me bring focus in awareness back to this moment. So that I can really listen to this person who's talking to me and really. Give them my undivided attention, which really shows that I'm respectful of their time. You know, these are the act of mindfulness, which is really an essence being thoughtful person to ourselves to others. So. How is the steps of? I'm aware that my mind is wandering let me bring my focus in awareness back to the moment, which is really the essence of meditation that when your mind starts to wander you bring it back to the breath. And it's helped the mind to be disciplined, really. But it does take that it does take discipline. And it does take that ability to to get started like that. And but it's a challenge it's a challenge for a lot of people. And but I think it's a necessary challenge. And and you also talk about. The judgmental inner voice. And that's when I shoulda coulda woulda comes in. And we always say, and that I guess it goes back to what you were saying about, you know, not not remembering things that in a good way. But lamenting what we have not done that we wanted to do. So how do we get away from a judgmental inner voice? I mean, I would assume a lot of it comes from first of all our upbringing, and what we were radio than being told whether we did things. Well, are we didn't do things. Well, and whether we were smart or whether we were dumb and stupid. So how how do you get away from that? It's so true. And I talk about that a lot in says who my first book because so much of what was told to us in childhood. We bring into adulthood, do you know? And my second question of a says who method is have I heard someone say this thought before because a lot of the people that I've worked with will connect to the first. Time. They heard something in childhood when they were told they were stupid, they told they were, you know, absent minded, they told they were told they weren't going to be good at sports or they weren't pretty enough or they weren't thin enough. And unless you really work through that you're going to carry those what they become our core. Believe into adulthood. So we all have the inner critic. It's there it's real we all have negative thoughts. You know, my teachings are not about the fact that oh, let's just positive thoughts all the time positive positive positive, and we're never going to think negative thought again, that's not real. But we need to know how to work with it. And we need to know how to you know, to use your your first word is those those those op pop words today transformation. How do we transform negative thoughts into positive thoughts? Again, it's being aware of when that negative thought comes up and to what I offer up and says who is a a technique called release. And replace if you just. Released negative thought and replaced it with its positive counterpart. You're starting to build a a healthy new healthy thinking habit, you know, which bills new neural pathways with all the neuroscience that they're discovering and how we literally can change our brain. It's fascinating. So what do we do? We take these little steps we start to be again mindful of when we begin to tell ourselves I'm stupid. I'm unlovable. I'm unworthy. No one's gonna love me. And never going to get that job. I want on and on and on. And by the way, what I say in live true is substitute. The inner critic with a constructive advisor. Do you know we can tell ourselves how to do things differently? But let's be constructive about it. Let's not throw ourselves under the bus. Let's not sabotage ourselves. Let's not say these horrible things stores of what good is it. It doesn't help us. It just makes us feel worse about ourselves. So. Even these little beginning steps. And this is really what it's about Gail. You know, we all can say, oh, that's so hard. Oh, that's so challenging oh. That's never going to change. But I can tell you with out any doubt that if you stick to this, and you practice the skill sets daily, you will see a change in the way, you think. Well, I totally agree with you. I happen to be, you know, a very I happen to be a very positive thinker. Everybody that listens to me knows that. But it's you know, it is kind of a difficult when you've been raised a certain way, I was really really fortunate. My my parents were it was amazing people really were amazed. They were they let me get away with things that most parents would not let them get away with and gave me a structure that was still strict I remember at the age of thirteen I was coloring. My hair and everybody said, oh, how can you let her do that? And my mother said, well, this should be the worst thing. She does. And it's fine. You know, and it was and you know, I always kind of was out front with everything that I did. I was a tomboy and just lots of things that I did. And she said, well, that's okay. But when it came down to a how I answered the phone or the fact that I had to be nice to people or that. I I had to say thank you, and excuse me, those were thinks she was serious about. But the other things she said, look, you're you, you know, or like all my friends were if they got a good grade, they got money, and my mother said, no, you don't get money. You've got the brains, and you come up with a good grades. You know? So it was it was just a different kind of parenting and it worked really well for me. And she just, you know, the a lot of things as I say that most parents would be upset with. She just said, no, that's hard. She's expressing herself. And that's okay. So it was very very you're very you're very fortunate. Because what I what I hearing the way you described the way your mother brought you up which I think was very balanced in that. She let you be you, which is really a lot of what I talk about live true about the authentic self. And I think that's a great way for us to bring up our children, and I try to implement that myself. I'm a mother two sons. And I always say, I let my children let me know who they are. I don't tell them who they are. Yeah. Yeah. It really is a long with those disciplinarian. You know, what I wanted to say is whether it's rules or vice again about how to be a conscious kind person, which it sounds like she was teaching you that? But also letting you be who you are and expressing yourself. And that's to me a very important way to bring up our children because you know. More often than not we see these very, you know, sad situations of people that talk about that in adulthood that. My parents wanted me to be what they wanted me to be. They didn't accept me for who. I was. Yeah. People like that. She was not always happy with my choices. You know? I mean in the late fifties. I moved away from home. You know, I finished college in five days later, I was in Miami. And she wasn't thrilled about that. But I had always been told, you know, when you finish college you have to have a job. And so this is where I wanted to live. And this is what I wanted to do. So you know, she wasn't thrilled about that. And I remember my my dad making or my mom somebody made reservations or something on a on a train. And I said I am not taking two days to get to Florida. I said I'm going on a plane, and I had saved up some money, you know, and I got me my plane reservation in down I game. But let's tell our people at fell our audience how to find you up. So where can they go to find you what your website and very easy? Yes, go I was gonna say an where can they buy your books? And if there's something you want to give away to our audience. We're certainly open to that. Well, first of all born Adrian, which is by name or a NASD R. I C H is the my social media handles across the board. That's how you can access my website. You know, all the social media, you know, Twitter Instagram linked in Facebook on all of it. So it's my name again or an age rich and as far as getting my ebook. I'm on all the book outlets, Amazon Barnes and noble. You know, bookstores carry me, I don't know where people live and what's local to them, which can be ordered. But I find the fastest way to get my book, really is Amazon and or Barnes and noble. You can get my book in like two days later, I think so that's pretty fast. And you know, Email me, you know, I give away as a matter. It's something that we're working on right now. I did thirty audio meditations. Because I've thirty meditations in live true. And there's so beautiful. And now, they're on the the there on the music platforms like I tunes and Spotify and Pandora, and you know, if somebody wants them, they can reach out to me, and I I will give them access to it for free. Even though you can go on those music sites. They're just like I said, so lovely we've just completed them, and they're absolutely beautiful very calming very soothing. I might add it's to music, and it's a beautiful visuals. So I'm more than happy to offer those up to two people fantastic. So again, if you want to find aura, again, it's not complicated or O R, a Natick N A D R, H dot com. And she's that way across Twitter and Facebook and Instagram and so forth. So you can find her anywhere and. You can find her books on Amazon or Barnes and noble or wherever you want to get them or at her website as well. And I want to remind everybody that you can go to my website spunky, oh broad dot com. And go to the contact page. Let me know you'd like to have a little conversation with me, and there's no obligation. I would love to be able to do that for you. And I will be happy to get in touch with you or this has been absolutely terrific. I think that people really need to understand what mindfulness is I think people need to be open and willing to transformation, and I think that absolutely they have to be much more present. You know, let's not itself hard so complicated in our world today to not be concerned with what was and what will be but just to concentrate on. What is we just be so much stronger? So much happier. So I really think. Yeah, you're providing a really well needed service. And I can't I can't stress that enough because people need people like you. You know, I'm very linear, and very this is the way you gotta do it, you know, very linear, but I got to. But that's good to Gail. You know, we need all of that. Yeah. But we really need you to. So I wanna thank all so much for being with us today. I know our audience, and our listeners really got a lot out of it. And I wish you only the best in the future. Thank you so much guilt for having me. I so enjoyed it. Thanks for listening. And I hope you enjoy today's show. I choose my guest carefully. So if you have someone you'd like me to interview, please drop me a line at Gail Carson thirteen at Jamal dot com. In the meantime checkout. My intro program, mindset matters at WWW dot SOB, mindset dot com. See you next week.

Gail Carson founder and president Amazon Barnes Facebook Barnes Samak Dr Ron Alexander Scotts valley Twitter California president Louis Miami advisor Spotify Instagram Florida NASD Adrian
77: Q1 2019 Top 3 Countdown #3

Daily Sales Tips

03:24 min | 1 year ago

77: Q1 2019 Top 3 Countdown #3

"You're listening to the daily sales tips podcast. I'm your host Scott Ingram. I thought we try featuring the best of the show for the next few days. Now that q one is behind us. I'm going to count down the top three tips by number of listeners and engagement the next three days. Here's the number three. Hi, this is Matt Hines founder and president of Heinz marketing in this is my sales tip for today. You know, there's a lot of things I could cover. There's a lot of things that we do with our clients as well as things we do internally from a sales perspective. But the one thing that I think is accessible and important for everybody is to have a set of daily habits to have a disciplined approach to things you're doing on a daily basis. Sometimes it's a bunch of little things that add up to helping yourself create more predictable pipeline. I have what I call it. My daily do list. It's on my tasks list every day once I take it off of the tasks for the date automatically shows up on the next business day, and it's based on a checklist of things that I need to do every day to feed my network to end in defeat my pie. Line. I have a version of this is actually laminated that I take with me when I travel, but, you know, even if you just have it in your inbox or have it just as a piece of paper, I think reminding yourself of those little things those tactics. Those habits that helped drive behavior and help drivers volts is really important. So for example, on mine, you know, it's a reminder look at my calendar from yesterday the meetings. I'm the meetings. I had to make sure I've done follow up to make sure I've connected with people on Lincoln to make sure I've sent any. Thank you notes or whatever else to do. There's a reminder to look at a few different filtered reports for me in Salesforce in our marketing automation platform to look at you know, the accounts that we're tracking to look for buying signals to look for any changes to look for, you know, behavior with our content that I can follow up with. We also have a series of filters in linked in that can tell us about particular trigger events, if someone in my first connections has changed jobs that could be a trigger event that could lead to some opportunity. So looking at that on a daily basis in knowing what my follow up processes is important, that's all documented in my daily dualist if you. Listening this you'd like a copy of your sample of what my daily Dula. So I'm happy to share it with you. Then we cannot make that available somehow. I'm sure the Scott can figure out how to do that. And we could put a link in to to doing that either put it up on slide share or whatnot. I guess the moral the story on that for me is that there's always, you know, room for strategic improvement thinking about like who are we targeting, and how are we going after them? But you know, the top one percent of sales people will consistently tell you that their success is tied to consistence repeatable behavior. It's doing the little things as doing them every day. It's putting in the time and effort to do those things on regular repeatable predictable basis. So that's what I got this about Heinz from Heinz marketing, thanks so much for listening. Now, Matt sent me the PDF of his daily do list, and all you have to do to get. It is click on the link in your podcast player or go to daily sales dot tips forward slash twenty three. In addition to the link to the PDF, you'll find links to Hines marketing Matt's sales pipeline radio show as. Well, as a couple of his favorite social profiles while you're there. I hope you'll answer the question. Do you have your own documented daily do or daily habits list? If you do I'd love it. If you share it. I'm gonna share mind so jump over and join the conversation at daily sales dot tips forward slash twenty three.

Matt Hines Scott Ingram Heinz marketing Lincoln founder and president Dula Salesforce one percent three days
Podcast: Apstra leads the way for intent-based networking (IBN)

Telecom Reseller

24:14 min | 4 months ago

Podcast: Apstra leads the way for intent-based networking (IBN)

"This is green and the publisher of Telecom reseller. To deal with monster corrupt, who's the founder and President of abstract? Thank you for joining me today. Thank you. I'm delighted to be here. This is going to be a very interesting podcast. We're GONNA. BE TALKING ABOUT CISCO. We're going to be talking about their announcement to improve its intent based networking IBM portfolio and we're gonNA. Be Talking about abstract story within that story but I mean what is what does that stress? So, it was founded in two thousand fourteen and you. You're mentioning ten business working Astra Pioneer incentives networking. We came out the felt into thousands of extend and delivered the first in ten based networking products on the market. So, right there. Maybe we should talk about a difference because what I'm hearing. Is You pioneered the idea? So? Were you actually in front of CISCO AND THAT ONE? Oh Yeah. We worship think it's well documented I. think that's a Cisco you know. Calling their products under the umbrella in ten days networking in two thousand seventeen. I think they up on stage and They talked about in ten days networking redefining. That's working for the next thirty years, but it was bullying two thousand seventeen in fact astro. Again of product was launched or a Os one. Though which is the first intended networking product on the market? hit. The markets in July of two thousand sixteen. So you'RE A. Curve. Well Yeah. At the ends you know we found it after. Deliver on intended networking and you're asking about the difference as. Well intended networking As with, be that abstract. Think of it as a tool that's both architects and others us so I think the number one say differentiator. Is that what we want is to unify architects and operators under one umbrella. Usually problems in the Parisians happened decree because the architects would have a vision of how the network needs to be. They build a beautiful network, and then they toss it to the operators right, and then you know the operators got go off on their own, and then you know it. In the sense the nets were deviates from the original intent. With Astra I think of it as this very powerful nation software that Bush architects and operates is us to essentially also made the entire life cycle of. Designing Building Deploy and then operating your network, including moves adds deletes. Changes including you know ultimately Changing your security policies or adapting your security policies or compliance policies, etc.. It keynotes in based networking. Is that you can closing loop read? So, what does that mean closing the loop? If you, think automation you know typically You're You're automating writing configurations to thousands of devices through scripts right and to like you press about them, and then you know these Chris Ron, and then essentially configurations are pushed on tons of devices, but then that's it. You know you're hoping. Hoping that everything works out as expected closing the boots. The Duluth is this notion that is. We're also collecting telemetry in time continuously gathering a whole repository, if database of the state in your network and we are performing tests against all of the state, insead time continuously to ensure that your network is as the moments delivering on your intense and so this notion of closing the loop. Is a combined with pushing configurations right so pushing corporations, but then verifying that indeed network is. It's critical to incent business working all. That's possible. The same tools not as enough thoughts. Now you did this and came up with this idea and twenty sixteen. What what existed before witnesses replace or take the place? Yeah so before in ten days networking what you have is what you call basic donation right, which is essentially. What was talking about right this this you know you. You know that you WANNA. Push configuration to switch right, and then you say well, you know the difference between the completion of this which and this other switches. Maybe some of the variables Ip address the. The. The the the the specific V., land etcetera, and so you're right up. Scripts writes You know that will help you. Stay time right, and so instead of pushing competitions manually by typing I think people were you're essentially writing Chris could be an answerable or or curling, no or some other tools in that's helped. You essentially pushed competitions faster to too many many devices. The problem there is because you're not. closing the loop, right? You're not verifying that as of the same tool that indeed you know your network. If delivering on what you want, many times, we have tuitions, and that well documents that where you know by making one mistake, right? You're not pushing the wrong configuration up to thousands of device devices. are very familiar with the feeling. It's almost like if you know. PTSD. You. Know you're on a on a you know you have your pinky on the answer, but then you're just praying. But before you press that indeed, you're going to get the results you want, and if you don't you're you're you're really? Out of commission, you're you don't west of starts is all you know if you cancer network anymore, and that's engineer has gone through that nightmare, nightmarish scenario, and so this is the type of tools that existed before in networking. So you, introduce this twenty sixteen. Ended companies start to adopted. Yeah. We quickly the in production and what we're seeing is that since then it's advocating It's been it's been asked erasing at a very fast rate, and it's really exciting to see I think that's when we launched initially were still this kind of resistance in the sense, you know especially network engineers. Who you know because of the last thirty years how they've done things right? If they you know through their CIS, etc were they're very close to the Cli, Cli is the command line interface, which is essentially how you manually configure a typical fiscal switch right, and so you know it's like you need it. We need to move them from a place of you know thinking about specific configuration commands who replaced? Carrying about outcomes right so it's not about you know what what specific configurations you put your network. It's more about you know. What outcomes do you expect your effort to deliver on your building and Network for a business reason? What are these business outcomes that you you needs to care about but over time I think because networks are so critical reading the. The continue becoming so critical and and because of the fact that you know at the end of the day. That's works. Engineers are being asked to do a lot more with less recipes. Nets seems not growing. Yes, the importance and the scalable networks are growing. They started embracing automation to help them especially those tools that them deliver better predictable outcomes. And so and so I'd say, and now she's be Cisco and what they've done in pushing the whole intent, based networking approach and every. The other vendor out there leaving with software and automation right, this is a no longer the exception is now the norm, but and so we've seen Volusia, and over the last year been exciting to watch. No. Let's dive a little bit deeper into some of the things you've been discussing. A lot of our readers deal with maintenance. You've been talking about how they stricly have done it now how they can do with IBM one. You need to know about abstract mate with Cisco. Well with. first of all think of it as a turnkey solution rights so you you deploy the software and essentially with Astro, if you are in the process of building and you pods right in your networking father in networking infrastructure, essentially with Astra, you're able to get the whole network designs built deployed, and you start operating. Get within half a day right so it's it's simple. It's really about the simplicity of operating your network and so a lot of times in the. Software bet the best type of software hides complexity right? What's makes in that poll? iphone attractive right then especially when it came out, I was this whole interface that made. It Complex Operation Super Simple right and that's what abstract Oh that's. We are simplifying the operational model and doing it in the way that delivers reliable experience, and so that's that's the first thing you need to know about APPs. in terms of you know Azran, how relief and that's looking specifically Cisco What after those two? That abstracts outs the specifics of the hardware? So after as multi vendor solution, it doesn't only work for one type of hardware or one type of vendor if works across. Various vendors, essentially all they sadly spenders CISCO, but also every stuff, juniper, Dal, and the open alternatives right cumulus, which now. Has Been acquired by not with itself has been acquired by and video. You know becoming another of. choice that customers can deploy. A and with Dell Sonic the know how much you know or knows about sonic, sonic. If fascinating developments in the last year, where essentially it's an open source switch writing system that delivers on all of the enterprise features that enterprise care about and so it's a viable kind of option. white label essentially option that's not is to your options from established vendors in. If you'd like, we can talk more about the importance of multi vendor. If that's something that you think is the you know, it's interesting to your audience. Well I. Think it is I think most of our readers contend deal, manage a multi vendor network, and indeed many other readers who are the other side of the desk serve customers who are managing networks like that, and of course let's talk about the the the diversity that network in the context of Migration So how does this fit? Yeah absolutely right so Your career. You I'm glad to hear that. In fact, that matches our experience in that in that you know we're seeing. interprises become increasingly more multi vendor in fact in days where? You can source your empire networking infrastructure from one vendor. Over right and the reason is it compliments stuff? Things one you know. Let's take the example of how when Cumulus acquired by men and all the sense. In the context of the larger and company. And video is focused on machine, learning educations you know a especially these high performance clusters and these high performance clusters have very stringent requirements on the networking side very specific requirements on the networking site. That's what you need is networking. That is optimized. For for education, right. Namely you need to have. A also need to have some low Nathan. Etc So i. think especially like stack will be critical to get the most performance of your. It'd be cluster, and so this is where you're going to bring in some video. That's getting into. You're into your network, right? And then you may have some more generic you know. type of education's whereby you can use more cost effective, as which is not especially low latency. Just you know W- switches work well Do the job respite. They're more cost effective offense for that. You'RE GONNA. Use another nets. Networking Vendor maybe open networking options such as Dell and then maybe as at the fabric layer to put it to kind of bring it altogether, US established under such as fiscal or every so so that's one aspect. The? Other aspect is clouds right. Now with the last year's organizations move workloads to the cloud. and now they want to bring these These workloads back on premise the easiest way to do. This is to use those on premise solutions that cloud providers have delivered to the markets you know with with aws were talking about w outposts, or with as your as. Iraq! That's your now deploying in your in your network, which also have their own specific networking. and so you can imagine. With The compliments wants of all of these trends. How you're going to end up with a multi that's works and so having a multi vendor network management tools becomes critical in fact, you know. Bringing in management stuff, and that's what management software from a single hardware vendor is it past with dense? You'RE GONNA get stuck with this vendor whereas your business requires you to bring in all these other vendors into the mix. Now how does the security sector into this? Great Question. So. Security so so if you think of networking intense, right what outcomes you're looking for from your network. One is ability right. You know you only have the ability for specific. Workloads to you know a server or a virtual machine in some other rats, and then that's where. Is Delivering on that intense, and it could be at the three. The other intense is security. The also have compliance. You have product of experience, but security is really key right then you know with security. What you want is to ensure that your policies in terms of. How particular machinery particular application reaches another virtual machine or server or application? You know if the are being enforced in your network and you WanNa. Know for a fact that they're being enforced recipe visibility into your into The compliance of your network to your security policy is key right and. You know I say this and. It sounds obvious, but you'd be shocked. How many times an organizations have no idea? What Acuity Hustler. They have in their network infrastructures, and that's because they don't have that visibility, but they don't have the tools to essentially confirm for them that India. It's their policies are being applied and that the network is behaving, asked for the policy, so with Astra what do is collecting the state, and then we're doing continuous validation. We have this single source of truth. You know for a fact that your security policies are indeed being implemented in your network, and you know that if there's an deviation there, the tool will alert you, and in fact, you can also have the tool. He'll the situation very quickly, and so that's. Why you need to have the foundation in terms of the state and the visibility in real time, and all of this continues validation for us to be able to on top of foundation. Apply your security. Policies so intense as networking is foundational. To to securities it kind of the basic hygiene, you need in the network in order for you to have the ability to enforce and confirm your security policies. Now you know we should also talk about it. In the in the context of the Cova crisis is going on right now. no for many of our readers some cases they've had to move entire contact centers, large flocks of workers, who they did not intend to make mobile or remote. To remote. And so they're contending with that work situations that are very different or very new. does does this impact is? The impact then. I absolutely Kobe as you say, erect It's you know. What it is, it's really accelerated this whole trend around digital transformation. Right everything we're GONNA be doing now is through our screen. Right I mean. The? And it's went beyond anything before right now. Physical whether it's even stunning or events writes conferences. You know and of course we must work. And ultimately If you think about this networking is at the core of it all right. In fact, you know Garner sad, that's. Your Ti- times more likely to fail as your digital transformation. This is if you don't transform your network I. And I mean that's the August in the sense that you know. How can you you know deliver on digital transformation? If you're nets, work is being managed manually. It just becomes a pity on scalable right and with go ahead. You don't to be sending people everywhere right in terms of you know. Sending people could remorse vice to consider the networks you have the ability to remote control your network right, and how can remote control your network? The way through powerful Automation Software Association software that essentially enforces the policies whereby declare your policies, the desired outcomes of your network, and then you have. The software essentially worked with all the right systems in order to. Implement this follow policies enforce them, and then through the continues citation, Luke ensure that those policies are being implemented right and when released to remote work, you can think of the you know. This trend been going on which is companies have headquarters where you know. The majority of their employees were at the headquarter and we had you know it's past. Their best insured that policies within the network of that's headquarters facility essentially mess intense met the needs of their users, and then we spent. It's you know seeing We work type colocation facilities, right and that model. Has to change it right where now you need tremendous policies in every we work or remorse, replica location facility, and now you know what what we're seeing is. Every employee is working in their own home. Right now you went from having one or two headquarters to you know dozens of sites and now two thousands of different homes where you need to be implementing policies, automation software networking automation software in base of the Mason software is essentially the only way you can manage this. So you know we've been talking about this so far. This is really interesting stuff for readers. Can you give us some use cases or examples? Of of this process in motion of intent base networking being applied. Yes sure. Maybe the first example is Bloomberg Bloomberg built. A great headquarters. In London and They have there and there's MEKA network. Network essentially. is where all the accident happens, and you know whereby they ultimately serve four hundred fifty seven million households worldwide. You can imagine the that's worth these to be. Super reliable I have the right level of. Performance. And also a multi vendor networks, and you know essentially Bloomberg after trying, but quite a few different approaches ultimately implements as strengthen based. In the media and that's where you know back in London. Socio that's. One you know exciting example. I can say and then just more recently We've announced. The, elastic right this. Is. The company's plant in. Differs, Switzerland's first infrastructure is a service and bare metal providers, and what they wanted to do is allow their customers. Provisions their own service does and They needed the best of breed solution because on one hand. They want high-performance they want. To give high-performance to that. high-performance expedience to their to that customers and number two. He needs to be super simple. Essentially this customers nipple have it very simple operational model to proficient their own services, and so especially for the hardware they used you know offensively openness working with a minute ox, which is now part of Nvidia which is. What in in in in their estimation, what the best of breed solution for the is and you know that provide this simple model? They used abstract and based a networking. So. Are Your services available directly to end users or do you do? Do you operate through partners? Yeah so we sell. Become the rats but in most cases we actually sell through a network of partners We have a Partner Program called after partner advantage with different tiers It's actually every. Program and we do have a a network of resellers and distributors across the globe. And so, if you are a reseller out there, that's interesting, interesting Asra certainly reach out to us. would love to hear from you. So where can we learn more about abstract? Asks rather come. Once thank you very much for joining us today and I know we're GONNA be talking about this topic and the related topic very soon, but for now thanks very much. Thank you.

CISCO Nets Astra IBM Chris Ron founder and President Dell London PTSD Volusia publisher engineer Telecom Nvidia Switzerland
Investing in Healthcare in 2020 with Niko Skievaski and Nikita Singareddy

