20 Burst results for "founder and president"

"founder president" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

05:33 min | 2 weeks ago

"founder president" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"What, what is the biggest reason you? Any state or local areas coming up where people bring a debate or their contentious about that point what what is one one reason they give for wanting someone to marry it seventeen or sixteen or something? What is the logical reason that they're giving? I don't understand it. I don't understand it but senator I'll can give you an example of Californian. Senator Jerry. Hill in twenty seventeen from northern California. ICU scituate of his came to him and she said a friend of hers it it's going. She's going to be forced into marriage as a minor in discount happen and she found out that it's legal in California and she wants to end that and so he thought it was a no brainer. And he introduced legislation sp two, seventy, three, no child marriage under eighteen exception. It was watered down so bad that the. Proponents of it basically hands off and they said, no we I'm sorry. We cannot support this bill anymore the way it was watered down. It no longer speaks to the goal of child ranch under eighteen exceptions and some of the opposition came from. Unforeseen quarters like. ACLU and. You mean. University. No Excuse me what is ACLU so? I. Am American Civil Liberties Union. Okay And or civil liberties union was against. They they felt it's against the fundamental rights of. Marriage and religion. But what about the? What about the rights of the child to have a safe child ton And so. Neither ACLU NOR PLANNED PARENTHOOD Opposed it in the other four states, but they did here in California. So we're trying to build a coalition, we started a the California coalition to child marriage in on September fourteen twenty, nineteen We had a town hall meeting at American. UCI University of California Irvine, at the law school there and we co hosted it with a UCI initiative to end family violence. And we launched the California coalition to end child marriage and we have partners in it and. The partners in the group, and so people can go to see a coalition to child. Rights Dot Org. And its partners in the partners are either victims, survivors of child match, elected officials, organizations, our community leaders..

California ACLU UCI University of California I Hill Senator Jerry senator UCI
"founder president" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

04:13 min | 2 weeks ago

"founder president" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"I'm going to have to go with. Ten percent. Okay now you're really going. No? No, no no, it's Nineteen percent in the House and twenty in the. Senate. That's before the last election that was before last election. I was guessing you know hedging my bets because of the question so. Maybe get it right. But I I didn't think we're GONNA save fifty percent right you know if we were in discount in Scandinavian countries yeah. We would be in those ranges and and that's why. We need to increase the percent of women here in office. And as far as child marriage you know UNICEF indicates that child marriages human rights abuse child marriage is marriage under the age of eighteen. And the State Department indicates Shoulda reported into any sixteen that said child marriage is a fundamental violation of human rights in other countries and what I'd say is what about our country? What about our kids to find out that it's still legal in forty eight states when we say you country's GonNa, do this we have to put you on different years. We have a report and we put you on different tiers because you don't do this to find out that child marriage was still available here. In. This stuff are really like to get into a moment, but we're still back in university in. Economics. Again. I'm trying to shift it not on me on what we're doing. It. Yeah. No I totally appreciate it. So how after you graduated then you had your first job. Yes as Building, systems analyst. Yes, and so how was your career path shaping out and then then into the transition of you know your your current I. Mean I have I had interview yesterday in the ladies empress and I find your like almost the empress. This mission and I think it's a wonderful mission that you're doing in. So how did how did that I mean you said growing up with your father bit the idea of service in nurturing you. So how did this snowball start to build in in? You're like, I'M GONNA put my efforts into this after your first job out of university. No this this came in a later know my first job we were doing other things, but also to help the community then I only worked in that for a year then I became. A financial. Senior financial analyst for an Investment Bank. In Kuwait and I was responsible for the foreign portfolio of that bank, and so we dealt with all the foreign banks that wanted a piece of that pie and then, and then I came here to the US. And I went and Reema just. So 'cause I know you want to promote what you're doing but I think your your your life is powerful. So like even in the things that you've done even those what we could pass over like going to university taking economics getting your first job and then working in finance and these. These big. That's a powerful message that is encouraging to listeners as well. Showing that you know look what you can do like. These are some things you can do while also raising awareness for some of the tragedies that are going on in this world. So I, think both are really good to you know it's not just stop this, but also there is a better way to do this life or to live this life..