Venture Stories

56:58 min | 3 months ago

Investing in Healthcare in 2020 with Niko Skievaski and Nikita Singareddy

"Hey everybody. It's Eric Torbert co-founder Partner village global aid network driven venture firm, and this is metro stories a podcast covering topics related to tech business with world leading experts. Everybody. Welcome to another episode of village. Globals venture stories I'm here today joined by two very special guests Nikitas ready investor are ventures and Nikos. You've ASCII founder and president at. Redux. Nico Nikita welcome to the PODCAST. Happy to be here. So we're here to talk about healthcare and and some of the newest regulations, but also more broadly in the space you really you recently wrote an article as summarizing what's so interesting about the latest new regulations what unpack with we're trying to do in that. Yeah. This is something I think a lot about at someone who invests in healthcare. Aria, as a big healthcare portfolio, but there's a tremendous amount of inertia in healthcare and I think it's more pronounced in healthcare than a number of other spaces I. Think the close corollary is probably Fintech and financial services where you have these really large incumbent players and also as in addition to that deeply fragmented on the customer side So that might look like SME's for the fintech world. And just the sheer number of people that companies that need payment processing, and then in healthcare, it's just the sheer number of provider organization and vendors and everything in between. So when you want to innovate in healthcare there needs to be a number of driving factors that really force it to happen, and we've seen it happen a couple of different times and healthcare but I think really following regulations and easy way to see this materialize one good way I think of framing that says. If. You look at the high tech fell in two, thousand and nine. which was a related to the American recovery reimbursement. act. That was one of the first times that the government said you need to adopt and demonstrate meeting use of your Marzano HR's and it's not like the industry didn't exist before that epic was already one of the biggest players in the space and so is Turner. There wasn't that forcing function from the government to have to do that, and it really solidified all healthcare institutions, not just the big health systems but also that kind of Taylor, on smaller provider groups have to use EHR's as well. But you see this in, you know not not just with electronic medical records you see this happen over and over again with different acts. So some random examples and other ones. To mention the fairness construct the fairness to contact lens consumer APP in two thousand and four that really created one, eight, hundred contacts and Hubble. The affordable care act I think is it obvious? Line two, thousand and ten you got the bright health's on the Oscars. The invisible line patent expired and so you got candid and you've got small direct club and then you have these telemedicine reimbursements and now the. CMS. Interoperability rules and a bunch of other things related to data exchange on the Medicare admission discharge transfer side, as well as social determinants of Health and provider directory, and you can very clearly see the timeframe in which these products to to be rolled out. So I use that as love me follow where this train is going and usually you can see these rules and regulations put out three or four years beforehand. W requests for comments etc, and if you're smart about following those requests basically I think you can do a pretty good job of tracking where the industry's going and investing in those tailwinds. Those forced talents what I think is interesting if I could just add to that is healthcare needed the government to push innovation. So before meaningful use, which was part of the the bailout package in back in two thousand eight. Healthcare organizations weren't on their own adopting TRONC health records, they you were kind of cobbling together their own systems and trying to trying to make it work but just because of the broken nature and miss line incentives within our healthcare ecosystem, there wasn't really an incentive for them to use technology to better themselves and become more efficient on their own and what we saw was elected health records really cross the chasm. You know if you think of the traditional business school crossing the chasm electronic health records were. A highly bespoke customised piece of software, the cost tens of millions of dollars to implement you know two years to implement with the health system, and at the end of the day, it didn't really actually you know it was unclear if they actually provided efficiency gains for their users and what the government did in they had they had outside incentives to do. So with the the last recession going on they put money behind the subsidies to implement these electric health records for hospitals for providers what did was It actually pulled the technology across the chasm. So typically, it takes a ten x improvement of technology to for to be kind of naturally by market forces pulled across the chasm. What we saw instead was the government pulled it across, and because of that, I, think we got almost premature adoption of technology that wasn't really ready for mainstream yet for instance, you know we're talking two thousand, eight year really went to a fact two, thousand nine and you know the years beyond that out for about a decade in. And electronic health records. You know we're implementing things today that were never designed to talk to the cloud or you know designed to work with the Internet and modern edge. So we in some ways by the government interfering in natural progression of technology option, we actually saw technology that wasn't ready to to be adopted by by the masses and I think that puts us into a lot of the position that we're in today with the older school technology you know server system stored technology that's being used by healthcare organizations. Totally, and so is there any sort of forward predicting here in terms of predicting where regulations GonNa go and you to what presents Create as indicated as a healthcare investor, can you look forward or do you really have to look back or or look at the president? I think you have to be two three, even four years ahead because if you're looking at regulations today, right there are already companies that have been built in the space and likely companies already have several rounds of funding and those companies saw these really intractable problem seemingly intractable problems and decided I'm going to go against the grain and built a business here and it's not like reeboks necessarily new or any of these companies that I think are really going to take off with these new rules like red impatient, Ping. Etc. if they knew that there was going to be a rule, but there was a general sense I think that people. Knew something had to happen and probably the government was going to be that push in order for there to be more efficiencies be being generated in healthcare. So you can look back I, think several years and see an are having been the best at this and I think there's plenty of funds I haven't been the best this but I think that that's a guiding force for me. If you look back three years, they were already asking cms was already requesting people and requesting institutions give us feedback on how we should be thinking about data exchange gives feedback on how we should be thinking about value based care. Give us feedback on. Things and you can use that as a guide right and you're not always going to be hitting the tail hitting the nail on exactly what the ruling is going to be you. You never really have a full idea that, but you can have a general sense of the space and I think some people have been. Good at that when you look at companies that started my i. read about this. I'm not entirely sure if it's true but if it's apocryphal I heard about the some of the people that built the. INVIS- line, related companies, a lot of them were consultants and people that were generally tracking these regulations and had a sense of what patent expirations were going to happen. So because they knew that there was this idea, you could build a big business in space because it was white space and I think you can be really ahead of the curve as both a builder an investor if you put in the work to track these. Totally, and still where do you think are the biggest disagreements in this phase right now kita in terms of where where things might lead what this could lead to in terms of investment opportunities are in terms of the bill menchaca. Good question I mean as with all things. Derek. Can help you never know if you're actually backing the company can only back you know really great teams solving really great problems and hope that you're catching the right whale based on the information that you're going also i. think there's a sense that some people are thinking not some of these technologies may be commoditised like looking at telemedicine reimbursement rules are good sense of I think people are saying some of these larger. You know let's let's look at a doc or doctor on demand, and then every single tele related telemedicine company that focuses on a specific specialty all the tools that you might need to run those businesses. Some people are saying, you know these things, everyone's GonNa everyone's going to help them, and maybe they're actually going to be available via API. So we don't actually need to be connected to a business to do that and I would decimate some of these businesses. But healthcare move super slowly even if you have a rule change, I'm sure we're going to see people pushing out the deployment of a lot of these technologies and even if you read the rules closely, they give a lot of wiggle room for exceptions and for you to demonstrate that I need six months longer twelve months longer for these types of reasons and if you know anything about cms I, think they actually have a lot of leeway. To a lot of organizations. So I'm not sure I. Say Disagreement I think that that's an interesting interesting way. Of phrasing, it 'cause disagreements to me is just as -fensive. What's your go to market strategy? What's your distribution? Your product strategy I think ultimately comes down to that I. Think just to if we could give some context for what's going on in healthcare right now I, think there's a confluence of a couple really big trends that are happening the the obvious elephant in the room is that we're in the middle of a pandemic and what that's done to our healthcare organizations is still yet to be seen as the long term effects of that it's financially decimated. Many organizations where there are already running on super slim margins. Now, they are running definitely in the red this year, and that might continue for a couple years, and so their technology buying really went from kind of a differentiating activity to something that is now driven off of necessity. How do we actually continue to provide services that we couldn't provide before via virtual care via remote patient monitoring or other remote diagnostic services, all these these ways that they need to adapt to in person care because you know even if you know social distancing works and the swell of new Cova cases goes down people still want to avoid. Because that's where the that's where the pandemic is You want to stay away from those and so there's a very real fear that health systems have around how do we actually keep lights on and working right now so technology adoption has shifted to accommodate that and at the same time we've alluded to it a few times, but there's these new data sharing rules that I think really opens at the landscape for new technologies to exist that didn't exist in the past. And Nikita destroyed that great article on its maybe you WanNa, walk through kind of some of the like what what has changed in the landscape based on these these new roles that were I guess the latest version announced. March we go. Totally I think when you look at hospital margins, right they went from not great to begin with eight percent to two percent less than that in in Kuban times and the spend that was there was always relatively small but it's shrunk and now I feel from my conversations I've had with health leaders. There are things that they were maybe thinking about spending by neon wears they will not be thinking about spending money on that until twenty twenty four at best and then other areas that are top of funnel revenue expanding their thinking about how do I actually have efficiencies in my call centers and the front desk. So I can have more time actually being spent on care and less money spent. On those kind of front desk resources how do I expand and get more potential patients into the funnel? How do I actually think about building a proper healthcare crm that hasn't really existed meaningfully for a lot of these a lot of health provider practices or health systems, and as you were saying, remote patient monitoring if the same thing in its second expansion, a net new revenue opportunity. Alexi of nomad health has said before and I think about this all the time it relates to a lot of businesses but particularly in healthcare and healthcare, you can't really offer people savings like savings doesn't mean much. What does mean a lot as can you actually show me the my revenue is going to be expanded. Versus savings. Totally, it means zoom out just a little bit. More context what Redux does and why it it's it's the having. Yeah absolutely. So I cut my teeth and healthcare working at epic the one of the large electronic health records. So I ended up leaving epic and kind of jumped out into the healthcare entrepreneurial ecosystem and I just assumed that a lot of activity Madison we're is located because the same year I left epic, there were twelve hundred other people left epic. With your typical ten percent of people leaving the company every year. So I looked around the health, the health care technology ecosystem, and really saw consultants and not many people actually creating companies and so that drove a lot of the motivation behind Reebok's because we started looking at. Well, why aren't there more healthcare technology companies and why aren't the ones that are out there actually getting to market and getting in the hands of users? One of the biggest barriers that we saw was that in order for you actually take your product to market a healthcare technology startup has to go through like two years of sale cycle. They have to convince a hundred people at that at a healthcare organization to say, yes, an f. any one of those people says, no then the deal is done and so that huge gauntlet was was a massive barrier to entry for new. Technology and for innovative technology that should exist in the in the healthcare space because you know, we still literally have pagers and fax machines and clipboards use at Houston healthcare, and it's like the only place I've ever seen a pager being used in my adult lifetime. So one of the biggest barriers to entry for these technologies is is getting through it and the challenges of interoperability with the existing technologies in electronic health records, those organizations. And, so this is this is kind of you know a lot of the context around why this new regulation this new inoperability will make sense as well. But this was six years ago now and we saw this problem we saw the writing on the wall, and so we started a company a middle layer actually pulled it out of health systems to standardize it in the cloud naked available over consistent API and give that to. Software developers who are building applications for these organizations So that's that's what the company does. What we started the first couple years of that I. You know we didn't make much money. 'cause we were trying to figure out chicken egg problem, and so as Nikki dimensioned one of my side hustles was a book that created called ten illustrated and crowdsourced artists to create to create artworks based on icy ten codes which are. Billing codes that doctors have to send to insurance companies to tell them you know how people get injured. If you imagine the hundred, twenty thousand ways, people couldn't get injured and the different codes associated with that. There were a lot of funny ones. So we got artist to kind of pick the funniest ones like Bernard, water skis on fire or sucked into jet engine I guess that's not that funny but it's You know it. It creates good illustrations, and so we made a book and I ended up selling ten thousand copies of that book as the as the country was moving from I version nine version ten, and that's that's Kinda how I kept afloat while we were in the early startup days Reebok's LE. Let's pretend US three were starting a venture fund focused exclusively on on on healthcare before getting into sort of specific. verticals and saying what what do you think about Nikita? What do you think is the mistake that most VC's misconceptions most VC's have on on the category whether they're specialized or whether the journalists trying to trying to the way what do you think they don't either secretly earlier don't appreciate it as much as they should. Healthcare is one of these industries where you have to have a Rolodex and even having a Rolodex the whole it. Doesn't mean you're necessarily going to be successful. Most of the people that we like to back at R. E. N. I think folks that have generally had success in healthcare and again not it's doesn't mean that you're going to have success but I think is a very important piece of it as you've worked in healthcare before people in healthcare tend to trust other people who've worked in healthcare if you're an upstart. That someone who's never really been in healthcare before it's just that much harder particularly when you think about who you're selling to, it's less of an issue if you're selling direct to consumer I, think. But if you have anything that will start touching clinical trials, pairs and health plans, pharmaceutical companies, anything you ha- after really have folks on your team that have done that before. So that, you know how to sell into and have access to these types of pie paying customers. So sometimes I think that can be a little bit overlooked because even when you go and listen to some of the biggest success stories, like let's say kink one medical for example, or even Glance Lubango these folks had a tremendous amount of healthcare background and even for them. It was not just a cakewalk for this company for the companies to be successful, and then if you take these kinds of chew outlier of founders and founding and companies, and then look at everybody else who's tried to build a healthcare company that has a healthcare background, and then you look at the folks who tried to go to our company, I, have no healthcare background. To me the success one of the most successful variables is that kind of how having that material healthcare background and having folks on your team that that happened background. What you just said makes pretty sad because what that means is. You know it's like the status quo we depending on the status quo to fix an industry that desperately needs disruption but I think it's true. You know I like I I'm a hypocrite here in that I came from epic I came from that world of understanding how healthcare technology works and we're able to kind of solve that chicken and egg problem and get through it but you know I'm, I'm not an investor. So not putting my money where my mouth is but a lot of the companies that I see that get investment that I kind. Of Roll my eyes at our the it's it's really easy to have a huge vision in healthcare of about the way the world should work because as an entrepreneur, you can see a million different ways that healthcare should use technology to be better, and so it's as founder you can paint this vision in say like this is this is how textured work and this is how the world should conform around this vision and the execution of that vision is a whole nother story and I see a lot of companies with a very big vision and They can't get past one or two customers. There's a lot of health healthcare technology companies that have like one or two or three or four or five customers, but there's not a lot to have twenty or thirty or fifty and there's a big. There's a big gap between those that do and don't and it's often that the ones that succeed have a way you know a foot in the door they have whether that's that's connections like Nikita was talking about but more often I think it's a very specific value proposition that. As a buyer that can say, yes to that that isn't too expensive that they don't have to wait for the next budget cycle to figure out how to pay for in. They can start small on the kind of grow from there and I. Think those focused companies we've seen them grow faster in. You know it's it's hard to do the whole ended expanding in healthcare where it's like, okay we're starting in diabetes hour expanding to of heart failure not. You know all the other places where there's a lot of good to be had. But I think starting focused is is where we allow more companies be successful. Nichols leary era is said in in in that as well. Was You understood the challenge working at epic? You deeply understood what the problems of data exchange. was going rebel was the issue with EHR's as they were a epic built them. But also as competitors, the Turner's the Athena's with the world. Yen One of the things you also just said was around deeply understanding the challenges of data exchange and interoperability as they relate tm Mars because he worked at epic and because you hadn't understanding of this is what the competitors look like for Turner Athena's walls all these like Taillon are ours like web pt for physical therapy, etc.. That is the same thing and healthcare and building great healthcare company. As you were saying, don't properly have a sense of the real challenges and live. This thing doesn't work if you haven't seen in a very intimate way, this is how that aspect of healthcare. would. It actually looks like this is what it looks like if you are a social worker thinking about social determinants of health. So some social deter of health company or if you haven't worked in it, you don't have a sense of these or what middleware companies may look like or how you actually work with enders on the same thing anyone that's trying to sell into a pair or a health plan having sat on the other side of that for myself at Oscar in the intimacies of insurance operations. And how it works how internally within the company things get done in prioritizing not prioritizing is the same for any industry I don't want to over to overstate that healthcare is super special in that way but there is something quite unique to the way. Healthcare is still operating. It's the early two thousands. Julie. There's some big farms who choose not to get get into healthcare abuse. Maybe they just don't think you can have the type of big outcomes that big firms need. What do you see differently about the potential to be sort of? Decca corn plus potential in healthcare companies that maybe some of these other firms are are missing and maybe that's why they don't. You don't enter them as often use a deck of corn but what does that? Plus. Don't bring it up then we'll bring it up at the next board meeting. Great. I think that there's obviously a native even obviously there is a list of ideal buyers for any kind of healthcare company or any company right that you're trying trying to sell your product into and I think that there are certain spaces in healthcare that are just much much harder than the others because of fragmentation or because of overconcentration. Too. Easy buyers of this as trying to sell into provider groups of which there are tens of thousands. And then trying to sell it to win insurance company. Of which there aren't really that many I mean most people know the big five health insurance companies and so when you're thinking of how? To Sell. It's going to be a challenge if you're going through something super super fragmented or saw an area that's really really concentrated on the buyer. So. When it comes to thinking about investing in healthcare but you WANNA maximize for both the maximum efficiency and maximize speed and success. Right so when I think about why we? Invested in a company Reebok's I think that the reliever maximizing the amounts of sellers on like this kind of the intention of what a middleware could do to bring in a lot of people into an ecosystem makes it much easier. I think sell than something that's you're trying to sell to every single tens of thousands of provider groups. It's just more of a challenge. So I think that that can be something that can be really hard for the average investor particularly don't have a background in healthcare to get over also, healthcare is really confusing i. I I don't think I really knew what a co pay or deductible was before I worked at Oscar and thank God. It never came up interview because I probably would not have been able to answer that question and that's the average person. That's our I'm not trying to say that the not average or whatever but it doesn't. You're not ever going to be an expert on every space, and I think that there are some spaces we're really requires you to be much more of an expert so you can get to the meat of the business. So I think I think healthcare is one of those spaces if I could add an maybe this is too alimentary but if you look at healthcare in the industry at large, it's So inefficient and we spend so much money on it. You know nearing twenty percent of GDP that something has to give like at what point in that number's been climbing every year climbs up a little bit more like at what point does that totally cripple our economy is a twenty five percent is a forty percent like where does it break and if you just look at that and say you know something's gotTa give here and then also the consumer experience in healthcare is terrible like as. A patient we know that there should be so much opportunity for improvement and there are huge incumbents and the status quo strong and there's a complex system. So it's it's held off for so long but something has got to give and maybe what we're seeing right now because I've been saying the same thing for for years. But maybe what we're seeing right now with the pandemic is giving because we've taken this old crappy car and now we Florida with with this pandemic and the wheels are. Falling off and we need we need to replace it and a lot of ways, and so I'm really optimistic about new new types of healthcare delivery models to start to take hold especially as patients are now open to to seeing seeing doctors in different ways, they're not going to do the same old like drive across town wait the waiting room and see a doctor for three minutes just to go over a blood stray like there's so much opportunity to change that, and that's why I'm. Extremely excited about where healthcare is going and why as an investor I would I would be looking at what are the ways of that's going to unfold and so that's a really high level. Obviously but I think there's got to be something there and there's got to be what did you call stacks of corn I I forgot? There's gotta be those opportunities here. Why I totally agree and talking about the consumer aspect I think that's something I've been thinking a lot about because some of the players I mentioned earlier, they have deep pockets. Consumer the average consumer, the average patient does not and we know for that insurance. Even if you have good quote unquote good insurance doesn't work that wall and you can still get slammed with a bill that will put you in some serious medical debt If you look at some studies think instead which is owned by J. P. Morgan. It's A. Payments Company focused on healthcare. They put out this really interesting stat that even in like two thousand and seven patients, lush consumers were only paying for about eight percent overall of their healthcare bells. Now, it's up to thirty three, thirty, three percent isn't that crazy of space if you already have insurance or even people that don't have insurance that's a lot is a. Hyper, engine a lot of money to be spending and so when I think about investing in healthcare and I think there's this this bill big seduction around consumer digital health businesses, and that's why when you look at a lot of the best healthcare companies, they have multiple revenue streams and multiple types of buyers even a digital health company often times they'll be. Working with medical device companies, they'll be work with pharmaceutical companies as alternative streams of revenue. Even some of these diagnostic companies that send you know testing sticks to your home. They're also looking at alternative revenue streams never WANNA be chew focused right in one area just in case it dries up and healthcare I. think There's a very good reason to be working with. Lots of different types of players I never want the consumer who's already. So buckled under a tremendous amount of financial pressures in many many different directions to spend even more than they should be in healthcare that that consumers and points is a really good trend to touch on. You know fundamentally in the healthcare market one, one of the things that's really broken is. Consumers don't have a direct demand for healthcare like you know you have a demand for any other sort of consumer products in healthcare. We have drive demand in that we want to be healthy, and we hope that buying healthcare will make us healthy and because we don't have an understanding of how healthcare can provide health, we depend on experts to help facilitate that. s your doctors and healthcare systems in pairs who tom you to get your annual checkup and all that sort of stuff in. So that is a fundamental market failure that prevents healthcare from operating like most markets where a consumer can just you know pay the one hundred percent of the of the fee and actually rationally save and and act as a consumer on their own. But what that means is that technology has an amazing role to play in fixing that market. So yeah, you could argue that the market should be replaced and this is what a lot of industrial countries have done is instead of instead of fixing their healthcare markets, they replaced it by a government run program that pays for everything and you know has as guidelines around what people should do from our behavior standpoint, but you could also. Look at opportunity to fix the market by providing more transparency into that production function, how does how does healthcare translate into health and that's where things like I should have huge potential That's where where you know all the consumer heuristic in technologies that come from the consumer space as they move into healthcare I'm hoping that they are able to engage patients in figuring out how does that their actual behavior change their long term health and? As as an Akita mentioned as consumers pay a bigger and bigger portion of their healthcare, they actually have an an incentive to close at information gap and figure out you know if I go and get an MRI down the street and said about the academic medical, center is that going to be way cheaper and you know aligning those incentives around things that can actually drive costs down I think is you know hopefully the the? Merican way to save our health care system otherwise I think we will have to replace it because the government run systems are are much more efficient in every regard as far as Costco's on you know there's other other problems here there. But from a cost perspective, you know the United States is off the chart I don't WanNa get political or anything. So we don't have to go down the rabbit hole. I'M NOT GONNA go down that route. Or. We could be on. We would end up being like a two to three hour broadcast. But I did like you know some of the things you were mentioning about shop ability and another aspect of how I've been thinking about how as an investor. You can bring some easy tooling that has existed in other areas and just bring it to healthcare and it's not about revolutionary, but it could be huge. It's kind of interesting right? Like, why is there? No make make things hip compliant. Construct. That around everything I'm saying. Less. The Cms God's come down on me. Why is there no slack for health or healthcare? Why is there no Trello for healthcare? Why is there? No? Like Amazon really for certain types of. Durable medical equipment I think we're now seeing, but he's not space, but it's pretty crazy to me that you could take these existing business models. Jigger them a little bit and bring them to healthcare and I think that they would actually see a tremendous amount of success. This goes to I think the challenge that Nichols brought up where he said. We want to see you know it's unfortunate that people that successful that are successful when they start a healthcare startup people who've been in the business for a long time but. It doesn't always have to be true I think there are people who've built these kinds of companies that have worked as developer productivity tools are just business applications at any business has and just bring not to healthcare and take A. Of Empathy for all the people that are in the healthcare system whether it's the patient and their family, it's a caregiver it's a provider it's someone in insurance operations. It's one who's just on the phone I think of you can do that. You can also unlock some really nominal billion dollar opportunities and it doesn't have to be something that is the biggest uphill battle in the world because some of the constructs of the success of a business like this have existed in other places you WanNa go off of interesting to see from your perspective. You probably you know read our Salvia has had a sense of this is what the rules were. Aiming for, but you didn't know what they were going to be until recently. So I mean I've had a sense of this kind of over remainder, but I'm curious. And you don't have to obviously go into internal mckinney. The Rocks Business Hud. As you were figuring out okay. This is what we're doing business having a general sense of what not what the industry wants. But also like where we think the regulations are going to end up, this is where the regulations are now. And where does Reebok's fit in relative to that? Yeah. Yeah. So right right now, current state and healthcare data is exchanged a ton everyday. So data goes from south ware providers to healthcare organizations and they're trying to health records for providers to to look at. If, you see a telehealth visit data goes from the doctor you're seeing telehealth to pharmacy goes through all these these back in networks and they happen through through agreements that are kind of done behind closed doors in large largely, these are called business associated agreements where. Two parties will say, Hey, we are now business associates taking care of this patient, and therefore we can share data with each other. The kind of the foundation of the new inoperability paradigm is that we are giving the right the right for that data to move based on where the patient wants it to move. So the patient is has become the forefront. Of the foundation of of these new rules and what that means that instead of instead of data flowing between your doctor and your scheduling system that you can access on your phone as a patient to schedule your next appointment. Instead of that happening behind closed doors, we want that all to come to the forefront and it's almost kind of like a GDP are esque move in that patients will have the right to see where the data goes. Have the right to stop it. And all all of that sort of stuff and it's this groundwork is being laid. This infrastructure is being put out so that we can encourage more innovation to happen with. Healthcare. Data. And and what I mean by that is that if a patient can say I want my data to go to any application they want then hopefully, applications will exist that will will serve any sort of each patient need that might be out there from the perfectly healthy young invincibles like those of us on the call right now like what sort of absolute we want with our health health data versus the person WHO's dealing with? A end of life Palette of care like what sort of APPs would they want built on top of their healthcare data and the bet that the government is taking a saying that if we mandate that this infrastructure exists that we mandate a single API that healthcare providers and health it companies have to contribute to the exact same way. Then this ecosystem of patient facing applications should exist. And that's kind of the you know the foundation of of the A, lot of the new inoperability regulations if there's a whole bunch of details around that but. That's at the center of I think that's what's what's fundamentally different here is that we're putting the power in patients hands to hopefully drive a consumer like revolution around healthcare technology. That was its summary. What am I think? I'll leave. The thing I find really interesting about this. You know. So coming from the. World. Electronic. Health. Records. The there's almost this sense of net neutrality comes along with the spirit of the regulation in that. So at first electron health records that they are the application that doctors used. So WanNA is sitting there typing into the computer with his back to you instead of. Paying attention to you in the exam, they're typing into Toronto Health Record So they are the application layer, but the government mandated those those HR's to be in place and therefore they've become application layer but they've also become the data source of truth for any healthcare organization you go to healthcare transition and ask them about their patients like they're looking in their electronic health record system as their database for all of these patients and what a lot of the especially the information blocking rules state is that we actually have to have a separation between the application layer and the database layer, and what that means is that electronic. Health record system and he hr cannot discriminate against the type of applications that can be built on top of their database and into that really calls for a decoupling of those two things and it's difficult because you know if you put yourself in the shoes of an electronic health record vendor, you kind of earned that position and I know like a lot of investors think about platforms, they earned the position to be the platform that has all the data, the source of truth like like salesforce for instance, the because of their market share, they earned the ability to have a marketplace on top of salesforce with all sorts of applications. What the government is saying to electronic health records yet you earned that but we also kind of gave it to you through subsidies. And therefore now that you're in place now that you have this unique position as controlling the pipes to the data, you have to make those pipes have them open neutrally to any technology provider that's out there. You know much like comcast running a cable line to your house can't control what you can, what what shows come in clear. How faster Internet is for certain pages based on their own interests has to be a very neutral perspective and treat. Everyone fairly built on top of that infrastructure and so That's a really interesting position and you know as a very controversial position that the government took but really kind of going on the basis of net neutrality presumption I really liked the framing I hadn't even. Fully, conceptualized it that way, but it's really spot on and it does still allow for. Multiple sides that are attracting and using and leveraging this API network to also still have kind of decision making about not just the kinds of information that they're giving. But they're still rules around. You're still given some independence to make certain decisions about it. For example, you are allowed to charge fees it doesn't have to be uniform, but you can do that in certain ways elise the way that I read through the regulations those also ways you can limit the amount of content that's given. There is a floor so basics that you have to provide, but if they're pulling or requesting other additional types of information. You don't have to provide it as the entity so I still think that it's Trying to give some freedom and independence to and some kind of sovereignty right to these organizations but. In the same way that you pay for cable the cables free, you still have to do that, but they're giving more uniform accessibility as Nico. Really eloquently, put it and Nico I. Now want to go back into my sub stack post and put your quote in there about net neutrality because I thought it was spot on. Will I have to give credit where credit's due that? That came from a description that any show who was the first CTO of the United States Obama? How how he described it 'cause he he was instrumental during the actual net neutrality debate and he's like this is the same thing. It's you know these organizations because of. Cable companies it's a natural monopoly in that it doesn't make sense for every cable company to have cable line you go into every neighborhood in with HR is like. When in the HR is implemented a health system, they're not going to take out for ten years like that. That's how long it's going to be there just because of the organizational inertia and sunk cost that went into that investment like they're just not gonNA turn around and replace it, and therefore that unique position of having a super sticky platform at these organizations gives it a unique market position where they can have anticompetitive behavior in. That's the for this regulation saying. We need to level the playing field to make it neutral. There's a fuzzy line though I think between like what is he hr functionality versus what is like digital health functionality because you know is is a scheduling system. You know that's traditionally part of a practice. Management system is part of any HR or does the HR have to let any scheduling system be built on top of the records and have really open market for a provider or hospital to choose whatever scheduling system they want most based on the unique needs? And that's I think that's an interesting players that that line in the sand was not defined by the regulations saying you know which digital technologies are are fair game in which funds art and and may maybe it's just all fair game. But if you think about it as an electronic health record company, they have all sorts of modules have population health modules, they have telehealth modules have. Every specialty during Matali Radiology list goes on and on they have modules for those things and a lot of the selling point for electronic health record systems is at all those modules seamlessly together and now the government is saying well, heck now you have to open it up for any any you know dermatology application to be to work seamlessly with with your underlying database system, and it really opens up the market for competition to more easily enter. Hopefully that's the that's the spirit of the regulations that have been put in place We're starting to see the beginnings of how he hr vendors are implementing this but With the pandemic out of the deadlines have been pushed back So we're still you know a couple of years out from it but I think that's where a lot of the bets investors are making right now are is I the infrastructure that will enable this to happen so companies like reeboks but then secondly, infrastructure actually exists and is usable. There's GonNa. Be So many more companies out there that can take advantage of it and get to market faster and You know hopefully, change change. The way that healthcare is delivered to become way more efficient way more consumer oriented and know just a better experience overall. I think the exciting thing about being in healthcare in this moment is I have not felt the excited about health care in a long time because there were rules like that. Putting is lack of rules around this that Lilly Stein eat a lot of innovation and the ability to take something from zero to wall on because you couldn't even do something as basic as. Integrating with epic unless you're using reeboks or something like that without being actual meaningful to you had to make that a part of your business and right now if you will get. Most coyote companies that exist in the world that are not related to reeboks that aren't of Click or exchange platform. They are a core competency of business. It's one of those things where you don't actually want to spend time doing this because it takes away from your. Time spent on your value proposition and now that you have this. Up and hopefully as Niko said, meaningful competition being enabled by these technologies that have to exist for every one. We're going to see a heck of a lot of companies just be built and that kind of manifestation in healthcare had seen that for for a long time and people. Now I believe that they can build a company that's no longer a huge challenge. We. We see it really as the sort of continual abstraction of technical issues much like back in the ninety S. if you wanted to build a website, not that I was hoping websites in the nineties. But if you did, you have to literally have a server under your desk running in. That's where your your website was right and then we saw aws. Another cloud providers come about in in really open it up and lower barriers to entry for new technologies, and nowadays you know you don't even need to know html to build a website it's all been abstracted away. And made so much easier and therefore you know you can stand up in ecommerce site on tropical in ten minutes and I think that's the direction that we're hopefully heading in healthcare technology in that five years ago. If you want to start a health tech company, you probably had to have a hundred people on your team just to like make yourself hip compliant to handle all the infrastructure requirements of immigration. To have a, you know a huge enterprise sales team to go and knock on doors of health systems, and that's that's just to have accompanying get your your product to market. Hopefully in the future, it can be much more like other startups where it could be like two or three people building it out and all all of that complexity should be abstracted away. So you you've spent some time you a best time in the space that's based hasn't gone as well as many investors have thought it would what. You sort of give a little bit of historical overview for why that's the case if you accept that premise and wetter the learnings from sort of the last decade or more VC's investing in. A STARTUPS? Yes. Certainly. I. Think this touches on what I, what I mentioned earlier about the government mandate. So so yeah, the government created a market for EHR's. But what they did it was it was very heavy handed in. All of the requirements that the HR had to meet in order to actually. Satisfy that mandate and for their customers to receive subsidies for it. So that was the meaningful use requirements and electronic health records. Essentially, I think from thousand eight two to now they really lost their innovation muscle and they took they took eighty percent of their products are and resources and turn them towards meeting regulatory requirements. Instead of what most that companies should be doing, which listening to the customers innovating iterating all that sorta stuff that kind of went away because everyone was focused on how do you actually meet the requirements provided? By the government and and that was the last decade of EHR's and so yeah, it did make some some kings in the in the space and we went from not that much HR option to like ninety eight percent of the market is using any hr now. So so the government I think with with the regulations kind of put HR's in a tough spot to to meet the needs of the customers, which is why you can't find a doctor who likes there you hr today they all you know speak terribly of them. and. They call like epic is the best of the worst. So I think that was a that was a tough spot to be in and nowadays because of the regular regulation that surrounding electronic health records, you definitely don't want to start a new e HR company like I don't think you can. You can start like disrupt epic and sterner like you don't want to start that business because. It would take it would take years to meet the regulatory requirements, and then because of how sticky they are once implemented health systems aren't going to turn over and buy a new new one. So I think the new approach is going to be that Uh ours over time, we'll be relegated into the database and they're gonNA compete on the application layer, of course, but they're going to compete with a whole market of people building APPs assuming that the database is the HR and hopefully there's a middle layer between that connect them, and that's this government mandated fire based Middle Air. That's kind of how I'm thinking about the technology market but you know you, you don't see startup EHR's I think Dr Cronin was probably like the last one that that came made a splash, but they're really selling to the to the edges of the market to. Private practices and small practices and specialties that didn't need to top the charts to begin with. Yeah. I think Nico Right about that I don't WanNa. Stay I. DON'T WANNA see any new HR business fan belts because I'd like to I think that. Arts are Ed like there to be some. But you're right trying to unseat epochs sterner. Some of these companies that have fifty percent collectively fifty to sixty percent of the market is really hard and just from the you would be shocked how Big like hundreds of millions of dollars these longer health system contracts are with the MR companies. It's insane. And when you think about as Nico saying just the sheer amount of time it takes to train thousands of people that work in an organization to know how to use an e HR. It's going to be a really hard sell for larger health system but I think that there's opportunity I. Think this is why Dr Krono went after this kind of tail. End. For Released Specialty Amar's we see this in. I think the dental world like there's a company called dead right that has a substantial amount of dentistry Mr Market you have web PT. That has a lot of the physical therapy market. I do think that there's opportunities still there because it's much easier sell to a small provider group particularly certain specialties like they really stick together like the physical. Therapist world. They're just with each other and from what I've heard much. He's sell to kind of specialty group like that. So I think that there is maybe opportunity there, but I would like it as Nico said to get relegated to more of it kind of a deeper technical stack so that you can see more applications, I, WanNa see marketplace for healthcare. In the same way you have the slack marketplace the same way you have the aws marketplace, etc etc. I think that's when you know that healthcare is a really good place where there's actual competition and where the best kinds of products are winning because they answer the needs of payers and providers and patients to. The where you're excited to be investing in healthcare more broadly that we have discussed or touchable. Yeah. I think you know what I was alluding to before. I think taking just business applications that exist outside of healthcare. Jigger, rejigging them for healthcare world and applying it I would love to see an actual Google for healthcare I would love to see a Youtube Ralph care that surgeons in healthcare providers can use I'd love to see a Trello for healthcare slack for healthcare. You name it I think a lot of these things can be applied to the healthcare world and. I haven't seen too many of them, but there's certainly an opportunity there. Another thing I'd like to see is a really great I path for healthcare. RPA tool. We're seeing a couple of companies in the space, not nearly as many as I would like to see for the number of use cases that exist. And I think that no moving onto another kind of area to look at, of course, home health is huge and only becoming huger as we see, the fragility of hospitals and a lot of them are looking to more outpatient like home health opportunities. Because it isn't again another expansion of revenue while allowing the hospital to be cleared up and taking more patients there. So there's a whole bunch of companies that I think could be built in the home health space. Honor as an example of something on the caregiver side, what have we what if we actually applied to honor model to many different areas of healthcare I think that would be really interesting ones that have a lot of. Clinical on and caregiving staff, but are not necessarily related to seniors. You can see this in the disability space, there's a whole host of. Clinicians and providers and just caregivers for patients like that and for their families. So I think that could be an interesting angle that we've been thinking about. I think another area is looking into certain interesting aspects of Medicare and seeing how we could build a business around this NICI thing. So there's an example and the Medicare world called pace. Pace stands for programs of all inclusive care for the elderly and it's really a all. But what it's focusing on how do you actually bring a whole host of community needs? Into providing Medicare and there aren't that many companies being built in this space. There's like Commonwealth which is a health plan and I think there's there's another company out in Pennsylvania New Jersey that's building but I really haven't seen just given how many dollars like billions of dollars that are focused on pace I just haven't seen too many. Companies that do that and I was speaking to a friend at flair. That's also thinking about this base and I and I think that they're spot on about this. End To end digital health is another thing I've been thinking about It's great to draw on a lot of different tools. So this has nothing to do with tools, but more to do with digital health is mostly seen as an add on right like there's an aspect of the digital outside, and then as you need it, you can go in and visit provider in person, etc. But there is this concept. I think of there could be just an end to end digital how digital halls companies for certain areas and I'd like to see a couple of more companies thinking about it that way. I think another interesting. I've been thinking about beyond just healthcare payments which I think is still huge. There are a number of companies being built here. I think Papaya pay is an interesting one. There is no real fraud and risk analytics company that focused on healthcare and I think you can take really interesting fraud and risk models from other industries like let's say you worked in the payments base. If you're an a company like stripe if we're going to like paypal, you are an expert in detecting fraud and risk on the KYC am etcetera level. I think a lot of those similar concepts apply to healthcare and to claims data and I would love to see a great company being built in that space. So those are just some of the things I've been thinking about. But if you're building in the healthcare space, I would love to have a conversation with you. I take as many conversations as I can with folks in healthcare from every new every single kind of. Actor whether you're someone who's a patient enter your someone who's worked in the payer world or we're GONNA provide organization or vendor or start up i. think the more that we can share knowledge and information with each other the better, and maybe built some great companies out of it. One of the things focusing on right now, I'm writing a piece on how inspired lenny who has this whole series for how consumer and B. to B. Companies got their first customers I'm trying to do the same thing in healthcare and I got some time with some really really great and. Founders and CO founders in the healthcare world. But that's another thing that I've been thinking about deeply is like how do we democratize a lot of these acquisitions strategies on some of the things that Nico and I talked about, which is like almost the curse of the Rolodex like can we actually make it? So you can be on the technology side, which hopefully companies like reeboks exchange are going to help enable but can we give these multitudinous acquisition strategies to a bigger people? So we hopefully see more healthcare companies down the line. I love that. Are there any early learning from the research of our I mean I will say that people have such creative story just I mean it's not like they intended the story to be creative but. Building. Any company as hard imagined building healthcare companies and just the many many different directions. At some of these companies built in three examples of these companies at the beginning when they were just a project, even we're not hip compliant but some you know someone who's using them to figure it out to see if this is something that we should actually build and turn into a real business. Companies that you would not expect to be. Having a large line of business that lets it's a consumer health company to have a large line of business in the life sciences world their companies doing dot, and it's actually like more core, some of their first customers versus. which you may have expected or just stories about companies that started off a certain way, and they had an anchor customer that was pulling them in all the wrong directions right and they had to dip to had to adapt and change. It's like it's going to be a really good post. I. Am excited. I've heard some like really crazy honestly stories like. Stuff that I'm like, wow I did not I did not know that or I would not have expected that for the software company and it's really nice. People have been willing to participate I was worried that you know I kind of put out this request and no, one would be willing to chat about things and. It's like you can't give away all your secret sauce but I think high level. There are a lot of things we could be doing to provide more strategies more knowledge excetera and I hope that this series is a small part of that. Awesome. Great Place to wrap. At Nico and Bikita I think so much for the. Are. Fewer and early stage entrepreneur we'd love to hear from you. Check us. Out. Village. Global. Dot. BC.

Reebok Nico Nikita EHR US Houston healthcare Oscar Turner Nichols leary founder and president Marzano HR SME
College Liftoff Plus

Affording College with Aaron Greene

31:15 min | 1 year ago

College Liftoff Plus

"Welcome to affording college with Aaron green founder and president of college liftoff. Thirty. Affording college. I'm Erin greenhouse of affording college and found of college left off college, DAV college planning firm. I started to provide solutions for anybody in everybody that's going through college planning, our has college planning needs. Our mission is to secure teens brightest future and save them and their families thousands of dollars in the process we work with teens throughout the entire college planning process starting with personalized one on one critic element work from there. We find the best schools to match our students chosen career paths and interest then offer support throughout the entire mentions process next, we work with families budgets to find the price that makes the most sense for their kids education all while insuring. It's the right fit today. We are hios premier college planning firm. I'm happy to say that where shooting for the world, by the way, and we strive to save time stress and money when it comes to your child's higher education. So that's a little background on myself and college liftoff, I do this podcast. I really want to offer families from solid vice when it comes to planning for college and higher education because there's. So much misinformation out there. The purpose of this podcast is to dispel the Mets and misinformation and really help families. So one of the most important, and yet overlooked aspects of how to do proper effective and successful college planning is really through creative element work. We talk about it all the time in this podcast. And no one knows that better than my coast today. Sarah. Hey, how's it going? Good. Good. Good and page. What's going on? How you guys doing today? So starting with Sarah your rockstar here. College liftoff you've been in visor here with us for about six months. You really are working with families and every step in this process, but you really have a heart for early teens and actually have a background in teaching. She's been working really closely with page college liftoffs manager client planning page has an undergraduate degree in psychology and a graduate degree in education teaching night. Page. You want said in terms of critic element, you're passionate about helping students recognize trained some passions. They didn't recognize fully in themselves leading to careers that they never mentioned or didn't really understand or know about at the time. That is that. Right. Absolutely smart. You should give me a raise. No. It's totally true. It's just amazing when we have students come in even the students who have kind of an idea what they think they want to do so often at something that somebody else's told them, or maybe it's a Crear that someone, you know, has like, I know for instance, I was going to get a degree psychology. I thought that with the guidance counselor did at my element school was really interesting, and it wasn't like from a deeper need to help people or anything. I just thought her job was cool. And that sadly, like no one really talked to me about what I could do with the degree with interested in in some of their area. Like, I just went to school thinking that is what I'll do. I mean hearing today in college planning. So yes, I'm helping people. Yes. I'm guiding them and my counselor in elementary school. I am not. So I think about how if somebody had sat down with me talk to me a little bit about what about psychology. What about guidance counselor work was interesting? I might have moved into a dip. Direction. I'm super super passionate about public health. And since this is the me show will just keep talking about my stuff. We see the same thing in our students. They come in. They might have an inkling or they've been told. Hey, you're really good at this. And so that's sort of informs their idea of potential careers, or at least a potential major and they come in. They sit down with us. And we do this great board exercise with them where we help them identify strings, help them identify even more importantly things they know they don't want to do. And then we look at their strengths and we look at their interests. And then we sort of paired together in Aaron what I like to think of his Aaron's magical formula and health that come up with this enormous list of careers that are potentially viable option for them. And then as we do the work that we do we sit down, and we we continue to research, and as time goes on we get rid of a lot of those careers because they aren't the best fit. But when it clicks with a kid is just so awesome. When they come in to the office. They're like, I love this thing. This is what I wanna do. This is what I love this. This is where I wanna go. What I wanna do? I'm. So happy, and we see it over and over again. I think if at once I'd be like, let's do it again, but pretty much with every student we work with they come in. And they're like, yes, this is that thing that I am born to do if there's a magic pill that we have. And it's not a magic pill per se it, it's it's just a good understanding of the fact that jobs aren't one thing. And I think we hunt suddenly try to put jobs and people and interest in a box and say, here's your one thing. You do this one thing you like psychology, go work and the school, but like you have to put in public health like these other aspects, and when we dissect not just programs at schools, but when we start talking about I setting jobs, and if you ask anybody shoot audience member ask yourself, what does your job really pertain? What are you really doing? And you're gonna come up with a list of probably ten twenty thirty things not two or three. And I think that's where the. Translation is really wrong in this is that at a earlier age. We think off we boil it down to these very boilerplate things that that's the best method in order to get them into. No, it's not it's about talking to students as an adult and having them expand the concept of who they are. And what the jobs are look that look like them and the magic pill to this isn't continuously adding more things to the list. It's about vetting through those things and taking the time to really see what it is. And that's where we get to those points where the kid can walk in and say, you know, what I've sift through all these things we started with it wasn't two hundred at four thousand five hundred universities worth of things. It was about ten to twelve and these are my interest in how they correlate to those. And you know, what this one's for me because I've researched have seen it. I've studied it. I've gotten job exposure to it. Now, I know that this is from me. And that's exactly right. And we have so many students come in and express that oh, they wanna go be an elementary school counselor like you said page, but the. Reality is they only see it from an external position as a student. They don't see the background that goes in and -cation that teacher counselor. How to do and the things that you normally don't think about that accounts are house to do. Right. And so those might be dealbreakers for a student if they actually understood those things so figuring that stuff out now before they even go into it. That's what we're all about idealism. His ideal perspectives of jobs, especially that's what we kinda give our students when their kids when they think about jobs, I say this to every kid walks to the door and every family because it's true most kids know, Dr teacher nurse. My parents who ex that's the extent of the world and truth be told they probably have one or two word terms for each one of those jobs, and they're so vitally in vastly different. But this is how and why we've developed L plus over the past year and trooper toll it takes time to do the stuff, and we've really seen that we really need to start at at at at an early age earlier age early high school, ninth and tenth grade is an fit for one student should be thinking about this on when our students are coming in asking these types of questions and are willing to spend time to do that career development at an earlier age so often I think what we talked to parents. But they're still young. They don't really they have no idea. What they wanna do. We say. Yes, that's. Exactly what you should. I don't want her to come in. And be like. Yep. On fourteen. I'm going to be a lawyer. Yeah. I get it that they're probably some kids out there who already have that in mind. But in general we wanted to help explore and really help just pare down a list. That's it's infinitesimal really tiny include it. So it's infinite. But the list is truly ballistics infinite there, so many choices, and we need to helps us again like Sarah said look at the the less pleasant side of job, and what's less pleasant to you. It's such a subjective list. Yeah. But what's not interesting to you about a job could be totally fascinating to me and vice versa. Need to help them. See this is what this is what a career looks like you're going to do are you content to do all of those things for big part of your life. I mean, I'm amazed at the kids that wanted to actual science because I never. That could ever picks myself. It's that's the if there is a miracle to people in general that somehow I've said down done this board exercise with kids about eight hundred times it's been a little over eight hundred times at this point. But the interesting thing is not a single one of those situations that come out the same. When you take the major specialization minor, you combine them together to see what's the real look of what this kid's going to look like in the end. The combinations are always different. So the world the world is vital in vastly different, thankfully, and and the thing is too and mitt page. You mentioned this like, we'll we'll have kids say, you know, really want to be a lawyer. And then the parents say, well, they've said they wanted to be a lawyer since they were three he's been bring a briefcase arguing over vegetables as but in that same vein that you still want to do the vetting work to make sure that you know, fully what that may. Means I use this scenario a lot of all all the time. Actually, we'll have two cases that walk in the door. When I meet I meet with the kid before they go and work with you guys more on a day to day fashion. I'll have a valedictorian that a walk in and say, I really want to be a neurosurgeon, and then I'll have a three point four kit or whatever the case may be that walks in and says, I have no idea what I wanna do. And you know, the truth the exact same point. Yep. Point the valid torn say neurosurgeon because it sounds smart. They have no real concept of job actually seen in action. They may have an interest in the brain bio, that's kind of extent of it. At least three point four kid is being honest about it. I think the thing that we're we're we're trying to put his that the smarter. You are the more confident, you know, about what the job is that you're gonna wanna do when the truth is that's never been taught to you in the first place. So how would you know, and all the the the key is getting exposure to the work road and saying that that's something -pletely different than negative study. And we've got a separate those two points and making sure that our kids see that at an earlier age. I e doing a lot more job shadowing. That's what the plus is really kind of build around is really just being able to give them exposure to the world that much younger age. So they way we do start studying programs from schools and things like that. They have tangible field for you know, what I know what industrial systems engineer does for a shoe company. I know what a biomedical engineering person does at a prosthetic limb development company. I know what's a physical therapists may do and Neth let training center all these things that are not just static topics be a PT 'cause I like working with athletes they're much more than conversations. And I get it's scary. It's a scary place for an adult and a kid debate. Because droopy told how many people have the time to really investigate that thoroughly. Well, we do we do. Can you hear that? The other part of this equation that I find really fascinating is. I think a lot of times kids come in with sort of a dream career. Maybe it's for whatever reason it somewhat limiting or maybe their parents school where maybe their parents are just super worried that it won't yield any real reading ration-. So their kids are not going to get paid at the end of the day. And so I think one of the great things that we can do is pair a whole complement of careers with someone's interests. So that you don't you don't have to be the kid who winds up playing your violin on the subway platform. Right. We instead can find you a great career in use and the music industry where you can continue to play aiding continue to enjoy music and love things that you do in the world of music, but also find a job that that pays us Alary that gives you life insurance that gives you be health insurance, but health insurance. It gives you all of the things that you need to actually say move on and be an independent adult. And I think so often parents come in and they're just really anxious like she is going to have to live at home forever. Because she wants to be a poet when we can help you with that can help you find a career where poetry is part of it. But you can also bring into paycheck poetry may mean, you have strengthened writing writing from creative standpoint. Which means you may have other pieces that go along with that. Which may means you may have a real strength in the communication wing. Not just communication in general, but maybe more strategic organizational type focus in that. Now, you have new media. And now, you have somebody that's actively designing the interface between people and technology and the heavy program is that actually write the stuff and those people gigantically vital today. And so that's where you can take these skills that we just again think of a static things, and they really become born dynamic as you start inputting into the inputting of pieces of their interests into this and setting career fields. Actively pertain to that. And then not sticking to a love the example music because we think of that as a one shot thing within that industry know, the truth is that's a full industry just like any other where you have yet musicians which are like shooting for the pros. No question there. But then you also have technological side of that which is audio and to some degree video production, which incorporates and hires a lot of different people. And then you have a whole business aspect of music. Whether it be working at the local orchestra within your city or working for record label and all the business aspect pieces that go along with that it's about getting into industry and still taking that along with it. And making those things connect like I have been saying this a lot recently international businesses, a terrible major. It's terrible. Because it doesn't really say anything. It's just saying you wanna work in a nationally. A major IAS skillset is like finance marketing, it's counting its opperations management things. Like that. That's a skill set. International businesses and industry connector saying you wanna take finance and work at internationally. So you do a major in finance, minor international business. Same thing goes here. You can swap international business out with music management. Sports management. Doesn't matter. You wanna find the skill set and take it to that industry? And then got an end. And just like, you know, you said that not every boy that or not boy that you've created is the same as the next one. Similarly, like the job hats that our students go down in their majors lead to different results. Right. And every lawyer that is going to school to be a lawyer doesn't come out with the same result. They can specialize in different things. And it's really. Partnering up those interest in. What makes you you? And figuring out how you can change the world around you after you get out of college that you can partner those things together with patent attorneys. Yeah. Are engineers. That's a very different thing than a civil Arnie. Let me note works for the state in works on criminal cases was very different than pharmaceutical. Like, you can get any type of version of that as you really want depending on the area. Computer, science built the same way. There's a version of computer science in every single field. Now, it's not just the technical field. I mean, you have everything from computational biology and the in the health related fields to the even the more tech versions of library information science, you can get into more liberal arts categories, like it's spans of and again it boils down to their multiple things that make up degree sets and jobs and people, and that's what you have to do is look at it from more than namic perspective, not static. It's not a time line or like linear trajectory, it's like a choose your own adventure type thing. Yeah. It really is. That's a great perspective. All this as you gotta start early. That's one of the great things about coming in and doing work with college liftoff because we want to give you access exposure to what what your career looks like, and we like to bring in real world examples of people who are working in their industries. We talked about how they got there. What they did in the work leading up to what they're doing now. And we talk about what that looks like going forward for them, you know, and what they're hoping for because what we know is that very few of us. Now, we don't work like we did like sixty years ago where you know, you start a job at twenty two and you finish when you're sixty sixty five and you do the same thing all the way through our jobs, change and warp all the time and even within an industry or within a company the work that you do often shifts pretty dramatically, and so it's really terrific to bring in like a group just in the month of February. Yeah, we brought in a group of counselors and social workers to talk about what it looks like to work in that profession. And people talked about, you know, that both the high points and the difficulties in working in these careers, and it was it was fascinating. I think our students gained a lot of information. I think that we probably inspired if you people to to move forward. And I think we probably similarly inspired a few people to look elsewhere. It just you know, after hearing from other people about what this really looks like maybe they decided it's not for them. And then the nice thing is we can take that same interest area and just shifted a little bit and talk about well, you know, maybe you don't wanna do say social working hospital setting, but what about child life or one about? Let's look here. Let's look at public out there. So many different ways that we can spend the same set of interests, and strengths and just turned it into the perfect fit for you. With a panel. They were three different perspectives on what social work really was. I mean, it was everything from working at children's hospital to work in clinically. And then also working for a new American based group and seeing how that was done in the giving the real of what their day to day, I've looks like within those areas again that way this student whoever that student may be that sitting in that audience can now see and understand that and really gave to grasp. Now, this is social work. You know, granted it's still from three perspectives. But it's three times more than they've had before versus just an ideal perspective of what they may have thought of it before one hundred percent and those three perspectives. They all majored in has they have different backgrounds. One of them was photography, right. And they just landed into social work through experience through different past experiences in jobs. Real quick quick anecdotal pieces. Like, what's it like working with younger students? This is something that we're this is new to college left off. We we've traditionally worked with really student starting in their junior year. This is an additional add on service because our clients have come to us, and and really have asked us about this. What can we do at a younger age in order to to to help our help their kids foster better understandings of jobs in PISA? So CO blesses was basically created by Clinton in order to to help them. Do this a lot better, but bent some fun experiences? Our first time of my students. They're just Sinoe ready to jump into the research and look at colleges and look at careers, while others will admit they know nothing about the world of work or the world of college. But they're open to starting with workshops that we have monthly and going to job shadowing events. Even if they weren't necessarily job shadowing opportunities that aligned with majors that you had pointed out. In their board. They're open to those opportunities and experiences. I think having that time, you know, if they are starting in ninth grade, we've got four years to develop what it is like and dislike and having the opportunity with time on our side gives us that benefit to do both for students. Absolutely. I think too. We really can help the parents because I think so much of this. The earlier program is very parent driven. The parents the parents are very interested. They're already really thinking ahead about the the Bill that they're going to pay for college. And they wanna make sure I mean, they wanna maximize the opportunity right? They've heard the rumors that college now take six point two years, and they they wanna make sure that doesn't happen until they don't really know how to to make it. So that their kids go through them for years, but they've heard that we can help. And so when when our college looked plus families come in. They the parents typically said to us, I don't know what he wants to do is that. Okay. Yeah. That that's why we sit down, and we do a lot. I I would say that we break down the pieces of career planning to very basic level. Because again, we have that kind of time we down we can talk a lot about like fit factors in work and in your college. We can talk about the intersection of purpose passion, you know. And we, and it's so great when we talk about it because we illustrate the point the points beautifully like everybody stomach job where it pays the bills. But they're not passionate about the work that they do. Right. Like their pizza delivery drivers, you know. And then we talk about areas where people are like find somebody that they're really really passionate about like, I would just go readykids every day. But nobody's offered to pay me any money. So much fun. But no-one said here's a million dollars. Go go read some children. Right. And so then we talk about jobs where you alternately are quite good at what you do. But again, you just you don't enjoy the work that you're doing. And ultimately, we wanna find an area where we combine the things that you really love to do with things you're really good at and then at the end of the day a paycheck that you can be happy with because you said, I really like what I do like, I feel I'm very filled in the work that I do. And so that's the kind of experience that we can have with our younger students because we can really sit down and talk about all of those pieces and make sure that we're not identifying just one area, but rather hitting all of them and bringing them together. So that they can eat really fulfilled in the work that they do for the next. Let's say five years because again their job will change over time. But in that work that they deal moving forward. Honestly, that's pretty plainly with students when they walk in the door. You really don't want to chase money. Do something. You know, you're gonna love but insane vein always always understand the financial realities of which walking into. So that way you can plan for it better. And if we know all that stuff up front three four five six seven eight years before you even start in the field. I mean, we've got a tunnel landing ground that we can really prepare these kids. And yeah, if you're going to make a smaller salad for a particular field, we can control the college costs and make sure that that worked for you. And same thing goes for anything in between if you're making something with a higher salary, but you don't have to sacrifice what you're doing. Or what you wanna do? Because of that. The problem is when students go off and just do this and say, I'm going to be a social worker or somebody that's an early education where they do traditional have lower starting salaries, and they take one hundred grand in debt. Exactly probably to blunt about it. But you're done like you're not going to do that job because you can't afford to do it. I mean, you're you're you sacrifice your entire financial future. And the truth be told you can't afford to do that thing. Now. That's the difference. Here is that we want and we need good teachers. We need consults workers. We have to be able to plan for this stuff better with them. So that way they can afford to be that in the career paths period. We've got to do that. So this kind of get says to one of the questions we've actually gotten for this week. It actually came from parents that were received and I'll just read the read the Email letter says hi college left off. We have a daughter who will be entering high school in the fall. She's fourteen years old is an excellent student wind. Should we be thinking about preparing for college? Now. Down to one now. That's that's pretty much. The crux of talked about debate. Any final thoughts that you guys would add to convert another piece that we do with a lot of ours. GOP students curriculum planning even making sure that their high school curriculum aligns with preparation for college and beyond making sure that they're taking the right classes and performing well in those classes as well. Still the kind of quiet secret today about high school college planning special curriculum side is that it's no longer a be doing all these three buckets of things and make sure you have a mole filled. It's kind of now be directed. So making sure that you are taking the right science courses, if your medical bound engineering bound or just general science bound or if you're more down the teaching variety, or if you're more down the like business communication route. You've kind of have to focus in your disarm degree, focus, your, Hercules, really, try to focus your curriculum into that particular perspective. You wanna pay the narrative? But four years the plan instead of one or two we can really we can help kind of drive things in the right direction for your entire resume. Whether it's your activities, or your volunteer work. We have an awful lot of kids who come in early in their senior year to work with us, and they have three volunteer hours. Right. Just want more colleges. Expect more right? It's a lot harder for us to to backfill. Right. If you come in and your senior year, it it doesn't give us much time to to help you get those tier hours to get those experiences that are so vital before you go off to college. If you come in and work with us as a freshman or sophomore, we can say, you know, this summer would be a terrific time for you to maybe go volunteer Cosi where you are interested in doing some stem related work that will then inform. The the major that you choose in college or to take on a job that again gives you some real world experience in an area that you're interested in those are all great things that we get to do and we can talk. About I think kids a lot of times have this. Pretty outdated notion of of just the number of activities, they need to have on their schedule and get on the resume to say, I was really great at everything that I did all the time. And I did a lot of different things. We can help them. Make more informed decisions moving on. And again, it just it's the benefit of time. Until you don't want one three. Honestly, you went three and you phoned in on and you've taken leadership roles you've really showing some peak interest in those and especially now talking about certain fields. I mean, we're seeing undergraduate degrees like even the two year level like the PTA's, we're at trooper told they're requiring you have certain amount of volunteer hours at forty two twenty forty or sixty and different settings even not just at some random place that you saw would be willing to house you for a couple of hours. But now they are serious about that. If you just finding that out when you start application season if you're doing this on your own and you find that out in September. You're not going to be not going to say, it's not gonna happen. So you've got to do the stuff earlier we've got to be able to blame for an earlier. That's again, that's the whole premise of cultural stuff. Plus, and why we've created this model it's expansion for service into the ninth and tenth grade model for that reason for that exact reason makes your parents and students are more prepared. Well, I'm glad you mentioned that parents because in addition to you a lot of the workshops that we offer per students. We offer separate workshops just for the parents because I think parents especially younger students are really hungry. For more information and good quality information about how to help their students adequately prepare, and they know they know that the influence that they have it fourteen is really different than the influence that they'll be able to exert it seventeen. And so they wanna get in early and be able to help their students make good choices. And if we can help them identify, the soft skills that students need to be successful or great, you know, financial planning vehicles to make sure that they have enough money to support their students through school. Those are great conversations that we love to have their family. I was gonna say this isn't even talking about the money and what we need to do to prepare for an alert. That's a whole other broadcast because it's all those pieces that we talked about just today just on the side of figuring which one do with younger age whole different story. You have to prepare those things earlier period. So what are some of the? Workshops that we're doing with some of our parents just again to kind of give them that earlier pieces. Well, well, right now in April, we've got one set up for what your student needs to know, some of those soft skills patriots talking about and how you can start developing that with your student now before they had off to college. In addition. We talk about or we have a workshop for which test. And when when you should be preparing for the SAT's all of that stuff. Yeah. And that's something that our parents are always asking about. Yeah. More about the application process. College visits if you're a student, Scott, an IEP or five or four or please sport. How do you incorporate that into the college search so a whole bunch of great information for parents great? Well, thank you Sarah page today. Thank you listeners for listening. As always if you have any question that you'd like us to answer. Please feel free to Email us at Hello at college dot com. You can also reach us at six one four three two nine six six three three. And please always follow us on social media. Whether it be Instagram Facebook Twitter to search for college lift off and you'll find us. Also, visit us a college liftoff dot com for more information, and you'll get access to our blogs or podcast there as well. And please subscribe to afford in college wherever you get your podcast, whether it be I tune Spotify. Wherever the case may be thanks again. We'll see you next time. College liftoff can help empower you to make college affordable for your student. If you wanna learn more about your options Aaron will be responding directly to your emails, Email him a question at Erin at college, liftoff dot com. Thanks for listening to affording college with Aaron green of college liftoff if you'd like more information, visit college liftoff dot com.

Aaron green Sarah younger age founder and president Mets Instagram school counselor mitt Neth systems engineer Scott Arnie partner
Pet adoption and fostering interest grows with more at home

Techstination

02:00 min | 7 months ago

Pet adoption and fostering interest grows with more at home

"Your destination for gadgets ungeared. I'm Fred fishkill. If you have a dog in the household you already know how happy and content they are when everyone is home every day schooling at home working from home and many other people with more time on their hands have been adopting or fostering pets at the pawprints in the sand animal rescue in Newport Beach California Co founder and President Kelly Reeves cautions that while many potential pets desperately need homes families should think long term. So it's important to realize that just because you have a little bit of a break now time wise but this is a lifelong commitment. It's not a pair of shoes you just returned because you've got too busy back to work so it's a good idea to think things through and if it does work out find the right animal for you your home and family visit offense in the sand dot. Org for more Info you can find us at text nation DOT com. I'm Fred Friskin cooking with the power of the song. Hi I'm Fred Friskin here to tell you about the latest innovation for my friend. Patrick Sherwin and his great team at goes on stove the goes on fusion has arrived using the companies tried and true reflectors and the solar vacuum tube could get cooking without a massive charcoal heavy propane tanks or smoke a really bright idea and with an optional solar panel and battery storage on the ability to plug in at home or on the road really can use the goes on fusion to cook anytime and anywhere day or night Reno. Shy I love what Patrick and his team are doing. And so will you want to learn more head to go some dot. Co Two check out all of the company's products and innovations and use the code texting to save ten percent that's goes on DOT Co.

Fred Friskin Patrick Sherwin DOT Co Fred fishkill Newport Beach California Co founder and President Kelly Reeves Reno ten percent
Toni Dupree Talks Etiquette, Style, Manners, and TikTok!

Billy Dees Podcast

39:01 min | 4 months ago

Toni Dupree Talks Etiquette, Style, Manners, and TikTok!

"Well. Hello, everyone I am billy. D's a welcome to the podcast. If you have never checked out our program before we are primarily an interview and a commentary podcast, you can find abilities pike pretty much anywhere. PODCASTS are found that would say apple podcasts, which is I tunes is probably one of our mainstays were also on spotify radio tune in stitcher on down the line, and this is a first for me. We're actually recording via zoom. So this is like who Zilin who right and on the line with me. Today I have Tony do pre. How's IT GOIN' Tony? I'm well. Everything is going well, thank you, how are you? Good, you don't sound like you're sure. Sony you down in? Houston right. Yes. Did you get any of the rain and stuff that was going on down? There wasn't there some kind of our hurricane or something going through there. Yes? For a couple of days, we got a lot of rain. We welcomed the rain so hot dry. Weight all over the country from what I understand? I'm up here in Ohio and typically we don't get scorching hot weather, but we've had like two or three weeks of ninety degree weather. The lawns are Brown and. Yes. Really. It's really strange. Let me tell the audience a little bit about you. If I may Tony. depre- is the founder and president of Etiquette and style by depre-. And Etiquette Training and coaching company based in Houston with a mission to help young people and businesses and business professionals. Get ahead with good manners. Since two thousand six etiquette workshops style seminars, a self, esteem and behavior classes have taught hundreds of individuals from youth groups to business gatherings. How to present their best selves and cultivate meaningful productive relationships. That's a that's. That's a lot when you're not when you're not. Practicing good etiquette. What do you like to do to let off steam I mean like? Did you have a big hobby or something? What's what's going on down there? It's fun and Houston of course now with code and everything is kind of tough. Well. I picked up a little hobby. Recently. Yeah, for about maybe. Four months now I've been doing tick tock away. Yes, I know him. We were going to talk about that, yeah! That's that's what I've been doing pretty fine. We're definitely going to have to come back to that because your videos are actually very good. And And that's that's not. It. In all honesty, your videos are better than a lot of people half your age and that's tough. That's tough. and. To Be Successful on that platform. You have to be visual and we're. We're going to talk about that. Because I'M GONNA. Kinda wonder how that's going to factor into your marketing because I would think it would have to work if you can tie it in somehow so we'll get to that. You're also author. You published your first book in Two Thousand Fifteen who's fork. Is that anyway? which is an entertaining and easy to read dining guide for young adults I'll. Let's start with that. How did that come about? So. I've been an etiquette coach for was since two thousand six and I had a are. Still do it now but A. A don an etiquette. powerpoint in this call, who's Farkas it way I named it. WHO's for? Is it anyway because of this three year old little boy? Who was trying to. A school and Afar getting night. All at the same time to eat his forget. And he just got so tired of it. He just put everything down and said. Who Cares about the sports in which one and who it belongs to? So, WHO's for his it anyway because of? Just had a little meltdown. And rightfully so I actually you only need a fork for you. But he he had seen as parents use the SPO and so he was just combined in everything. If you just gotTa love. And unnamed my powerpoint after his meltdown. Yes, and so that's how it came about because parents were like I can't stop them from eating. My kids stop eating like animals at the table. You know. Can you help us, so? I wanted to come up with something that they could use for themselves. You don't always have to hire me are. Somebody you can count a do it yourself in the book is laid out for you to use it like a tool if you need to, you can invite in. I really wanted separate clubs to start after that you know because parents were complained. About been on video too much, so you could. It's them how to cook. And invite their friends over and they can just Kinda have low. You know dining session among themselves. And that was the concept. That was my thought behind it. It just kinda turned into something I mean. This whole business has just done a few different hoops. that. I didn't think I mean I couldn't have no I. Start with one mission. And then it just kind of spiraled. So many different ones. I'm I'm happy about it. Surely happy sometimes works you. Get channeled into something and it takes off, and it's not what you originally anticipated, but there's been a lot of businesses. Go that route. Yeah Yeah and I think to one of the best things is. What you start in mind with bike I started with One of my favorite quote quote is by George Eliot. What are we to do but make life easier to one another, so my whole concept for etiquette style was to make either the interview process. For the the managing process I've never been a manager or supervisor anybody. Because I never wanted to because I don't want to supervise individuals problems I don't want to. I know that that's not where. The people issue of it all is not what I WANNA do I can manage projects on somebody else's job, but if I have to manage all of that, so I thought about how I felt about it and in both books, I camera came up with something that was easy to transition into A. Or to use for yourself, you know. It's just another person in minor sure so I always keep that quote at the foundation of everything. That's a great foundation and we're GONNA talk about how we treat each other as a society in here in a little bit because I think that's not really ties in to what you're talking about now in addition to everything else you. Do you also write for several magazines? Do you WanNa talk a little bit about that. What do you write about? What are some of your subjects and? So this is insane. Publications are all etiquette inspired. Okay, and I have I. Have I have a Rockstar publicist? And she is the reason that I right through so many publications because she sees something, she sends it to me and she's like urgent. Put something together for this site. Pichit and so this is how this comes about so now. been working with Tracy for two years and so a lotteries publications are national publication. So really proud of that work to you know it's not a bad deal to be quoted in the Mashal magazine, so that's awesome. But before that. I started with makeup, a one, a one, which is a nonprofit and they had a a magazine is called movement one on one and the things that I wrote about were a team. Inspire insights. From behavior. Etiquette how we treat ourselves. being polite to one another I wrote articles about that and then Hokkaido I can't is so many. I just can't think short the names, but everything is etiquette. Inspired or people inspired our behavior inspired. That's what I mostly right about now in my own personal blog I write about a whole Lotta just the collateral of. Things yeah from traffic to. Those things where you can use colorful language. Yeah You have to have a way to let off steam us. Well I gotTA. Tell you I'm I'm probably the world's worst at driving and and using. Profanity as a matter of fact I could probably. I could probably str- string together some really good rhymes, and have a good backbeat with profanities while lumped. Wow So. ABOUT ABOUT ETIQUETTE What is different about etiquette versus just saying well I have good manners. So. Alright so let's let's put it in these terms. Okay. Etiquette is how everything is phrased. Absurd umbrella. And so you have your manners you have. Your managers your approach. To your behavior. Does that help. In this beautiful and sells etiquette is how things are. Present it how it looks okay. That's the advocate of it all you know you, you put yourself together very whale. Okay, and then your manners is your approach so from there, so you look real nice in pretty so van. You present yourself there. And then you have your behavior, that follows so also in the manners. Is Your thought processes? Your how your approach is like how you might choose to speak to someone you know are difficult situation in our. You know lackluster individual. K. This year manner behaviors, and then you behavior is. Putting it in motion Does that make sense, yeah I kind of like to put it like that. Because when you say etiquette a lot of times, people are like Oh my God. I don't want to deal with that. This hortatory and is not really about that. Because etiquette is just the whole person is, everything is how you see yourself how you speak how. The choices that for best practice, yeah. Yeah. Well, you mentioned that quote and I believe a great quote. Increasingly the the society as the way. I'm not young anymore. And I go back a number of years and decades and I don't ever remember a time when there are so many divisions in society I don't care if it's your. Necessity Your religion your political background there is a reasons to divide people up. And on top of that there is an increasing hostility that I don't remember now I remember back in the days of Ronald Reagan and things like that. When I very young people had different opinions, and sometimes arguments would arise, but now you say the wrong thing and you're faced with aggression I don't know that I ever remember it being this bad And you talk about. A mutual respect and trying to make life peopling life better for people. What is your opinion about that? Since since that behavior and that etiquette is and mannered. Personality is so important to you. How are you dealing with these times that are just off the charts. Okay so social one I'm GONNA. Say I am humid. Yes an etiquette coach. That's my title. But I'm human so things get to me, too, but I realize I can choose how I address it, so if I can share. A something that happened actually today on talk. I did video, and it's video where You mean to tell me. Hand Soap and hand. SANITIZER can kill the virus. But you can't find a cure for pretty much. The best video I mean is is a lot more. Emphasis on things but. Air limitation. Fifty when I lasted fifty five hundred people. Responded to that video. But the comments. Were so disrespectful, not necessarily directed at me. But at the video. And people who responded so some people may have said Oh my God I can't believe it so then someone would come in and say this just ignorance that you can't believe that you know so then. I thought about it. I could just watch this. You know like amend the Coliseum I could just watch this play out, but now after video out there so to me I have a responsibility, so that's the whole thought process of it. So I come in whenever I see somebody who says something derogatory about it or about someone say. Let me remind you guys. This is skit. Is Not my voice. I came I joined Tiktok to have a good time. Yeah, I did my political views of what I really think about this virus, and all this kind of stuff that is, we're not gonNA who were known to fix all that. In one. One three absolutely. So it's lighthearted. And sometimes, so the last one I put was sometimes. You just have to smile and move through it while you're trying to figure it out. You know and then people started lightening up, but to everyone who was rude. A made a point to respond similar to that like each response is different, but it the foundation of the responses the site. And so. In the Liza. Why did that is because we all have a responsibility you're not. You're not superman I'm not saying that we're not cancer. We're not, but what we are doing is trying to make life a little bit easier for one another. One situation at a time just like the quote that I love from George January. It is the best clothes in the world because if you think life there. You can't help move like that so when I think about what's going on. Today is ridiculous I think that What would help is we're all here together for res? And I think we need everything that is here as unfortunate. Some of this stuff is and it's horrible. It is to look at. There's a reason for. Now it's not your responsibility to figure out what the reason is, but it is your responsibility to make toward. because. We're not I mean if you were supposed to be, you're by yourself. You would be by yourself. And you're supposed to figure out how to work this out while we are here, so somebody's may be ignorance. But, if you have knowledge and you don't share it with them at that point there, ignorance becomes your fault. Because if there's something I, don't know in you. Don't tell me and you know it. You bear responsibility for that. And Etiquette Etiquette touches on all of that is how you think it is how you behave how you choose to behave. It is education of all people, not just some people you know it is know. And, we're not doing that. We're not because everybody is mad. Everybody's is impatient. Nobody's trying to find. A easier way to do. Any of this. or We don't make it. Okay. Like what have you don't know what to do? Can Somebody say. You know what to do. 'cause I always know what to do. Read the just like I said. I I'm Humid's. You know yeah. I say bad words. I just don't show them all the time and I. Don't say Bam. At people, you know, I don't use them as a weapon. Weapon I use them as Cutler for my compensation. When! I in researching you a little bit going through some of your stuff, you talk about empathy. And they know that really factors in to how treat people. Right. In Your in your coaching and some of the experience that you have. Can something like empathy be taught, or is that something that you either feel it or you don't? So. CAN IMPACT THE BE. taught. I know that's a tough one. So! Empathy can't be taught to children. Can Be taught to children. For, adults. I think that empathy may be a nudge that we do like a reminder. Are you know? Don't forget to be prepared today. So if you just happen to be married to a BOOB job and they're going out to work. And and you know how they are. Because you know how they are with you, you might WanNa do a low. Sweet low knowledge. Don't get to be insulated especially if there's somebody supervisor manager, you know. Put your kindness had all today you? Can Be massaged in with an adult. I don't know. About teaching. Adults empathy because. That is not something that I do what I do in my workshops is massage it in to the lesson? Yes, like a Candy Gentler Nudge and not not the pat on the bag kind of thing, but just as. When you give an example of something, a personal example that we can all relate to. Everybody's GonNa feel it even if they don't say anything about it, you. And you probably GonNa, give it two seconds of thought. Well, really, that's all you need. It only takes two seconds for you have to. Embrace incubator use it. Or share. Well that kind of leads me into my next question. What are some of the very basic things that the average person can do throughout the course of a day to just be nice and show people that? Want to open up the lines of communication and just communicate with them better. So for what you know, they have this thing that people say act. Tell it like it is. You heard people all the time. So thousand night, my favorite people and so limited everywhere I wa I'm very sensitive person. Asset that. Ams I'm so sensitive I'm have shirt made. super-sensitive proceed with caution. I said I was sure best. How sensitive I used to be! Not as bad today, but I'm still sensitive and I don't think is GonNa go anywhere. So I'm not a fan of the. Tell it like it is people because they usually do it as a straight shot. No chaser I'm not always prepared for that. I can listen to you. Tell me what I need to hear, but you need to have bedside manner batch itself absolutely. Okay and I think when when you wait one of the things that will make being kinder. Be. If you when you wake up, think about what Kinda Day. You have you want to have yeah. But I. You have to think about who you need to be in that day in order to have that result. Curve, so if you wake up thinking that way. That could help. Now you know everybody. Everybody's different. Did say united reference. The term biker should say that on your shareholder boob job comment. But we have them in every industry you know in in every work environment you whether you know I work for myself, but I still meet that difficult client. And, what what? I normally say when I'm meet somebody. WHO poses a challenge? Is We got us all of this anyway I'm glad I came out. So! We gotta use the good the bad and medically so we can get to where we're trying to be. Usually. That fuses the situation. When you wake up and you think about who I need to be in this day. To get whatever result I'm trying to get. That that kind of brings it home for you. You're going to be less likely to have these little tips that people have throughout the day that unnecessary. I see stuff in a grocery store I mean. A lady gave me the business in the grocery store because I was given somebody six feet and I said. What does what they said on the news that we need to? Up Six feet. Well you enough space. You could just get over there I. said I'm not going to crowd that gentleman what he's getting his produce. Well I'm going, and so she went in front of me and I'm may have been thinking something, but I didn't say it, you know. And that's the thing I gave a little grace, and then I had to ask for forgiveness. From Jesus, you know for what I was thinking, but you know because I'm human. That goes back to what I said. We're all human. It is what you choose to do for the world to see. You know if you're okay with that I mean I'm not the police I don't have a heaven. A hail put anybody in, but what I am supposed to do in my business, and in my in my day is to bring about a conscious few. That doesn't mean that I get on the soapbox. And Damn everybody to hail, but what it does name is say you know what. You know if if that's what you need to do. Let me make room for you, you know. What that means. So, that's a great attitude and a I can tell you. Just like the the issue with the masks. We don't talk about it, but. There's people protesting and all that in Ohio. His wearing a mask for ten minutes. While you go to. Kroger's or whatever it is. Is it really violating your rights to do that I? It amazes me I if your life is so good that you're passionate enough that you're going to go to the State Capitol and protest the fact that you have to wear a mask. Um I mean I my life is. That good got bigger problems than that so? The hostility that you get. And I. Don't know where these conspiracies are coming from the. It's just amazing to me. There's just so much wrong, and it's so good to hear. Someone like yourself talking about how we should treat people and the etiquette that goes along with how we present ourselves and That's so important now. You mentioned Tiktok and For those that may not else, tiktok is somewhat controversial because every like everything else. It's been politicized. But. It is a essentially a video APP and you can make fifteen second videos within the APP, or you can go up to a minute. And of course you can produce your videos and upload them if you want. TIKTOK is loaded with a lot of people doing lip synching a dancing, but there's also a lot of people who. Are Doing political commentary they are. There's a lot of creators on their. WHO ARE ACTORS COMEDIANS and they're doing these little skits. Some of them are very talented. I'm I. I kind of got on I. Don't know if you know who Gary Banner Chuck is Gary V, but he was touting tick tock there for a while he's. He's one of these marketing gurus that I follow so I. Thought Alright I'll. I'll check this out and I found it interesting I. Don't know that it has really taken off, but I know it has for you you. You do these very entertaining things, and is this something that just came to you recently? Have you always tried to do stuff like that? It seems like you're in your approach. It seems like you've been doing these things forever. So no I am not pro, okay. And so. And I feel so bad because I have to tell you this. I was never going to get to. When. I also work at a school a middle school and there was some middle schoolers and they kept saying. Oh, Mr Pre. You should do a TIKTOK video with US models sites. I'M NOT GONNA. Do a tiktok video would much of cheaters like a loser and so i. Feel so bad I actually joined because I tell those kids there. I'm never getting on that I. AM fifty one years old. What do I look like getting onto todd food. That's what. And here I am on their lack of flu and so. I just don't mind. Band silly, you know. Maybe that's the only thing I can tell you yes. I wish I could tell you something more profound about my joining Tiktok but I have absolutely nothing profound nothing now. Stands like as an author. That I should have these wonderful words to site. No at Dell. I just do it with my wine and I don't always have wine I do not because. I don't need it all. But. But. Shown of videos adjust. I think they just call you. When you're like. That one's for me. Yeah, that one is for me. You know they speak to you some Conway, Oh sure. I have nothing else to say for When I decided to actually jog orange I. told my husband I, said you know what? This corona virus has taken on you. Know is just ridiculous so I'm I'm going to see if I can make? PEOPLE SMILE IN France will worried. Just irritated about their lives changing. Virus. And when it first started. I join at the end of April. And, you know everybody was bellyaching about how their lives have changed in. We were locked down on. Short and I. Wanted to turn that around a little bit. People, laugh or smile. I did not know if I was actually wanted to be able to do that. Because Jay tick, Tock is difficult. It is it is very difficult. Billet is those because you are having to make somebody else's content your own but funny. Or add some Kinda some some kind of different magic to it. In, you didn't create this it and that is something I have never done in my life. So I just a that was my commitment. And I and you and you know you get hooked. Is like Oh. We gotTA do my house. You know or let me get my work done so I can do. It's like a little treat and the midnight. It's an old show business axiom that it's all been done before. You just have to make your own. You just have to make sure. Has. It worked out as a marketing tool for you. Have you tried that yet? So I did something really interesting because I'm not really good at marketing myself I. Mean That's not what I do. I'm not a Mark Avenue. That is not what I want to soon for so but I know. I mean I. Think when you're in business. You know what you need, right? You know who? You know you have to talk to people all the time. You use what you got, so I did this one video. It was actually a sex in the city. Video and I use my book and I didn't all I wasn't trying to. Really self promote because I don't feel real comfortable doing that like toot my own horn, but I did say in the writing. This is actually my book. Short Limb people have been buying the book awesome and I didn't do it for that I just said, and I have all these books on my shell and I said. Why would I hold somebody else's down Absolute absolutely. That's that's what I did and people reached out and said well look what I ordered. Look what you know just what came in the mail? So it I guess I. Happen using it used it that way. And Ben just been out there consistently. Because met. Is the thing consistency? Appreciate If you are going to act like a fool. You own that and you do that and you're committed to the consistent. That is what we're. GonNa see where we see you. because. We don't have enough of that today now. I mean there are people showing up, but you don't know how to show up every day. You know what I mean. You don't know what you're GONNA get. You know you're going to see them that. You now know we're kind of behavior. So yeah, yes, so so I think that is one thing that has worked well for my business. Awesome. That's fantastic that really I I can't speak highly enough about your videos, and while we're on the subject while we're on the subject where competes and find you on Tiktok and all the other places, your online your website and all this other stuff. So on top it is. Toni T. O. N. I. Dupre D. U. P. R.. E. E. Fifty one. That's on Tock and My website is Duprey Academy Dot Com. So my last name, p., R. E. E. ACADEMY DOT COM. and. facebook burke is Tony do pre. And on instagram. They can find me at etiquette eighty ND style. Awesome. That sounded consuming and then. was going to say about the book. The book with the exact title is who who's fork. Is it anyway and author? Is You have yourself? Let's I presume. Is Tony Debris as author? can people that online where can is just Amazon or So, they can find it online on. Re launched. WHO's Farkas Anyway and I know the relaunches on Barnes and noble website so my? Excuse me. My mother books straight up from the tea. Cup is actually in the store, Barnes and noble, and of course is on Amazon and Bars Noble. Did you can find it a on on any. It's online. A leave you with this final word to anybody who who happens to be listening. What positive message or word of inspiration would you like to leave with others today? I am going to lead my quote, which is improving me as value to the way I see. That's awesome that is that's really a good one. That's my business. Motto also improved them me as value to the way I see you. This has been a very charming interview and. I want to thank you very much for coming on. And we have been speaking to Tony. Do Pre and again. She is the founder and president of Etiquette and style I do pre. She just mentioned a whole bunch of places that you can find her online. She's definitely worth a a good search finder on Tiktok. There's some really. Really toe-tapping fun videos on there that you've done you, you know you you. You come across very well video. I'm not necessarily. Orient I've always tease people. I got a face for radio. That's the other it is. But you very fantastic. I'm telling you. You can lift anybody's move a wonderful. Thank you much Tony for being here. Thank you! Thank you for having me absolutely just to tell the audience again. Billy Dis. You can find the billy podcasts pretty much anywhere. PODCASTS are found apple podcast spotify radio on down the line, and you can find me on twitter, and you can tweet me at billy. Dis. You just have to be nice. You don't have to agree. Venus and they always say that it's not just because don't easier. Thank you very much checking out our guest today and we'll be back again next week. Well everyone I am. From the self titled, Billy, Dis by guest you can find me on apple podcasts Stitcher tune-in iheartradio, and many more of the best podcasts networks. Join me for my commentary and interviews. Follow me on. Twitter released defined. Ask Billy Dis I am. Love to have you listen in.

Tiktok Billy Dis founder and president Tony Debris apple Ohio Houston spotify Farkas supervisor tiktok Sony twitter George Eliot Tony. depre Amazon depre Mashal magazine Barnes Afar
23: Have a Set of Daily Habits - Matt Heinz

Daily Sales Tips

03:32 min | 1 year ago

23: Have a Set of Daily Habits - Matt Heinz

"Welcome back to the daily sales tips podcast. I'm your host Scott Ingram. And today's tip comes from my friend. Matt Heinz Matt is the president of Heinz marketing and has been a truth thought leader in the sales and marketing space for over a decade. Now, he is basically a good idea machine. And here's the one he's got for us today. Hi, this is Matt Hines founder and president of Heinz marketing in this is my sales tip for today. You know, there's a lot of things I could cover. There's a lot of things that we do with our clients as well as things we do internally from a sales perspective. But the one thing that I think is accessible and important for everybody is to have a set of daily habits to have a disciplined approach to things you're doing on a daily basis. Sometimes it's a bunch of little things that add up to helping yourself create more predictable pipeline. I have what I call it. My daily do list. It's on my tasks list every day once I take it off of the tassels for the date automatically shows up on the next business day, and it's based on a checklist of things that I need to do every day to feed my network to end in defeat. My. Pipeline. I have a version of this is actually laminated that I take with me when I travel, but, you know, even if you just have it in your inbox or have it just as a piece of paper, I think reminding yourself of those little things those tactics those habits that help drive behavior. Help drivers alz is really important. So for example, on mine, you know, it's a reminder look at my calendar from yesterday, the meetings, the meetings, I had to make sure I've done follow up to make sure I've connected with people on Lincoln to make sure I've sent any. Thank you notes or whatever else you need to do. There's a reminder to look at a few different filtered reports for me in Salesforce in our marketing automation platform to look at you know, the accounts that were tracking to look for buying signals to look for any changes to look for, you know, behavior with our content that I can follow up with. We also have a series of filters in linked in that can tell us about particular trigger events, if someone in my first connections has changed jobs that could be a trigger event that could lead to some opportunity. So looking at that on a daily basis in knowing what my follow up processes is important that's all documented in my daily dualist if. You're listening to this. You'd like a copy of sample of what my daily Dula. So I'm happy to share it with you. Then we cannot make that available. Somehow sure the Scott can figure out how to do that. And we can put a link in to to doing that either put it up on slide share or whatnot. I guess the moral the story on that for me is that there's always room for strategic improvement thinking about like who are we targeting? How are we going after them? But, you know, the top one percents sales people will consistently tell you that their success is tied to consistence repeatable behavior. It's doing the little things as doing them every day. It's putting in the time and effort to do those things on regular repeatable predictable basis. So that's what I got this about Heinz from Heinz marketing, thanks so much for listening. Now, Matt sent me the PDF of his daily do list, and all you have to do to get. It is click on the link in your podcast player or go to daily sales dot tips forward slash twenty three. In addition to the link to the PDF, you'll find links to Hines marketing Matt's sales pipeline radio show as. As well as a couple of his favorite social profiles while you're there. I hope you'll answer the question. Do you have your own documented daily do or daily habits list? If you do I'd love it. If you share it. I'm gonna share mind so jump over and join the conversation at daily sales dot tips forward slash twenty three then come back tomorrow to hear about the three things that every sales professional needs to no end master from Richard. Helen.

Matt Heinz Matt Heinz marketing Scott Ingram Matt Hines Lincoln founder and president president Dula Salesforce Helen Richard
Health Technology for an Aging Population with Vera Rulon, Founder, and President at Tir Health Advisors

Outcomes Rocket

14:53 min | Last month

Health Technology for an Aging Population with Vera Rulon, Founder, and President at Tir Health Advisors

"Hey constructed listeners Sal Marquez here. I. Get what a phenomenal asset podcast for Your Business and also how frustrating it is to navigate editing and production monetization and achieving the Roi you're looking for technical busy work shouldn't stop you from getting your genius into the world though you should be able to build your brand easily with the professional podcast that gets attention a patched up podcast could ruin your business. Let us do the technical busy work behind the scenes while you share your genius on the Mike and take the industry stage visit smooth PODCASTING DOT COM to learn more that smooth podcasting dot com to learn more. Welcome back to the Outcomes Rocket Sal Marquez is here and today I have the privilege of hosting. VEIRA. Rulon she is the founder and president of Tier Health Advisors and is a member of the Executive Council. For the Center for Health Innovation, she's a strategic and senior advisor to the ATA. Areas of expertise healthy longevity patient advocacy and engagement, and use of personal health. Information. To improve outcomes with a focus on the use of technology to advance these areas prior to starting her own company, Barrow spent eighteen years at. Pfizer. At Pfizer Vera lead the technology and aging work stream for the center of excellence for active and healthy ageing. Before Pfizer Bear managed the clinical informatics team at Oxford Health plans she has also served as chief content officer for. A clinical trials recruitment startup foxing on the underserved populations. Vera is a past president of the. American. Health Information Management Association a Hema and is a fellow of a Hema veras an active participant with the Society of Participatory Medicine, and she's also recipient of Hemas distinguished member award a Hema visionary triumph Ford as was designated from voice one hundred as a change agent. So I'm. Privileged to have her here on the podcast Vera. Thank you so much for being here. We're very welcome solemn looking forward to her conversation likewise, and so before we jump into what you guys are up to tear health, I love to hear more about what inspires your day to day journey in healthcare absolutely I love to talk about that because all my life I've always. Strived, to help make a difference in the world, even if I can impact just one person. So I've been listening to people's personal stories and I try to find ways now to address some concerns that people have you know on top of all of that I'm also an artist and someone who had inspired. Me Was Regina Holliday because she showed me that you can leverage. All of your talents in different ways to help improve the healthcare system I. don't know if you're familiar with Regina's work but she started come you are her around the podcast in how you did wonderful. Yes. I I'm also an artist for the walking gallery of health. So cool and that really helped push me to figure out ways that I in my own unique. Way Can help make a difference in transforming healthcare and part of that is also around the hall aging because I've been working in aging now for a while and as I started getting older and I'll tell you a little story later on about how I really land at where I am today after having worked at various organizations over the years I love it. Yeah you. Know. It's a good reminder vera that we all have our unique Mrs and way of contributing and support that we have confidence and faith that what we're doing is going to make an impact and so you took the leap of faith you're inspired. You've done a lot of things in the corporate side as well but now you're on your own do in your own thing. So. A little bit about tear health advisors and what you guys are up to. Sure. So some of the ways that I think we provide values I really do like to focus on those areas that we've already talked about that. You heard my bio and a lot of that has to do with improving communication between providers, payers, life sciences, various communities, as well as patients and caregivers most importantly because we wanna make sure that there's access to healthcare, but it's also working to the benefit of the patient. So to that end as I engage with various organizations. I have applied some approaches. So for example, storytelling is really important. So a lot of the work that I do, for example that the ATA have been collecting case studies that express the best practices and getting care to people who needed through telehealth and digital technologies and the more we tell these stories and the more that your health can provide some thought leadership to help these organizations connect the dots I think that's where we provide the most value. Another example of that would be what I was working for him. Rather the PCH alliance I helped bring people. In workshops where they would try and salvage shoes around improving the aging process and that in particular was helpful because we came up with a lot of very, very strategic ideas on how to work on how to improve age and in general to the use of technology. One of the ways that I think that I'm different already mentioned the unique ability to connect the dots on strategic issues. A big part of that is having as broad net of network of colleagues. Who are also working to advance health care and I think that's another important and helpful for organizations as I help them build their programs as they're working through their strategies. So that connection is well as bringing people together as also a big part of what tier does love it and so yeah, you know the stories matter and how we tackle the problems that were faced with matters as well. So talk to us a little bit abou how what you guys do is. Than what's available today? You know I, think several of the things I've mentioned you know connecting the dots on some strategies that they might have especially with those and providers, stories and areas of concern, as well as creating these communities but I think what else cheer brings to the table is the vast experience in very different healthcare industries from a background in hair organizations to provider based organizations from a skilled nursing facility straight through to acute care, and then of course, working for a pharmaceutical company that brings a whole nother dimension I think to looking at the healthcare ecosystem and be able to come up with very effective strategies for clients. Yeah and so who are you mainly working with? Vera and and you know who you guys look into work with in the future how that's a great question. So working with the profits has been the primary alignment there and not for profit healthcare organization. So organizations like hymns, the ATA a Hema and others in that vein, mostly related to information healthcare information, as well as the technologies that support the advancement of health care. The startup that I worked for was very interesting because there were obviously looking for sponsors, pharmaceutical companies as clients really with. A focus on bringing in the under served population into clinical trials. That's been a big theme recently especially with the Covid work. So in the future, I think I would like to find more clients in the life sciences areas as well as additional non for profit association specifically patient advocacy groups because I think I can provide in the organization can provide some really neat sites to those groups and help make connections with other organizations very cool and so as you've embarked on your journey with your. Own Practice or what would you say has been one of the setbacks that most impacted you and that you learn most from Oh Jeez I thought a lot about this and I it was leaving Pfizer was the real setback for May. It was I had been for so long and I was so comfortable and I was really enjoying the work there and I loved working for the company but just the situation at the time had me really think about, do I stay or do I? Go. And so I decided that it was time for me to go and it was really broths decision for me and at that time was also in my fifties I said I was eighteen just like everyone else. So you know is kind of like you know what do I do now? Do I look for work elsewhere or in undoing I go off on my own and had a certain point I did decide not to pursue work elsewhere and to go off on my own. So what I? Did was as I am this where the key learning comes in I spent time exploring opportunities and I decided that you know I couldn't. You know I needed just to talk with someone to figure out what do I need to look at? What can I do to really do a good job of evaluating and exploring opportunities. So I participated in an online group mentoring session over one summer with a gentleman by the name of John Tarnow who calls himself, the boomer reinvention coach, and one of. The exercises we did was to look at ourselves fifteen years prior, and that really gave me the opportunity to boost the standing of where I really wanted to be. Because in my forties I was in my best help I was exercising every day you know work adviser risk terrific. I was serving on the board of a Hema. It was a busy time, but it was also, it really gave me that boost to understand what I wanted to do, and that's another learning that became clear to me. You know especially after going through that exercise and then spending time doing a lot of networking I realized that my reach and my impact would be more impactful outside of a large organization like visor while the experience was excellent and really built the foundation for me. My voice could be heard better outside of a large bureaucratic organization. So what I did was started beefing up my volunteer efforts at this point and that included and I think that's where my love for non for profits. Really. Solidified, because I felt like I could do more and be more impactful. Of course, there's a limit to how much you can spend volunteering versus getting paid work. So I was very targeted. So I selected organizations like the Society for Participatory Medicine where there's an opportunity to make some significant differences there, and then I tried to keep that same vein of what my passions were given now that I was out on my own that I could be selected about the clients that I chose to work with. So. Cool. Well, I think it's fantastic and you know you make a move like that. It's never easy and you certainly just did a nice job of identifying strengths and where exactly you were going to make an impact and so here you are. So, awesome work as you think about, what makes you most excited today? What would you say that is oh my gosh definitely this whole digitisation of health care as I heard a term coined several years back called healthcare everywhere, and now with Cova, it's really coming to light in many respects. I mean, there's still a lot more to do but to have access to healthcare wherever you happen to be makes me very excited and also this increased interest again more to do but there's an increased interest on focus on including. Patients and designing new healthcare delivery systems and addressing patient needs within the healthcare system, which I'm really happy to see. You know providing access to your healthcare data increasing interest in participatory medicine. So the patients become really active in their own personal help I. think that's great and it's definitely exciting times as we look to get patients engaged in you know the way decisions are made at healthcare institutions having folks like you at the charge is certainly so important and so i WanNa commend you on your efforts and so with Atta. What call lots would you leave to the audience today? Look losing thoughts would you want them to think about well I've mentioned patient advocacy an inclusion is starting to become more and more the order of business, which is wonderful but there's still an awful lot more to do. So I would ask people to keep listening and keep telling your own stories and help spread the word. So we can address the issues that really matter both to providers and patience bear. Thank you and and if the listeners wanted to get in touch or continue the conversation, what would you say the best place for them to do that as sore please find me at twitter my handle is the. L. O.. N. Fee rule on my Lincoln is great and I do have a tier health advisors linked in page as well. Feel free to reach out to me the email at Vera V. E. R. at Tier. Health T.. I. R. H. E. A. L. T. H. dot net. Awesome. Vera. Will listen this has been a great discussion and I certainly thank you and look forward to staying in touch. You're very welcome saw wonderful to speak with you. Hey everyone saw Marquez here. Have you launched your podcast already and discovered pain? It could be to keep up with editing production show notes transcripts and operations. What if you could turn over the keys to your podcast busy work while you do the fun stuff like expanding your network and taking the industry stage? Let's edit your first episode for free. So you can experience the freedom visit smooth podcasting dot COM to learn more that smooth podcasting dot com to learn more.