Senior financial analyst UNICEF Senate State Department systems analyst Reema Kuwait Building US
"founder president" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

03:28 min | 2 weeks ago

"founder president" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"I grew up there and so you basically and then I went to the American University in Beirut and so we were involved politically I was the because you can see it through my life. I was the secretary of the Arts and Sciences Students Society and we had the civil were cleared where we worked with an outage responsible for orphanages and mentally retarded into Dushanbe, and we had programs for them. So it was all a student volunteer on. Did you sorry what did you take university? Economics. What what led you to economic I mean you seem like a lady who has her head on her shoulders unlike myself who did not end still try to just it but what got you into even before high school how was what was your trajectory then in to get you towards economics and finance and will what I wanted to be is an architect actually okay. And because when we were studying in Kuwait, it was the everything was in Arabic and you go to American in Beirut and everything is in English I never had a problem except physics somehow my brain couldn't do that translation well in physics. So I switched from architecture. To Economics. But we were always just like Korea in the family we were always like who's going to be the top the class. So. It in. Korea right. Who's WHO's going to be the top? It's dot who's going to be second? Yes. You're either chocolate class. Are you're just one? Yes so my older brother and I were always competing who's WHO's The top of the class of his or her class, and so that's when we went back home and a like. Yeah. Looking forward to going to university was this something that even from earlier childhood Middle School Elementary School that this is the Max that's the path as you get the highest of education because then once you have that base than you can basically do whatever you want, but you have to have that base of at least to be A. Better it's more but basically that's. Life. I can picture. Yourself or even like Koreans in wasn't like me of like a path in kind of the younger. Adolescent growing outside of the path where I did and I kinda ventured off into the path for yourself and other people it's your family pruning, those those wings that are trying to. Go to these different directions and. How did you find that in hindsight? How you? How do you appreciate the value that your parents you mentioned your Father Pudding Education at the forefront. In you know maybe not speaking about it yet but the work that you're doing now where you know some people don't have those. Visions and hopes for their kids in there doing other things. But how much did you appreciate them clipping I mean I. Don't Know How free spirit you were growing up, but I certainly went off the track. Okay.

American University Beirut Korea Arts and Sciences Students Soc Dushanbe Middle School Elementary Schoo secretary Kuwait
"founder president" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

05:45 min | 2 weeks ago

"founder president" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"And it talks about the case of Sherry Johnson who was ten years old repeatedly raped by a deacon in the church parishioner eleven she gets pregnant. In Child Welfare was going to conduct an investigation and. The church and the parents get together and they marry her off to the twenty year old rapist, and so the title was eleven pregnant and married to Harare's. and. So that's my first introduction to the fact that child marriage was legal in the US Senate was legal back then in forty eight states. Right, now, it's legal in forty six states the first state to ban. It was dilawar in May of two, thousand, eighteen followed by New Jersey in June two, thousand eighteen. then. A Pennsylvania in May twenty, twenty this year during covert. And Minnesota. Also. May Twenty twenty. So these are the only four states that ban child marriage under eighteen with no exception. And usually children are married because of parental consent. And, we hear from survivors and the. General theme is that both that the parents failed them and the system failed them because the parents should be the ones who protect them from harm not that ones who put them in a harmful situation. And most of the Times is to let their rapists in their cases, statutory rape, which is crime get get odds of jail free card basically by marrying the victim and so. I've added child marriage to our goals. It was initially human trafficking and you know with covid. Nineteen. Human trafficking has. There has been a huge optic at least in the US in Kohl's to the national hotline during covid nineteen, forty percent nationally and thirty percent in San Diego, which is just south from where I live. So that's that's what I'm trying to do is. Protect. Basically, a women goes and that's our mission because the mission statement of Global Home Three six five is that we're dedicated to improving the lives of women and girls locally and nationally by advocating for their safety through raising awareness education..

Twenty twenty US Senate Sherry Johnson US statutory rape Kohl San Diego New Jersey Minnesota Pennsylvania Global Home
"founder president" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

WhyWeWork BrianVee

03:26 min | 2 weeks ago

"founder president" Discussed on WhyWeWork BrianVee

"Welcome to why we work with your host Brian Veep, as he speaks to people like you from all over the world as we together dive deeper into our motivations struggles. Joys. Seemingly missteps. Colds. Warnings. And Advice. which would be an encouragement to us all to get up. Get going. And keep on working Working stopped. Working His good. Now here's your host to why we work. Trying. I'm Brian in. This is why we dad.