Vera V. E. R. Sal Marquez Tier Health Advisors ATA Pfizer Vera Pfizer Regina Holliday Center for Health Innovation Barrow founder and president Mike Pfizer Bear Health Information Management ATA Oxford Health
Using AI to Improve Clinical Development

The Bio Report

31:47 min | 1 year ago

Using AI to Improve Clinical Development

"The california technology council's new c._d._c. Benefits trust combines groups of emerging technology companies to offer large company benefits fits to small businesses. This approach delivers employee benefit programs with better choices and lower cost. What's included medical. Dental and vision options are available with additional employer and employee online resources to support simplified enrollment and ed administration to learn more go to california technology dot org forward slash join. That's california technology alleged dot org forward slash join. I'm daniel levin and this is the bio report <music> <music> artificial intelligence is all the rage drug discovery today but there are efforts to apply the technology to other aspects of the drug development continuum to improve decision making and increase efficiency one such example is fi cy which has developed an artificial intelligence platform to improve improve clinical site selection of valuate protocol designs and patient inclusion criteria and manage the implementation of trials. We spoke to gently gently founder and president of fee cy about the company's a._i. Platform how it works and the case for the use of artificial intelligence as a tool tool to improve drug development jen. Thanks for joining us. Thank you dan for having me. We're going to talk about why it's artificial intelligence platform and how you're using it to help clients make better decisions decisions around the clinical development of experimental therapies. Perhaps you can begin with a description of and what it does who its customer is and how it makes money. <hes> says i was created twelve years ago. <hes> we are a data driven can communicate development organization we <hes> leverage our database <hes> which is big data <hes> and also our statistical artistic model and outward and those are artificial intelligence to help our cons to <hes> more objectively planning and executing clinical trials it was <hes> a created <hes> based on the situation that <hes> despite communicative elephant as an industry was spent ninety one hundred billion dollars. I year <hes> level the company next. The of the operations management was never a proper <hes> handled the simpleton. We we are seeing he either. Inside industry or external industry are those <hes> prolonged your cycle time <hes> blooming projects <hes> and and so never <hes> easy to come on pre trial originally planned those are the simple send sympathies being treatment by the fact that we really have little understanding think about <hes> how those <hes> clinical development process <hes> from the operational management poem view being structured and implemented so the fast i was created at the to reveal those patent and those fundamental structures driving those deliverables from the clinical development in point of view <hes> from the <hes> so so that's where the way can <hes> fess is working decline spending fading us from several different ways i fall we are helping them to looking at hey aurenche maly <hes> mystified the picture of planning economic trial <hes> to a more structured took the way so for example the always conflict between the clinical trial teams and the senate and management in terms how long picking a clinical trial to complete that conflict also happens between the the the pharmaceutical industry companies and so the result <hes> all fit. It's usually descend your management wanted to have an clinical trial to come to complete much faster <hes> to <hes> getting a job to be approved with the much quicker and this year owl's <hes> not <hes> <hes> understandably often one into have more sites and they are expecting too much longer time which defense i platform we we're allowed them looking at it the picture in much objective fashion that way we'll be able to <hes> implement it at a <hes> at its plant. The clinical development of drug involves many decisions that a a drug developer must consider along the way this includes lose things such as education assessments protocol evaluation clinical trial site selection trial management. How are these things generally done by drug developer's today do they rely on existing relationships recommendations gut feelings or is this a highly data driven process. Unfortunately the it's anything but driven data driven process a highly highly relies on the level of the experience of those individuals in those <hes> he being assigned with those tasks asks for example a medical professional also play a very important role of defining had talked <hes> is so cutic- product product profile and development and other elements of development plan withing a protocol <hes> in etc so so what so that's where the fundamental reasons of <hes> a lot of uncertainty <hes> commun- from and also a all of mistakes been embedded in those because those are really much empirical <hes> derived <hes> solutions not a data driven solutions. What's the consequence of these decisions. How much is at stake and what can the impact on the costume duration and success of clinical trial. Be it impacting in in many ways <hes> a connecticut trial in in today's <hes> setting most of the times of for example phase three clinical trial that's based on the results of face to clinical trial aw by anaemia extrapolation and as a result of it <hes> because the relationship it's not actually near <hes> relationship from our <hes> understanding <hes> but if you to use them ne-near extrapolation at today's a practical practice practice today the result is that <hes> face reconnect trou- often much less much longer than original plan and and that means it's gonna be must must much more costly <hes> from the financial point of view but it's also going to delay <hes> the <hes> the time for patients to get in those much needed. Medicine feces has an artificial intelligence platform. I suspect it's value now. You can only be as good as the data and has what data does it include and where do you get the data from. That's a very good question. We are according ourself <hes> a big <hes> a big data driven and artificial intelligence in naples able to platform because we are collecting data from all four corners of the internet and be there already examples like communica- trial started off <hes> which is sanctioned by the u._s. Government then you have similar chuck registries all over the world in europe in japan in china in <hes> in many places so those are the type of the source of the data. We are getting from. We also getting data from <hes> many of communicable child sides the the posting their information in different places and <hes> like <hes> also the academic conferences meeting extract and share the information getting information from those places as well and there are some of the less known <hes> sources of information <hes> we are also getting <hes> from <hes> by the they are a passing the majority of the data. We're getting off from the public domain but we also <hes> purchasing southern data sets <hes> from <hes> different places. The idea of our perform is not necessarily the monarch data we are having with the key to our <hes> power of the pratt from lachey residing all capabilities to <hes> structure structure the data in a meaningful way and cost checking data from different sources <hes> with each other to making it can sure the quality are reliable and consistent and and <hes> in in all of those spaces are approach are absolutely <hes> you know vegas and and and <hes> the most the forefront of the artificial intelligence and the imperil was state extra extracting and struck and the process in a structured process is the interpretation of the data and those are having equally as much innovation in our platform and those are the <hes> the innovation are being in <hes> patent that is so serious of <hes> of patterns in the u._s. and the rest of the world. How does one go about using the system. We are <hes> having to <hes> mechanisms of our clients to you died in this system <hes> traditionally we have been a service based <hes> organization we are engaging our clients and <hes> <hes> in in in a human to human interaction and getting the understanding the projects and giving input to various elements from the canoe you integrate economic development process to <hes> to communicate the indication assessment to particle planning to <hes> the the community trial implementation so along the time we figured it out the need to product size some l. dollars services to make an easier for constant access and that's where we have developed a canonical <hes> investigator data site selection pat from we call the clean side. That's a platform. It's assault software for <hes> for a two services services <hes> so in that platform or clients can <hes> going into any of the computer with internet access access to search <hes> the investigator sites according to what they need and that's a very friendly interface ace and in many of our concord like hookah like <hes> fashion to to to to to work and and we're hoping with doubt <hes> coincide will allow many of more for all kinds of benefit hall platform. I'm hoping you can walk. Talk me through the different ways the systems used. Tell me what date is available. What customers using the system to figure out what let's start with the the development planning indication assessment we are working with our clients <hes> based based on the their product <hes> they're actually communica candidate profile and <hes> in checking <hes> the <hes> the view <hes> data enabled <hes> <hes> fashion. Let me give you one example. One of aw clients were in a mechanism of <hes> lowering <hes> dealing with iron overload patients so data type the patients having <hes> a disease called thalassemia so their original plan was to looking at <hes> a single indication and forecast the peak sales to be <hes> <hes> to be he <hes> about six hundred million dollars and when we being caught in with started looking to i'll over no the magnuson we recognize that that's that's a cluster of diseases or share similar mechanism so you said of talking only thalassemia and we're asking them. I'm actually targeting a group of indication by doing so they're they're orange. No projection of the peak sales rat race the from <hes> six hundred million dollars a year to three point two billion dollars a year so that's the type of the ways we help them injecting data driven perspectives to allow them council <hes> comfortably and confidently making solutions to maximize the value of their product or product development. How about protocol cessna talk about <hes> a specimen that it's a fascinating area and it's we are pushing out a site selection solution called the clinton side. Many of the enrollment related the challenges are knocked cost the by m._s._a. Decide to performance rather they were actually being caused by the inadequate design of the particles in the i pat phone we are in in the process of developing a similar product <hes> he in in that area which we're looking at it historically <hes> studied <hes> clinical trials in any of those indications we currently have over three hundred thousand products in our database based which allow us looking at the detail the patent in all of the design elements associated with a with a particular disease z's then allow us to build a modal value which is statistical time <hes> really means the most frequently used the value and and the using that frame structure to allow clients start at the enchanting innovative ideas to change and the modify those value but the benefit and taro fest. I platform to allow our clients not only just having an on could a structured structure to make those chance but also having the ability to understand that the operation impact because of those changes is being made and for example if you shanking the patient the popular <hes> population by restricting their age old old by the severity of their disease simpleton <hes> you're you're starting to looking the increase of the number of investigators sites needed to for their trial and the enrollment cycle times becomes longer those are obvious reasons but our systems will allow clients to making much more sophisticated assessment and decisions based are out to phone how about when it comes to the selection of sites for clinical trial all sides selection <hes> solution. I it's real solution. It's a very competitive space. <hes> from site selection dentists point a point of view but the generally speaking many of those <hes> pat forms are providing and they are not solution are how to form allow our clients to looking at a particular disease indication occasion then we will <hes> guiding them to the country distribution of those qualified sites around the world and then from this country picture we allow constant dive into specific country or a specific set of a set of for counties then <hes> we allow them to <hes> we actually assign a set of the school <hes> allow our constant make uh-huh decisions on those of ascites the needed before there can initiate trial then the <hes> coincide walk go no further to <hes> to provide the detail the profile for each of those investigator sites including from <hes> some of the men mechanic <hes> <hes> elements of the information the address and email and telephone etc too too much more soft could description for example historically. What did the trials to have run and what's the capacity they have you gotta sites to round southern child's and as well as their performance in running those clinical trials then <hes> go the further we started looking at it their medical knowledge profile so if they are a <hes> on college est <hes> they oncologist colonist specialized in particular type of cancer or a set of cancer if it's a set of cancer where other to exp expertise area resides so and we also looking at the experience in working with different types of <hes> <hes> jacker candidates is that small monarchial or vaccine or antibody and we will be able to making those those <hes> those experience experience visible in a quantitative and objective fashion so those are all of these things are being built the way based on massive amount of data rounding behind in real time and allow them to making the decision <hes> based on <unk> collective view we provide by this platform of the last one to ask you about was trial tation station management. What what does this including. How does the system do this. Could you repeat that again. Sure the last one i wanted to ask. Ask you about was trial implementation management. What exactly does the system do in this regard. Oh <hes> that it's so the travel implementation management. It's not a part of the coincide but it's a separate set of capability in the <hes> fence. I <hes> performs. The meaning of it is is that you can imagine the <hes> <hes> the the implementation of a clinical trial particularly a museum large scale of clinical trials can and be a very complicated in the sauce tecate it <hes> system system engineering projects so what we are allowing in <hes> all capability allow or clients to do is to looking at the space in a structured review for example <hes> who are potential high <hes> <hes> potential high enrolling sites heights and who are not but not just looking at a static picture but looking at in in more than amick away so so we incorporating semak muezzins to tie our ties those the size and the supporting them was different type the resources to allow two sides with the best potential to enroll patients get the most support that away will will be able to <hes> save money and resources and also what's the potential to shorten the cycle time and those saw all who we have patent the method to support that implementation process you mentioned a stunning example early on about the the patient <hes> the company that was developing a treatment for iron overload. Is there anything more generally you can say of. The pay off has been for people have used the system as case studies two point two. Are there actual savings or hard time savings that have been realized <hes> there are three major benefits from <hes> the the <hes> from our clients perspective. One benefit is just to gain the kind of <hes> visibility to the outcomes of their plan and which will be a very much improved the communication effectiveness evenness between the sponsor of <hes> of the the trucker candidate and in the seal and bettine senior management and a specific <hes> project team so that's one type of the the the benefit another type of the benefit is to allow the <hes> the the picture to be objective for assessed then to <hes> pull with different levers to <hes> to do either offered him is the woman the cycle time <hes> all looking at the most cost after effective way to implement the trial in some incidences we would be able to looking at a particular economic trial kyle just the from the design point of view. We come protected. The actually cannot be successfully implemented and one example four of so. It's a t._v. h._d. Which is a horrible disease <hes> associated with <hes> with transplantation and <hes> one type of intervention one. It's <hes> type of intervention. <hes> it's the treatment of those patients another one. It's the prevention of the patients from happening that these it looks like very similar <hes> trial by the by i using our product form we indicated that the prevention trial it's actually much more costly <hes> <hes> physical than betrayed them in the child. It's the matter of fact our model or clients. The <hes> betrayed treat him in the trial will take three times small decides and the words even long on the side cycle time to implement and the based on our assessment all clients actually <hes> basically they can't the trade them in the trial and focusing hang on the prevention trial by doing so <hes> the chief dissimilar marketing objective <hes> by the saved <hes> likely about thirty to forty million dollars and that's just one topic example another example is at that time i'm a rare disease in cancer world and our clients got a very promising clinical <hes> can develop in the candidate so the sentence senator management so eager to putting this <hes> candidate to to to patient so the <hes> the basically padding the portuguese team say tell us how much money you need to do this but i want you to be able to complete the trial in two thousand a month so so the trial team somehow understand that this is not to oval but did they don't know how to express it so we look at all aspects of that can nicotrol by looking at it the competition by looking at the business in this process which decided activation by looking at the decided performance by also looking at the product design we presented our our assessment management and all and in that <hes> assessment we concluded that trial cannot be completed could eat the shorter than thirty months so by the because of the <hes> reliability and objectivity our assessment the to send your management create with our print <hes> cycle time so at the end instead of everybody forty in the frustration fission <hes> and and <hes> and many of the other uncertainties associated the trial was successfully implement exact as we predicted addicted and the rockets actually now provide <hes> approved and also approved the medicine to the patients in that indication. There's there's a lot of discussion about the use of a._i. And discovery and in the clinic less oh about applying to clinical development and you see this changing or proving the clinical development process. It's a <hes> it's a <hes> at the complexity in the communica could develop <hes> comparing with <hes> with the discovery space. It's the it's the patience patience it's the the center in terms of our business but they are also fundamental reason of causing so much of the complexities associated with connecticut development element so we are chew believer that with the amount of data now we are having <hes> and with the soft occasion patient of all our capability of in interpreting data we are in a very good position and to allow <hes> artificial intelligence to be widely implemented and applied in various of communicate development scenarios scenarios <hes> we just talk about the clinical integrated community development planning. We're talking about polical design. We talk about vowed that the <hes> the site selection with we'll also talk about the clinical trial implementation management but i wanted to also should the excitement is is that we also accumulate over thirty million of patient data well-structured and and and and and derived the form femme does controlled clinical trials data will be the type of data. We are looking forward to us to to <hes> to do like synthetic on all even <hes> you know similar certain type so the community charles <hes> we are so much excited to see those other things being put into practice jann lee founder and president of jenn. Thanks so much for your time today. Thank you very much for having me <music>. Thanks for listening. The buyer report is a production of the levin media group automatically downloaded of this podcast each week subscribe to our r._s._s. feed or through itunes or other podcasts manager join our mailing list go to levin media group dot com com. We'd love to hear from you. If you want to drop us a line or interested in sponsoring this podcast send email to danny at levin media group dot com special facts joel levine who composed are themes and jonathan levin collective which performs um <music> <music> <music>.

founder and president investigator california daniel levin california technology council thalassemia developer europe product development dan cessna senate ascites connecticut
Sherry Williams on Juneteenth

Two Broads Talking Politics

27:09 min | 5 months ago

Sherry Williams on Juneteenth

"Hi this is Kelly. This is a special June eighteenth episode of Two broads talking politics. Listen? On June nineteenth, eighteen, sixty, five, nearly two, and a half years after the Emancipation Proclamation Union Army General Gordon Granger, formally announced in the city of Galveston Texas that also leaves in Texas were now free. June nineteenth is now known as June eighteenth and has been continuously celebrated since eighteen sixty six as a day of freedom I spoke with Sherry Williams. The founder and president of the Brownsville Historical Society in Chicago about the importance of June team. So I WANNA talk some about June nineteenth, but maybe just to start if you could talk a little bit about yourself, and what the Brownsville Historical Society is and Y, you started. Ranville historical society began as sort of a way to have children who were in the community. Get engaged in some of the I would say a cultural heritage events that had been occurring much all of my entire life I had a family that was wrapped deeply into. How we celebrate and honor the ancestors, and how we honor the elders, and my daughter's shared with her on schoolteacher at that time I would say probably about nineteen ninety seven. And she shared with her her. Teacher in the sixth grade and hey. My mom is always taking our neighbors, kids and her in her door, her sisters as well to events that were happening sort of. traditionally in neighborhoods and many of those traditional community events would be hosted by my mom who was. One of the first, female black DJ's in Chicago so with her having these. Huge Macintosh. Bulb hot when you touch it. If you decided to dare to do that, she would take her her system around. In sort of DJ, impromptu parties. Backyard or in community spaces, churches you name it and these cultural events would be wrapped around the heritage of of cultural practices that blacks had been doing for her lifetime. My mom was born in nineteen, thirty, three and and Burning Mississippi. And, so she share with me just really how she learned the rich history of how? Cultural events were saved around the emancipation around We call it grade decoration bay which Memorial Day. And, so I thought it needs to sort of pass down to my own. Daughter's just pretty much repeating what I had learned through the years from my mom and my grandmother. And one of those events was jolting. I, and although never understood the significance of it, meaning say June the nineteenth. I looked at as cultural celebration is one. Time that I can eat all the watermelon in all of the homemade ice cream. So it didn't matter to me as a child, the heritage or the history around this culturally met, and just knew that this was time that we would see saw many elders in so many cousins and. Would have time to play and just sort of gather around on history and family. I think I was probably in my twenties. When my grandmother's share with me the need for me to escort her to any at at time it would have been Allen Temple Ami Church. which was then the oldest African methodist his church in the city so far structure wise, and they held each new year's. Eve. Watch watch service in the watch service of course was an anticipation of emancipation day, which would be on January first. So. We know massive patient day, January I eighteen sixty three and so my grandmother's church had a long tradition of. Having this watched service replicating what are those enslave men and women a head done? They were anticipating freedom to rise up on New Year's Day of eighteen sixty three, so it took a little while me as a child to really understand these cultural events that were happening and again I was. Very, much adult before really understood the significance of these things that we had kids get dragged into. Tall began to replicate those cultural experiences and. Jens I began deliberately hosting jolting celebrations in Brownsville in about nineteen ninety nine. Yes, I guess. I wasn't the only one who who didn't know the significance of it I. Mean Obviously I. I'm coming to this much much leader. The only been the past few years I think that I had even heard the term June eighteenth and sort of a realized what it was, and of course, a lot of people this year are are hearing about it. More people are talking about making it a a state or federal holiday, and of course there's the. A terrible trump decision to to hold a rally on June eighteenth that was later changed. But now what what do you think we can and should be doing to to teach more people about the significance of the the date, and in how we're the ways the that you celebrated it you know once you know in the in the late nineties when you started. Celebrating and teaching people more about the significance you know wh. What are the celebrations look like? While they're began emergence of more contemporary practices, said the time I started. A hosting events in public spaces. And in the sense of contemporary practices, I would say that we would bring in local drummers, or we would also poor, allied nations and so this African cultural practice where you're actually pouring water or kind of libation on at the same time. You are calling out the names of your ancestors. and not necessarily your chips, they could be ancestors in says that these are a significant people who contributed greatly to trade them into societies soul. You know for instance I could easily call out the name of Gary Tuchman. While, we go in a circle and speak loudly their name speak. Their names to just have an affirmation that recognize these as sisters. Being who we feel. We have a steal of profound connection to today. So imagine that young people would ban have to maybe ask questions about. That I can call out in. Certainly, that's how I learned about my grandmother Great Great Grandmother. Great Great Great Grandmother. Because here was the opportunity for my mom and my grandmother. My aunts to tell me about those who can't compete for me. In so, this would have been a more modern practice in terms. Oh, you know what I've looked at historically that. A practice of pouring libations lane, speaking the names out loud. To a company in June team event has become very very very much on important to how practice jilting celebrations, but you know not to say that we've abandoned that ice cream, making or eating watermelon, or having dancing, or even participating in barbecues, and a remember finally seeing a cousin of mine, who certainly would use the opportunity of having a huge gathering of family and friends and community, and this will be the time she would pedal. The bangs that she made on would be jury or would be. There was the odorant made by one local black company. Called the full of company, and so she would sell items in. Sort of A sense of a maximizing her time near Oslo. She would paddling and earn her some money while we were here for the purpose of June teams, she had an opportunity to a pedal. Her words and and of course there were others would be Aaron so my mom, she would sell Jelly Jam and Chatchai! She later learns to quilt so here. These opportunities to gather round heritage history and celebration would often turn into a festival lace with people bartering in exchanging recipes and sharing horse family stories in histories. in and then a great mind would certainly be part of debt. Whole gathering that communities across Chicago in course knows would be visiting from out of town. Or those who were just reporting back for Hey I visited inverness Berenice. Mississippi and I found out that. One of the. Is is struggling, so you would get inflammation from far and near just being a part of this really really important celebration. Is So one thing I've been thinking as more people sort of think about and discover what June team does, and if it does become. A Federal Holiday Estate Holiday. No Wha- what what might it look like for? For people who are not black to be celebrating June eighteenth, would that be something that's appropriate or not appropriate. How How would you like to make sure that this is a holiday that is is still respected as a cultural practice a without being you know just one more data. People are just off work and barbecuing. You know what what might that look like? Admit to really take a look more deeply as to how many states in America actually recognized June teams as a Holiday Inn. Know that it's upwards of more than shorty. And you know with that sad again. There are many people who all. Know Their state honored June team. As as a holiday in Illinois is one of those states that does honour June. Team does a holiday. It doesn't need to maybe habits visibility raise certainly and the times, and in challenges that we're having about really making certain that. The narrative of how freedom was gained, and and certainly how it's. Not For granted by lots of communities in. Of African descent and think that we need to spend the time. Possibly collaborating with groups that we might Google or and passing, we might see a flyer or something on facebook or twitter where there's a June team event happening in a think, certainly sharing that information widely is the first steps for getting a this Freedom Day. June tank widely understood as being one that has been around since. Eighteen sixty five. SOLIDS Ben Continuum of looking at what freedom means for African communities African Americans in particularly have never not celebrated June team. And saw for communities outside goals of African descent, and think if they took a look and see what states position is if they're state does not. Have June Tiv as a holiday. Certainly we can advocate made certain that as something that's promoted to be a part of the narrative for the United States history. And speaking in terms of significance and importance, but if you are in a state that already recognizes June team as a holiday, maybe lean on our legislators say hey, is there materials or reading materials or educational materials that could be read at home whether it's homeschool, someone who just really wants to get a floor, understanding of of how and why the practice accelerating genting is important so again. Just many people may not understand that this is a practice that. Recognizing June teams as a holiday that has never been abandoned by the African American community. There have been lots of parts of black history that. Are Really not very well taught in schools still certainly not when I was growing up it, but still even now. I think a lot of a lot of people in school gut, this sort of highlights of of history and might hear about you know Rosa. Parks and right Luther King Junior, but then don't hear a whole lot of other stories that are so important. What could we be doing in general through organizations like yours, Brownsville, historical society to make sure that these are parts of our history that are are much better, but much better known much better understood in in ways that could really help us building a better society. I know that in two thousand and twelve I was actually appointed a commissioner for the honest dot commission the State of Illinois. And through that commission, a curriculum was developed. That is free and available for all to experience, so you don't have to be an educator to gone onto the Saddle Museum of African and African American, history website to look for any curriculum from as early as those who three and four years old of course through higher education, so the curriculums certainly give. Families, who may want to say hey, how can I? Really share with my family members is profound history of June team. There are materials that are out there that certainly me, all of the qualifications for. Others in Xilin. Courage teachers to look at those materials breed by the stock mission milloy. To bring those experiences into their classrooms, 'cause often materials did speak about. Freedom and off equality. May Not. Have the materials that speak about how Africans and African Americans celebrate their freedoms. and Saul curriculums are out there off free and open to the public at very well be used and integrated into teaching practices. If teachers find themselves, not having the materials available, they are available for free as a result of Illinois Department of Education. So I think that's one way to consider especially now that we have a shelter in place order, why not take advantage of the tools that are online? Yeah! That's excellent and I can linked to those in our show notes and I hope that people who live in Chicago if they haven't been to the do supple museum when I don't know if they're open right now. What shelter in place? But when they reopened, I hope that people will go there. It's just a really wonderful wonderful museum. Absolutely. So, what do you anticipating this year in celebrations for June eighteen, th you know with both pandemic and shelter in place going on, but also so much going on with black lives matter protests. You know what? What may June teen flick like this year. Well of course we will continue as Brunswick his society. Look at some of the digital platforms where we found out numerous emails. Number of events are going on virtually. And the one that I probably would spend some time with is when it's being hosted by Mount. Appeal Yer Montpellier is the home of president on James Madison in Orange. County Virginia ahead through listening through oral histories trace the number of individuals that my mom and grandmother, and aunts, his share with me more apart or life, and in thirty years later I was able to actually trace our family history to the plantation of Fresno James Madison so I. Am a descendant of enslaved population of Madison's plantation. In so I've just received an invitation to participate in a virtual June team celebration, and I encourage those who listening. Certainly, that's one way to find out which communities that are nearby you especially for myself connecting with the community in Virginia. Here's a great way to find out who might be participating in events when Kobe. Gone that's a great way to save way to what you do. In the future to participate in on a line June team celebration, take a look at some goals virtually vince that are happening and the one at all participate again will be when it's hosted battle by mouth chillier, and I know that they've scheduled a drum call obvious schedule, so storytellers and storytelling is a very important part of June team celebrations. and. I'm almost certain that the also have some singing and dancing as well. Also I encourage anyone who while we're in shelter in place will get some of the virtual celebrations that are happening and I highly recommend those or listening to take a look at now. Players Virtual June team celebration. So rightly a lot of confederate statues have been pulled down recently. What are some historical figures that you would like to see him statues in their places? While I would say if we had done a better job of how history was written. In many history books, some of the challenges we have to find what is truth. Wouldn't be is difficult to find saw often looking at what I call revisionist history. And sometimes I WANNA. Pull my hair. Because I. Read some bangs. Go like okay. That's not really right. For instance, my oldest daughter's forty two years old, and so imagine thirty years plus ago, she brought home her US history books. And, rightfully so Abraham Lincoln hand four pages within a the the page that preceded Abraham Lincoln was all of a paragraph that explains Slavery, and it's impossible to explain slavery in one paragraph. You know four hundred years slaying man? Course Jim Crow and fear and all the other taxes that was used to. Keep those African descent in in bondage and just was furious about the fact that whomever had put together. This US history book left out an opportunity that a could've spoke more broadly about slavery beyond this paragraph saw think that anyone listening in in really all in light of everything. That's going on now. Emerges self in things that are written by black people who have credibility who have high remarks by educators. Have things distributed in the bailable to the public that can be torn apart and reviewed and examined because you know not to say that everything is written as his entire truth. That is time which we. Find ourselves in place is a useful tool for us really taking a look. Deeply at the history of how black blacks in America and slavery has been a written and so much of it is jaded or twisted or omitted or intentionally distorted. I mean I could go on and on, but I'm finding that you know as I've been home. More and more references to. Would say. Pieces that had been looked at you know in historical lands that is more clear than in the past those things becoming more and more available for us, so the information is out there and you know, of course you know. Ask Your friends, so that's why I'm so happy. Yelling at you invited me to speak about the limited knowledge that I have about this fantastic over one hundred. If you're Salvatori met because it takes friends, saying hey, I want to ask those who might participate in things. That I've never experienced. It it has shaped it. And you know for me, just hearing my grandmother in terms of talking about her own truth, and so there are alternatives I guess you would say to what we've heard and much of it is is glaring right at us, so the information is there it just rate we all grass halted truce. If people would like to find out more about the Brownsville historical society, how can they do that? Oh! I would love to hear from everyone certainly taking a look at Brownsville Historical Society Dot wordpress Dot Com. Our website is a portal for you to see the artifacts and documents nobilia that we have in our holdings. we are transitioning to of course using a more tools online to give people just a glimpse of of of what we have in our archives, so in the coming weeks we expect to showcase more than one hundred images out that chronicle those who came during the great migration, so that more than five hundred thousand blacks left the south between nineteen sixteen and in nineteen sixty. So many of them, landing right here in Chicago, so our archives have thousands and thousands of images, those migrants, and most of them were acquired through our aquisition of Jackson funeral home, records, and Jackson funeral home, opened in eighteen, sixty five, and they were the longest and Otis running black funeral business based here in Chicago in close in two thousand eleven, we acquired those records in some are fragmented because of damage in molded things like that, but certainly the one hundred forty thousand plus records that we have that quantum whole the mic race in blacks Chicago. Are Open and available for folks to take a look at so we now have a guest will call it a surname database. Funeral records that we have in our holdings, but we imagine in the coming weeks to put physical images out photographs of. Those that are images of those who are in our holdings in those images date from nineteen, twenty, one into two thousand eleven. So follow our website closely. Excellent well. Sorry, thank you so much for taking the time to talk with me today I'm always excited to learn more about history. Stockton sudden. That didn't learn this the first time around when I learned American. History but I. But I'm glad to have the chance to now. Oh with they Hubert. Thank you for the invitation and let Freedom Ring. Thank you for listening to two bras. Time politics put of the dim cast podcast network. Our theme song is called. Are you listening off of the album? Elephant shaped trees by the band immune. And we're using it with permission of the band, Our logo, an other original artwork is by matthew wetland and was created for use by this podcast. You can contact us at two broad talking politics at g mail, DOT, com, or on twitter or facebook at two broads talk, you can find all of our episodes at two bras. Talking Politics Dot Com are anywhere podcast or found.

Chicago Brownsville Historical Society US Mississippi founder and president Brownsville Illinois America twitter Texas facebook Ranville Emancipation Proclamation Unio Sherry Williams Gordon Granger Kelly Brownsville Historical Society Holiday Inn
Tech Toolbox 2019: Learning to Code How Online Education Has Evolved with Mark Lassoff

Learn to Code with Me

28:07 min | 1 year ago

Tech Toolbox 2019: Learning to Code How Online Education Has Evolved with Mark Lassoff

"Yeah. Hey listeners. Welcome to the show. I'm your host Lawrence Bradford today. Chatting with Marc last off as part of adverse special tech toolbox. Twenty nine hundred series this week to celebrate these second dish in of the ultimate tech career toolbox, which is a bundle. That comes jam packed with thirty three different tech products and courses from twenty one different expert, creators. It covers a wide range of topics in skills, and you can learn more about it in everything that comes with over at learn to code with dot MI Ford slash toolbox. Two thousand nineteen. Now back to our guest today. Mark Mark is the founder and president of framework television. He and his company have taught over one million people web and mobile development online in the corporate classroom and in secondary schools across the country. I'm so excited that Mark is taking part in the bundle with his certified web developer program where he starts with basic coding principles and then works through variety of languages to help you earn that title as a web developer insider conversation. We talk about his background in career intact. Why he started teaching in how his program works? Mark. Also share some of the best ways that you can start learning to code right now. Enjoy. Hey, mark. Thank you so much for coming on the show you for inviting me, it's really great to have you and associated talk to you in. A course you're part of the two thousand nineteen tech career toolbox, which will definitely get into later in. What you teach in all that. But I I wanted to talk about your background. So how did you get your start in technology are started very early? I am of the generation where the Commodore sixty four was kind of the big computer when I was a kid, and I begged and begged my parents to buy me one when I was eleven or twelve and they relented and they did. And once they bought it. I realized I enjoyed kind of making my own games applicastions and things like that more than I did the playing the ones that you could purchase with it. So I taught myself Commodore basic programming before I was thirteen and wrote a whole. A bunch of different games and programs using the basic programming language and probably pretty horrible coding technique at that point and just maintain the interest as I got older, I have formal training and computer science from the university of Texas at Austin. And when I graduated from school started my career in the industry. So when I started your career were you working full-time in software, engineering or software development or related. I've had kind of a weird PAF I did work in a couple of fulltime programming jobs. I worked for one of the largest polling agencies in the country. Doing coding also worked for a large computer manufacturing, computer, manufacturer writing code for the sales teams there in a couple of other jobs, like that enterprise level types of positions. And then I got very interested in two things simultaneously. The first was the new at the time online education industry became extremely interested in ways, we could teach online and also entrepeneurship and those two things merged to really guide the rest of my career. So everything I've done since I've did formal coding has been somewhere in the education space or online education space, but you know, very, very tech oriented Gotcha seven how long have you been teaching online for now? I was one of the first we started. Teaching online in two thousand two thousand one somewhere around there. And it was interesting back them because bandwidth was a lot more precious. So what we take for granted today of people universally being able to see online video and being able to talk, you know, real time through websites, etc. Through the internet the bandwith back. Then just wasn't quite there yet. So it was a lot more challenging to do some of the things we take for granted today. But it was interesting because it really felt like we were, you know, on the cusp of something huge. And you know, of course, you, and I both know how online education is really blown up and I got to see the beginning of that and see the industry develop over the last two decades. And I think it's only going to grow. I think it's a really exciting space to be. And I think you know, it's one of those things where I get up every day. And I know what I do is benefitting people, I know people are getting job and career skills out of. What I do. And what we do in industry, and I find that really gratifying. Wow. I didn't realize you had been teaching online for that one to be totally honest. I didn't even realize there were online teaching resources in two thousand or two thousand one. And I think you are probably the guest I've had lots of guests on the show that we're technology in various ways, I've had of course, a lot that are online instructors teaching online. You may have the most experienced teaching online. I think out of anyone I've ever interviewed. So that's really exciting. I didn't even know that when I invite you to come on. So this is a pleasant surprise to find out, you know, as as chatting right now, what did that look like in two thousand thousand one like when you were putting together these courses or programs kills interesting. I back in two thousand two thousand one I was still early on in my career. And I got a job doing corporate technical training for what was at the time the largest chain of technical training centers in the world. They at the time at one hundred fifty train. Centers everywhere from Dubai to Trumbull, Connecticut, and I was instructor for them. And then I was in a leadership position for one of their largest franchisees, and you know, the national effort for the franchise company was to get the training online because they saw immediately as much more efficient way to deliver training. So I delivered some of the first online live classes for them and helped design some of the first self paced, a synchronous online classes that they did at the same time. I was also working for I think a pioneering web say that recorded videos to teach visual studio, the PC based development environment or the say windows based development environment, and I was recording some videos for them as well. And it was really really interesting. I mean, it looked very rudimentary compared to what we have tha. Day. I was wearing the type of headset that you wear to talk to someone on Skype and plugging that into my USB port, and basically recording on my laptop, and you there was no HD video at the time. We were very worried about compression, and you know, trying to get the appropriate level of quality where people could still stream videos consistently. No matter where they were. So I think the biggest thing that's catalyzed, the growth of online education has been the availability of bandwidth, and the fact that you know, anyone now can connect to YouTube or any site and stream video without a problem yet. That's something. I never even. Had put too much thought into. But it makes a ton of sense. And especially talking to guests that had a lot of folks, I talked to top themselves in these, you know, the late nineties or the early two thousand it's the conversation. Just of how the learning resources available to people learning how to code have just just insane volition, right? Like so many, folks. Yeah. That they were very limited in what the resources were. Now there is. I couldn't get you may know better than me, but thousands and thousands of YouTube videos on learning how to code alone, not to mention other platforms. So I would love to hear a bit about what you have seen just over the years teaching people these technical skills like especially in as far as like, what are the best ways to learn with people you've worked with you. I mean, there's a number of choices out there. And I think that's one of the things that's really beneficial about learning. This point is that there are so many options for people who wanna learn, and I think, you know, partially it's determined by how much time do you have how much budget do you have and how aggressively do you want to pick up the skills? You know, I commonly say, you know, you can learn anything on YouTube. But you know, you might be learning from a thirteen year old Ukrainian with a cold. So you know, that's an option is free YouTube videos and people make those sometimes just because they love to teach the problem with that. What makes that difficult is that there's no specific curriculum laid out for you. And you kind of have to push your way through hundreds of, you know, ten fifteen minute videos to to to learn what you're gonna learn. And then you still may miss things that are important. So, you know, with online curriculum like I teach it's carefully designed based on the needs of industry before we designed our latest curriculum. We went out and talked to one hundred people who were hiring first time web, developers and said aside from the the irrelevant list of skills and the job ad. What are you really looking for? What are the things that make new developer successful in the web space? And then we designed curriculum around that. So I mean between, you know, free YouTube, videos, and. Our formal boot camp style curriculum like we do, you know, there's there's a million other options for people to learn you know, what I learned in college. I mean, none of that is is really relevant anymore. So I continue to to learn in all sorts of ways, I take formal courses. I learn from. I learn new techniques on YouTube, and sometimes I go to Barnes and noble and sit down with a book. And I think that's what's so exciting is there's so many ways to learn and it doesn't have to be expensive. And and I think one of my core beliefs too. And I think this was something that's changed over the years is there's nothing special about developments in that the average person can learn this it we used to consider development monolithically like, you know, creating algorithms for artificial intelligence to same things creating a website. And frankly, it's not and just about anybody can learn HTML and some Java script and put up a website, or or some type of basic mobile app. You don't have to be particularly smart or good at math. You don't have to have a college education or a master's degree. You know, you just have to be willing to learn and put in the work. And I think that's the other thing that's exciting as the accessibility of these skills now to just about anyone with an internet connection. He I I love that angry with so much that you said like that how work ethic is just so important when it comes to learning anything new or maybe not anything, but the HTML CSS Java script, and and things like that just getting a website up. That's exactly how I fell and people ask me about how when I first start teaching myself how to code. I hated math. I did not do well with computers at all high school or college. I was not like you. I was not tinkering on the computer when I was, you know, thirteen years old in in. I was still able teach myself in a relatively short amount of time. So yet totally great what you're saying. So I was doing research on you in looking at all these different topics. In skills in language in frameworks that you teach. I would just be curious if there was a certain one that is like your favorite to us or to teach or maybe both. And why should I am pretty vanilla? When it comes to the technologies that I recommend that new people learn because I think it's really important to choose things that are very very widely used. So I teach a fairly standard curriculum starts with HTML, and that's the underpinning architecture of every website and many mobile apps that you see out there. It's kind of the the structure the skeleton I teach CSS which is the design layer, which is how you make things. Look the way you want make them look good and usable. And then Java script her interaction. Javascript increasingly is the most important language out there because of its flexibility you can use it in the web browser which was the original intent, but now with no J s kind of different implem-. Implementation of Java script, you can use it on the server side. You can run in the server and even on the desktop and then for for server side languages, we also teach PHP and while it's not the sexy choice. It is the most commonly used back in language out there. And when we teach I think, you know, it doesn't matter as much what language you you. Learn initially if you have a good foundation because that's what prepares you to learn other languages because languages have a lot of similarities, it's kind of like if you know how to use Microsoft Word, you should be able to go ahead and use for example, the Google word processor without much of a transitional problem because you understand how word processors work. My goal really using HTML CSS and Java script is little understand how digital development works, and then they can take that basic knowledge. Neither use that to execute projects or use that as a foundation to learn more advanced skills in language. He's got it. So when someone is starting out and learning these things, and now you mentioned earlier, it really can vary depending on the like how they are. And how much time they spend a few other factors, but for most people who do have strong work ethic. Let's say in our dedicating a few hours every week or Regan day. How long is it taking them to pick up on these things like the HTML CSS Java script, it's very individual everybody learns differently. So, you know, some people may be very aggressive, and they can be functionally creating websites and in a few weeks others because of time commitments because of just taking longer to absorb the skill sets. It may take them a month or two, but if you put in the effort just about anybody can become functional with these skills, and I really think you know, what we're talking about. Here is modern day digital literacy. Right. Whereas when I was back in high school. School many years ago. We were all required to learn physics and chemistry and biology. But I think the modern literacy is really these skills is HTML Java script CSS, and if you look at today's high school students they're spending all day every day immersed in digital media. But so few of them know how it's made. And I think it's important for everyone to learn these skills for that reason got excel really have been talking a lot about what your program teaches that is offered in the ultimate Tekere toolbox. This certified web development professional, and we cut about all these things one thing that we didn't talk about that. I know get into is sequel. So could you talk a little bit about that? Yes. Sequel is first of all structured query language, and it's used with any type of sequel compliant database that's out there. So common databases include my s q. Or my sequel, and then, you know, sequel light so most databases that use sequel have the letters SQL in it and these databases use a very similar sequel language to access database content. So for example, if I had a database of for example, students at university, I could write a sequel statement that shows me all of the first names last names and social security numbers of those students if I had the appropriate access so sequel databases still even though again, kind of old school computer science are still an important school skill because when it comes down to it most databases that people use use the sequel language, so once you understand the sequel language you can start communicating with just about any database out there. And it's a skill many employers look for in new developers in a lot of new developer start by working with day. Databases database admins or database developers in order to work with the actual data. That's used by the employer fat. And I was looking at this course, certified web developer professional, and there's a lot of content there. Lots of different modules after person goes to the program. What do you suggest they do next like what should their next step be typically when we're working closely with soons once they achieved the certified web development professional certification, which means they've you become functional HTML, CSS, etc. The technology we were discussing before I think it's really important to build a portfolio of project work. The portfolio is really I think one of the most important elements in getting your foot in the door in the industry because it shows what you're able to do and it shows that you can get projects done. So we actually have some suggestions for our members to build their portfolio in different types of project. Acts they can build, but the idea is that you can show a portfolio to potential employer, and they can see rebel to get something done. This is a specially effective with nontechnical employers. You know, there's there's two types of jobs at a high level out there. Right. There's employers who are nontechnical, but are hiring technical people for some function. So I have a friend for example who runs the website for a pet supply company. Well, their main their main focuses Pet Supplies, not the technology. But then there's technology companies. But if you're working as a technology person at a non technology company, we found that the portfolio is extremely effective at getting hired because they don't have the technology background to test you on your sequel knowledge, or if you're HTML is correct. But if they can see visually in an online portfolio that you can get things done you're very likely to get the job. And the other thing is that Br. Which is the gap between traditionally trained programmers with a computer science degree and people who are taught through programs like we're talking about today who you went through an alternative education experience. They may be just as skilled, but they don't have that degree the portfolio can help bridge that gap. So I'm a big fan of portfolios. I love that. And I okay. So supernova pie have a whole episode about portfolios. But it, but if there's someone thinking of making a portfolio, and they're trying to target these non tech employers as someone who may not really understand exactly what they're doing. What do they look like how do you balance not make your portfolio to technical? So you confuse these these non technical people, but still show what you're capable of you. I think you know, it's one of those things if you're dealing with technical employers oftentimes, it's it's the old adage, you know, the the. About the cover it with the book cover book cover for getting it can read read don't judge a book by its cover. Right. They will. That's what I'm trying to think of they will very much judge the book by its cover. So if you're dealing with Anton technical employer, they're gonna look at the portfolio, and they're going to look at it from a user's perspective. So they want it to be attractive. Look good be functional, and they're not really gonna probably asked you any questions about the underlying code is long as things work. So I think it's important to include some web applications and mobile applications, if that's what you're interested in that are appealing and have simple working functionality. So one of the things, for example, to take a transit API and building arrivals board or departure board Pank careful attention to the user experience and making sure it's good because that's what nontechnical employer is likely to be paying attention to versa. Technical employers is more likely. To look at the code and care about the code and its structure and its correctness nontechnical employer may look at the things that are more obvious to an actual user faring a half to ask this. And I think it may be obvious to some people, but especially for those just listening. I'm just starting out in really knew I knew I would be thinking as had what even know if the employer is technical or not or the person that is hiring me he thinks that's that's a fair question. I would ask what the person's job title is who's who's interviewing and you might ask. If they're part of the technical team. You know, some clues that the person is not technical as they work in the HR department, or you know, they're there have a broad title like vice president of something and you'll often find that their non technical. But also, you can tell by the size of the companies, you know, in small companies that don't have a large technical team or any tech team is off. Often where people get their start. And they're you know, you may be the technical person. It's real common for me to hear that people get their first jobs wind up kind of providing a little bit of desktop support along with managing the company website. So you've gotta just by the size of the company. But I think it's a fair question to ask the person interviewing you what they do. And you can also just ask this technical interview. And almost all the time. Someone is nontechnical. No, it's not a technical interview. And then you can approach it from more of a user's perspective. Yeah. Yeah. Time to laugh. I'm laughing is technical interviewing if the person's not technical coarser gonna say they could feel like if they can almost be nervous if they think the nervous, but oh man, I can have to run a technical interview. Because even that to me idea running one could be overwhelming, if you're not you're not technical, and they wouldn't know what they were looking for. Anyway, I it's real important to to be very honest about, you know, the level of skills that you have. Because it's very easy to in a nontechnical interview over promise and under deliver. Because if someone is nontechnical they may look at you as a guru, even if you're just starting out. So I think it's important to be honest as far as you know, what your limitations are at that point. And but also state that you know, you're continuing to grow and and learn and you'll continue to to grow in the position. Once you have it mean sense. So we talked about a lodge things today. And I think we got into everything that the program certified web development professional teaches. But is there anything that we didn't touch on that you think is really important for all the listeners to hear? I just want to talk about the certifications a little bit. You know, the certifications are designed to show that you know, what, you know. So when you earn the certification a couple of things happen one. You get a validation page through credential dot net, which shows your certification at shows. The knowledge that it represents and also allows you to directly link the certification with your lengthen. So it's listed under the certification section of your Lincoln and often employers will search by those types of certifications for skill sets that they're looking for the second thing with the certification is it becomes part of your portfolio because you have unique certification page that displays the certificates that you earn and explains what they're about. So those are good to include in your digital portfolio. Again, help people understand that you know, what you've know especially if again, you've been through an alternative education experience versus something more formal in college setting these will help you compete in the market against people who have a degree got it sell. Obviously people can catch this product in the two thousand nineteen Tekere toolbox. But do you have any other resources that folks might find useful especially for those that? Are listening to this episode maybe months from now. Yeah. So you can first of all visit our website at framework, TV dot com, and there we've got a number of different programs from beginners to intermediate level, developers who are learning and those programs range from short half hour free project based content where we might do something like build a tip calculator or a weather conditions application to twenty four week formal courses on digital design, and that's framework TV dot com. Anyone can come and join for free and take advantage of the free content that we offer in decide whether or not a more advanced level of learning with us for them. I thank you so much Mark for coming on. I appreciate you. Having me this has been fun. I hope you enjoyed my conversation with Mark again, you can check out his product the certified web developer program inside are two thousand nineteen version of the ultimate tech career toolbox. This toolbox is a collection of thirty three different tech products in courses seriously. It has so much to offer. Here's what one bundle buyer revert. Oh who lives in Atlanta, Georgia had to say about it? I was skeptical at first thousands of dollars in coding courses for hundreds of dollars sounded too good to be true. But the ultimate tech career toolbox turned out to be the best way to save a whole bunch of time and spent a fraction of the price. You would try to get all these courses separately as I advanced my learning in decide to pursue new subjects. I'm very fortunate that I can still access all of these courses that I bought months ago. In fact, I was even able to drop out of my second bachelor's degree to spend time working on these courses. You won't regret getting this. All. As revert. Oh, said you're not going to regret investing Innis. You can find out more about the bundle at learn to code with dot MI Ford slash toolbox. Twenty nineteen that you are L is all one word in remember the car closes on Saturday may fourth at midnight eastern time, and it won't be vailable ever again. All right. That's it. For me have a great rest of the day. I'll be back tomorrow with the final episode in our special tech to locks twenty nineteen series.

YouTube Mark Mark web developer founder and president developer Commodore Lawrence Bradford Marc university of Texas Atlanta Austin Dubai Skype
Crowdsourcing to Improve Digital Health Experiences with Denise Silber, Founder at Doctors 2.0 & U

Outcomes Rocket

30:28 min | 1 year ago

Crowdsourcing to Improve Digital Health Experiences with Denise Silber, Founder at Doctors 2.0 & U

"Welcome to the outcomes rocket podcast where we inspire collaborative thinking improved outcomes and business success with today's most successful and inspiring healthcare leaders and influencers and now your host so marquesses. Welcome welcome back to the podcast. Did i have the privilege of hosting denise cedar. She is the c._e._o. Of doctors two point oh and you driven by passion to improve the healthcare through better use of digital innovation denise founder and president of us. You'll strategies and of the doctors two point. Oh a new conference series has a deep vision asian and understanding of the opportunities and challenges of digital health with twenty plus years of experience. She's a global thought leader and social media influence or based in in paris. The niece contributes her unique experience as both a strategic digital health consultant and coach in marketing communication and as a digital health keynote speaker m._c. and conference curator multicultural multi-lingual. The niece was one of the rare americans to receive the legion of honor from the french government for her work. In international e-health she deploys our skills in strategy communication events training and writing to help digital it. All projects pushed forward. If there's anybody that can help push your project forward it's denise and so it's a pleasure to have her here on the podcast with us and and <hes> with that i wanna go ahead and open mic to you denise. Welcome thank you so much. It was really lovely to seek out for this interview in looking forward to it. Yeah me too denise niece did did i leave anything out of your intro that you wanna share with the listeners about you think that was already quite nice so let's just talk into into a thank you for the opportunity. That sounds good. So why did you decide to get into the healthcare sector so it was a combination of wanting to and finding the right opportunity at right moment. Few people know that very early on is a teen. I was considering becoming a doctor and then i went to an open house and an hospital and realized that i didn't think i would have the stamina and strength to be surrounded by people with at the time what i perceived as such suffering munger ability and later when i was at a couple of times in in my life my first job after college which was with the u._s. Foreign service and i was put in public health physician visiting rural medical centers listened city hospitals. I was very interested in trying to help from a policy standpoint and then when i was getting my m._b._a. One of if the offers i received was to go to work for a leading pharmaceutical company and i thought well this is it. This is my opportunity to observe a little bit more closely. What's going coming on in the healthcare system. Wow so it's like one thing after another whether it be through a hospital or a pharma company you just sort of kept this healthcare thing just kept popping up in your life. Yes it was unavoidable. Pops up in in everyone's life although although perhaps in mine a bit more as child because there were the previous generation and the generation before presence of physicians in part of mike inside of my family these people were looked upon as heroes the other side yeah that makes a lotta sense and so you took the opportunity the and fast forward to today while i mean you've done so many great things got this conference where you bring people together on on this theme of you know just being digitally focused. What would you say hot topic that needs to be on health. Leaders agendas today is how are you guys thinking and approaching it well. The hot topic would would be the flexibility that leaders need to have terms of planning for the future in a world where i believe that the health system the treatments in the health system won't be structured in the same way i just came back from the second edition of the virtual medicine conference and when i see the enthusiasm and results for therapeutic virtual reality and as well the fact that in general general term of digital therapeutics is catching on and use of digital for prevention for prevention that up until now has not been successful and and that all of these things take us out of as well at least in part from the physical buildings then i think i begin to see what i we had hoped to see which is that when people are thinking of the healthcare system they think simply bringing solutions to people people wouldn't medical problems and not well. I've got these hospitals have got these healthcare professionals. What am i gonna do with them. That's not the best perspective for how do we organize ourselves to provide the best healthcare to people yeah and and it's happening and i think now more than ever you have have the use of of digital technologies telemedicine present and i think it's important that we focus on. How do we stay focus on our core permission. Give us an example of either something you or or one of your clients has has gone through or done to achieve better outcomes uh-huh or improve healthcare well. I'm thinking of a <hes> a study that was done by hospital in strasbourg zone out success france with an artificial intelligence consulting company who is a partner and this study was able to demonstrate in respect to mammograms the usefulness of the mammogram in the two populations who were observed retrospectively who would not been in a study but because they're able to use software that could gather data that was unstructured that wasn't even a fistula. Can you think of is the electronic medical record but that could have been in notes or any other way. They will demonstrate that women who came in regularly regularly for mammograms had better life expectancy than those who did not that is certainly one way to not put an end but to bring a solid argument to the debate about whether we are excessively exposing people to x-rays and taking their time and creating inexpensive me there is a debate about women in mammograms and you feel that in the end the data showed food that is actually good and the quality of life as well as the health span of an individual is better here because of that and if we can say that so i have two types of professional activity or they're very interrelated one is the consulting on communications aspect of something and the other is making events for medical professionals better so a second example example of outcomes is the fact that i was an important part as the moderator of the patient panel at the virtual medicine the conference because there i was able to put the patients at ease so that people who are not ordinarily in the business of speaking to to a professional audience this was c._m._e. Accredited then we're able to really explain how they had gone from pain or anxiety to state of peacefulness and resolution of their problem through the use of love virtual reality to me. That's why. I know that i'm repeating what i mentioned earlier. What should people be on the lookout for but up until now and i think this is important in distinction digital has basically been putting information in the right place. The example that i gave about the mammographic mammograms is is that case the individual patient isn't going to feel better because they took mammogram. That was a demographic study that overall tells public health policy makers to do but in this case with virtual reality it is the first time ember that a digital tool shoes right directly to the minden face if the patient yeah how to feel better and right away and they all still that after doing this for a while they can actually get themselves into that state. It's good teaching tool. That's that's <hes>. There's a lot of promise to that and you know to your point unlike the more traditional brick and mortar solutions the the v._r. Set could be shipped to a patient at their own home and they could do it from their own home. They absolutely are expected to it might be a hospitalized patient because that was one of the cases as somebody who had massive pain do irritable bowel syndrome disease and to was hospitalized but then used it at home additionally. I don't know that there have been studies using things like google cardboard or other very inexpensive tools but it will work with with that as well. That's awesome. That's fascinating. Have you ever put one of these on and experienced that yourself absolutely so several times unfortunately. I can't say that i did it well. I'm glad i can say that. I did not do it from a from a suffering from a medical standpoint. I one that i had tried was the glass elevator where about three hundred sixty point from inside the elevator and depending on how fast accelerate your head in the direction that you go. That's what you see see. Now it so happens. I am not. I don't get worried when i get into an elevator in one of those hotels has the glass elevators but i definitely felt out that acceleration. I felt exhilaration. I also tried one which was conference person. I go to events as well to know order to bring exciting things to other to the more traditional medical conferences so i went for a number of times two games for health europe. Branch switches often held in the netherlands and at that one i some of their games are are virtual. I tried on one that that had to do with physical therapy where you would see shapes like shiny shapes on a dark background and you would have to move your gaze. He's to shoot them down by doing this day. It would disappear and that gives you physical therapy that is measurable because when you tell somebody do this movement forty five times they may not count them not count right but you can see it with three game method and the game would end when you've done your your your dose went right now. Cedars sinai in los angeles. I also tried on one where you are <hes> in in the body of a person with dementia with form of dementia and so you're in your house and you're seeing people come but you're you're sort of not seeing them right now. I don't know how perfectly they imitate because they cannot be in the head of the demented person right to know but it was a very distorted compared to how i see things the sound and the view were sort of coming in and out were incomplete and a bit scary so those are different purposes that was to train out care professional empathy. Guess yeah yeah as very interesting among these different applications and sneak that you you've tried the different ones and i must say that i tried one at our own. It's something i had organized where that particular model and this was a couple of years ago. I can't remember exactly which model was was not for me. That was a model where there must have been a problem of delay between in some way of of what delay of what you see may meet as he sick right away and i saw so they're improving that yeah so i i'm always interested in seeing it's super interesting and what if finals interested thank you for sharing that <hes> you know the most interesting part is gosh. The different applications shins for virtual reality. You walk us through an empathy with the alzheimer patients. I love the one where also the person can look town and st their avatars limb because this can be that can look and then that can project to them that they can walk that feeling right. Wow yeah that's so interesting. I i had a chance to do was meditation and then they just kinda place me in a forest. It was really an in by the way i was stressed before i did it and i'm like let me try this and it really did relax me and then the other one that i tried it was a training orthopedic training how to use the <unk> surgery fascinating stuff. The applications are plentiful and folks. You probably are thinking wow gosh. What else do they use this on and that is a good question because there's a lot of things at v._r. Is being used on so appreciate you bring that to the conversation denise might and i thought of something that might be that goes back to early questions but it's in relation to this instead. Is there anything anything hasn't been said about you. I own a three. D version of myself says that that has to do with digital well. I wouldn't zinn barcelona on on a personal visit with friends when i walked past this three d. printing store and i saw that it was full of tiny figurines that people purchase just some different size so i stood on a desolate turns aren't they took four thousand photos in like something like seven minutes and i have this figuring. I just did it out of my digital curiosity. I wanted to see if this could really look like myself but i talked with them and they produce ears for a local surgeon out of their own material but it enables the surgeon to then make one out of the material that he needs to use to create an ear for example for a person who is missing one. I can imagine that it could as well given you the body sense to a person who feels off balance or or whatever i just wanted to the thrill of it no. It's very interesting interesting. So how big is the figuring. Oh maybe five six inches. It's it's it's very small very small. I remember as a little kid. I wanted a superman. Dan rea supergirl figuring now you have it. Did you put a little k- bonnet not yet but that's a good idea. I love it. No that's really great <unk> so denise. You've done some some really interesting work in your career and what you're doing today. What would you say one thing that setback setback that you had that you learned a lot from that's major. You've been stronger better well. I firmly believe that failure is always useful unless unless it's a failure that puts an end totally to anything you could ever do again. I mean physically it would ever that. There's no way to start again so it's true that <hes> none of the failures really were a total setback. An example would be my initial relation to startups. I joined one the earliest second opinion medical startups in the u._s. Nearly twenty years yeah twenty years ago nineteen ninety nine and we didn't. I didn't get to reach the milestones and get the financing that we needed there. It was the first internet bubble at the time and it was so difficult because if you had really walk on eggs in relation to getting a second opinion who is it perceived as versus and that with the original opinion you know putting the doctors ability in question a whereas these are very complex situations and actually it's more likely than not that you'd have as many opinions opinions at least variations based on the number of people that you would ask so when that didn't work out. I accepted another concision with <hes> the very first surgical online community deep and that didn't work out either they also didn't have their funding because it was too soon and so i learned from those experiences to be very wary of these great ideas because you need enough enough people. It's it's a delicate balance between you. Don't want to launch something that there are fifty million of them and this brings nothing on the other hand. If you're too soon you won't have enough supporters orders to make it viable. I have a certain distance with respect to founders of startups who could come across the same. This is a really amazing idea. It's it's going to work guy. I've seen from the inside how things don't necessarily work even if they seemed logical yeah. I think that's a that's a really great. Call out. The jason speaks to your experience. Every great idea is a great idea until it's not and it's definitely a great that you mentioned that something for the listeners. Keep in mind if you're looking at something that seems exciting. You gotta really vetted out. What would you tell listeners the niece. How do you tell you know it may seem like a great. Idea may seem logical but what's that thing that you see say. That's that's not well. It depends ants on what market you're after. If you're going to need you would know this well. If you're going after market with reimbursement then you have to wonder what time line is this company or service going to get the proof needs to submit to regulatory authority and candy last passed through that that is a key question because originally many digital inventors weren't thinking of going down that regulatory path and the people realize that because health care functions big time based on reimbursement you have to that and that may well welby question. You can't answer that you might need to show to people use to trials because they can say well. You're going to need x. number of users in two two groups and to show a statistical difference and you can start to wonder whether this service will show that relative great caller. What's one of your proudest leadership experiences that you've had to date overall was in creating a movement and i would say a happiness appreciation through the events that that i've either created or assisted with and in particular particular giving patients voice so when i first launched doctors to point out was a standalone conference now. It's an embedded session in another conference back at the beginning of this decade that is ending. It was very rare to have organized a conference. That's where you would have several patients speaking to treat them like a speaker to have them to give them transport to ask them for their biography their photo photo to give them keynote position and and they all <hes> if i were to ask them but most spontaneously said that taking the stand and in front of an audience where there were senior people healthcare professionals in manager's listening to them not only as appear but listening to them as as a speaker did more for them than in certain cases there medicine which is another thing that i should mention in looking at the the healthcare system for the future the idea of looking at the whole person and not just one particular medical condition which is very difficult for a professional fashioned to do because they're led to practice through a specialty if not a sub specialty but the joy goosebumps of seeing the patient pull pull out the lessons of their medical and digital experience because all those that we invited had both they had a medical condition to which they had somehow contributed in terms of solution along with the healthcare professional by using the using new technologies the internet in app or something in some way to improve their their state denise. What inspired you to start doctors two point. Oh one day a few couple of years before that i found myself organizing as a volunteer and event that turned into three hundred people i had been an expert bert for this french commission that was trying to determine what to do with the quality certification for <hes> web for web stuff websites and i and created an association to discuss this with stakeholders to go beyond what the government was doing and healthcare in particular in general it was for quality of healthcare. Okay got one of the things that i had done early on was. I was invited to many working groups about the quality of information n._f._l. Care information and so that led me around the world but i did this in the u._s. Very european countries <unk> around the world that did not do this in languages in asia for but eurocentric remark however i did participate in so many of these reflections on what to do do with information that hasn't been vetted by medical publisher that i wound up creating a symposium and a large company gave us a huge auditorium meriem and it showed up and said wait a second. Why don't i take this. This might clearly. This is a gift to know how to get people to attend things. Why don't i make this into a business. I then discovered that in terms of the intersection between events anson digital that those events attract predisposed people people who are ready early adopters and sint including doctors just to winnow so my goal which is has always been to convince the decision makers healthcare professionals. I believe that if tomorrow there were an uprising the healthcare professionals saying give us more digital gives us more patient engagement the things that i believe in we would have no problem it would happen because authorities already want to work along with the doctors. It isn't happening because not only do they have burn out but they're not given the opportunities to learn about these things and so that's why i'm still interested in the event world but i wanna be lodged will air the doctors and other healthcare professionals are really going. The not in private private isolated events for i love it. I love it. Thank you for sharing that the knees and what would you say today's today's an exciting project. You're working on well. It's that i've always got more than one thing going on. It's a getting the word out and identifying events where i can bring this expertise of digital and and the patient and <hes> i'm meeting next with a law firm law firms like to promote their expertise by organizing events so hopefully we're going to put together a psycho that reflects these interests and secondly i it's just that's been proved that there is a hospital somewhere in france in a very small smallish town that would like me to participate in there. I'm i'm not sure if i should say digital transformation but in using the power of collective intelligence inspiration to create new ideas working directly with the healthcare professionals from all over the hospital. It's a fairly large hospital several hundred beds and they we need to make the atmosphere more conducive to better recruitment so i'm going to do a lot of brainstorming but these people of what they they would like to see in the way of novelty and i know that or innovation in some of that will definitely be digital. Some of it may be related to exchanges with patients. I'm looking four to this project. Which will i guess start soon and run for several months fascinating denise year always up to something really cool so <hes> <hes> because i'm excited if i can make a spontaneous answer to question. You haven't asked i i i would recommend that people do something started doing a little while ago. Which is a daily gratitude workbook or notebook at night. When the days ending i just right down very quickly. Some bullet points of what i'm grateful for and i think that this gives you a view. When you look around yourself you see the good stuff. I love that yeah. That's a great. It's a great tip the niece so i personally in my morning routine right when i wake up the first thing that i do every day. Eh is go through several things that i'm grateful for. I don't write them down so i think that's a good next step for me and listeners. It is a big deal. You know if you come from a place of gratitude versus a place of expectation. It's a completely different. World and denise is obviously a testament to that so appreciate you sharing that the needs thank you <hes> getting close to the end. I've got a lightning round a couple of questions for you. There followed by a book that you recommend listeners ready. What's the best way to improve healthcare outcomes. Ask the patient. What is the biggest mistake or pitfall to avoid isolating the individual into their different parts rather than looking at the person is whole. How do you stay relevant. Despite constant change it's about what you are exposed to so reading material and challenging yourself by meeting with people that are different from yourself. What is one area of focus that drives all else in your work listening in denise these next two or more on a personal note for the listeners to get to know you. What is your number. One health habit the number. One thing that i've learned as a new habit is how to breathe in breathe better. Thanks to using digital watch. I love it and what is your number. One success habit get outside. I think that we spend too much time at our desks risks. I agree with you. I think that's a good one to get with people. I met my best woman. I'm in an exchange with people that's really good. What book book would you recommend to the listeners then he's so i have two books to recommend one for your whole life that is called the art and practice of loving living heartfelt. Yes by frank andrews p._h._d. I did this book within a course its own line called love the factor for social justice you can find from stanford inferred encore sarah and in short term sapienze by you low harari which gives you a new way of looking at the history <music> of the earth some great recommendations nason listeners you could get links to those books as well as a full transcript of our interview with denise piece but outcomes rocket that health and in the search bar type in denise sober it's s. I l. e. r. or type in basile strategies. That's b. a. s. I l. strategies. You'll find this podcast there with everything. You need to take action on the things you learned today so denisa before we we conclude i'd love if you could just share a closing thought and then the best place of the listeners could get in touch with you or learn more about your work. Closing thought is that when must only the main optimistic sundays. You have a breath in yourself. There's something to be done the great message and if the listeners wanted to learn more about you and your at work what would be the best place for them to <hes> check it out well they can follow me on linked in under my name and they can also check out the doctors twenty dot dot com website on its blog and doctors twenty dot com yet doctors to dot com beautiful and we'll of course if they follow me on twitter twitter. I'd be very happy that south to open a health to paris doctors to allow dot com will leave those lakes in the show notes. If today's interview resonated with view and you want to check out this this awesome conference that the nieces put together. It's now embedded in part of a larger one as well as her work. Follow her on twitter will leave all all those things in the show notes denise just want to say thank you so much really have <hes> enjoyed our talk today thank you. You're doing a wonderful job yourself in presenting all these people to your listeners thanks for listening to the outcomes rocket podcast be shoot visit us on on the web at www dot outcomes rocket dot com for the show notes resources inspiration and so much more.

denise piece paris hot topic twitter founder and president french government munger consultant google los angeles alzheimer Dan rea strasbourg
Your Questions Answered - How Do We Get More Money For College?

Affording College with Aaron Greene

19:21 min | 1 year ago

Your Questions Answered - How Do We Get More Money For College?

"<music> welcome to afford in college with aaron green founder and president of college liftoff. Thanks thirty guy so welcome to foreign college. I'm aaron greenhouse of affording college and founder of college liftoff colors of college planning firm. I started to provide solutions for anybody. Nobody in everybody that's going through college. Planning has college planning needs. Our mission is to secure teens brightest future and save them and their families thousands of dollars in the process. Yes we work with teams. Throughout the entire college planning process starting with personalized one on one critical element work from there we find the best schools to match our students chosen career paths hats and interest then offer support throughout the entire mission's process next we work with families budgets to find the price that makes the most sense for their kids education all while ensuring ensuring it's the right fit today. We are ohio's premiere college planning firm. I'm happy to say that we're shooting for the world by the way and we strive to save time stress and money when it comes to your child's else higher education so that's a little background on myself and college liftoff. I do this podcast. I really wanna family some solid advice when it comes to planning for college in higher education because there's so much misinformation out there. The purpose of this podcast is to dispel the mets and misinformation really help families so every so often we get questions from the audience through our website and through facebook and twitter anything like that <hes> just asking questions about college. Just anything on your mind that you may want answered and we love to answer them. <hes> so i'm sitting here with allison page and alex typically sees these questions i so without we bring to the table and just be able to answer answer some through ooh yeah this summer. We have seen a lot of questions. Thank you for submitting <hes> but one of the questions <hes> that we've seen most <music> as of late as the summer is winding down it are actually from <hes> the parents of students that are college college bound so recently. We've been seeing a lot of questions from parents <hes> saying you know hey. My kid is already committed headed to college. They're going in the fall. How do we get more money now. Yeah okay okay so this is. This is a harder topic to tackle because the truth is there's no good answer and it's again as i've talk talk about an all pass podcasts of how this process likened house it think of the concept of you bought a house and you see something that happened or something thing went wrong or nothing and you just like you know what i think. I want more money off of this. That's not gonna happen. You've already bought the house you've already. You've already gone through closing closing. You've already done all that. There's no reason for the seller at all at that point to go back and give you anything else. <hes> i really wanna make sure so that people understand what they're doing when they when they buy college you're buying college and i mean that i want you to understand that that is the full aspect of this. You've gone to the school. You picked it. This isn't something that it's not it. It's schools are nonprofits and twisted. They do their best but they're in business awesome business tomorrow and in that same vein. They're not gonna give you really anything else. You've you've already bought them based off of the deal that you've already agreed to which is is the financial aid package that you accepted. When you sign on the dotted line to come to that school. There is potential for more scholarships through other methods and now mind you these are small. These are not gonna by any measure cover tuition cover room and board for the vast majority of schools. You're looking at things that you know maybe two or three thousand thousand dollars here from your department as you go further on into school because in your department whatever you're going to school for <hes> as you gradually get older meaning <music> as you get into your software especially junior specially senior year and your student in that specific department that degree your more dedicated to that major so the individual apartments or colleges the college nearing his more willing to give you money to help you with your education because now you're full-fledged engineering student versus. If you're an incoming freshman shman fifty percent of incoming major changer a fifty percent of incoming freshman change a major but in the whole aspect of it the majority of money you get for college comes to admissions missions so when you apply to a school you do the fast food you do all the things you start getting financial aid offers and this is why i really really encourage you guys as an audience pay attention to the financial aspects just as much as you do to the other ends whether it be the academic the fifth pieces the financials justice just as important because we run into these situations all the time where you have to see what the financial package looks like before you signed dotted line for the school again house comparison. You're not going to go buy a house without seeing the price tag. You're not gonna go out there and just say oh give me that one and now all of a sudden. It's an eight hundred thousand dollar house with a four thousand dollar mortgage per month and your last homeless two hundred and fifty thousand dollars. That's not going to happen. You have to do this in the same way the system the situation is set up that that you can do it that way. Though that kid falls in love with the school you go visit you apply you get in by by holloway or by christmas. You say yes on january first your financial. The packers will show up until april but you're stuck and especially if you go through early decision you're really stuck so you have to do your financial due diligence at the beginning. There's really not a good method or way to make up for it down the road and my pagent raining here but i guess but what are your thoughts. I mean honestly other than <hes> <hes> submitting like special circumstances so say you've said yes. It was april. We've all agreed. This is the package that we're getting. I'm off to you college you in the fall and then their special circumstances. Maybe a an illness or a job loss or something you could submit and ask for <hes> some additional accommodation but other than that. I think you really just need to look forward to the next fafsa which is again october first. The new fafsa graphs will open. You'll you'll fill up again for your next year of school. <hes> you can try to look for additional moneys. You can indicate a change in circumstance or <hes> you know you can do more of the work to look for additional scholarships and things like that but i honestly by the time we get you. August rest is really too late to do much of anything to change your financial outcome by the time you may. It's too late honestly. If you have a financial situation that has abruptly changed then you do absolutely submit the it's called the special circumstances form goes to the financial aid department right there on that spot or something abruptly happens if you knew ooh this job loss was a thing six months before you need to submit that special circumstances form six months before when you submit that application so that way that can be written into your financial aid package going forward and you can still check on it then that's why it's so important to govern this process with logic and thought and reason not emotion not strictly emotion <hes> and now your kid wants to go to school acts. Are you and i know that this is beautiful and your parents or whatever the reasons reasons are that we sometimes chew schools emotionally. We've got to take a bigger step back because they're asking for an annual salary out of you. They really are and or four years. That's the house that you've just bought. That's why compared to off into that. So you have to be really on top of that again. The things you can do their small they make a difference france on a small scale. I mean i'm talking. Factors of five ten percent of wichita struck shar <unk> search has form. If you need it always do the fast food ah but you know from the previous year if that's gonna make a difference or not anyway <hes> and go to your departments within the school and try to see if they can apply and get something for you as well. If it's too much of a heavy burden <hes> the truth is and again. This is coming from an honest perspective. You really may have to consider swapping tools that it really may be your next and community. Colleges are wonderful tools tools to be able to kind of reduce costs and do the same coursework in order to get back to that same university to finish out your degree set in the end. It's all about where you finish your degree somewhere you started. Let's start at anywhere. What about a gap year are sometimes a gap year is helpful. Sometimes i feel that most people use a gap year. At least you can correct me if i'm wrong because you hear different things for different people and it's all of it. I hear a lot of people say oh go. Use a gap your figure out what you wanna do. That doesn't teach you what you wanna do but what about a gap year to in order to address this financial issue yeah so sal. The problem is for the gap year. Is that in order to a gap your effectively. You have to do the exact same process in your seniors. Everybody else does she have to apply and you have to do all the financial things you should be doing that at the beginning anyway and then once you get your deal set with at school then you tell the school. I'm taking a gap year the package. That's the way effectively done. If you decide to delay applying to a school that's different if you decide to delay applying until the next year the truth is your marketability is vastly deteriorated. So what about these families though who are saying. Can you help us gets. We're getting ready to send her kid off to school and we figured out that we're short does a gap year makes sense while they kind of figure things out. I mean i know a lot of our families might say not a alive but families may say well you know here she could work for the ear puts money away and then i mean does that make sense for our kids we'd be. I think there's a lot of things that have to like a a big list of chip of checks that we have to go through. Yes nos one is their financial aid package secure that actually be held for the next year where if we actually go make more money this will help and we can shorten our time and i think that's one thing that might not be the case. You're saying it might not be <hes> if they may say well. If you didn't show up then gone <hes> so you have to see what's going on there. <hes> i wouldn't say do a gap here. I would really if the gap here's the thing for time and money. I would go work and go to community college to be honest us with because this is an easy math problem in the sense english one. Oh one every freshman is basically going to take a version of its usually a three to two five credit hour course at a private school in this country a on average that per credit hour costs is thirteen hundred dollars at a state school. When you live on campus it's six hundred sixty dollars again multiple by three or five credit hours in both cases at a community college. It's about one hundred ten so in the same class in a sustained glass it'll transform backwards and forwards between all options and honestly at a community college you are more likely what happened with the professor then at a larger school. Sometimes i know all of my courses like all of my gen. Eds were taught typically by graduate students. Just that's great. I got some great experiences that way too but you know i mean i think it was really helpful that i took a chemistry class with chemistry professor who had been teaching chemistry three for a long time but i took it during the summer at community college so and your your your degree to education so chemistry wasn't really a part of your degree theresa so you didn't need it right per se but you had to fulfil a credit so that makes it even better so truthfully. The mathworks almost better if the kid could doesn't work and just goes to community college because the truth is you're going to be more cost effective by knocking out the coursework on the cheap versus making more money to go so to keep these things in mind. I think these are things that we may want to think about another not popular but at the same time these if you're in that position this these are the options that are left on the table. I mean i was looking down the barrel of too much debt for my kid to go off to dream school number one i mean it's something that we would talk talk about really seriously so i just can't even imagine speaking of somebody who did just pay my student loans off this weekend. After twenty twenty years after my husband finish finish graduates cool speak day. It was kind of like burning a mortgage which really hasn't happened yet but yet now. I can't even imagine decided well. We'll figure it out or we'll just we'll deal with the debt this year we'll try to we'll try to make it better next year. You're setting yourself up for a really long painful road. Uh and i want to acknowledge to that. Nobody towels parents this in advance. You know nobody. Nobody is here well. That's why we're here. That's why we exist really to help guide parents and students through this process because nobody else university is not going to tell you to you. Know have all like your financial situation. Relation really figured out before you accept the just want your money. You know nobody. Nobody is your kids. High school is telling you. This probably not right. No no no because it's funny where in this is a little sidetracking but it'll make sense for that comment the majority of clients we get come from almost financial advisers because of the reason that you just stated the question is pain pain points right who actually feels the pain points guidance counselor's really don't feel it because once your kid has done with their senior high school they're done over like they move onto the next step. <hes> the parents don't fully in most cases as we're talking about. The financial difficulties of this interestingly is the financial advising world whether seeing parents liquidating retirement assets that can send kids to school are feeling the real brunt of this pain and we're seeing what the financial implications of this thing looks like long term so they come to us and say help us with our families figure this out because we can't have them liquidate two hundred thousand dollars per kidney got three kids. They're retire. Their retirement is gone if they do that so we work with and say okay well. The truth is spending forty thousand dollars in total for this education based off the vibe that agree based off of the work we've done we set it negotiated. We do all the things we need to in order to make that work before and now we've saved a hundred sixty thousand dollars per kid and that's a doable thing but that's why you have to do that stuff well before and that's hard and that's why we have this podcast to to try and help people fault because there really aren't enough advocate for parents out there and i keep saying it but it's true schools are invisible tomorrow and they do a lot of things that i don't particularly love in the financial way of this and we have kids seventeen or eighteen sign off and more debt than your house is worth with with a swipe of a signature a blink of an eye when the truth is it takes what forty signed documents three witnesses to get a mortgage in this country. So what are we talking about. Here is somebody at some point is gonna wake up to this and be like oh my goodness. I can't believe we're doing this and striping our kids to this responsibility when when nobody really knows what's going on. That's what we're trying to blow this out there and say like oh this is this is what's happening with folks like or parents so i mean i know it's is one thing when we talk. We talk a lot about student loan debt and for the students but parents take on debt just as quickly and the terms are usually less friendly right. There's the interest rate is usually higher or they're they do things like pilfer their own retirement or take equity out of their house or borrow from a relative with the assumption that they're going to pay back but there's a huge cost and it i get it like in in hanging out with other their parents. There is a lot of pressure to be able to say yeah. I'm sending my kid to a great school. And of course you know like everybody else on. The street has their kids banner out on the front line on. I think people feel a little anxious about it but that's one of the reasons. I like what we do because a we're going to help you manage your cost to. We're gonna make sure that you feel really good about the school that you are going to because it's the right school for you and we can find you the right school whether you want to go spend close to eighty thousand dollars at <hes> chicago right now al like they just you just just beneath the eighty mark. That was big news last week or you decide that you're going to go to an in-state school that that offers you. The kind of great programming and traffic stayed that will make it possible for you to get a great education at a reasonable price or even a small privates will do the same thing ah honestly and totally harley munis go listen arrest of our podcast. 'cause we talk in depth about how that is. The linchpin finding the right school for the right person on all those pieces is because these are the situations. We don't want to end up in where you're kind of feeling like. You're bent over a barrel in the sense of you know. Johnny just loves it there and now we have to go live in an apartment which i'd say that we know situations where that's happened whether decided to give up well more more than they should. In order to make johnny or jessica really happy about college choice and we have a is part of the bigger contract for a problem that we have in our one on saturday just delayed gratification about things. Sometimes you just gotta be patient. You know yeah you really want to go to do kosonen five thousand analogy year. Maybe go for two years not for you know what i mean graduate school or graduate school or they help you pay for it. Exactly there are plenty of ways to get there air. It may not be the best to go there tomorrow. You just have to look at it and see what's going on. I know you know it's your it's like we've turned it into disneyworld like you've got to be there. Oh my gosh you're going to pay anything but really this is more expensive than we really want to recognize and if we don't it's it's the it's i can't even describe how bad it's going to be further financial future right not to besmirch duke or chicago or any any of the other terrific schools but john. It's got to be the best fit for your family but house mixer us all the right tools for it. Make sure you biologically make sure you buy it with reason then and then of course mature happy there but it's got all those things have to be men. Don't wanna make sure it's the right choice so as always listeners feel free to submit submit your questions to hello at college liftoff dot com <hes> or you can visit our website and write to us through our website or website is college liftoff half dot com college liftoff can help empower you to make college affordable for your student. If you want to learn more about your options aaron will be responding directly to your email email him a question at erin at college liftoff dot com. Thanks for listening to affording college with aaron green of college liftoff if you'd like more for information visit college liftoff dot com.

aaron green chicago mets ohio aaron greenhouse facebook founder and president packers founder allison Johnny twitter Eds france
1479 Tracy Jacobs, RDH, on Hygiene Education and Innovative Oral Care Products : Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