Brian Veep Colds
"founder president" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

Dose of Leadership

05:45 min | 2 weeks ago

"founder president" Discussed on Dose of Leadership

"Greg it's an honor to have you on the show. . Welcome to dose of leadership. . Thank you. . It's an honor to be here. . I always love talking with CEOS I talked with one for a while and I'm curious about at electrical supply. . Can you just give me a quick synopsis of of what the Company does sure <hes>. . So we have a few different revenue streams and a few different markets that were involved with <hes> in Las Vegas Nevada, , which is where we kind of got are stark <hes>. . We primarily deal with the switch your market there <hes> we get involved with large commercial construction projects. . <hes>, , for example, , that t mobile arena, , anybody's into Las Vegas. . Over the last few years they know that they know they're in a so we did all the incoming switchgear for that <hes>. . We do <hes> the incoming power for <hes>, , the LAS, , Vegas Convention, , Center <hes> were we're currently working on the expansion for that although it's it's on hold right now but I'm eventually they'll release that and probably the most exciting project we have in the switch during their is <hes> the square gardens. Spear. . . In Las Vegas Yeah. . You guys. . Anybody's ever seen. . Pictures of that. . It's it's pretty phenomenal. . How does the world working on that? ? How does one get started in that? ? I mean I'm amazed by the type of businesses that are out there that are even know exist. . I mean how does one get started in being the provider of that? ? Sure. . So <hes> I started my career with. . Schneider Electric which was back then called Square DIJK and <hes>. . They're they're the switchgear manufacturer that we now representing Las Vegas. . So that was my that was my upbringing <hes>. . We became a square distributor in <hes> Las Vegas in two thousand eight. . and. . So <hes> with my knowledge of that business <hes> I just went after those types of projects and <hes> started hiring people that had expertise in those projects and then <hes>. . We just got a reputation for being really good at bidding and managing them, , and so the contractors in town <hes> like working with us because we. . Have, , that kind of expertise and so as these projects come up. . <hes> we bid them and <hes> because of our knowledge of of the products were able to see things on the specifications that <hes> gives us a competitive advantage, , and so we <hes> we use back to to get the lowest number possible and and thankfully we were successful on those. . So. . It's a whole process <hes> you had it. . It's years in the making yeah. . We'll going to say specialization and I wouldn't even think of even existed because I just like you said, , I don't have the knowledge for it, , and so it's always find it fascinating. . So how'd that lead? ? How did that? ? What was kind of the mindset or the process where he said you know what? ? I'm going to start this business in two thousand four like what what led to that. . So I was a sales person for several electrical distributors <hes> well, , I just going back out of the salesperson I nine electric, , and then eating <hes>, , and then I went over to the distribution side was doing sales for that. . and. . Then I worked my way up to management to where I was a sales manager, , and then I became vice president of sales for electrical distributor <hes> and then I. . Guess it was <hes> interestingly, , I had some some people that I've worked with that that I didn't think repair lead in a little bit frustrated with <hes> with with how I was treated. . You know in dot you know, , hey, , I could start a company and <hes> and do this better and I had several people that were my employees that came to me and said, , if you start your own company will come work for you. . Wow and so so I decided to take the leap and thought you know it's it's Kinda now or never if I'm going to do this as well might as well go. . So I, I , convinced them to work for straight commissioned. . Because at the time I didn't have any money to pay them as far as you know salaries and so they came on board for some pretty generous commissions and <hes>. . Just started growing from there. . I love that will <hes>. . Will you entrepreneurial before that or was this kind of an awakening to your? ? Can of untapped entrepreneurial. . I grew up the son of an accountant. . Anything entrepreneurial. . <hes>. . You know accountants <hes>. . Typically pretty conservative. . So I I grew up not taking a lot of risks but as I started <hes> increasing my knowledge in the industry and <hes>. . And became more confident in my abilities <hes> I decided that if I. . Was Half a successful salesperson earning my own company as I was working for somebody else. . Than I could I would be just fine <hes> because I think I'd be able to manage my expenses better and <hes> and and just you know build a business. . <hes> around the you know the revenue streams knew it could bring in. . And so I I felt confident enough the business plan was was going to be successful and so I just took the lead. .

founder President and CEO CEO executive Texas
FinTechs Pandemic Pivot with Cross River CEO Gilles Gade