1:05:19 hr | Last month

1479 Tracy Jacobs, RDH, on Hygiene Education and Innovative Oral Care Products : Dentistry Uncensored with Howard Farran

"Protect yourself with loop shields and wraparound. Oakley loops using the same frames US military visit Dot com to order. Now that surgical telescopes abbreviated surge I tell dot com. It is just a huge honor for me today to be podcast interviewing. Tracy Jacobs Rda she's the founder and president of Wisdom Dental Education Solutions Bill US Instructor Training Center facility at RC health. Services Advisory Board member at Anderson and associates and a registered dental hygienists. Dental entrepreneur is dedicated to empowering dental professionals through education. She focuses on providing up to date continue education to dental professionals in their own community wisdom dental education solutions was previously named bridge mill dental hygiene study. Club Tracy founded the organization in two, thousand, twelve as club grew she noticed a disconnect between the members is they were coming from various areas around Atlanta to get the small and intimate feel back in two thousand, eighteen, she created local chapters. Tracy's goal is to have numerous chapters in every state. So that professionals in every community both urban and rural, we'll have access to quality relevant continuing education in two thousand sixteen was asked to become American Heart, association, Faculty, and completed. That training shortly after in March of two thousand seventeen, she left clinical hygiene and accepted a position as operations manager at safety and health solutions and responsible for overseeing all aspects of the company in addition to teaching both at the company's training facility, as well as off site in May Twenty, nine, twenty, one, thousand, nine, hundred resigned your position to concentrate solely unwisdom that's wisdom with a with a Z.. W. Is e do am I love that Tracy graduated with an associate? Of Applied Science degree in dental hygiene, and then transferred to the University of new Shaggy Nuba and took classes and help manage it to expand her knowledge for future endeavors. Tracy is from idler Alabama, but has called Georgia home. Since eighty five, she's married to Jay Jacobs and has two adult daughters and three beautiful grandchildren which if you're on I, you don't see this. You got a switch over to youtube and look at her wall. That's her first granddaughter's Nursery Atalay? My Guy Thank you so much for coming on the show today. You've done so much for so many years and. But I know my listeners. And the first thing they always want to hear about I is a covert update. Obviously, we're in pandemic has started in March Tomorrow is October first by the way to put this in perspective first of all Tracy. Did you ever think you'd be practicing in the middle of the pandemic and what is it like in Bama during the pandemic? George you remember. And it's not too bad practice clinically for a while but things open back up here in May A lot of pageants were I've known I have a huge Collection of of dental professionals in friend's offices I've been around for a long time doing the CPR. So I finished reaching out to me for temping, and so I went back for a couple months. So my mom who has health issues like seriously you're going back now practicing now you're GONNA go back. So I had to ask for my mom and I'll tell you it was a challenge We were back to full speed, but it was hot under all P. So So I did that for a couple months and then once they hired someone that I kind of no phased out because I just didn't have time to do everything else that was do. So. Tracy. You know. I I graduated from High School in eighty the HIV AIDS pandemic started in eighty in in seventy nine, it went on to kill thirty, six million people will make all those adjustments. What per how much more threatening? Did you feel from the corona? The needed from. HIV AIDS when you know when you first encountered that in the eighties. You know I actually felt more protected Melena or not at work because we were more conscious and more cover and it was more layers. Of P. P. So I actually felt cleaner when I got home at the end of the day having my hair covered everything was covered more and everything was definitely taken off in left it work actually safer believe it or not. And would percent your big in the hygiene community in the Georgia? Hygiene community. My Gosh. Most I, I know already know you. What percent of hygienist would you guess? Didn't want to come back to work during the end because the pandemic and what were the reasons? Why mostly what percent of Janice do you think just said now I don't want to go back. I don't want to be doing a caveat tron and a Piso. You know in someone's Saliva Phil Coronavirus. Well, I get really say percentage, but I know that every office I filled in at people aren't coming back assistance as well. I think heart of it was that maybe these particular people were on the edge of wanting to change the career or retire, and this was just a good transition time I mean I know an assistant at Ward offices she she actually found a position working from home with. Her child was they're doing something with a little over the phone and so perhaps it was a great time to explore something different. So I think people had time to they were forced to not go to work. So they were able to maybe exports different avenues in I. Think they left for that I have many people were really really afraid of for their own health maybe more for their parents health I was more concerned about my mother than myself. So. So I, really can't can't take a percentage but I it was a good time to transition person some people who are ready to get and how could I get my four boys to worry more about me than their own health Write a book. Do you have a C course on this? I want to take I want to take that course. That's very interesting because I notice on town. We get on ninety nine on the classified ads. There's always been about one thousand dental offices for cell, and it immediately went to two thousand in doubled and what I have noticed that if you're a sixty year old Dennis and the pandemic if you've never been divorced, you never had to split your money and a half to begin with a lot of six year old just said you know what I'm done so so that was. So you think a lot of the staff didn't come back because they were kind of on the fence for a long time and then timing's everything and then they had to take a two month time out and during the two-month timeout they thought you know what I my heart's not been doing this for a year or two I wanNA start a store and I think it just it just forced the issue s what I would guess. There's no way to know for sure but that's what I would guess. Yeah and the working from home. You know if you look at it objectively. People started to work from home as soon as the Internet came out and it just slowly been going up so. When so all the pandemic did is fast. Forwarded the next twenty years in one minute. But the trend was already moving towards warrior home. That's why I'm so confused about the schools opening backup because in Arizona they. Just like it was Monday through Friday eight to five, it's like my God you know the people are Working Ramon. Why didn't you just come back to school like every other day now or maybe half the kids come Monday. And Wednesday in half come Tuesday and Thursday but they just went right back to everybody right back at school and I'm like I I don't think that's where the trend line is. I. Think the Trend Line is people are enjoying working from home. So tell us about wisdom I mean when I I love wisdom teeth, it's my favourite procedure. I would rather pull for wisdom teeth and go golfing in Beverly Hills, and that's true. I mean I I have so many friends that have golf course memberships around Arizona I'd rather pull for any day of the week. was that. Did you love wisdom teeth? Where did the name come from on wisdom dental education solutions? Well, you know we call. Ridgeville in the beginning because I'll in the subdivision named breach meal and literally starting in my clubhouse with about fifteen friends. And never planned for it to be a business about thirty miles outside of Atlanta, and if you've ever driven in Atlanta traffic may as well be the sound. and. Even though Hinman is closely really just didn't enjoy going to the traffic. Now, if we were travelling to another city and stay in hotel where you can justify your husband, you know spin in the not in. ATLANTA. When you live right outside. So anyway, we need to enjoy it at all. So So I started this mobile study club handful equally collected just enough tuition to I was paying for the pay certification at the time and to pay for the room. I didn't advertise. We didn't need any more members people starting hearing about it and an end. The first year we outgrew the space. So we kept having been moved to different Two different. And we got farther south in South Korea get larger places in about. Five years. I guess I can say who was there but it was andy on She was speaking for her for for us wisdom and it was the biggest speak garage had the room was full. The president of Atlanta data was there, which is crazy note there were. A seats and it was so exciting. So I stood up and I looked skin and I didn't see a single one of my friends from him and I realize I had created just what we didn't ally. We'd we'd like the small feel. So that's when I decided to branch check. So came into my doctor and then up a new chapter in that area. So Bet Wisconsin you idea to keep a small and to keep it like a small community. Feel. So I was going along my merry little way and then dill peace network. I'm sure you're familiar with him them. They were looking for a study club new being affiliate partner with them, and so that was a great opportunity. So I became an affiliate Arner being that I could advertise my chapters in the loose and so that's how I grew nationally. And you know it's a slug it out with any business elect opposition my position to work on, and I just didn't have time to do both and so I've been doing that for the last year and a half and the ball apologize for such a long bio I. Guess I just sit what was Saguenay my computer with all my gosh that was so long and a little bit outdated because in addition to to those things I'm. Also. Promo or health educator. So I do lunch and learns and women are pro help oral probiotics and you get agent Stelle. That's a new endeavor for me and so as Stella product specialist. So juggle all those things but wisden is my passion. I love the other things that wisdom is like my baby even if I'm never might opinion which I haven't yet it's okay if the other things can support it, my passion is to bring education To, everyone I also want to give a platform. So they're a lot of times. We don't have a famous speaker we can't afford to pay an honorarium. It's just me and my I have a checkout one single Teke so. So because of that We'll have usually large sneakers it gives a platform. So if you're a new speaker and you want to be able to get your feet wet, you can come to wisdom. We'll give you a platform to do that crazy recording and give that to you. You know the alphabet you're speaking for us. Of course, they have to be qualified but So I left to give a voice in a platform to newspapers or trying to break in, but my real passion came from when I was A. Graduate from Hygiene School I was a single mom Alad Chatanooga and I certainly couldn't afford to come down to Hinman in Atlanta I couldn't afford to take off work I couldn't afford the hotel and so I'll only took the that was available. I couldn't even afford to take a day off work. So I, had to take what was on Friday. It really wasn't about the see that morning about something as interesting to me. It was just about it was on this day I could afford it. My first class was instrument sharpening and it was the same he on watched in Haji Year before I got nothing at it, and so I never really had gotten anything about education because I couldn't afford to go to the courses that. Interest me. So Ma, it will make me happy if if there's a single mom in Timbuktu, she can put our kids to bed she can afford to sit is complementary. Can't afford complimentary right so she can sit down at her computer with her kids took the not miss work and get the education that she wants. If she wants Lord about essential oils then she can because if you're learning about something, you're passionate about you're more likely to take it to the opportunity and the better we are auditorium you're going to provide better wally if were passionate about what we're doing. On. Long winded. Can you tell I love it you I love the most I love your southern Belle. Accent. I could just listen I grant which Shaw, Kansas and what I miss. The most of Kansas is the snow's girls from Oklahoma and Texas dog. Ear Candy to my my. mind. Is just something that's on that that I find interesting. So you. Pro By oral health, right? and. That's sort of a dentist, Geoffrey Hellman D. MD and who's also a PhD and it's Kinda weird because. When we were in school. You would do they recommended listerine and it just kills everything and now they're all starting to say, well, it equally kills the good guys and the bad guys and when I was in dental school, no one ever talked about the gut microbiome. There were no probiotics I mean how there there was just Jack Daniels and vodka and beers all I remember and and now people are. Really in this gut microbiome and I just I just read another case the other day where this girl was suffering from Eczema and psoriasis and forever, and all the doctors give them prescriptions and pills, and finally was a natural path is said will quit washing your hair with all these chemicals and conditioners and shampoos, and just quit bathing and showering, and just just rinse off with water. Did that for ten days, you'd be fine and what happened her skin microflora came back her ECZEMA that she's had psoriasis for decades. So my question to you tracy is, are you still swishing with listerine that's Kinda dumb bomb that will just kill everything. And then take a probiotic or you starting to let me tell you what I'm doing. So I'll also. So here's the perfect scenario still alive. Is it. Okay. If I showed the ball. Sure. You. Do. Everyone. So visit still on your own dentistry uncensored. You can even cause tell jokes do whatever you want. It's your show. Still has a ranch. This is their oil Vega rants. This is all natural. It's made from sixteen all natural ingredients, plants and minerals, no chemicals and it's It's not toxic now. So there is just a study done in a burn university with Dr peco's, and after Myron I think there was someone else. Could Iran's head had core ahead city we need or exiting clearly kills everything right but it kill it It also inhibits the fiberglass with you if you're aware that it hits last and And it. As long as heck sitting is active, fiberglass cannot do their job. So you're GONNA rip out a tooth right tooth extracted, and then you wide to heal up with the fiberglass can't while you're killing bacteria by blast can't neither jaw also, the study revealed that Cora Heck Sitting Causes Inflammation increases information. So if you ever wonder seven days at the person comes back in their tissues, look really read there were more blind is because of exiting. So those are all bad bad things who are experienced great because it kills everything right but it tastes Brad instincts so that this head to head miss product ill the same amount of bacteria but not only did it not inhibit opera blast fabric list like it excited him. So there's more collagen synthesis and it decreases inflammation. There's natural products in here are up. CanNot. Chemicals Natural ingredients that worked synergistically and they they decrease information and it tastes. So what's the word is out about still office is going to replace exiting and I didn't even realize it Hex is banned in some countries I don't know if you knew that. That that was very surprising to me macher Myron and he has a thing on youtube piece talking about his study in the results anyone wants it. You know it's actually are still does you know that Jeffrey Hilton? Impartially that got Gutter Jeff. Hillman Andy. Anna. Dr Martin. Hands deal was her protege. so He's kind of direct trainer. Information Anyway so I'll rest with this. So I kill everything David in the morning and then Use the Promo Code. So we're GONNA, kill all the all the stuff but not house inflammation right and Marin take a robot This robot or this is our body and is has three patented strain. You may see oral probiotic similar else in some restaurants out there there's no other or promo that has the three strains of probiotics as were discovered by Dr Dr Hands Field not hands field, but Gilman. So. What he was doing in the seventies the year I was born he was studying the bacteria responsible for guns. And how will he discovered was three strains so there's once-tranquil stratus. An strip rats is a mutant cousin of ESME UTANS with there's one town in Utah and what mutation does not allow the bacteria do. Lack produce lactic acid. So these guys are competing for the same food source with this doesn't. Produce Lactic. ACID. So basically, you're GONNA kill as much as you can. You'RE GONNA dose with how a numbers of s it's rats and eventually gonNA shoot them up around. So Yeah I. Just I Google that the Clark scenes being. One of the. Things in hand sanitizers that. Says that the FDA drug safety communication FDA warns about rare but serious allergic reactions with the skin antiseptic core exton Glue Canadian and I think we've seen from the pandemic that there's all these hand sanitizers and they've been banning a lot of them I. I was not aware that one of those ingredients was Was core Xingdong but I, I do think it's interesting how Dental school no one ever talked about sleep. I never heard the word sleep one time or sleep apnea. Now it's a huge thing and it was all the gut microbiome and it So treselle. Go back a year when the New York Times publish article that there is no research on floss. And you've been in the field for two decades at that time wh-. What did you think when the New York Times said? Hey, that's just that's just Tracy's opinion. There's no research on plus what did you think of all that? News. Yeah. You know I don't know I, I. I believe in blessing. At Abbey I really didn't didn't research drop bit pretty much dismissed. Tapes Ruth. So you were born in Chattanooga. Your Chattanooga in Chattanooga but Alabama where I'm from the the is just Rondo along Arado in. is out either I ne- E R. Alabama. It's like a four way stop. So we were about twenty minutes. Fifteen twenty minutes from the Georgia line, and then you go and around to Chattanooga. Got Chattanooga I just can't think of Chattanooga without that hotel with the train. Yeah and I told my mom about it after I lecture. Member John McFadden. He was probably the greatest ended. Honest. You know him and Ben Johnson. We're probably the two biggest impacted ended on time and jumping span was Chattanooga and I went up and the course I stated on train and I told my momma that I defy my mom back. She just wanted to stay in that users are in. That was so cool uh-huh. So. Everybody wants to know. Would adjustments everyone's making for covid nineteen. So I WANNA ask specifically Tomorrow's October first, this pandemic has been pretty much all twenty twenty. So were the world. Health Organization declared it in March, and now it's October. So we march April May, June July August September. So we've been seven months into pandemic. What does it look like right now to you in Georgia? How much longer do you think it's GonNa go. The Ada as saying that Dennis running at about seventy percent of pre pandemic. What are you seeing in in Georgia right now on the ground. In Georgia, things almost feel back to normal the schools are there are a few schools that are doing a discount by tally in our county. The kids are back as normal. My daughter's teacher in another county over and she has to go to school. But the kids are home, which is odd because they're not letting her keach from they're Meghan her through the school. To An indie classroom, teach the kids. So that's Kelly counting on the restaurants are open I don't know if they say full capacity you know they make sure the tables are spaced apart. You have to put your mascot when you walk in and then he can take it off when you sit down, which is kind of odd that we've been going to e. everyone is pretty respectful and they wear their masks in the grocery stores and people are out shopping not like it was, but it's Really, WanNa get back to normal I think here and with dentistry. Storage of progress for sure because a lot of people didn't go back to work and then is probably going to slow down the aisle. But when things I opened backup everyone, all patients wanted to be back there they could not book. They were booked out for a couple of months they couldn't get in so people really want to get back to normal here I think and again I'm not working clinical right now expect a slowdown because things were closed six months ago right? So there's not gonna be recall but I think I think is more positive than we thought it would be. and. One thing I want to remind everybody is that you know these numbers are undeniable that. When you when you so many people have stopped going out to eat they've stopped traveling these type of going to Disneyland taking cruises Bubba. The savings rate has not been this high since nineteen thirty three and we realize that seven months of not going to fancy restaurants, dinners, cruises, flights, Disneyland, and she's been thinking about getting those veneers that invis- align I mean. There's a lot of high-dollar cases being done. Because the savings rate is so high I mean usually a really good economy people will spend all they make plus they can borrow. So they'll spend about one hundred and three, hundred, four percent of of earnings, and right now they're saving up to thirty percent of their earnings is just going into savings kind of I. I can't even spend money I know I don't even know how to spend any more so. Do. You think there's going to be a revival of big case dentistry in line implants, things like that just because they haven't spent their money. I hope so I hope. So I mean, I'm not sure that's something I don't know how speculate on that but I would hope. So okay. Well, we talked about pro by ord all I wanted to get you on there because you're a big, you're a big. Force in that and all I WANNA do is I wouldn't get you on because I wanted to remind Dennis that. You know that you know just dunking everything in listerine. is going to kill everything good and bad and I've been thinking about this since I met Perry Radcliffe in eighty seven who started closest which was. which was chlorine dioxide and and so so you know killing everything is probably not the right idea and this is a really big changing thing and the other reason I wanted to bring you on is. I always talk to my friends about what they know about this is that. The Stella. Still alive products still life is a huge huge company amongst so many dentists and hygienists at the same time. So many other people don't know anything about it. So you're with Stella, life and pro by Aura. Are those separate companies, sell life and probiotics. Those are separate companies only separate companies, right? SORT. Some Dennis listening right now says we'll tracy what's the difference between life in Pro by? So. Still Live. So life we have three products, rents, Gel and sprays of the sprite, and these are are all natural enhanced. Lou Healing Reduce Inflammation in Provo. OUR IS A. So they're totally different products. So there's if you go to still dot com, you can click research and you're going to see a lot of different videos, Walford tach videos on there a lot of implant cases Anderson Saga thought of actual video of the reduction of inflammation when jail is placed on right after the implants. Doctor PECO's I was he is. He's a legend he's like the biggest name and implants. PECO's is the bomb and that's another thing that. Piqued my interest in Jersey Pecos Docu PECO's peaked my. Upon I thought it was funny. But but yeah, I mean I mean how much harder core of a implant colleges can you be right? Because institute wait before last and. You called me from that. Dry emailed you to be on the show he he actually still alive in his book. And he talks about his courses he he makes it part of the care. He doesn't. He doesn't say you know this is an extra things can reduce pain reliever release information. This is our of it. This is his pre his pre surgical protocol. Couldn't you couldn't get Michael Dr Michael a Pecos. To, be interested in this, unless it was just wasn't the bomb I mean. That's a that's a hard core man. He does his homework as as ethics are off the the first of all. Why were you at the Pecos ensued because? I was there representing still alive? Okay. So I'm actually going to go to in. Orlando again in a couple of weeks to the Oh. My Gosh. I'm still near the implant world. It's another of course down there. Mike. NICOS AHEAD TO LOOK I should know that and. As was the pandemic hurting the attendance I mean I'm so many dentists have switched zoom. Where we were at the PICO since two was Ernie Attendance Oh. Yeah. It was there was full the had to limit the amount they could have there but they were sold out You know normally have a lot more but they're all they're open their seats for or there, and there's no way really to to to get everything you need online with that. You've ever been to one of those courses because your hands on your actually in a lab as well, and then he does a lot case and it's a it's a guessing to say this, but it's I guess it's a one way mirror whatever and he's actually doing loft case and it's also on a big screen TV with. Him Talking and so they're able to see real time a alive case they did a six on six I. Think. Yeah that is amazing and he's in Trinity Florida Rats and is that is that an part of a clearwater is that we're is pretty close to clearwater. Yes. The pretty close fluoride I. Always, I, always thought that was clearwater. And but you did you I guess where I'm going is, do you think the Hinman it will be open this year or do you think it's going to closer the next year and by the way I wanNA shout out to the hitmen people because I when this virus came out it was called a novell current vices brand new. So anybody they told you that they were an expert in it knew what was going to happen was completely delusional and The British Columbia Canada. They had the same call and said, let's go ahead and have it and Hinman said, no, let's not and it was a very controversial decision for both and obviously Hinman. You know was better. There were some dentist at the Vancouver one that actually died but. My question is You Know Shit happens. Nobody. Knew what was going on no fault. But do you think Hinman will be back in March already saying it's going to be twenty, twenty two. I hope so but I kind of doubt. There's so many people that they have to you know to to look out for and so much lobby. I, I, doubt it but you know who knows. Yeah. And so why why did why did Dr? Pecos put this in his book I know when you do implant surgery I mean. You just can't failure because man. When implant case, go south to Redo it for free you're GONNA eat the prophets of three other cases. So why was why was? Mike into this. Well, he tried it and that's really all you have to do another good thing about our product. There's a one hundred percent guarantee. If you don't like it, you don't see results. The patient brings it back. We will refund your money one, hundred percent including shipping. There's no risk whatsoever. So he tried it and he he saw the results dentists are saying that they see healing in seven days they normally see at fourteen. or or longer they're sitting he'll that met quickly. So that it's almost like premeditation because you're going to use you start using it three days in advance it's called the three three three program us all three products three days in advance three times a day. So by the time you have your surgery this is already in your system because one is going to be submersible. So it's going to be in your system. So you have that high level of anti-inflammatory those products in your system before we ever have the trauma. And the share. Saad. After they've done your extractions implants, they put the Gel directly on and you can really see there's watch the video there's a forty minute you hear the clock taken and they go to forty minutes and you can visibly see the difference. It's amazing and he saw that case after case. So he believed in it and then of course, the patients are GonNa, take them home and use them until they're gone. So basically, the proof is in the pudding. So Putting. That's a southern Belle exactly exact-. Here that exist. Pudding will you know we'll give your money back but we still strongly believe in the product that that is. Rarely will someone request money back they they want more and another thing patients that use it. It's called the the kit when they have authored products for surgery. But we we make the rents separately because patients will come back and say I love that rents can I had more rents so So we actually started producing Max separate kit and then also once we started use it, they start for kit but mainly the main goal was to reduce the nate for opioids that's the mission and patients are not having pain because they're not having inflammation so they're not having to rely on opiates for pain control. That was the main. The main reason this company was started in May found that the products do other things as well as constantly research going on the jail we have. It's good for for canker. Locking planets for Meka, Sintus and the reds is really great drought. Lot of patients with cancer are are using this because of their mouth alpin is doing wonders so. They're really okay. I know you can't ask a woman her age. But you already admitted you have a grandchild, right? Of Several Grand John. So the young kids have been asking this question when they get out of school since the beginning of time and that is, can you do new patient cleanings on some people? The new patient is only a new patient, FM Max exam perreault probing, and we're going to reschedule. But of course Americans want fast food they they want to they want the same day new cleaning. So same new patient same-day cleanings are no to be or not to be you have to pick one of the two you can't. You can't play both sides of the fence I'm calling you up Tracy and I wanNA to come in and get my teeth cleaned. If I had to pick one or the other I'll say no because you. Don't all fit into the same box perhaps for some people for me maybe that would be okay but we don't WanNa just give people what they want because they may not know what a need and a good clinical a hygienist or your doctor assisted who is talking to the patient if they need something more than that, they're going to be able to relate that to them. They're gonNA, be able to make them what the SRP or whatever but for an example. So let's say I was I was working on a patient and they had a piece of piece of sound and I want to get it but I know it's going to hurt. Right so this is what I would do. I would say. I would always Peter on them you have a piece of Carter under your thumb now, I would like to get it for you, but it may be uncomfortable. So we can try if you want to or we can. We can you know bring you back? No number do a date cleaner whatever it's up to you. And so they'd be like, oh my gosh, they want me to help him. So that was please please try to get it in a mock. Okay. Might be comfortable. So no matter how hard you know by Doug? No I'm. It. So I would get what I wanted getting the deep charter out and they would thank me for that makes sense. So it's just the way you phrase it and so I have a whole notebook full of ways that you can convince people do what you want by just choosing the right words. So back to what we were talking about. You want if you choose the right words though he said the. Words the right words and if you choose the right word right words. So and of course, you know it's never going to be. Sure. But if you if you are passionate. Provider and you really care about your patient and you explain it to them. Then chances are they are going to do what you want to do at an let's say they needed. And they demand the cleaning. Go dismissed them. You don't want that type of patient in practice anyway. See some more question asking these questions because you've been a leader in this field for. From being single to having grin grandchildren's Saul from from single hood to grandma do you like being called to grandma? And GRANDPA. Your grandma GRANDPA. Is that a southern. Sometimes known as granted banana granted. I think GRANDPA is is the ultimate government. This here's another question in your field. So, my hygienist calls in sick and the young dentist saying God tracy's been hygienist forever they all know Tracy I'm just gonNA reschedule until Tracy comes back and then another part of them saying you know I'm going to call a tab and I'm just going to get a complete stranger to come in here and replaced Tracy that everyone knows and loves and his wanted to come. How do you? How do you wrap your mind or at your twenty five year? Old Dennis you own your own practice. Tracy just calls in sick. Do I get attempts complete stranger or do I reschedule what what's best for the practice? This is going to depend on the practice. The practice I was in for eight years here in Canton. It was a very on the practice have been there for. Probably Sixty years seldom to than the other hygienists that worked alongside had seen those patients for thirty years. There is no way they would see anyone else. So that's going to depend and you may have an office that has more transient agenda sitter there you know in and out in and out. And again, they may used to send someone else. So what I would actually recommend is having a regular tint. That's what I was for a long time is irregular temp there. There are certain offices I would look at the chart. This was looking at Charleston on the computer algorithm asthma handwriting and I'm locked up I really work here abuse feeling but I saw Tom Zay last time so that you know people were like you really work here. So I was just a regular camp that can count on me. So. That's what I would do is reach out have a pool of people that you trust that you know we're GonNa take care of your patients. one of the things that I. Really embarrassed about this I I love my dentist I. Love My homeys I really do but. They say they're Americans you know they say they love their country and yet they go give money to political action committees that pass laws that you cannot own your own business, a High Jenner's you cannot be an independent business owner. You can't beat American. You could only work for me and I'm like, dude, I want to punch you when you say that I mean she's An American, and if she owns our forty acres of land, once opened up a dental hygiene dill go knock yourself out I. Mean I I'm embarrassed when I meet hygienists and they find out I'm a dentist because I mean even dental town we had a poll do you support what? What are you guys call it independent access or direct or what do you call it direct? Access hygiene. Is. The Asian. I think I think they're calling it direct access to but anyway. The the question is. Let me see Do I, find it Y- but anyway but anyway. The me see if I can find that But Anyway why how can you be an American and then tell a hygienist that she can't open up her own dental hygiene business in Atlanta Georgia I mean, how? Where does that come from it and you even believe in it d do you believe that you have the right to open up your own? Hygiene business. Well. I would want to personally. And not wanting to like I don't want to smoke pot, but I don't think that if someone does they should be kidnapped arrested thrown in a cage I mean yeah. I think that's I I draw I. Draw the line at kidnapping and putting in a cage which at least ninety percent of Americans have no problem with that. They don't like them. You say, well, I don't think that dog should do that. Okay. Well. Are you ready to kidnap and put the owner engage? But anyway, but but do you think hygienists slightly your are Atalay satellite wants to take after grandma and twenty years from today. She's eleven now you said eleven. So. Let's let's say, let's say a decade for now. She graduates dental hygiene school and she wants to go to downtown Atlanta at her own her own beauty salon gene parlor. What would you say? Well. I. Hope it'll alienate hygienists here but this is what offic. It depends on the education so A lot of our learning comes after school it comes. You know working in the office and educating yourself after the fact. They're also still to a two year hogging degrees out there and actually have that's what I have an associate degree in Haji. Our twenty one years old had a associate degree in hygiene adult think I would be confident to open up my own practice. I. Wouldn't be ready and we know that it's not it's not just cleaning t the oral systemic league. We all know that is that's a true true wink. Our mouth is part of our body and I think for hygienist to own her own practice, she would need to have more than associate degree there. They'd be parameters on the education and experience. There are some health, their hygiene hygiene directors you teach at all these people think would for sure be okay to do that but there would have to be some stipulations on. Of How and WHO In my opinion. Now I don't really know a lot about it I'm here in Georgia I can't imagine ever going to happen and it would be interesting to know in other states I is is Colorado WanNa think that they can have their own process and what I've Wonder can somebody. So so I go to. Poland. Little town it's under practice manage administration for him. Early should be under hygiene says, do you support hygienists hygienist? Up their own hygiene clinics and only twenty two percent of dentist at five, hundred, five votes say, yes and three, hundred and forty six say no, and and that's the thing you always see in politics for someone who has many options like Dennis. He could go work for heartland he could open up his own dental office and so what are the people with many options? Do they take away an option from the people have few options? That's all. That's all of human history. In one word I have many options. So I'm going to take away your limited option and where it's legal I've seen it and. And Colorado I've seen about seven times and they're in a small town of a thousand they have an old three bedroom they have an old colonial house and when you walk in the front door, there's that little parlor to the right and and they took out the parlor they put in a used dental chair and people come by and they give her how much do you spend on average when you go have your? Hair, done. Yeah. How much does it cost you to have your hair done? Dollars Yeah and they'll come into her and they'll give her money and show cleaner teeth and if she sees something concerning, she writes a referral card and that personally that town of a thousand and get on the big road and driving our in a town and the Dennis Air Lover. God, she claims her teeth and if something's wrong, they come down here and or notes or perfect, and they just let the same thing with dental with. What do you call it the dental therapist? They, they come out of school and the dentist I go meet the dentists. He's got to hygienists in the first two rooms they're doing cleanings, eight patients a day, and then the next two rooms is all operative in you know they get the patient and a number mob, they do the filling and the is making you know fifteen twenty percent on the hygienists dental therapists I mean to me. The worst, the worst work I do is when I walk into the room and it says, you know upper right quadrant emo composite two, three, four, five, I mean that's just sit down. An hour of bust ass work I mean nothing and then my dentist like no, we don't want to dental therapists. We WanNa do all those. Okay Buddy. Go go when you're done mowing your yard come oh my yard. I WANNA. Get a lawn service. You know what I mean and why someone wants to do all their hygiene when they have a high genesis and he wants to all their fillings when they have a dental therapists and if you don't want have a high jettison therapist, there's nothing wrong with that. But why are you legally taking away the right from the seven hygienists and Olive Colorado that want to own their own business and makes me just hope that someday someone takes away their right I hope someone takes away their right to own a gun and then when they say The Second Amendment, you wouldn't let tracy however owned dental hygiene. So why should you have a shotgun? I mean I just I just I just don't understand it at the most basic level of human nature in America I mean I would understand it if you came from an authoritarian government if you came from Russia or China but dude, you're from Alabama your from Tennessee for Michigan don't you have the right to open up your own dental hygiene business if that's what you WANNA do. I don't think about is about human or American rights as much as it about patient care we wanna make sure that the patients were getting good quality appear and believe he. Can do it i. just think that there needs to be willing Colorado. On do you have to be at school for a certain amount of time? Do you have to have our patient have had your Bessul? Masters are the parameters like that emplaced? If that's the case then I think it would be fun but I think someone just meant just graduated and believe me wasn't just graduated all the stuff but so much you're gonNA learn when you're actually out there doing it and seeing it and so bad takes time. So either you know time should bear rapper I never knew anybody could make a bachelors and Masters Rhyme like you just did but that you You. Have a whole career in rapping. A you so one more question I wanNA keep getting questions for hours up but I'm did the pandemic kill the. Aerosol. Generating Cava Tron Piso Room I mean are we back to hand scaling? Everybody's talking about aerosols. What what, what are, what are the what are the aerosols? What's happening air souls during the middle of the pandemic in Georgia beginning I know one was used the Cabbie trying and then I think some people started and now there's all these new inventions But a fellow Hodgin is her name is Arabia. You have you heard a real you burn. A. Real you burn. No you need to find her because she's not. She's from she was in Texas she just moved to Florida she got his name a railway burn. AU Ariella a in her facebook Israeli Orillia. She has surprised this one. was invented before Before Kobe. Biz attached to the back of the dental chair. This for the dental chair gonNA attach here Mori myself and this whole slow speed. So this would attach to the back of the chair and this holds US lobby ejector. So you've got both hands Free Right House attached jerk it's affection. Okay. Okay. So it back in his chair holds US lobby jacker this band all kind of crazy ways, and so this is here I was using this. Over a year, I couldn't practice now. So she came out with this one. I don't know the exact name of this. Is when attached to the chair well. What It hooks to the have that. Looks a little complicated. But it hooks to the hobby back here. And then it has suction on the end. She had it all put together. But. Anyway. So this sticks to the back of the chair and this goes all. Ways and this. Is Right, here the patient's mouth. So you've got one once I was lobbied jeter. This is right here. It's amazing and she is a hygienist just one of one of us she she saw a need and that I flex insist are it took her several years? She starts you into Hobby Lobby homedepot she was trying to find the raw materials and she spent her own money and she had no topped three D. printed and all that kind of stuff. So it's calling a flex assist off and so bad is what I'm saying. post pandemic is all products coming out to help with the ear Sol's. And actually created this Hey, it's called dental products explored. and. There's another there's a mask on their can't figure the name of that company came here we were hearing office and it actually has a fan as it looks like a big helmet that one's a little pricey. But that's what happened. Our companies are coming out with these things to help with aerosols and. Hopefully, offices are providing these for for their for their hygienists and make a little bit safer. Wow. That is I love human ingenuity I mean when? They say necessity is the mother of all invention and so she probably got sick and tired of something. Some something bothered her so many times she finally just fixed it. We'll need to shout out here. This is also a friend of mine she's having down the road we could. Could find a shield if it over the loops so she went to. Store and she just made one his got some flexible stuff and she made one. She now has business just covid accompany pick this up. It is amazing that she what she did I think they're a little bit different now but she simply Cut a hole in it for her loop light and then she attached it. Genius right and she made me want. So she was just making for all her friends and she had it on facebook and we all started saying here. Let me give you the money to you know L. dollars whatever and now she has her own company. COVID. That's what I love is the entrepreneurial spirit her name's brandy Rogers beer a in e you will have shows called the genus had had genius something like that shield. So I just had no justice email me. This email me when when you got a lead like that and I want to talk to him I, I would love to support these entrepreneurs any any way I could and I. Say. Yeah. And as I always get flathead when I see their idea, I always hit my head think well, why the hell did I think of that and? So. A Raila she's in Frisco Texas. Orillia yes. Well, she just Nick Florida. Plantation. Florida. Not sure exactly. Where in Florida. but so I want to ask you another question. Can I ask you another question? I know. We've already gone past our our. You're Atlanta was the home of Alan Thornburgh APCOA and associates, which sold more dental offices than anybody known a man I think I think he had sold a billion dollars or the dental offices before I even met him for the first time and the million dollar question kids have as. They got out of school through four years ago. They were just getting ready to buy old man McGregor's dental office, the guy selling, and now a pandemic broke out and everybody just froze and the financing froze like when people complain about the Federal Reserve, they just don't get the the operation logistics I mean the reason the Great Depression. was so bad is because people who wanted to sell You couldn't finance anything you were so. Concerned with saving and preserving your capital that you wouldn't loan it to anybody because they might not pay it back yard depression. So what the Federal Reserve does it just it just creates a market for liquidity. So things happen and banks start saying things like in the pandemic like well, Tracy we said. That we would sell this is because as long as he was doing, you know eighty percent of last year's numbers, but you were closed for two months, and now you're seventy percent of the number. So bankers or wherever weirding out and what I want to ask you who's done hygiene from being single to grandma would you buy a dental office in the middle of the pandemic by Dental Office tomorrow on October I in the middle of the pandemic or would you just say you know what I'm GonNa play it safe and wait until this thing blows over. The price is right. I think things are going to be got to normal eventually. So if the price is right the the real estate market, if if it is a good deal, if it was a good deal last year. I. Would I I wouldn't let the pandemic stop me. That that's a really good answer. So if the price is right, you would do it. And and did you ever meet Allan Thornburgh did not He was a just an amazing man now his. It is Dr. Go. Faster. He pioneered dual representations like I'm going to represent the buyer and the seller because I'm just going to get this done. I get that. Now, no lawyer on earth is going to recommend that because every lawyers WanNa just protect Tracy and my lawyers going to protect me and the more they protect each other the more we're gonNA fight and argue in this is GonNa take forever analogies said, you can't get to Dennis to. Agree on what to eat as an appetizer let alone by a practice. So he was one of those wham. Bam. Thank you Ma'am just get it done. Dual representation but I always I, just wondered if you so you're saying if the price is right, you would eat the risk during the pandemic and by and I always say is that you know it's it's so awesome to be on team Sapien because. You. Know I mean hell we're the apex Creator I, mean we're the apex species I mean were the there's eight billion of us we live on. Every continent how we even live on an RT, there's four thousand. Humans living on Antarctica and I- podcast the only dentist Antarctica I mean. I mean. For as long. Jimmy. There's only about a dozen species lived to be one hundred years. Humans are one of them I mean we're like turtles and tortoises and deep sea fish. We have the most people the most continent there's eight billion of we have the same mass for every human. There's about one million ants, and if you look at the most biotic mass, it's like ants, termites, beetles, and humans I mean we just crush everything and so what I want to remind the kids are is that you're probably GonNa live a hundred years I know you're twenty five and a year seems like a long time but. When World War broke out, those troops were gone for four years and I would so much rather be attacked by a different species of virus than being attacked by humans I mean imagine instead of the pandemic we were attacked by Canada and we were in the middle. You know we had more casualties. Killed by a virus in another thing. You're gonNA, live a hundred years. My God. I. Know You're young but I'd rather you be an unemployed dentist in twenty twenty than some boy on a boat getting ready to go to d day on the other side of the World War Two. So I mean obviously could be so much worse but have any. My final us, what advice would you have? She's twenty five. She just got out of dental school. She's four hundred, thousand dollars in dad she lives in Phoenix Arizona and she can't find a single day job. Would you tell her? What would you tell? Who Was Atalay? Dentist or a hygienist or Either one either one they just got out of school and they can't find a job. I mean hygienist dental therapists, dentists, even I even know a specialist the only the only job you can gradually from and have a guaranteed job I. think right now is an oral surgeon, but there are down there eric people coming out of every dental school imaginable and they can't find a job. So what what would you tell them? They're depressed. They're unemployed there in the middle of a pandemic what would you tell them? On tomorrow will be brighter. The dental world isn't going anywhere and we're GONNA come out on the other side even stronger. I think we have learned a lot during this a lot better sells a lot of people that that works sure profession or getting out in the people that stayed in an and bright. It are the true warriors and we're GONNA SURVIVE WE'RE GONNA Be just fine and so maybe right now it seems blake in dark but hang on you started middle school or how'd you school because you had a passion in? You had a reason that still there that is still there this is just a pause and your career it's not a sprint it's a marathon. So just just take it and strides hang on there'll be a brighter day tomorrow. That was so good. I'm not gonNA, screw it up by saying anything else. I, mean that was There was a reason why you made it to all those years of school and those reasons haven't gone away and yes life is two steps forward one step back I mean you know you dance with some long they're gonNA stick on stand on your toes and and but just hang in there and and these other your other hygienists WanNa come on I it's dentistry and centered, and I do too many dentists and not enough high Dennis I couldn't imagine. Having my dental office without my hygienist. So if you got those Orillia and other ones on set him on the show. But I'm thank you so much. I love about you also is the fact that you just seemed fearless. I. Mean you tried so many things. You're not like that the hygienic in the box who's always in room one I mean every hygienist north of the the the I assume the the black hole of the milky. Way. They're always in room one and they're all. So many of them are the same and then you meet someone like you who's just tried everything I mean my. earless and I know we're out of time that sometime I'll tell you the story but long story short I was a single mom when I went to high school I lived on six hundred, twenty, five dollars a month Hale rant food stamps when I graduated in May of Nineteen, ninety seven I still have my check register and I'll keep it forever. I had no get had had seven cents in the main. When I walked down for Haji and still got Bahama I'd seven cents to my name. So I went from seven cents a single mom to where I'm at now. So, I'm a fighter. Could ever you graduated graduated in Dental Hygiene in Oklahoma? Tennessee new. Guy. You just said that your ex I actually thought. My God that story would have been better. If just just make just say it was in Bama. Just. Say the whole driver sounds better. Say I graduated from Bama with seven said. Well, I live in Bam actually lived in a trailer on a dirt road and commuted an hour to Chattanooga. To get to school. So I lived in Alabama so you lose in Alabama and commuted Chattanooga Tennessee and now live in Georgia. So you're right at that tristate area. And that is that is truly gorgeous territory. I'll never forget that I when I when I started lecture on the country, the two things I'd never heard of and couldn't believe the beauty was Carolina's Arkansas and that Georgia Destin area. That's just three areas that didn't get a lot of TV coverage time I. Mean I mean Arkansas has four seasons and none of them were extreme saints with the Carolinas and my Gosh do you? Just one other question I'm a lot of people are worried in real estate markets in downtown that that people aren't GonNa go back down to living and working in skyscrapers in Manhattan and all this Do you think there's going to be a big exodus from downtown Atlanta and people just go back to their roots into the small towns and the countryside? You think Atlanta will fire back up and be all it was. Yeah. And have you recovered from the Super Bowl when they were completely winning in the first half and then came back and slept through the second half and of Super Bowl I mean I mean holy Moly was that the craziest thing he'd ever seen your life at the at the halftime show the Falcons had won the party's over just just go home and then they came back and lost. Did you how long did it take for you to personally recover from that? Oh my God, you're a lucky woman if. That was the. That's the best advice you've ever given anyone is don't watch football because that can kill you but tracey Jacobs. Thank you so much for coming on the show and sharing all your wisdom. It was an honor to podcast you, and if you ever wanted to come back or any other hygiene, just let me know I'll do. Thank you so much. Appreciate it. All right and congratulations on A. Single mother going all the way to school graduating seven cents I mean talk about at American story. Exactly. I have a good night. Protect yourself with Faye shields and wrap around Oakley loops using the same frames as the US military visit search until dot com to order. Now that surgical telescopes abbreviated surge I tell dot com.

Club Tracy Dennis Georgia Atlanta Alabama Hinman youtube Atlanta Dental school Chattanooga US Hillman Andy Doctor PECO Colorado Florida Anderson Belle Pecos High School founder and president
a16z Podcast: Eyeballs on the Game

a16z

26:02 min | 2 years ago

a16z Podcast: Eyeballs on the Game

"Hi and welcome to the as sixteen z podcast. I'm Hannah. And in this episode we talk about the changing of the land in the world of sports media as audiences of the traditional sports broadcasts fall. What happens to how we consume sports? Where are the eyeballs going? How will it change the kind of sports content we consume, and how is it affecting the game itself? How are athletes beginning to cultivate brands in this new world of content? Joining us for this conversation are a sixteen z general partner, Jeff Jordan, Zach, Weiner co, founder and president of sports media platform overtime, and Yogi Roth Pac, twelve college football analyst, sports storyteller, and former athlete and coach. What do you think the sports media landscape currently looks like as we know it is a landscape that has been changing quite a bit in the last few years. I think sports media is at a mess of crossroads you've you kind of go back ten twenty years. It was a few channels doing the must see game that almost everyone saw in real time fast forward. You've got cord cutting happing, massively consumption of the linear. Broadcast is chain medically, the iconic sports media properties ESPN in Sports Illustrated or both in decline that Sports Illustrated. They're trying to give it away. I mean, it's it's now down to like a dozen issues a year, and literally they're trying to sell it and they're not finding any buyers. True, cultural. Oh, just a phenomenon. I mean, I grew up waiting for Sports Illustrated to come to the door and it would consume it cover to cover is that's now gone woods driven. Constantly escalating value of the sports teams is almost exclusively these media dollars at a flown in, but media dollars typically follow eyeballs in a vibe. Balls are declining rapidly, the media dollars disappear. What replaces them? It's an interesting overlay to the economics of the league's in the teams are eyeballs decreasing, or are they just kind of like fracturing until many different kinds of sort of niche interests or is that impossible to say the bundle of a game is declining in eyeballs, but then there are elements of that game that. Show up everywhere. I asked my friends at ESPN why you guys just have two heads yelling at each other. Now what happened? All these great highlights, they go, well, the highlights are everywhere. It doesn't differentiation use us saying them. Everybody's seen them. I think it's a really interesting time. You have all these organizations paying billions of dollars for these rights. And yet particularly the next generation are not watching additional live sports as much that to me is the crux of it because there is so much money there and there's so much potential audience that I think everything that we're seeing beneath the surface is caused by that. And that's just that millennials and younger are just not watching broadcast sports the same way. It's clear that the lie broadcast is not working for the younger generation and probably jen's even less than millennials. A friend of mine manages NBC universal and they have the Olympic rights and it used to be, you know, twenty years ago the audience all watched one channel. Now they estimate their audience is about the same size in spite of cord cutting, but they know Purdue. Use content on multiple channels as well as web in streams, and they think they're aggregate. Audience is the same fragmented across channel entering its splintering like crazy. You're not being forced to watch a one thing. They curate if you're into the lose, you know, you can watch a loser because there's demand for the luge and so therefore filling demand, not with one stream, but with tons of streams, I work with high school quarterbacks the off season. So a county is a high school guys research. What are you guys watching? How long should it be in the college space? But it's clearly dropping. I think what is increasing is the appetite. So I think for artists and creatives, what's really fun for us is like, okay, how do we get on your phone and how do we keep you there? Or how do we get you onto a link? Or God forbid onto a TV channel and keep you there. It's the greatest time right now for storytellers because we have to utilize the questions how and why obsessively you gotta. Come correct, like no longer. Are there three or four channels that were just by default on a watch and even no longer are there. Twenty-three bang in cable channels. Like there are millions of outlets in every one of us are outlet in our a production company, whether that's our Facebook page, our YouTube channel, Instagram, TV. I think it's gonna make the storytellers even better and hopefully make those stories even richer because now there's so much choice. It has to be all about the story. What does that actually start to look like? What are the different ways that happens? I think you hear this word thrown out all the time, but I do think it really has to be interactive. I do believe there is a way to do an MBA broadcast. That's more interactive game a fide that has other elements to it that gets kids actually watching. So we've spoken to a few teams and regional sports networks about how we can sort of bring our flavor of younger content and our younger audience to live sports. You guys did the little segment with k. d. dissecting the game of a bunch of. The leading high school guys. Oh, that's cool. So you got like the high school point of view? Yeah, and it's cool to see sort of like these professional athletes interact with high school kids, but I'm even talking like take a Knicks game, like, how can we bring our influencers to the table to call a game? How can we make it more twitch style? Think about when we get an alert after a game, it's so and so throws for three hundred and fifty yards and four touchdowns, right? I may have missed the game, but just looking at it the alerts and I have an idea in the vibe. So your point of making sure that you're hooking up is an analyst. Can I get you lift you up off of the alert, even it'd be like, whoa, what did he just say? Again, even if it's just one thought or one one minute video. I think that will continue to build the tribe that may be old school networks, quote, unquote, allowed people drop into right. You gotta bring it to get you to stay. It's like, I got a cook, you dinner give you deserve, talk you in bed till you three stories and give you a gift and like wake up in the morning with like breakfast and bet how much time. Do you spend crafting the intro? Because when you go onto a game, you know the two announcers are there and they're trying to hook you. So what's the prep process for like the first five minutes you spend the whole week diving into the team. That's why college football to me is so much more unique than basketball or baseball because the amount of games is so less. I look for theme and I'm trying to set a theme and hook you with that theme and bring you back every single opportunity. It's a narrative arc, whether that's in fifteen seconds or three and a half hours. You gotta keep bringing me back. So I would hope if you tuned into our game, you could turn at any point but be brought back to the theme of what the hook was the game and check back in with us because I know you're not sticking around for three and a half hours. I think the audience has to be able to participate. So I mean, this is a wacky idea, but we've had thoughts about, okay, if you have two or three broadcasters, how can you make? It's that the audience votes. And then one of the guys has to be in a penalty box and then can't talk for five minutes. If you were. Something like that every five minutes during a broadcast, I think kids would want to watch for new fans. It's about the culture around the they wanna see what guys are wearing leading up to it. What are the fans thinking? So I think it comes down to engagement and game if occasion and making it feel digital first broadcast, or I think it'd be hilarious if Ted Robinson, I got voted off. But I think fans were just like they were just vote us off. Their team was losing told every week I should retire, and I'm the greatest based on whoever wins and loses. So I think that'd be hilarious to try it out. So maybe we can be your Test Dummies. I'll give you a good example of how storytelling just has to improve. So we publish a lot of content on YouTube and on YouTube. You can see these retention charts. You can see exactly what percentage of your audiences watching it every single minute. And that's like our bible. Like we look at every single piece of content and we see, oh, between minute two and two minutes and ten seconds, we lost twenty percent of our audience really do there. What kind of decision would result because of that knowledge that you would use something differently? I'll give you a very clear cut example. We noticed that about ten seconds into our videos. We were normally losing a little bit more than we should like. You know, it's a downward sloping curve because of course less people are watching five minutes in the national shaper. Exactly. But we noticed a little bit of a stark drop off at ten seconds, and we looked at our video and say, oh, around ten seconds is when we normally play an intro card. Yeah, and it fades to black for a second says over. Time, and then it continues the video, but you lost people. We lost people and every single second has to really count. When you think about digital content, if we start seeing all this play out, given these big economics of sports and sports media from you know the player contracts to the owners to the clubs to the investors. How are these deals going to start getting renegotiated when all these different models are coming? You know, when this earthquake is happening, sports is a business that big crossroads and they need to figure out how to go direct to consumer. They need to stream. They need to do a whole bunch of things, and I think they all know it, but there's so many impediments to doing it including these long term rights deals. This is controversial in there are lots of different points of view on it. I believe the leagues were betting that the viewership would go down. If you're going to cut a deal when you think you were ships going to do, what do you do? You cut a really long deal. And so all the major sports leads cut, you know, ten twelve year deals for billions of dollars, but it locks in an annuity of money. Oh, for some period of time. The interesting thing comes when these deals start. Having to be renewed. And so what happens if ESPN has half the Bure ship when the NFL deal comes up, are they going to? You know, can they bid? Are they going to bid? And that originally impacts values, sports teams down the value sports teams haven't gone down since I bet live and I've been, I'm a while. So I mean, people have been calling the top times and it hasn't happened yet. So I could be wrong to gaming comes in and replaces the media, the license rights and things like that. But it certainly creates a lot of turmoil alone the way. Do you think that more value will go to the live experience the same way we've seen in the music industry? I mean, you'd think so, except attendances also down on a lot of the viewership is down. I just read the number of unredeemed season tickets is increasing. They're selling the tickets if you're fans are showing up. So there's something inherent in, you know, a generational thing that gets back to your early question of how does the broadcast actually change because you could imagine a world where four or five years from now the broadcast looks very different and techniques. Is used to have ten different broadcasts and all of a sudden maybe more kids are watching. I don't think that it's predetermined that you ship will go down and there's some stats up the other way. The NFL his past weekend viewership was up compared to last year. So I don't think there is a one hundred percent chance that viewership continues to go down. And then you also have first of all new players in the market. You know the last time most of the big rights deals were up. You didn't have Facebook and Amazon Apple bidding for them. And then you also have new rights categories. You have VR which didn't exist fifteen years ago as a rights category too. Yeah. So I think there's too much going on to say that the meteorites will definitely decline in value, but that's why innovation needs to happen to them that works. We're in a really fun spot because we own all of our rights, and sometimes we'll be able to potentially make two deals by the time. Some of the other conferences are up just once said, there's been a lot of substantial shifts over the last year as in content from, you know how we find it to the way it's delivered to what shape it is. What size it is, what it looks like. I wanted to ask what you think the relationship between live sports and streaming platforms like YouTube, Netflix, and so on, how that will evolve, say in five years, like, where do you see that going that needs to evolve really quickly MLB their idea of broadcasting baseball game with Facebook was just put the broadcast and put it on Facebook. And I don't think that that works like the people that are on Facebook. They know that the game is on TV. There's just not turning on. You can't put the same product in front of them and expect them to watch it. And so I mean, and it gets back to what I'm talking about. You need to change the nature of the game in the actual content, more storytelling, more interactivity and look. It's risky like you may actually the first time you do that put out a product that's worse, but you need to take those steps in order to figure out what actually works the legacy businesses under siege. But then that does create opportunity in the tools are different. All of a sudden you have all these different tools you can bring to bear. You've got all these new formats on snap on YouTube on Instagram, going to wear the fan. Is you've got streaming all over the place. I'm Stanford football freak. I'm one of the biggest streamers off the Pac twelve app because the women's soccer teams on the road. That's the only place I can find it. We've tried to manipulate and sell and optimize so many parts of the game that maybe that becomes the niche thing of let me just tune in when it really matters. Specifically in the NFL were every game comes down to the last few minutes of the game or the NBA each sport will have to find their thing. You know, college football has a specific audience. You know, international soccer has a specific audience NFL clearly has a specific audience in NFL audience right now is kind of like, man, I don't really know if I want anything other than the game college football fans. We want the pageantry mall, the essence and every essence of a campus. I really think it goes down to the sport and everyone who watches the sport has a different palette. But that's four. I just wanna watch Aaron Rodgers, Tom Brady Russell Wilson, and Pete Carroll on Sundays. Those are my guys. Those are my teams. 'cause I want to see at all. I think. It'll be more things on the menu versus, hey, come to that high end restaurant where they kinda tell you a fixed menu, you'll be able to pick and choose what you want because Lee can download any type of option we want. It's interesting right, because not so much of what the internet has been in the very beginning little niche communities. And now it's sort of niche audiences or niche moments of the game. I mean with EBay, it was initially wasn't beanie babies like the babies where something like seven percent of all wise merchandise sales when he went public. In fact, that was not highlighted in the us one when it went public seven percent like that. Yeah, because it was heavily collectibles and beanie baby was the white hot collectible. So how do you see these niche communities sort of spilling over pushing out into the larger media landscape? If we're in the moment of like being babies, EBay for like sports media, like where does that lead to? I think that that relates to this idea of relating to athletes over teams like, you know, I can connect with fans of. Kyle Kuzma like in the pre digital age, you couldn't really do that. It was like, you saw someone in a Lakers z. okay, we're all Lakers fans. I couldn't find that many people that were obsessed with the same player. We're obsessed with a particular idea about analytic. So I think it allows your phantom to go a little more specific. Yeah. Let's talk about those fans. How do these new trends and content start to kind of trickle down and affect the fans, what they want from the game, what draws them in and what doesn't does it start to impact fandom in any significant way? And how? So? I think more than ever it's personality driven content. I mean, if you ask a kid, what team they root for, I would say most kids in America right now, say the Lakers because they're really a LeBron fan. We think about all the time what talent actually resonates with this audience, and it might be a nineteen year old. One of the keys to that has been focusing on this idea of the next generation of superstars who's next up. And I think that it's sort of a white space that a lot of traditional sports media companies have really ignored for a long time covering this next generation of superstars. First of all. You want that immediately. You don't wanna wait two days later for the coach to go through his fell, and then he sends it to that. I don't care anymore. Exactly. Part of it is we identify who the really influential athletes are. We have a technology that allows us to send one kid into Jim and send highlights to us in real time. So for instance, is I on Williamson, we know that we want to be the first one with every single one of his viral plays, right? So we will make sure the first one with that. And that's a level of sports coverage that isn't generally happening. It's not because that's traditionally one of the issues with high school sports. It remains very local and very fragmented. But now with technology, you're able to cover a lot more ground. So what is that technology play? The problem with highlights is you never know when the good play is going to happen. So we build the technology call flashback where the game is streaming through memory the whole time, it's not saving it because we don't live stream games, but when something happens, you press a button and it goes back twelve seconds and it lists it and it sends it automatically to our server. So if you're gonna Jim with low network, which is most gyms. Our clip will be the first one out of there, and then we can put it on social media right away. And then everyone is sharing that clip seven-hour going to totally date myself at it reminds me of when you use to try and make a mix of the radio, like hold on one second. Let me press play and you would, of course you never had the first ten seconds of any good song. Yeah, that's exactly right. You don't wanna miss that play. You don't wanna miss action. So this allows you to get sort of what you need to hit rewind on real life for a second particularly useful for sports. So one of the early Goto on overtime was the reaction shot. Joe one part of their businesses highlights to capture, highlights had previously weren't captured anywhere near the breadth they were captured in. So athletes, amazing, high school plays that you never would have seen you now see all the time. And one of the things that happens like after a brutal dunk, the fans, the camera scans, the fans and the fans, the reaction shots. Joe's? Aw, whatever it is. The crowd goes insane and you want it very raw. There's something about someone using an iphone. It just feels very immediate, like you're so close. There's some plays that we have that are shot both of an iphone and a real camera, and we've tested this on Instagram and actually performs better when you do with an iphone. It makes sense to me because it feels like it's like man on the street. Right, that's exactly right. So how does this new exposure on all kinds of levels to these younger athletes playing in games that didn't use to be covered before? How does that start to affect the way these athletes are perceived or even think of themselves Zion Williams, just headed what three million followers or something like that on Facebook. And so he's learned to market himself at that age and it does change. The dynamic sports media seems to be much more people driven versus just reporting or stories every summer. There's this event called the opening and we call it football heaven. It's the top hundred sixty six high school football players in the country, and we're on the practice field. And Larry FitzGerald is there which is a big deal. There is Jerry Rice. One of the greatest players have not the greatest player in the history of the NFL and then Odell Beckham junior's shows up and it was like Bieber showed up in front of like thirteen year olds. They were screaming and jumping. They surrounded as golf card like it was a flash mob, and it was a really interesting moment for me like you Jerry Rice. And Larry fits like on the practice field with you, and they were appreciative of it. But then here comes del who has done a lot of things, but not nearly what the other two have gone thus far on the field. And it was this moment of like, whoa, this guy's in love with him because of his because it was persona of course of how he plays. But that's just the barrier Venturi. And as you said, Yogi, it's not just about your skill. I mean, lamelo ball free point. Five million followers on Instagram might not even make the NBA. So I think this social cash shade at these guys have that's actually how we decide who we want to cover, not necessarily about who's the best. It's who's the most interesting and. Fenwick to this audience. Right? And a lot of these kids are being given opportunities because of this exposure, right that they would never otherwise potentially have gotten, oh, absolutely. Kids get more scholarship offers or some kids that may never even get to play in the NBA there. Now what I would consider a basketball influence or football influence or what you mean by that phrase? That's really interesting. So I'll use an example of a guy named MAC McClellan. This is a kid that had maybe thirty thousand Instagram followers. The beginning of this past season got a lot of coverage partially from us and now probably has six hundred thousand Instagram followers. I would say that most of the basketball population does not believe he's going to go to the NBA I do because I'm a supporter, but this kid is a legit celebrity. Now this guy can have a ton of brand endorsements. Once he leaves college there, a lot of different things that he can do because of what social media has done for him and it's a whole world of content. Yeah, that's exactly right. I mean, he's not the best basketball player in the country. No one would argue that, but people want to see. There's something about him both his play on the court and also who he is off the court that makes them adding Matic. And now I think you're finding athletes even college athletes, figuring out their brands if you're gonna, put continental there, don't just put it out there but have a purpose behind people who have great access to be popular or learning. They have to refine their craft and be like to what is my lens into this world of millions of channels because I better have one or I'm just going to kind of get lost in the shuffle. So that was what I wanted to ask about brand. Right? So if now high school athletes are starting to think about how they're perceived and whether their footage is ending up on overtime, and then you know, at ESPN might the end of the day, do kids have to start thinking about brand sixteen seventeen years old and how they're building their sports career. I mean, I know at sixteen I was not mature enough to manage my own brand at all. Yeah, there's a meant pressure for some kids. It's a good thing and it makes them mature really quickly. And then you have other athletes that come in and they couldn't care. Less who they're interacting with. All that is magnified by what you do in social media. I mean, I've seen countless athletes, right? These really long, Instagram captions, and every other word will be capitalized and they'll be all these spelling errors. They are broadcasting millions of people, yoga. What do you think about this kind of new role of this athlete influence her? It's a different type of branding. I see the top twenty four high school quarterbacks every year that have hundreds of thousands of social media followers and our toll. They're supposed to be this and they're still trying to figure it out. So what I think is so critical for high school student athletes to help give them tools, but fifty things you wanna do in life, not necessarily win every Super Bowl or VP or Heisman trove. What if you things you want to do that is a step that gets missed when soon athletes get to college because coaches don't have the time and all of a sudden, what happens? You have an identity that is told who you are. You are paying us -ly you're the top quarterback in the country. You're supposed to be the dude. Then we've got major issues around anxiety, depression identity. And so for media's only ramping up in one of the character traits do you wanna share in? Are you sharing them should be required coursework every semester of student athletes, crew in college? Let alone when they get their first recruiting letter. I mean, even you think recently about the whole Colin Kaepernick you know these thirty years old and obviously has a lot of influence and is able to make a decision and stand by his word. But Zion when he was sixteen had almost as much influence as Collin did at that point and is a sixteen year old really ready to do that. I love the fact that student athletes have the platform at a young age. I think it's amazing. They've earned it. That's what sports are, but you gotta surround yourself or be given some tools to prepare for this. And a lot of times you get burned. You know, like, man, I didn't think that was going to be the headline for me. I didn't mean it to be, but that was the lesson. Let's talk about the game itself. Now there's all these different ways you can sort of consume content around the sport and around the game. How do you think this is impacting the purity of the game? Do you think that's something that gets changed by. This kind of different media consumption in the future. So it changes scouting, right. Does it change other things or the changes a lot? I think it changes with the student athletes start it all we ask every quarterback every season. We look at a thousand of them, whittle it down to the top twelve. You know ones the MVP, the other of the elite eleven. These are the top high school kids in America, and we ask them the same question which is do love what football does for you or what you can do for the game coaches are really struggling figuring it out because who doesn't like get loved up at sixteen with scholarship offers tweets letters, cool Jif, great images. You can post on your own platform. They're created by other institutions. I think it does affect the play on the court. I mean, Jeff, and I were playing bath all this morning. If someone had a camera out there, I would have noticed it and it might have affected how I played. As soon as there's a light on you, you're aware you're aware observed and for these kids, it's not just a camera, but that video is going to be seen by tens of millions of people, and it's hard not to keep that in your head and you hear coaches complain about it all the time. They're like, don't play for the Cam. Right? Don't play beyond overtime. Wow. Try to play. Fundamentally. What I've seen broadcasting games is that the games and the viewers are becoming even more pure. It's kind of like people talk about the violence in football specifically. I love the targeting penalty. I love when we're trying to clean up the game for my kids and their kids happening overall viewership, but you're only watching it if you really love it. Like if you love Stanford football, you're going to tune in this weekend on the Pac, twelve networks. If you are curious about Bryce love or Caja Costo, you'll see the highlights and I just think that's where we're at outside of the top two or three games a week. Maybe that are like epic games. Overall viewers are being like YoM role with my team. I even feel that ways of consumer. If I watch a game and I'm kinda like man, like giving me like the general stuff right now gimme two, three deep on the depth chart gimme the backstory's behind these guys. And I think as viewers by self included as a consumer, I want more expertise. I do think that. The purity of the craft of the game is only increasing, which I think is better for the game. As there become more opportunity to do things outside sports. I think you'll use right that there are some people out there that wanna watch the game more pure, but I've pretty strong conviction that the younger generation, there's very few kids like that. The kids do want the fanfare around it. They don't wanna just sit down for three and a half hours and put their phone away and just watch a game pure. And I think for a lot of it does come down to this idea of foam. Oh, like, you know, I think one of the reasons why live sports has always been so popular is like, you don't wanna miss out on that moment. I don't even DVR games anymore because I'm so afraid that I'm going to see the result on my phone. You want to have that moment that impact. And I think when you can see the highlights on Twitter, instantaneous, Sam, basically participating anyway. So there has to be something about the broadcast that doesn't quite translate to that might actually get me to watch. All right. Well, thank you guys so much.

football Instagram Facebook NFL YouTube ESPN basketball NBA Sports Illustrated Jeff Jordan analyst founder and president Yogi Roth Pac Jerry Rice Larry FitzGerald Purdue Jim
Robin Dreeke: ...that the secret to success is being a resource to others

Nobody Told Me!

32:05 min | 2 years ago

Robin Dreeke: ...that the secret to success is being a resource to others

"Welcome to. Nobody told me I'm Jan black and I'm Laura Owens with us on this episode is Robin Drake, former head of the FBI's behavioral analysis program and a recognized expert in the field of interpersonal communication. Rob is also the founder and president of people formula an organization that offers advanced report building training and consultation. And Robin is the author of several books including the code of trust and American counter intelligence experts, five rules to lead and succeed, Robin, thank you so much for joining us today. I'm really talk to you about you the former head of the FBI counter intelligence behavioral analysis program. What exactly did that job entail? It sounds very interesting. You know when you first do anything, it sounds like it's really complicated and that's kind of where everything originated from. So the job really tailed, you know, working with case agents, you know, especially across the field in the FBI that worked out our intelligence and they come to requests on their cases. You know whether they need a strategy for trying to recruit a spy or w agent operation or interviews strategies or false flags, all hoop, he spooky spice stuff, which is still very live and well, you know, it can seem like it's an overwhelming daunting things like, how do you do all these different things on it took a step back years ago a number years ago and try to co fight it because someone else to write an article about it. What I quickly realized was all it was strategizing every time we did a consultation or anytime I worked any of my own cases started rising trust, honest, genuine trust with no manipulation deception, just trust. Because everything life that happens, whether it's at home or work or anywhere is based on relationships and so that that's the bottom line of what I was actually doing. So everyone thinks you know, or might think that the world of counterintelligence or spies Burstein. I've is all this deception and everything. Some might do that, but I've found the most successful ways forward in life, whether it's at work or home with your children or in any job is to have good healthy relationships. And that's always based on trust. But how do you become an expert in terms of behavior analysis. I mean, one question. So I'll tell you and an expert is that's always a relative term because I consider myself practiced, I guess, as to put expert, you know, thank you. It's very flattering in my own case, here's how I sucked at it. You know, being self centered Taipei, narcissistic moron. When you're twenty years old and then placed in the jobs that I've had where really took inspirational leadership to execute them, you can buy that would being surrounded by some fantastic experts on on relationship building and having thankfully enough humility to know that I was doing something wrong and then just and then it comes down to. I mean, I've been with the government over thirty years, you know, with the FBI twenty one years and day in and day out my job every day was to build relationships with people. And I, I was considered the one of the most challenging sales jobs in the world because I was selling the concept that helping protect the national security nited States. Great idea. And I'm trying to sell the people that don't believe that. And there's no reason why they haven't talked to me. So it's, yeah. So that was really is just years of continually to try to figure out what these. Awesome people were doing and what inspired you to write the code of trust kind of goes back to what I said at the beginning. Whereas, you know, I had written a number of articles for journal called the law enforcement bulletin and back in twenty thirteen. The editor had asked me to write an article on counterintelligence never want written a specific counter-intelligence article, and I was really asking myself what can actually right? Because you know, some of the stuff is classified and you can't really share it. And I said, and I really hit me, oh, let me write about what my team does. My behavioral team and I'd never really step back and horrified it before because I just figured we came in, we listened to some what the case agents were saying about the people that they wanted interact with. And we came up with some adjusted great ideas by the end of the day. But when I took that step back and thought about the, you know, hundreds of Cessna's I'd done, you know, running the team in both in my own career. That's when it hit me that all. I was ever doing what's driving trust. And I, I came up the five septa trust, which was what I was doing every time I thought about a challenge of communicating with someone and I call it my my, my new car affect and why new car, we'll because when you buy that new car also and you start seeing that same make model as you're driving down the road everywhere. And so as I soon as as soon as I started giving the labels of meanings to all the behaviors that I was doing, I seen it everywhere. So it wasn't just that worked. It was. I mean, my son, he's eighteen and at the naval academy sons and my daughters, George Mason University for nursing, and we my whole family and all my friends. All we all live by this code of healthy relationships through trust. And so the code is based on five simple principles the first being suspend your ego, why is that important? Because the code is actually flawless. Nothing. I came up with what I call the elusive obvious. It's it's how people wanna be treated and. People are seeking to be affiliated with meaningful groups and organizations, and they wanna be valued, and we wanna do this generally every day, but our ego and vanity or own security overwriting what comes out of our mouth throughout the day. So if we have the ability to recognize when we're being to centered on self sharing too much of our thoughts opinions than ideas without regarding those of others, it's going to get in the way. And so being able to spend Rio and truly doing for others without expectation reciprocity. So you're doing it for their benefit and not necessarily yours. That's both leadership and suspending ago. What are some good icebreakers when you meet someone and how can you make a good impression with them? There's there's four critical things that I try to include and everything either say right to make sure that everything I say is completely about the other person, and that is, I think there's an opinions when you seek someone's thoughts, opinions, you're, you are demonstrating to them that you actually Dow you them and you wanna affiliate with them. The next thing I do is I seek to understand what their priorities are. There needs lawn streams, aspirins, what kind of challenges they're dealing with and basically how they view prosperity from their point of view. Because again, if you're not talking in terms of what the priorities of other people are the chances them listening to you are slim to none. The next thing I do in this is critical. Also, I'm going to validate those thoughts and opinions and those priorities non-judgmental doesn't necessarily mean I agree with them. It's just means validate means I'm seeking understand how do they come to be the people. They were the person. They were the choice. And they've made and do that non-judgmental. But for a desire to understand because, again, all these three things so far are rewarding their brain with dopamine because it says, I'm part of the tribe. I'm being affiliated in our brain rewards us chemically for these kinds of -ffiliated. And lastly, if appropriate, I empower them choices. So in other words, people don't like being told, what do they like having a choice and taken the time to understand what it is I'm trying to do, and I've definitely taken the time to understand what they're trying to do their priorities. And ultimately, when I give choices, these choices are going to be overlapping. And so again, it's going to be very good for them, and that's how I basically communicate. And in the cornerstone of that, you heard me say at once, but a great icebreakers is those challenges questions. And what I mean is apple what their challenges are. How important is he using a slower rate of speech when you're talking to someone and trying to build trust. Very important and as an extrovert from the northeast, I struggle with this. Which is really funny because for me right now, I know him probably talk and really fast, but I'm actually slowing way down for me. It's important and caveat this. It's important, slow it down for the demographic and what you're speaking. 'cause you don't wanna be too divergent. You know the words. You don't wanna be an xer from the northeast while you're trying to speak with someone from the deep south. It might be too divergent, but you wanna basely slowdown enough. So people understand the words you're saying the meaning of them and your pronunciation of otherwise. If you start talking to fast, it gives that impression of overselling and overselling starts at Troy, destroying trust. Did you know that eighty eight percent of financially successful. People read at least thirty minutes per day. Reading is the ultimate secret to success and lots of people like Warren Buffett and Bill Gates credit their success directly to reading. The problem is there's no time to read, right? If you're like us, the list of books you want to read or those people suggest you read is never ending and always expanding. You simply don't have time to read them. All our sponsor blankets has solved your long list of must-reads once and for all linked is the only app that takes thousands of the best-selling nonfiction books and distills them down to their most impactful elements. So you can read or listen to them and under fifteen minutes all on your phone. I'm in the car a lot, and I like to listen to blink when I'm driving. I'm in the gym often in blankets doubles the benefits I get from a workout. I exercise both my body and my brain blink is adding new titles from best of lists. So you're always getting the most. Powerful ideas in a made. For mobile format, you'll find timeless classics like the seven habits of highly effective people and current bestsellers, like you are a bad ass how to stop doubting your greatness and start living in all some life. And right now for a limited time, blinking has a special offer just for our audience, go to blankets dot com. Slash nobody to start your free seven-day trial. That's blankets spelled b. l. i. n. k. I s. t. blink is dot com. Slash nobody to start your free seven-day trial. You can cancel it anytime. Blink assed dot com. Slash nobody. You talk to big groups of people all the time, and I know that you have to make individual connections with the audience while you're speaking in order to keep their attention even though that something that's really hard to do because you're obviously not having just a one on one with that person. I wondering what strategies you have to do that and how we can take those and use them in our own lives. A dispute. Another three hundred people before yesterday. First of all, for me, it's pretty simple. Having a lot of self awareness and no one really stink at so you can start out with self deprecating humor is fantastic because I think people recognize elements of that in themselves, you know, especially when they're younger or less mature in their interactions with people. So I do that a lot. And when I also do is so I, you know, I go through the anecdotes and background of where the coda trust came from. And then I actually show Email exchanges our, I demonstrate how I use this method of communication with people, so you can see what I written composed, and then you can see the reactions and all I do, and every sentence is state. I just highlight how that is about them and not about me how truthful non-manipulative and that it's providing them, you know, resources to take. Care of their priorities, and so I do those. But the next thing I do is I show them from every aspect of my life. I show wellness for more. I do this at work. I show interactions in dialogue between myself and my children, and my children's teachers at school strangers that Email me questions that they say, how do I deal with this kind of situation. So I tried to hit as many different walks of life as possible. But I do use my children a lot when I when I do this because I think everyone can relate to either being a child having children, having nieces and nephews, and I can't, you know, my my, my family's a big part of my life. So cutting that out is impossible. So I think that's a pretty big unified thing when I when I share this, you say it's often harder to trust people than it is to love them. Tell us more about that. Often harness crust in the low. Sometimes I, I wonder what I say too. Well, actually, this is going to bleed a little bit into what I'm currently working on. My next book is called, who can you trust? And the first thing I do when when discussing a trusting others is redefine what trust actually is the and this. This'll go back to your question. I price the trust. People will often associate with themselves when they're Sesing. Others is liking someone as well as their morals and ethics. So someone thinks that because they think someone has their similar morals and ethics and they like them that they can trust them. But what actually trust does is trust is actually very specific things, and it's actually predictability is what you're trying to do. And so what I mean is so because you like someone and you agree with their moles and ethics, that means you have, you might even love them, but does that actually mean that you can actually trust them. Mm, or reasonably predict what they're going to do. In other words, he's a great example. You can trust a stranger coming down in the opposite side of the road that's across the road and hit you because he has repeated patterns of behavior coming at you that he's not crossing the double yellow line. So you trust and not to do that. It's very specific skill set. Does that mean you like him? No doesn't mean you'd leave your kids with him? No, but it's very specific and so similarly, like I'm deeply in love with my wife. We've been married over twenty five years. I, I love her. I, I say morals and ethics that we share. We have great liking and loving each other, but I'm a pilot. She's not a pilot. I would not throw her the keys to the plane and trust her to have plane because she has. She does not have reasonable skill sets and predictability for those types of things. So that's where I think we it's important. I think that. The distinction, because if you associate what people can reasonably do with liking them entrusting them and when they let you down and things that they fall short on what they can do, it's gonna hurt your relationship if you liked them together. That's why I keep them very separate. I keep the liking love and and all those emotions very, very healthy. And then I reasonably predict from behaviors, past patterns, behaviors, and all these other signs that I'm working on, I keep them separate so that can actually manage my own expectations. So we keep a great healthy relationship on both sides. And what if you found are the most effective strategies to repair relationships? Trust has been really broken. That's that's one of the I was hoping you'd have the answer. I do. I do have the answer, and people are generally don't like it because it's not easy. So here's what you have to do. So if someone loses your trust or what is basically happened, there's been the -ception of some kind in general. You know where there has been a lack of transparency. There's some sort of maybe an attempt of manipulation of thoughts or controls time, something like that. In order to regain trust, you have to be willing to do the following things. I the the person that has lost trust in new. You have to give them complete control and transparency in the areas that they have decided they need transparency in your life, whether it's cell phones, text messages, emails, the credit cards, business schedule, any of these areas because in order for them to get trust back, they need to have it full Transpac. Insanity in the areas that they decide they need it as frequently as they say they need it and it's gonna take as long as they say it's gonna take tax repair if you're willing to give up that much control over that many things and be that patient good for you, but otherwise don't blow trust because you have to, you have to give complete control and transparency over to the person and then hope you can eventually repair it. What's your advice if you have to deal with someone, you don't trust and I can imagine in the FBI this happened a lot of times for you. I making very specific kind of goes back to what we're saying before. Trust trust me isn't blanket. Trusted to me comes very specific. There's there's everyone that I work with. I admire nearly I have great people that are great patriots that do a great many things to protect national security, and but I'm very clear on their skill sets. I'm very clear on their competence in certain areas, and I know what I can reasonably expect any cheese areas. And so where I do is I manage my expectations on in on each individual ideal with on what I can rues me expecting all these things. And so now if what happens at some point, if someone lets me down or I, they fall short of something that they either obligated themselves or expected them to do the first thing I do. I take ownership of it because I must have had, you know, I, I will do a full assessment of where was I off on my reasonable expectation on their skills that where. Where did I not provide them the tools and resources to be successful. Now, if I did all those things and they still fell short, then then it's a different conversation of all right. Maybe we're just don't have overlapping priorities and we don't have same interest anymore. So we know we'll have a discussion on, well, maybe we should part ways and move on. But I take a very pragmatic approach these things where I don't get hurt feelings. I don't have resentment anger, discontentment frustration with people because as soon as you start having those emotions, you going down the road to an unhealthy relationship, and you start acting with lack of clarity and clarity is really important so that you recognize the great opportunities that we all have and the resources we all have and how we all want in Iraq. So I try very, very hard to understand what people can do, give people the resources to do what they can do, and, and for myself, I do the same thing to others. You know, I have. I, I'm, I'm trying to be extremely mindful. I'm I, I'm very transparent and open with my skills what I have, what I don't have, so they can. So I can help others manager speculations of me as well. I thought this was absolutely fascinating. I'm a millennial and I feel like my generation is absolutely obsessed with titles and getting his high up in a company as quickly as they can. But you say the titles aren't quite as important as I thought they were. Why are they not as important when it comes to help people respect a leader. People really don't care about titles and positions care about how you treat them more than anything else. So titles and positions designate who is responsible in cannibal for things. But ultimately, you know, you're gonna follow someone and wanna be around people that again, they demonstrate affiliation to meaningful groups and organizations and decorated how your values because I'm I've, I done jobs. I followed titles jobs earlier in life because I thought they were important. But ultimately I wanna following the people in where they went because I wanted to continue to be around those people because they made you feel good about who you were. They made you feel good about the mission that made you feel good about the things you're doing and made. And most importantly, they made you feel good about who you were not food. They were say that from time to time people, you don't trust temporarily at least half power over you, but that doesn't last long. Why why not? Mostly probably because as soon as. Someone SARS exercising power over you. That's that's a form of control and control. Generally will again control if it's if it goes into the unhealthy words manipulative in some way where they're using some sort of the -ception or lack of transparency, it I, it starts wreaking of unhealthy to me and I just don't do unhealthy relationships. I don't. So I will. So people ask me this all time. So Robin, someone's got really great skills like this and they come at you. How do you, how do you counter manipulation and which is very similar your question? I think and I say it never happens. How's it? Never happened? So we'll because relations a form of control and using the step Shen in some way or subterfuge and and everyone gets this if people have questions about why someone wants to do something, or they're looking for clarity on rationales reasons or the direct role going, and someone's not giving that kind of clarity and transparency and openness. Well, that's unhealthy. And so if I'm going for those things and they're having a lack of transparency player and a sense of teamwork on this, then I just I asked them for it if they don't give it, I'll walk away with no animosity there for whatever reason that's who they are today. They're having a bad day and if they're having a better day tomorrow. Okay. Okay, but if not just won't engage. I 'cause I refuse to allow people to bother me because if people start bothering me, then I get emotional hijacked. And again, that lack of clarity of interaction and healthy goes away. I'm curious to know what you think the best strategies are to develop good listening skills. Another another great. When I talk about I'd love is it's having exactly nothing to say. That's probably and here's what I mean. So human beings when we're interacting what we're actually doing unless you're at a situation where you're standing there as investigators, they just the facts ma'am. And you have used bullet list of questions, but in general human beings, what we're doing is we're sharing our thoughts, opinions, anecdotes stories with each other. 'cause we're seeking that affiliation were seeking that tribe, mentality where seeking to be accepted for who we are thoughts and opinions. So and they did a study at Harvard back in the April of twenty twelve where they found on average people share the thoughts, opinions, and ideas that they have roughly forty percent of the time during the day. And what they're doing is when we're doing this, we're testing the accent me I am. And then when we get the head tilt, the nod smile the positive encourages or share even more because our our brain is rewarding this for rewarding us for that. And so in. As soon as someone shares their antidote story would do what happens in our brain within microseconds. We wanna share our stories again and those with them. And so it's just it's bad. It's his battle for time. And so what listening is very, very simple shutting up is different if you want. Some people think that if I just keep my mouth closed, that's that's listening. No, it's not because you're still thinking about the things that you wanna say. 'cause your brain is screaming after what listening actually is as the active act of taking the thoughts appears that idea that you can't wait to share back with them and tossing out your brain. Paying attention then to the things they're saying because everything they're saying is important to them and then pick one any of those topics because all topics are opened and find out, you know, how did you decide to do that? When did you side? Is that what kind of challenges along the way? Did you have with that? That's listening because what you're doing is you're paying attention to their words exploring day or soon beings without actually any need to interject your own. What do you think is happening to the one on one personal skills people had in the days before social media. Transitioned. You know, I, I know people I, I'm not a type of person. I don't think things are better worse or anything or anything like that. Whether it's generational, whether it's technology, I think things are what they are. I also think that you know, human beings been around a long long, long time. We haven't lost our genetic desire for certain things like affiliation and being valued by others. They just manifest in different ways. And so I think probably the the the, the skill sets at ages, I think might vary a little bit, you know, because you know when I was growing up, you know, I'm a gen xer hardcore generator born in sixty eight. So you know, no technology was existing when I was at that age level, the amount of jobs and everything I had and interacted with people. One on one was a lot greater at a younger age, one on one. But conversely. Really, you know, my children who are millennials, you know, they're doing vast amounts of interaction, you know, via texting Email with many more people than I ever did when I was one on one now, but there's a lot more misinterpretation because they don't have non verbals ago with as a motor cons, the share emotion. So there's there's great strengths, I think from being able to communicate with that many people. But there's some drawbacks obviously, because you're losing context until you can actually little later on in life when you actually maybe in positions wearing to work place and you are more one on one that they'll come up to speed. I really think it's job dependent though. I know better. No worse just gets in a transition, and I just had to ask, what is your favorite story from your time with the FBI. Oh, favorite that. So that's an interesting question. I'll bet you have a few. It's funny when you when you when you write books you you are, you are maize about how much you actually did when I don't feel like it did very much. I would say I was in New York are nine, eleven, and the, I wouldn't say it's a favorite story, but the the most I would say the most memorable time in in probably my life and not just the guy was the days in months, following nine, eleven in New York City. The what, what I witnessed was amazing. Not just amazing. You know, our office in Manhattan was only blocks away. I saw people jumping from the towers. I had an engine land, not too far from my car, but what was most amazing thing to me as you know with this fascination with human beings was the outpouring of people every day on the streets lining, the streets going down to ground zero with all these checkpoints. I've never seen so many volunteers. Mine tire life, and you had to go down with your windows open because they would flood your vehicles with water gas masks, homemade sandwiches, with notes from kids. In New Jersey. I mean, it was the outpouring of humanity and compassion that was probably the most impactful thing I've ever seen in my life and it was it was funny it that memory of the this collaboration of human beings doing all they could for each other. I wouldn't say it's it's a favorite, but his most impactful, no doubt and along those lines are show is called, nobody told me and we always ask our guests. What's your nobody told me less than what is it that you have learned over all of these years in the field of behavioral analysis that nobody could have told you. This is really easy for me, and people did tell me, but they didn't tell me how to do it as best way because I, I'm I, this natural drive and desire to to lead. I was naturally self-centered. I thought my I thought the way to get ahead was to make myself look, great grey cases, great behaviorist run piles and position. And when I folks on that, I had success success still your because like up and down all over the place. When I finally realized that the way to be successful and the way to have healthy relationships wasn't Senator focus on my success. When I started learning how to focus on being a resource for the success of others, that's when life started changing and Robin, how can people learn more about she wants social media? That's easy. So you could follow me on Twitter? It's our DR e e I'm on lengthen. You know, I, I go through. Erz you know, I love to re post science research basically on on mental health. You know, like easy. You know, you know how to maintain positive outlooks. How take care of people. My my my website is WWW dot people, formula dot com. A one word, and I'm pretty easy to get ahold of. So I I am freakishly obsessed with understanding Newman being and trying to be the best one I can. There's no doubt he's got great Twitter account. I was gonna say, I love the articles were posting. I read quite a few of those myself. Thank you. Yeah, thanks. I love them too. The under some great folks out there doing some great work and I and I love. I love frame it for everyone and tell us more about what people formula does in case people are interested in contacting you about that. Sure. So I do a few things. You know, I basically consult and I speak, you know, I do whether it's keynote speeches or can do up to six to eight hours of training as well where you get a full dose of death by Robin for eight hours. So can you, you know, I, I don't call it motivational speaking, although it's pretty inspirational, but I'm very much tool based. I love to share the tools berry. I call the allusive obvious about how you communicate effectively with human beings and it's good for I work with a lot of companies in the especially wealth management companies or people in leadership positions. Companies that have leadership programs about how to be a more effective leader to inspire people to action, inspire people to move forward in their own careers and collaboration, whether it's with internal off oaks or with external art. Thanks to Robin Drake whose latest book is called the code of trust in American counter intelligence experts, five rules to lead and succeed. I'm Laura Owens said, I'm Jan bland. You're listening to. Nobody told me thanks for joining us.