KindredCast: Insights From Dealmakers & Thought Leaders

06:42 min | 3 weeks ago

FinTechs Pandemic Pivot with Cross River CEO Gilles Gade

"Hi everyone is Rei and welcome back to kindred casts I'll sitting down today with my friend Jill gave the founder President and CEO of Fintech powerhouse and Unicorn Cross riverbank crossover was started by Jill two, thousand eight as one branch bank located teaneck new. Jersey. At the technology company now, powers companies like affirm circle best a coin based rocket loans stripe of star and transfer wise at are backed by big investment from Ktar, a French battery ventures, Andriessen, and Lyari. Issue over the past twelve years, the firm has grown to three hundred fifty employees providing over thirty billion dollars in loans over eighteen million customers, and during the crisis crossover helps nearly two hundred thousand small businesses would be yuan's through the paycheck protection program, which really puts it in the company of the big banks like Bank of America Vicki Morgan Wells Fargo Right? They're pretty impressive and very helpful to our overall recovery drinks endemic last two years it was named the most innovative bank to work for. Job GonNa try to give you a run for your money on that one here line. But I WANNA wish you. A Happy New Year it's a real pleasure and honor to kick off the year in the Jewish calendar fifty, seven, eighty, one podcast, and as I like to say when you have gone for over five, thousand seven hundred, eighty years, there's downs, ups and Dowse said via a shot at the by pleasure to. Today. It's real pleasure. We've. Meeting of last year's restaurants and and peers of isolation and zooms that in person you're one of my first meetings safety and security and I really wanted to stay closed during this dynamic given how busy you've been thus give everyone a background here because I really think through cross. River. Everyone here is going to get a lens of not only the fintech universe and where. We're going in banking what we've come from, but also what has been going on on the ground during the period in helping so many businesses on Main Street get back on their feet again, and that's really why this is such a story around business and building value but also round helping people around a real heartening narrative that I really wanted to to bring out here to. Tell us how the company was founded. In An Giang aid is a quite an unusual and interesting story towns came to be across different, very ginning. Sure. So I don't want to log on the history because I think the more recent stories much more fascinating just trying to help two hundred, thousand small businesses get back on their feet. As, been. Me Crowley the biggest side, my career and I think probably would be the highlight those anybody spuria stage. So something that's we're very proud of York buster the go back in time. So I came to the United States in Paris fries whenever airs went to school there worked a little bit I was actually analysts that CPR venture capital in Paris. Working on. Some of the first. Time nineteen eighty, nine, hundred ninety in Europe actually, and then crossed the Atlantic came in Nineteen ninety-one go to job at bear stearns I was in International. Working on. Of. Banks insurance companies. So that was my first foray on shown initial services got very fortunate. I. Wide. I landed in finishing the group at bear stearns and our retrospect you gentlemen standing of our God does things and just put. So you know some pebbles along the way that one day you're going to be caught to inspire where you heading in. Then I took a Atas when I got married and I went to learn fouls. Wow Yeah Joe Jr ethics, which is a commentary on the on Jewish law. In companion. I did ask a couple of years came back to of making this time. The only job I could land was open difficult to give back to the market I worked for Barclays Capital. Zoom one of the Thomas Tell you that made you on jump back into banking. More by necessity. With all the day will undoubtedly the feedback I needed to go back to work I. Think. All my life savings where it's only exhausted it's not a life that was prepared to date or the rest of my life. So regretfully, so because it's it's really fascinating as size definitely intellectually stimulating. Question about it but I still enjoy doing it. By the way I still earned every single day studying law in this is something that will stay with me Probably you know for the rest of my life. A lot of good business lessons and haven't company in the home. Absolutely I mean there's definitely a concepts of humility ethics respective others listening to the position particularly respecting the physician and there's always a counterpoint that. Is Truly a hundred centre-right nobody's abso-. Medium. Or these always way and ruth compromise, and this is only a life lesson that is invaluable. And by the way, you know any book that I've Read Entrepreneur and as points to she's. Have successfully led their companies through an exponential organization at goal example, Faisal Volleys. So just running about them under different concept different setting and they're trying to allies them intellectually and then trying to fly them. Businessworld is something that I was very fortunate or being able to do the. So you hundred that's that was very formative for me and trolley in the central step along my travels and my journey in becoming the COO crosser in that like say like the only job I could land at the time was in technology banking and nothing about technology. For aqueous capital. Under Sunday night, who's global head of technology and worked on some Fascinating Tales Global Crossing Iridium satellite network in then work on the transaction war on the computer associates CSC sale merger it was really fascinating to. To work on the technology front been trying in in learning about a new trade and look at this you know like some fifteen years later. It's a rejoinder between technology and banking.