FBI Robin Drake founder and president Laura Owens Taipei Twitter spies Burstein Rob Cessna editor dopamine George Mason University Jan black Iraq Warren Buffett New Jersey Rio Dow
Networking Rx

Note To Future Me

34:47 min | 1 year ago

Networking Rx

"From studio. See in the five one studios located in the borough district in downtown, Columbus, Ohio. This is not a future me. I'm Brad Johnson founder and owner circle to seventy media podcast consultants. In each episode. I interviewed businesses and organizations who have implemented podcasting into their marketing strategy circle to seventy media works with entrepreneurs small to mid sized to large businesses. Associations, nonprofits to strategically plan and execute podcast content creation distribution and marketing with over thirty five years of experience in broadcasting in marketing circle to seventy media brings a unique approach to consulting our podcast or clients. For more information about circle to seventy media podcast consultants and how we can help your business begin or better implement your current podcast into your marketing strategy, contact me at podcasts at circle to seventy media dot com and this episode I interview Frank Eggen founder and president of ams Barrett business connections, and the host of the podcast. Networking are ex Frank is putting in an extraordinary amount of time networking with his podcast, and his podcast has the unique flavor that is designed to help him expand his ams spirit business franchise base. Not only does he produce a podcast that provides insight on networking, but it builds his branding for 'em spirit. He's just a few months in. But he already knows his podcast will do what he sat out for it to do. You can find a complete transcription of this episode at circle to seventy media dot com or note to feature meet com- if you like to be interviewed about your business organizations podcasts, send me an Email at podcasts at circle to seventy media dot com, or you can go to my website and fill out the contact information for him from our formation about circle to seventy media podcast consultants and how we can help your business begin or better implement your current podcast into your marketing strategy, contact me at podcast at circle to seventy medium dot com. Here's the interview. As I do with every episode with note to feature me, I loved ask what nonprofit you're supporting or give time talent and treasure to, you know, I don't necessarily have one in particular that I give a time to about four years ago. I sat down and you'll learn as we talk more. I'm I'm into networking, and I there's lots of small businesses that I help to connect one another, but I knew of a series of smaller now for profits. And I said what if I brought them together? What if I brought them together and allow them to learn about each other? And I told everyone who was who's ever been there who comes they said, you know, what I know what? Everyone's number one issue is it's money. And none of you are going to give up your money for the next guy. But let's talk about all the other issues that you have let's just put money aside. Let's talk about all the other issues, and there are ton of issues that are out there. So this is called the charitable roundtable. We meet once a month the second Friday of every month, and I invite in any small non for profit my. Vite small business. People wanna come in. And just learn about what's going on out there. Volunteer or whatever whatever they can do to try and help that small not for profit community. So that's kind of my give to the charitable world. And it's something that I continue to try to invest time and a little bit of money every month and putting a website up and putting Facebook ads out there just to kind of attract other peak. Right. I'll put a Lincoln show nuts about it. Okay. Let's thing have an interest in it share and get a hold of them. Yeah. Thank you. Sounds good. So let's talk about your professional background and history before we get into your podcast professional background. I moved to Columbus in nineteen Eighty-four to go to law school. I had no idea where Ohio State was I had to ask some questions. But anyhow, I came here and go law school. I got a law degree and got an MBA from Ohio State finished up there in nineteen eighty eight from there. I started into really big firm. I was with a public accounting firm. I was attacked. Consultant I tell people I hate it every minute of it except for the twenty six days a year. I got paid. It was it was a good place to work, but the type of work wasn't really for me. So after about six and a half years, I decided to leave and go into private practice. And I told people funny thing happened to me when I wanted to private practice in a funny thing was that nothing happened. I started my career with a really large firm, and that really large firm just give you work, and when you're in small business, you gotta go and haunted yourself, and I had no idea how to do that. So through a series of introductions, I was introduced to a concept of an organization the concept of an organization was based out of Pittsburgh. They brought together entrepreneur sales reps and professionals into a weekly meeting setting where the people learned about each other and the exchange referrals thought, it was neat. Didn't think twice about it? I joined got d did very well through it got lots of referrals could help. Lots of businesses. Make a long story short of one point. I had not. Pretending I bought it. So that was back dating back to two thousand and four. I don't practice law anymore, and I've just pretty much named the organization is Amsterdam business connections and is short for American spirit. And that's what I do. I spend my days working with small businesses certainly here in Columbus. But I have a series of franchisees growing throughout the country as well. So why podcast? You know about a year ago. The notion was kind of put on my radar. I've written a number of books. I think I've written ten different books on professional networking. I do a lot of speaking professional in public. Speaking networking written. A lot of articles. Somebody said, hey, you ought to think about a podcast. This is another way to get content out there. And I right away dismissed it. It's like, okay. I don't I don't understand it. I don't there's so many moving parts to this. I'm so busy. But then over the summer, I was working with a gentleman, and he was as I try and franchise this. He was trying to get me to do what they term a sales funnel. You know? Hey, listen in. And if you next week, we'll talk about this just continually pulling people long teasing teasing teasing, and we were taping that and one of the episodes are one of the segments didn't tape. Well, and we need to re-taped. He wanted me to just kind of do it on my computer and send it to him. And I thought about overnight, and I and it just didn't feel right. And I. I called him the next day. I said, you know, what I don't want to do this. It just doesn't feel right. It's feels. Like a cheap sales ploy is what it felt like. And I said what I really would like to do. I have some so many thoughts and ideas on professional networking things that I could share to help people become more successful. He says, well what you're talking about podcast. Well, I guess I am. And I said, you know, give me a month. I was coming up on a vacation. And it's a busy time. Give me a month. And I'll put together an outline. So I didn't came back to him with it. And I said this is what I sort of want to do. And he really didn't offer a whole lot of help with respect to the nuts and bolts, I was very fortunate because this is happening over the summertime my daughter, who's a communication major Dennis in university was interning with me. And I just asked her I said, hey, Logan. Could you kind of get me a checklist of all the things we need to do to put a podcast together? She did. And we just started picking through things one at a time one at a time one at a time. In on the you know, the hardest things just kind of come up with content. I mean, not the hardest thing I got plenty of content which just deciding okay, what do I talk strategy on. Yeah. Yeah. Exactly. And that's a good problem to have though. Oh, it is. It's the reverse is horrible not to have anything to talk about. But you know, you need to have a podcast. Well, I'm sure there are lots of people out there. Get started in podcasting and get to episode nine and they're like, well, I really have nothing else to say, right. And for me. It's like, okay. I want to limit myself to you know, I could do it every day. But that's not the business, then it's just it supports the business. So I have to stop myself. All right week-to-week. So what factors were discussed in measuring the success or failure of the podcast as you began. You know, I decided when I was going to say when I started, and I and I know some I know some really connected people out there. And my initial thought was I'm gonna go to them and get them on my podcast because then that'll get me at audience right away. And I thought about it's like, you know, what I bet everybody does that. Hey, I'm going to have a podcast, I'm going to get person Exxon, and that will change my world. And I said, no, I'm not gonna do that. I'm gonna come to them. With one hundred episodes under my belt, and I'm going to come to them and say, you know, what I I have a podcast. I've been doing a podcast I've been doing hundred episodes or ninety nine I want you to be number one hundred to me that seemed to be more genuine. So I you know, I I do measure. I do look at the number of downloads month to month and see what's being downloaded. And what's working, and what's not working? But I try not to put too much into that. Because if you have a bad month, you know, the downloads aren't going up, you're not getting as much I just, and I think this is true of anything in any business. You just need to be consistent you need to be true to what you're doing. And that's for the most part where success comes from not just in podcasting. But really in business you just have to get out there. You have to do things and you have to stick with it. And so that's my game plan is I'm just going to keep providing great content, and and just give it time. I from what I'm seeing and feeling myself. That's pretty much the best game plan is the long tail of. It is anything you do take time. And you're going to get better at it. And you're going to find what topics are best over time. Yeah. What what resonates? Some are not going to be home runs at all, of course. But that's but the next one we'll be right. They'd just like making calls of the for sales that one didn't say yes to it. But the next one will than India nets that positive attitude of you're going to get better. You're going to get better. Yeah. Well, I mean, that's that's exactly it, and you get feedback for people say I really like that. I love the stories you tell okay, I need to do more of that. Right. There you go. Yeah. I share with people that the first episode. I did. Well, the first one was just talking about myself, and what my plans, but the first real episode. I did and these are twenty minute episodes at best. At the that's my I want my length to be the total length. Took me eight hours to record. I wanted. I wanted to cry. I really wanted to cry because I'm like this this, you know, I I don't have this is going to be a weekly thing. I don't have eight hours every week right now I've gotten down to the point where a twenty minute episode. I can get done in easily thirty minutes. There you go. You know? So we get better at it makes time exactly and the self. Critique goes lower and lower. And you just get better the interests are better than say was better. You know, what you're doing you critique less? Yes. Thank because. I always have that problem either. Stop doing it or quit dwelling on right? Exac are find out to get rid of the problem. Right. So you have a mix of solo in interview format. I is is that on purpose by accident. It, you know, to be to be honest when I started it was going to be nothing, but me sharing the content from my various books and the stories and experiences. I had I as I indicated a franchise. And so I have groups of of people in my organization all around the United States, and I had somebody reach out to me and say have you thought about having doing interviews? And you know, my initial reaction was this is self serving this guy wants to be on rolling my eyes. And I share these things with him. So, you know, after the fact I said, you know, and you really think this is a good idea, and he kind of came back, and he said, no think about it. So I did which is I think a left there's a lesson in there that, you know, people hit us with ideas. It may not be that idea. But something there's something there. And he said, you know, when you get people on your going to expand your audience like, oh, jeez. You know, you're right. And that's what I have found. So that's how I kind of stumbled into it. And you know, it kind of created a new issue of Okinawa. Find guests, right? Yeah. I think the the adage is if you're going solo your branding yourself if you're. Interviewing your networking, right? You don't really have the opportunity to brand yourself in an interview there are benefits to both dispense on what you wanted to accomplish. But you're right watching out who's approaching you. And why do they want to be on your podcast filtering that out without you know, again, you can always hit delete? And it never gets never gets aired in your stream, which is the benefit of podcasting. Which is great. Yeah. So you are doing some interviews. How do you go about interviewing I should say? Putting the schedule together to interview. You know, I'm struggling with that right now. You know, it's it's I wish I had a great answer for that. I I had a flurry of people right out of the gate that wanted to be interviewed, and I've got more people lined up, but trying to mix it all in with the regular content. General would have done is. Okay. Tuesday's the regular content is is coming out Thursday. I will put an interview out am I doing interviews every week probably not, but I have for the past six or seven weeks, and I probably continue that for maybe another six or seven weeks by the time. That's done. I might have another six or seven. I don't know to a degree interviews or easier. Because they're not you don't have to put the planning in up front. We just talk right to a degree. They're a little more difficult because you have to really kind of put a little more time into editing. Your after the fact when I'm when I'm doing an episode where I'm providing value. If there's something I've said that doesn't come out. Well, I'll stop in rerecord it. And so there's less editing later. Okay. It's done. I'm comfortable, right. So yeah. But there's less planning on the front end and worry about right? So how is the your podcast allowing you, and of course, and spare business connections to showcase your expertise? How did you plan for that to happen? Well, a number of ways like I said, I I've written a number of books on professional networking and might take on professional networking is less about. Techniques and skills, although it comes in a little bit. It's really about habits and attitudes, and how people need to be conducting themselves, and for example, one of the recent podcasts, I taped had to do with our relationships, and I now is to dealing with. Earthbound objects meteors coming towards towards earth. Okay. Sounds crazy. But you know, there's two there's two rules. There's two thoughts on that one. Thought is is that you just go up there. And this is the Hollywood approach you just go up there, and you blow it out of the sky the problem with that is that you have all this fallout still coming towards earth and instead of one big rock you've got one hundred rock earth hurt. And the NASA approach would be to go up to that object in just gently nudge, it gently nudge it out of the path of earth. And so I now which is that to our relationships, and we all have relationships that are not perfect even marital relationships aren't perfect. But I now is it to those relationships that are really detrimental, and you have to approach you can have the Hollywood approaching you can just blow it up in which case, then you have all the fall out to deal with for you can just kind of gently nudge, nudge, it gently nudge that person to be better behaved, gently nudge that person out of your life. So. You know, that's just kind of a way of the that's a message that's really geared towards anybody out there. And that's part of the podcast. The other part of the podcast. The other reason I did the podcast is there's a lot of things that I do with respect to training the members of my organization and locally. I see a lot of these people. So I can I can actually talk to them, but I've got a growing number of franchisees out there. And I want to be able to get these messages out. So in each chapter meeting of our organization, we have a segment that's twenty minutes long for a member to give a presentation. And so in lieu of giving a presentation I want to be able to provide them with content. You know, here's Frank talking about this particular concept the of asking for referrals, or whatever it might be. So that was the other thought in mind again, it's all about repurposing recycling. And you're doing at right now, are you creating content. You have okay how you delivering that to them. Well, it's going up on the podcasts turned on the podcast, not a private channel thing or are signing. Wow. And a lot of it. I'd really geared towards anybody. Okay. But I'll let the franchisees. No. Hey, this is this is an episode that you can deliver. It's just like me talking me doing the program. So yeah, interesting. Okay. I think a lot of businesses missed that aspect that. This is a communication opportunity to affiliates that maybe across the country or offices that are across the country that whether it's public podcast or private channel podcast. At least. It's a message. That's out there disseminated that your Salesforce can listen to it in the car on their next stop to next call. I I think they're starting to learn this opportunity. But again, it's one of those oh didn't know you could do that. I thought podcast was just for the. Public not necessarily. It's an opportunity to talk to who you wanna talk to on their terms. Yep. Very easily. So has this podcast in the amount of time. You've done it lead to has it led to new business referrals do think. Yet. Have you felt that feedback? I can't say that it has. Okay. I can't say that it has an in. I've really only been doing it started September of twenty eighteen Cam. And I think that's a short term to figure that out and feel that love that. And I miss I'm selling a franchise. It's you know, it's it's not cheap to buy franchiser. But it is really opening a lot of doors for me. I for example, I have one coming up this week. I interviewed a guy in Finland. We had connected online through linked in or something like that. And we're just talking and here's a vehicle where I can learn about I can learn about him. He can well he can share what he has it it provides content for me. He's got twenty thousand Lincoln connections. You know, and he's going to promote me. So I don't know where that goes champion. I don't know where that goes. But it's an opportunity. You can't not take. Right. You know, technically, how did you do that? How did you do the interview we did advise zoom you've been using zoom? That's something that just in kind of researching this whole thing. That's you know, some people say Skype resume, I just became very comfortable with zoom. So that's how we did it. Okay. So marketing the podcast, you're publishing schedule every week. Yes. Okay. And then mixing. In some interviews as well when available so a couple of times a week social media strategy. What are you doing to organically help awareness of the podcast when episodes release I will put a post up I have a a maybe not terribly anal as far as podcasters go. But I think John compared to the general public. It's kind of anal when I produce a podcast, I have an XL spreadsheet and Sochi. This is going in here. And here's the title. And here's the length. And here's what you know. Amazing short intro or a long intro. And what's the out tro? And you know, I one of the things I do put in most podcasts is I'll put a little plug for our franchising opportunity. Well, which one of my using just keep track of that. And I'll write up a description at that point in time and from there we populated Google calendar. And so when the podcast release, I've got all the information I need. And I can just go and copy from that Google calendar, and then paste on Lincoln on my profile, and then various groups that I'm involved with same thing with respect to Facebook. And then people will share that out. And and and that's how it's going depending upon who the person interviewing I might make a personal plea to a particular group, for example, if it's somebody within Amsberg business connections. I will. For example, the first person interviewed was in Pittsburgh, while I sent an Email to all the members in Pittsburgh, saying, hey, I'm you know, I've interviewed Dr below you might wanna listen to this podcast. So you're tracking. And you're also putting some call to action as well. In each episode. What is the call to action is an Email to you phone call to you. How how are you putting that in? I do ask people for comments, and you know, generally speaking, I don't know that that's the best strategy because if you stop and think about it most people are when you're listening to a podcast, they're probably in a car or they're probably on a treadmill. The that's the feedback. I'm getting hey, I really love your podcast. You know, I get up in the morning and one day a week. I'm able to listen to it on the treadmill right or a drive in the car. But I do get emails from people with questions. Hey, you know, you talk about you talked about this. But you know, what does that mean? Okay, right away. I know, hey, I have assumed too much knowledge. And then I'll get out. On a future podcast insert, something in and refer back and say, you know, an episode twelve I talked about this. Let me elaborate a little bit. That's fantastic feedback. That's golden it is. Oh, it's golden. Well, it's you know, we talk about running out of material. I don't let you ever run out of material. There's always something there always something. There is always a question about what you've put in play already. Right. And it's allowing that listener the listener base to have access to you. Right. You know, you'll respond in an inefficient way as well. As here are the many ways, you can reach me. Right. Unless do this right now could sharing episodes from the guests. Have you got a game plan? What are you give them to help you promote what the for example, the gentleman you spoke to in Finland? What are you giving him to help you? Yeah. That's a good question. I I have a I have a call a white paper. It's two or three pages just talking about. Okay, here here the topics. We're going to touch on. Here's how it's going to go. You're going to have opportunity introduce yourself. I'm going to answer. I'm going to ask about the podcast is networking are exits all about networking. So I'm going to address questions on networking. What's your pet peeve? Life. What's challenges? You what are some challenges you faced or would advice? Would you give your younger version of yourself? And then I have a list of ten or twelve other questions that they will pick from a at a time. So we kind of we that in in very natural approach. But they have that all ahead of time, which, you know, people appreciate some people never look at. But that's fine too. But at least it kind of gives me a game plan as to what I wanna do as opposed to just getting somebody on, and okay, let's talk share after the episode is done in. Do you offer any links any audio links? That's our thing to help them promoted as well that they were on the podcast. I do I we promote up to Lipson can. So we get a we get a link from them that I will share with them as we get closer. I some of them tried to access. It ahead of time. But if you know Tuesday's six AM it releases. Nothing's there before then. Hey now, thankfully, but sometimes they don't listen to what I have to say. Hey, it's not there. No. It's not supposed to be the right, exactly. So we'll have them share that out. Yeah. You spoke of Lipson. You did some homework, obviously, your your daughter. Why did you both decide upon Lipson as platform? You know? I don't know. I really can't remember the exact reasoning why there were a couple out there Lipson was one of them. And one of the things that she had me do there was a. There was a webinar on podcasting every week. That would have, you know, something here's how you name your podcasts. Here's this. Here's the equipment. You should have can every because it was a little bit of something. And and Lipson was on our list, and that was one of the two things that this particular person had mentioned, and so we're like, okay. Let's just go with that. There's no wrong answer that each platform has its specific nuances some bit better than others. But it all depends on where you're coming from. And what you need that platform to do for you and your website and your business. Yeah. And but they're all equally pretty darn good. At least the major ones that have been in play for the past eight to ten to twelve years. They're pretty solid. They're being certified you can guarantee that the numbers you're seeing are true numbers. Well for us. It was relatively inexpensive in a monthly basis. It's I think it's fifteen dollars. Right. You know? So when you're starting out podcasting, and it just kind of it's not your business per se. It's just something you've added onto your business. You don't want to invest a ton of front so go K fifteen bucks, you know, three months from now, if this isn't working out, I can bail on and I'm really not a whole lot, right? But the, but you're right. They give a ton of value for that. And. It's it's worked out. The equipment you're using to record the podcast. Let's talk about that. I generally do it right on my computer. I have bought blue yetis got a couple of blue yetis as microphones that. I use. They're not the best. But the pretty good from what I could tell again, there was some research done on the front. End list listening, this webinar and kind of looking out there. But yeah, it's generally done on my computer using audacity if I'm using zoom that I'll need to take that file, and I'll need to convert it to an MP three and then imported into audacity and edit from there, but that's really pretty much it learning curve to use. I'd acidy hard easy for you. Well, I cheated because I had my daughter, and she she she pretty much gave me a cheat sheet. Good good. A what? You jumped into it. And did even with a chichi. Yeah. Very very easy. There are times where I might need to text her and say, hey, wait a minute. I'm stuck here. This happened. What do I do here? I think to a degree, I'm impatient. And I I'm just so busy with so many other things in my life in my business that I didn't really have time to kind of climb the learning curve. And so she really kind of helped me up at care. And I'm sure there are lots of things with respect to awed acidy or zoom. Or any of these things out Lipson that I'm not taking advantage of I figure in time. I will. But it it was enough. You know, I know enough that I can get put out a good product. Right, right. Yeah. Yeah. That's I think that's with everything that we buy buy new car. There are a lot of things in your new car right on us for a year, right? Like a computer. You know, you just don't exactly. Future plans for the podcast where where are you going with this? You know, where it takes me. I guess I just plan on continuing to put episodes out as I indicated you wanted to kind of get to a hundred episodes, and then really try and explore some of these quite frankly, that's a really good goal. I think that's very smart if nothing else because then you'll have at least fifty weeks in looking at twice a week even more than that. But I think a lot of people jumping at the wrong way. And you're looking at it the right way get some in that way when your guest looks at what you're doing. Oh, he's one hundred. Yeah, he knows what he's doing. He's not trying to build off of my exactly my network to build him up. He's actually adding value to my world as well right idea early on when I was kind of researching all of this. I had a conversation with the gentleman who was looking to put together a company producing podcasts, and he didn't have a podcast himself. But he knew one of the people that I was thinking of approaching his yeah, I approached him. He told me no unless I had a million downloads. And I know the person well enough to know that that's probably not what they were saying they probably said that. But what they meant is. You know, what I'm not going to be your first episode, very I'll be somewhere down the line. And I think that's fair. I think itself share, you know, it is exactly. And I think it becomes your then working with a season podcast or that. They're going to ask better questions or not going to be listening to other podcasts and go. Oh, that's a good question. I need to ask him that what they're looking for is. What makes you different? You're gonna ask a better question than anybody else has that adds value to me as a to you in as holistically? But yeah, there are there are a lot of new podcasts are looking at ways. I can nail a couple two or three. Great interviews. And I'll be right there at the top. That is not works. Maybe five six ten years ago, maybe because of the lack of number of podcast right now. That's very difficult. Road to drive, right? Well, it's you know, I just tend to put, you know, back your questions, I just tend to put blinders on I'm gonna put out good material. There are people out there who not everybody's gonna listen to every episode. But every episode somebody's going to listen to somebody's going to get something out of. And so from that standpoint alone. It's you know, it's my duty to try and get the information out. And you know, there might be one podcast. I put out that only one person listens to and that changes their world. It's a success. So true. Yeah. And and that's probably the most realistic way of doing this is affecting one person at a time. Right. And because there's one person's add up very quickly writing for time as networking does to right back to your core. Networking does. Exactly. Yeah. So advice for business owners, considering podcasting his marketing tool, it'd be the first steps that you learned from that you should have done or that hand. Glad I did this. Well, I think the first step that anybody needs to do is. Take a hard look at okay, what kind of content. Do. I have just hearing yourself. Talk is not a good reason to have a podcast what kind of value? Can you add there's a I call it? I called Trojan horse marketing where you would a podcast allows you to do is just what a Trojan horses essentially back in back in the day. The the Greeks couldn't break into the city of Troy, so they gave the city of Troy the wooden horse and hidden inside the wooden horse were, you know, these elite warriors in the middle of night. They got out and took down the city and opened the gate, and that's how the Greeks got in. And that's how I look at podcasting podcasting. Is that way that you can get out there and get through the gates of the people you're trying to talk to. They know you're out there. They know you real they know you provide value that's going to open doors for you. Whereas calling literally their gatekeeper and saying, hey, I'd like to I'd like to talk to the CEO or like to talk to this person. That's just not effective anymore. So kind of thinking about okay where what's my game plan? What's the you know, you have to have a purpose? It's like anything if you don't have that purpose. You're not gonna follow through with it. It's not going to you know, it's not going to change your world overnight. I'm not likely won't can't say that for sure. But if you go in thinking, you know, if I put out ten episodes, and you know, pick up a client. It's doing it for the wrong reason. Well, thanks for being a guest on not feature me really appreciate this has been inciteful on on your take on. Why did you podcasting for a networking company, which is great which is pretty much what podcasting can be? So you're kind of pride in the in the zone for what a podcast gonna actually do for a business and you're in networking. Perfect match. Thanks for having me. Doing good work that matters. That's what a career at Mantech means from protecting our satellites in space to protecting our warfighters in the field. And we are passionate about empowering our people to be their best by providing unparalleled job, mobility, and offering a free bachelor's or master's degree in cyber cloud computing, the men and women it meant take pride in doing the tough work that keeps our country safe. Do you have what it takes to join our team? Learn more at Mantech dot com slash careers. The Starlight lounge presents an evening with the progressive box. That's you go tickling the ivories. He just saved. By bundling home and auto progressive gonna finally by a ring for that gal of yours Hugo send dolences. This nice St.. There's. In my. Progressive casualty insurance company and affiliates. Discounts not available in all states or situations.

founder and president Lipson Columbus Frank Eggen Pittsburgh Facebook Finland Ohio State private practice Ohio Troy Brad Johnson Consultant Exxon Hollywood founder United States ams Barrett
Marsha Sims -- MAKING THE MOST OF QUARANTINE

Taking a Leap

28:08 min | 4 months ago

Marsha Sims -- MAKING THE MOST OF QUARANTINE

"Hi Everyone. This is your life coach. Debra Brown welcoming you to taking a leak. Or guest today is Marsha since? MARSHA SIMS is a professional organizer with over twenty five years of experience in the organizing industry. She's the founder and president of Sorts Out Inc.. The leading professional organizing companies South Florida. And is recognized as one of the top professional organizers in the country. She has authored five popular books on organizing including the best selling organizing your day. smarts office organizing. Five days to a clutter, free hosts and ten time management choices. Marcia as a local national and international speaker as well as an active toast master. and has earned the coveted dtm distinguished toast master. Designation. She has been interviewed extensively in the media and has been featured in national magazines, including women's Day better homes, and Gardens Women's World Self and family circle. Marshes approach mother, three adult sons, and her idea of fun is helping people who've lost hope of being. Used regain the control over their lives. They feel they've lost welcome to the show Barsha. Good Morning. It is absolutely a pleasure to be here. To pleasure to have you. So the first question I have for you. Is What has been your biggest leap in life. When you look back. When have you step outside of your comfort zone and done something big? Oh what a good question! I think my biggest leap. was when I radically changed my diet. News ago. But you know what I've I've got a lot of big leagues because I. Don't have a problem with making a change. So if something needs to be changed. I'll do it and I. I changed my Diet several times, but I think the biggest one was when I went totally raw Vegan, I like to say I went from Macaroni Grill. EAT like everybody. To to raw vegan and I did it in like a week. And I did it because I thought that I wasn't okay. My blood pressure was too high. They could never get it to normal. The kept wanting me to be on more and more medicine. And someone I went to this. And she told me that if I changed my diet that that pressure would go back to normal and sure enough. It did I, did it for two and a half years? And, I fell right back off the wagon. Where right back to normal food and I got on the only results that I had before I did it. But. Then I but I've done all kinds of done every diet than all the every day they make. On the Kito Diet for a long time I'm done all he have to I think that sounds pretty drastic. Going to raw vegan from macaroni grill to raw vegan like that just sounds really extreme to me. How did you just make that change so quickly I? Mean obviously your health was a concern, but. Just in making the move. The mindset, and all of that. How did you make that happen when you? When you were scared. You can do anything. It's amazing to point. Flying, in and all of a sudden, all of the obstacles all the. Nation all the things you think you can't do. You figure out that Jesse can, if you get scared and I got scared. So. Now that that's that's an excellent point. So Marshall. I wanted you on the show. because. You're one of those people. Move. I guess in the good times the bad times. A life is great for you. And as I thought. Virus period. You know this this whole. What three months journey that the world has been on, you could say. Where people have dealt with it. In different ways, some people have thrived. Then some people have not. And Wanted to get your take on this whole thing. I have to ask if you've been driving, you just drive through everything. So well. What else? Here's the thing, right? We make our own circumstances. Your circumstances in your opinion. You can change your opinion. So, we're stuck at home. So, what can you do at home that you've always wanted to do? You know a lot of teaching. Well, you know a lot of people Wanna get organized, which plays right into what I do, but. You know suppose there's books you've always wanted to read well, you could read them now. Suppose you said always said I wish I could spend more time with my kids. Guess what you can spend more time with your kids right now like this. This is an opportunity to clean up and do all the things you always said you wanted to do. The problem is we spend that time looking at media looking at all this bad, and this is wrong, and this is sensational and I don't like this and this person said this and. No turn that off and get on with your life. There has never been times that are good. But there have always been times that are good for some people. There's never been times that are bad for everyone. You know even doing during slavery. There was a lady who made a fortune driving around creating and selling hair. CARE products to slaves I mean this always something positive. If you look in the right direction, and there's always something negative, no matter how good times are. There are people who are sad depressed, upset and grief. So it's. It's all your opinion. I heard. I heard a guy one time. He said he said my life hasn't improved, but my opinion about my life improved my outlook on my life and. I thought that, is so he really? All. Yeah so I stand like everybody else and depressed I. Mean I'm normal, I haven't been normal human emotions, but. I have tools that I use so when I get depressed I journal. And when I journal I get answers. When I get angry, I read. And so I have tools. Or like like for example. I tell my every year I. Tell Myself I'm going to clean up my filing cabinets and get rid of some of them because I, don't I? Don't go look them. I mean that stuff is on paper. My life is online. When I don't really do it. Because I. Don't feel like it today. Next Day feel like next day I. Don't feel like it, but you're feeling. Are What create your light so if you really want to accomplish something? Start doing it. I I like having that inside. Scoop to you the organizer. Because something tells me that you may not be as organized. As we think you should be. Like you have the same the same, at Mito I should know that drawer I should do yeah. Yeah. Knowing that you have all the tactics. What keeps you? Delaying such things for yourself. Okay so I. Let me quote Unquote, my co author, she says the best thing ever she says. The difference between organized people and people who are not organized is that organized to people just do what they have to do and disorganized people have to feel like doing it i. and therein lies metropolis. I don't feel like it. So if I want to do something, I have to ignore how I feel about it and start doing it. There's somebody I don't know who and I don't remember exactly, but something about you know that doing something is where the genius is. You know you don't have to be genius. You just have to do stuff. a friend of mine from toastmasters long long time ago, used to say that the secret of success is showing up much just be there. You know just do what you need to do. You don't have to think about it. You don't have to feel like it. I could easily do my file if I felt like it, so if I ignore fact that I don't feel like it, I can get it done. He. Yeah. It's not all about feeling kind of exercise a lot of us. We don't really awesome. But once we get there once. We ignore what we feel and go with what we knew we we need to do. You get it done. Get into action as you say. That's right, and it's the same dynamic exercising dieting and organizing same dynamic. It's something that if we did it. We know our lives would be better, but we don't do it because we don't feel like it and the moment. So, you look back at all the years. You didn't feel like exercising. And look at the result. So. What do we do today? Start Look at all the years. You didn't feel like organizing stuff, so look at the result. So. What did we did? Start same thing with diet all the years I don't want to give up that I wanna eat that Candy Bar I? WanNa eat things with sugar rental. And I WANNA eat things with sugar and I'm, too. I just don't anymore. Because I don't want the result. He. You know one thing that I have noticed a lot of people have spoken about. during the quarantine time is the fact that they've taken on a lot of at home projects while it. Might as well right. All. Over the honeydew, list The husbands are. Yeah that's right, and and you shared because we have an opportunity and it may not come back. I mean eventually whatever happens is going to happen in. This virus is going to be gone, and life will go back to normal. Will you look back and regret that you didn't do things that you always wanted to do? You know yeah. I'd pulls out my sewing machine. I pulled out my sewing machine, I my sewing machine and then in my closet for probably twenty years. I never I never did my mending. 'CAUSE I didn't feel like it, so I would. Donate it and I pulled out my sewing machine. What happened was I was trying to a a dollar tree, the and my boyfriend, trying to go into a dollar tree, and they had a sign. That said we couldn't go in unless we had on a mask. And I believe that and I said I'm not gonNA spend a nickel a mask. I know how to sell so I dusted off my sewing. Machine and I started making Matt. It's just kind of happened like that. I'M GONNA get kicked out of one dollar tree. Please come on. You Know GonNa. Kick me out if I'm going to get kicked out of a store. I WANNA kicked out of. High end store them on a diet. Because online. No, you're actually. Selling my. All of a sudden. On there that you never anticipated. Yeah, that's true. I absolutely did not anticipate as you know I had no intention of selling mass at all. But it more. People kept asking me and so reluctantly make them a mask, and then more people asked, and then my family got involved, and they all wanted math and one thing led to another, and you know so now. Yes, I and I have a friend who said WHO I made a mask for because he was helping me do something else and he's Oh. Oh, this is great. I'M GONNA make a website so I'll probably end up having a mask website. And this was completely unintentional. So, so what that actually shows us is that me him discover new talents. New Business. Like this when everybody thinks that everything is shut, no there there are. Is. That's true and the other side of it is. You can't buy Jigsaw Puzzles in the store anymore. My my little hobby was Jigsaw Puzzles I love to do apples. I just due to me, Jigsaw. Puzzles defined my life. My life is all messed up. Everything was off scattered and slowly put it altogether. So what people see is together. But it didn't start out like that. It was all like everything else like everybody. Else's everything else, so I I liked I liked putting jigsaw puzzles together I. Don't do anything with Mike Glue them together and put them in a pile, but but I like the makeup. And because of that. I couldn't by Jigsaw Puzzles and to me. Making mask is like a jigsaw puzzle. I take a piece of fabric active. CUT It out and. Things out, and you have to sell them together and so putting things together on still creating something so I have time now. Because I can't go anywhere. I use my jigsaw puzzle time to make masks to me. It's the same basic thing. Except, you know I can get a return. My son asked me one time he said. What are you spending on fabric? And I said it doesn't matter. I said I'm spending less money on fabric. When I used to spend on jigsaw puzzles, but jigsaw puzzle I couldn't get anything back. As you talk about the Jigsaw Puzzles I remember seeing an interview with the CEO of Walmart and the question he was asked was. What trends have you seen in in customer? Spending And he said the first few the first month. Let's say of the of the quarantine. It was all about getting things jigsaw puzzle. Home? And we've been to grooming products. He said. Talking about haircuts and everything, right? You said something earlier a boat whether we would look back and regret the time that we had this Florentine period. That has pretty much been put on us. and. It occurred to me that. There are so many people who made the passing commenced. Costs I wish I had a break. I wish I had more time and all of a sudden. We got the time right. That's right. Your wishes granted right. What you ask for because you just might get. Get it. Right. Exactly yeah. Those people. Are Using it. The way. That is. Right the people who used to complain to me that they never had enough time to spend with their family are now complaining that their kids are getting on their nerves tired of home schooling their husbands a problem. Same people same thing and so when people call me and tell me their depressed. The first thing I ask is how much time are you spending on media? Use, that will make you depressed. To turn it off. Turn on music. Turn on comedy. Turn on silent. Truly, yeah Halloween making good use of this time. What is the worst thing that you have been through your life that by media, other people standard. You should not have come out of it as gracefully as you did. What off. For you. Oh! Yeah, there are a couple of those. Okay, so when I decided. I did not want to be married to my ex. Husband anymore had three little kids. One was just out of diapers and then I had like. Three, three five and Nine eight or nine like that. And my ex husband decided that he. Did Not. Want to support that he didn't want to support my decision. And therefore he absolutely never paid child support ever ever ever. He gave me five hundred dollars in life one time. So I never got child support and I. I was on my own with a small business that was pretty new, and I had to figure out how to make it work, and we had to me on my three sons. We had to figure out how to make it work. And that was very tough. There were times we just did not have what we needed. I didn't how money my car broke down and my dad said he wasn't going to pay. It wasn't a loan. You the money to fix it, so I was on my own, and I had to figure it out. And I had to land on my feet and I only knew one thing I had one overriding mantra that that I used for my life, and that was that my three sons had to go to college and graduate. And? I'm in hindsight. I'm glad I. Put that in graduate thing on it because a lot of people go to college. But they don't graduate, and so that's all. They knew all their lives. You know you may not go to this screaming and have to go to school today. You may not feel like you need a break you. May You know whatever? Long as you now you're going to go to college and graduate. It was like you know there's a story about you know. They tie elephant to a state when they're babies. The elephant remembers that and they will never try to pull the stakeout easily, though as a big adult. They could easily pull the stake, but they don't know because in their mind tied to that steak and that I said if my kids always believe that they have to go to college and graduate, then they will do it at a point. I'll be free. Because when they grow up I. Don't WanNa have to support them anymore and now. They're all you know self-employed enough. They're all employ gainfully employed. That's the word they all graduated from college. They're all gainfully employed, and now not only do they not leave my money, but they've been able to send money. Which is nice, they don't act. But they can you know what I mean? It's like. They can and they. You know so. They appreciate that and I was there. It was you know it was me and my three sons We had to do everything together. There were meetings I couldn't go to. Because I didn't have a babysitter. There were things I couldn't participate in. My friends were traveling and doing all that fun stuff. I couldn't go anywhere. I have three little kids. I think that was probably. The biggest jolt because I never expected to be a single parent. Yeah I, always I. You know that that was not my and I certainly was not expecting to be a single parent without child support. gave so I got. No, so that was that was probably the biggest. Maybe given that because I hear quite a few challenges in there. For the person who is going through something similar interns in terms of the finances you know having less than they would like. probably a relationship that has gone. Wrong. Yeah. What would be your advice? Give me three things. You would tell that individual who is facing. Some of the biggest crises you could say. During a time like this? Well. Okay number one. The absolute most important thing is stopped being a victim. Stop playing the victim role because as long as you let some other thing. You're blaming something else. Then you're focuses on blaming and your focus isn't on what you can do for you. You can do things for you, and you can be okay, but you have to know that it all rides on you and nobody else is going to help you, so that's number one is stop playing victim role. One day it hit me. Was, walking probably walking with three them because we were always together. and. I realized that. You know my ex husband was gone. That was over. And this is what we had. We had exactly what we have. We don't have more than that. We don't have less than that. Things are not better than that I was no fantasy at that point it became. This is this is my life. This is what I have to work and so when I stopped being a victims I, could I could then. I was in control. That's number one. The second thing is once. You know you're in control then you can look at. What can you do? You know if the problem is your finances, what can you do? To make some extra money like I, pulled out my sewing machine and I make mass. There's something you can do. Can you be a consulted? Can you make something? Can you help somebody do something? and. This is about helping somebody. Do something it's not about what can you get? It's about what can you give when you start looking at? What can you give? Think about it in that way. There is something that you can give that. Somebody will pay you for just about every entrepreneur I know needs a virtual assistant. You know. Everybody with children need somebody to Babysit our help out on occasion. Everything needs to be cleaned. You know there's something you can do, but you have to look at it from the perspective of what you can do not the perspective of what you don't have. In terms of relationships realize you cannot control other people. You cannot make somebody love you like you want you. You can't do that. So. Don't regret it. Move Forward. So I have techniques because I've been single so long I have picnics to help my heart. Not Be broken like for example. I have a theory of everything you know so for example. Stop saying their name. If somebody really hurt you deeply, stop seeing their name when you think their name. Try to stop thinking their name. Because when you depersonalize it, it doesn't hurt so much. Don't try to make them love you. I had a boyfriend I dated for four years I just knew he was gonna WanNa. Marry me I. Just knew it. But he didn't. And I had to realize I can't be mad at him because he didn't want to marry me. There are people I don't. WanNa marry. I get it. So I said look. I gave you four years of my life. You don't WanNa marry me fine. I'm GONNA to teach you how to do something new I'm going to teach you how to become a platonic friend. And I moved on because you have to realize that you have you have to take care of you. That's all you have. And you have to think outside of the box that they give us. They give us a box of to survive. You need a job. What happens when your job goes away? Your job ends. You get fired. Your job closes down I mean look at what's happening now. You know that's what we're talk. We're taught. You're supposed to find somebody to love you for the rest of your life, and they're going to be with you and you're going to be married. What happens when that's not the case anymore? You still have you. So those are my three pieces of advice. Hope that was helpful. Marcia. Thank you for that for all the listeners who would love to know how they can reach you whether it's for organizing services or your new mask business. Okay! Well, probably the fastest easiest way to reach me us through by email, and that is Marsha Sims, and then the number one at g mail. That's M. A. R. S., H. A. S. I. M. S., and then the number one and g mail. or Or if if you want to reach me about organizing, if you have any organizing questions, you can reach me at Martius sims same spelled the same way in a R. S. H.. A. S. I. M.. F., at sort it out dot net. If he's have a question you want to ask. Ask Me right away. I'm home like everybody else in the country in the world so. Feel free to call me because I. Do you know I'm I'm home? It's okay my number is area code three, oh five. Four six seven. Eight, five six for an SBA anything I'm happy to talk to you. Thank you marching for being on the show today. Was a pleasure accuser. Thank you for having me. Thank you everyone listening my guest. Today was Marsha since this is your life coach Brown thanking you for tuning into taking an league. If you have any questions or comments, I, can be reached at taking league, dot, com, or nine, five, four, three, six, one, three, six, one seven. See you on the other side of success?

Jigsaw Puzzles MARSHA SIMS founder and president WanNa Marcia Debra Brown South Florida Sorts Out Inc Jigsaw Jesse Marshall New Business Walmart us. Machine dot