Bear Stearns Jill Paris Bank Of America Fintech Barclays Capital Vicki Morgan Wells Unicorn Cross Lyari Founder President And Ceo REI Andriessen Europe Ktar York Businessworld United States
EVO Cancelled After Accusations Towards Co-Founder Mr. Wizard

The Esports Minute

01:28 min | 4 months ago

EVO Cancelled After Accusations Towards Co-Founder Mr. Wizard

"Amid dreams and the sports minute presented by e sports network. It's just the Cherry on top of what was a crappy week in sports and the game community as large ego is, or maybe I should say was one of the most prestigious events in east sports as the top event for most fighting game titles. This year, the competition and moved online due to the pandemic, but after allegations of sexual misconduct towards Joey. Cuellar the CO founder President. Eve Online has been outright canceled Kular, better known as Mister. Wizard was accused of acting inappropriately towards teenage, boys, Multiple Times mikey crack prawn fan was the one step forward. The allegations publicly after those allegations went public Capcom nother Rome and band dynamic. Oh, all pulled their gains in the event. In addition, casters players also pulled out leaving Yvo, no choice but to cancel the event Yvo says sever all ties with cooler going forward, but he was a key part of the creation of Yvo and actually decision event from its Co. founder will be difficult. Defining game community was splintered this week. This is just one of many many allegations. Put forward by various. Various members of the community for much larger conversation about what's happening this week. The myriad of allegations and the lasting effects on the FTC I've just published an east sports network podcast episode with fighting Gabe writer Danny. Howard we cover these topics in depth, my condolences and the goal of sports network go out to

YVO Co Founder Cuellar Eve Online Joey Gabe Wizard Howard Founder Danny Writer President Trump Its Co.
"founder president" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

07:50 min | 5 months ago

"founder president" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"I I mean if you look at what's happening now. With pandemic in terms of the rising American electorate and particularly women in the last great recession. That was a recession that really disproportionately impacted men and manufacturing sector in the construction sector. What's happening now is just the opposite. This pandemic is disproportionately impacting women. And so you see high unemployment rates higher unemployment rates around women you see an obviously they make less than men and so you couple higher unemployment among women with less of a base in terms of a pay scale and you have a devastation among women in this country an economic devastation among women particularly unmarried women who earn less than their married counterparts. And these are the women that are on the front lines in terms of service workers healthcare workers. You know helping you get your groceries helping you. Pick up your drugs at a pharmacy. So women are on the front line of this pandemic and they are on the front line in terms of economic consequences and so that is a story that needs to be told over and over and over again and if you think about single moms and the majority of children in this country who are brought up by one parent brought up by single moms think of the devastation not only to the women think of the devastation right now for their children and we as a country have got to come together and recognize that and really not lose two and three generations to this pandemic and we really need to step up and make sure we think about how to create an infrastructure of support for women married or unmarried across the country. And that's a big piece of what the Congress and the states need to grapple with and address. Yeah I mean when you think it through. Women are being hit by this pandemic from economically in so many different directions right the fact that we are often in a caretaker positions which are considered essential positions. Right now right like women are. The nurses are her on the front lines. There are also the people who rely more on childcare care so this is going to be. This is going to be a massive hit. Two women economically long term. Like you said is going to reverberate for for generations and also again another group that I know that you focus on our people color. You know you've seen the numbers come out for people of color and how they're being hit by this pandemic. Yeah I mean the history of discrimination. Both the discrimination in terms of access to healthcare in terms of access to affordable housing in good areas the access to good jobs. It's again it's devastating what's happening now to particularly African Americans and their communities and this shines a very bright light an ugly piece of America. And it's something that we want to address and it's something that this pandemic hopefully will allow us to say okay. Now is the time we cannot afford to let this kind of discrimination and this kind of opportunity costs to the country in terms of loss. Wages AND LOSS. Talent happened because of race. I'm curious Leedle if unmarried women this group that you initially started to focus on if you could get them to vote and they had access to the ballot at the same rates that married women had without all of the barriers. What do you think the direction of the country policy wise would look like? I think that if you think about unmarried women and other members of the rising American electorate they have a certain set of values that they hold very dear and they believe in the American dream they believe in people working hard playing by the rules and getting the rewards of working hard and playing by the rules. They believed in opportunity for people all across the spectrum whether people agree with them or not or look like that or not. They agree with opportunity and so and they want this country to be strong. I think you have a different set of elected officials who finally represent the values of the overwhelming majority of this country. I mean sixty four percent of the voting eligible population and yet you have a congress. That doesn't look like the population and doesn't legislate like the population. I mean think about it. Healthcare has been the number one concern for pretty much every single American. In this country. They want access to quality healthcare. And if you think about some of the public policies in some of the attempts to undermine the healthcare system that was set up in the last administration at the devastation of most of the people in this country except for the very wealthy. That's not that's not the kind of public policies. They WANNA advocate for. They WANNA healthcare system that takes care of all Americans not just a few Americans so far. The people were listening right now. And they're really concerned about the outcome of the Tony Tony election and you know being able to vote in November. We know can they do right now to ensure that they do have access if they're not registered that need to register right now hang you know whatever you're doing you're not registered that align? Go Register the second thing is there are many many states as you know three or four states and the district have no excuse vote by mail and there are many states right now where you can ask the state to send you an. A- ballot in November. So go ahead apply to get a ballot if you live in Florida if you live in North Carolina if you live anywhere in a state that that's allowed right now. There many many states where that is than go ahead and ask you. Apply to vote by mail in the fall. The most important thing is to access information so you now as an individual all the ways in which you will be able to exercise your right to vote but the most important thing to do is to exercise that right to vote and to exercise it in a way that makes you feel healthy and safe in doing so if you look at what is going on now and the leadership in this country the leadership that is willing to sacrifice lives for a political agenda that needs to be a wakeup call to every single American to say this cannot be me. We cannot abide a fault narrative and of false choice between a strong economy and disposable people. That's a false narrative and if you believe that's a false narrative than you should go bugged while all page Gardner. Thank you so much for joining me and thank you for all of the work that you've done. I wish you well and thank you again. All right thank you. Bye-bye thank you for listening. The electorate is independently created and produced by me. Jen Taylor skinner. And of course I'm the host but also do all of the editing the Audio and the graphics you name it. It's on my plate so if you enjoyed this episode of the electorate please help the electronic grow by subscribing just hit the subscribe button and whatever APP. You used to listen to podcasts. Also leave a review for the electorate on itunes. Lastly one final way to help. The electorate is by following the electorate unsocial media. That's at Alexa rat on facebook. Instagram and twitter. Thanks again for listening. And until next time. Keep.

Congress Tony Tony Alexa Instagram Jen Taylor skinner America North Carolina facebook twitter Gardner Florida
"founder president" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

06:57 min | 5 months ago

"founder president" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"And being a mother. And that's wrong right. You know and and I think that's why it bothers me when I hear people disparage any group. Any voting block for not being energized. For instance right. Because I think that we have a tendency to look at groups who vote in smaller numbers as you know not being motivated right and. That's not really what's happening. I mean I think if we made it easier for people like this woman that you just described to vote and you know to have childcare and all those other things that working at democracy. I think that we would see you. Know Higher turnout. That's right. The system needs to open up and particularly now in a pandemic situation where you have people literally a getting sick and dying because they wanted to vote as we saw in Wisconsin so there needs to be a recognition that people have the right to vote. People have the right to vote in a healthy and safe way and in the manner in which they choose so the increase in vote by mail access to vote by mail. No excuse vote by mail critically important not requiring signatures not requiring witnesses on vote by mail in an era of social distancing having increased early voting very very important with social distancing increasing the number of polling locations. So that again you can have people vote. On Election Day with social distancing so accessing the right to vote needs to happen and a lot of ways and we need to make sure that their resources are there in the states so that we allow every citizen who wants to vote. We afford them the opportunity to vote and right. Now what's going on is some members of Congress are trying to starve the election administration system to suppress voting. Right two questions for you. What do you think is behind the resistance to moving to vote by mail and to secondly let the? This is probably less of a question comment. You're absolutely right about the signature. Because even in my state in Washington State we've had vote by mail for awhile and they're still a signature requirement. Which is I? Don't really understand the purpose of that because it leaves it open to interpretation ballot thrown out because they think that signatures don't match so what's behind that two issues. One is for example in the I'm in North Carolina. You have to have two witnesses to watch you sign young watch you having signed the ballot before you mail it in or a notary getting to witnesses in an era of social distancing and in a pandemic is pretty much not so much if you so. That's not going to happen. So that requirement deeds to be just gone away. I it's it's it's a silly requirement on because you can trace whether or not an individual has voted people are given particular codes and so you know voting by mail. It's one of the safest as you know ways to vote in the country. So that's silly so the other issue that you raised which is an important issue is signature matching and we need to do a lot better job and again. We need to resource election administrators and they're stabs to hire signature experts. I mean I don't know about you but my signature has certainly changed. Since the first time I registered to vote in the first time I voted and I won't tell you how many years ago but it was a while and my signature has changed pretty dramatically and young people. Now I mean if you think about using a credit card and all you have to do is wave your hand up and down and sign. You know the magic little thing you know. You're good to go so the accuracy of people's signature. It's not that they're not using their signature. It's at their signatures are changing and we need to have signature. If you're going to do signature matching to understand that change. And if there's an issue allow the voter time to then come back and either correct. Mis interpretation or demonstrate that their signature is their signature with proof. So that's a whole other issue and all of this is designed in some ways. Yes people want voting to be accurate and that's very very important but some of these measures increase the inaccuracy of voting and increase the denial of the right to vote. Because you have people who don't really know too much about signature matching. You only have one person doing it as opposed to a few people doing it. There's no appeals mechanism and some in many cases so it's a system that really needs to be addressed and I think people are beginning to understand. This and states are beginning responsible. States are beginning to address some of the issues that are built in to Challenges with vote by mail but their challenges with any system as you know the challenges with the accuracy of you know any system but they are so small. I mean it's such a small small. Small percentage of people and a small percentage of the problem that vote by mail is overwhelmingly one of the most successful ways. People have us to exercise their right to vote and they wanNA use it now. I mean we just did some research. We've done a number of research projects. Democrats Independents Republicans. All want to vote by mail all want the opportunity to by mail so we need to recognize what the citizens of this country want and give them the opportunity to vote as they wish. How much of that do you think? Think you know the messaging that's out there. How much of that do you think is you know? Making people believe or sitting out the messaging that it's problematic for voter which there is no evidence to support that I mean. Do you think that that misinformation is part of the reason? There isn't even greater support for vote by meal. There's that's a false narrative and they're they that false narrative is sort of you know going against the overwhelming majority opinion of wanting to vote by mail and so that false narrative comes out of fear as we have seen as the president. Said if you the more people who vote and the more people who acts as voting by mail basically the more people who vote it would hurt his partisan interests and so that's a very sad statement that you are so afraid of voters that you would begin a false narrative and try to deny the right to vote to people who wanNA in a healthy and safe way. It's a sad statement added it really lays bare the fear that some some of the Republican Party have a voters rate. I think he said the quiet part loud. Yes.

Wisconsin Congress Washington State North Carolina Democrats Republican Party president
"founder president" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

The Electorette Podcast

09:09 min | 5 months ago

"founder president" Discussed on The Electorette Podcast

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with page Gardner. The founder and president of the voter participation center the Voter Participation Center has helped over four point. Six million voters register and get to the polls and page card was a pioneer and identifying key voting bloc. She was one of the first to recognize unmarried. Women as a key political population one with significant and impactful political power. He's Gardner and I discussed what's called the marriage gap. That's the gap between unmarried women and married women in relation to their registration habits and voting behaviors. We also discussed this in the context of the corona virus outbreak. Given that unmarried women generally have less financial stability when compared to married women so without further. Ado here's my conversation with page partner Gardiner. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you very much great to be here so I was looking at your numbers. And since two thousand and three voter participation center you've helped around four and a half million voters registered to vote and get to the polls which is a massive amount of people millions and millions of people. And that's that's really incredibly impressive. But I'm just curious you know two thousand three. It feels like a lifetime ago and it wasn't but it feels like a lifetime ago and I don't think that voter suppression or voter issues for mainstream. Then what encouraged you to get into those costs to become interested in you know registering voters? So it's interesting that you bring that up. We have helped over point. Six million people applied to be registered to vote and hundreds of millions of people. Turn out but just sort of tripping down memory lane in two thousand I looked at the election of Gore versus Bush and noticed the difference between married and unmarried women in terms of how they voted and their share of the electorate and unmarried women. Married women voted very very differently with unmarried women voting for Gore in married women voting for Bush and I wondered about that and the share of the electorate of unmarried women was really really small in terms of their strength in numbers in terms of the voting eligible population. So that leads to lots and lots of research and the key question was was this sort of a just an observation or was there causality in marital status in other words does marital status determine whether or not you register and whether or not you vote. And after years of research and looking at things like articles from Census Bureau scholars to doing our own research it turns out that marital status along with age and race are key determinants of whether or not you register and whether or not you vote so then. The question became if unmarried. Women are unregistered and higher numbers than they should be. How do you reach them? So then what we did at the voter. Participation Center was pioneer mail based voter registration targeting particular demographic all across the country and that was really a revolutionary. We created for the first time the first list of unregistered people in this country. Because as you know no state keeps a list of its unregistered citizens so we had to create a list of unregistered unmarried women. Nail THEM VOTER REGISTRATION APPLICATION. And then make sure that voter registration application got sent to the appropriate elections official. We did that after a number of years. And then it turned out that this process was successful with other underrepresented demographics persons of Color and young people. So that is how our program's evolved to include what we call the rising American electric which is unmarried women persons of Color and young people who are now sixty four percent of the entire voting eligible population in the country today. More than a hundred and fifty million people yet. They're underrepresented in terms of their registration rates. And they do not vote and they are not as large as share in. The electorate would suggest that they could be while. That's incredible actually had no idea that before voter participation that there was no way or no one was tracking unregistered voters. And now I'm curious. How did you do that? How did you track now? Who was not registered? Well after many many years and what we have done is refined a system where we match a voter file from state to a list of commercial data and then we delete the names of people or addresses that do not appear on the voter file and then we go through about twenty five other steps to insure the quality of the data. And after having done that we then mail out a voter registration application form that then. The person fills out and sends back to the appropriate election. Official well actually. I do remember that election and it was very stressful and I remember back then being kind of worried about the state of elections after the whole hanging chads thing and you know what happened Florida but I am curious what your initial findings were about unmarried women because again back then I was not married I was single and you know just starting out in my career but you know I'm married now and I tried to think back of about you know what was my concern. I was voting but I had different interests. So you know. When I was single I still cared about Reproductive Justice Reproductive Health for instance but I cared about it from a different perspective. And you know now I have a family married I still care about reproductive justice but I care about it from you know having a functioning reproductive justice system for my daughter for instance. So it's it's different so or is moving that you found were the differences between what drove unmarried women versus married women. So there are. It's very very interesting because there are a number of factors one unmarried. Women are less rooted in their communities. They're much more mobile and they said they move more frequently. And your ability to vote is tied to a residential address. And so if you move. Oftentimes you have to reregister to be able to vote. So that's one thing so and you know unmarried. Women are a lot more stressed and stretched economically they represent in terms of the proportion higher levels of unemployment particularly now higher levels of poverty and they don't have sort of the support systems that married couples have and so unmarried women. They are economically stretched the make less than married women in terms of sent. You know two dollar compared to a married man or compared on man in terms of the you know the pay Equity Scale. They have less access to health care. There's more food insecurity. There are more mobile. But that's about their lives. There are other things that are keeping unmarried women and other marginalized communities from voting and it's structural in terms of the way we have designed the election administration system in this country. It's difficult think about the registration process. I mean you have to register you have to have residency requirements. You have to have it idea or proof of resident if you move you. Oftentimes you have to reregister. Elections are held on a Tuesday when you may have to be at work and if you take time off for more you may not get paid for that time off their a typical story that I tell a lot after each election we usually do focus groups among people who did not get a chance to about and there was this one heartbreaking story that I will never forget which there was a woman a single mom in the focus group talking about standing in a line that was going hours and hours and hours and she had her child in daycare. And as you know if you're late to pick up your child you get penalized financially every fifteen minutes and so this is what she said in the Group. She could hear it yet. Chink to Chang and you know she was a minimum wage worker a service worker and she could not literally could not afford to stand in line to boat because of the structure of the way we handle voting in this country and so she made the choice of picking up her child from daycare and at some point. You just have to do it. So in any event so that was a story of a failing of our democracy. Say for this woman who wanted to vote and yet had to choose between her right.

Voter Participation Center founder and president reregister Gardner official Reproductive Justice Reproduct Jim Taylor skinner Gore Participation Center Group Bush Census Bureau partner Gardiner Chang Florida
Page Gardner, Founder & President of the Voter Participation Center

The Electorette Podcast

05:12 min | 5 months ago

Page Gardner, Founder & President of the Voter Participation Center

"I'm Jim Taylor skinner. And this is the electorate on this episode. I have a conversation with page Gardner. The founder and president of the voter participation center the Voter Participation Center has helped over four point. Six million voters register and get to the polls and page card was a pioneer and identifying key voting bloc. She was one of the first to recognize unmarried. Women as a key political population one with significant and impactful political power. He's Gardner and I discussed what's called the marriage gap. That's the gap between unmarried women and married women in relation to their registration habits and voting behaviors. We also discussed this in the context of the corona virus outbreak. Given that unmarried women generally have less financial stability when compared to married women so without further. Ado here's my conversation with page partner Gardiner. Welcome to the PODCAST. Thank you very much great to be here so I was looking at your numbers. And since two thousand and three voter participation center you've helped around four and a half million voters registered to vote and get to the polls which is a massive amount of people millions and millions of people. And that's that's really incredibly impressive. But I'm just curious you know two thousand three. It feels like a lifetime ago and it wasn't but it feels like a lifetime ago and I don't think that voter suppression or voter issues for mainstream. Then what encouraged you to get into those costs to become interested in you know registering voters? So it's interesting that you bring that up. We have helped over point. Six million people applied to be registered to vote and hundreds of millions of people. Turn out but just sort of tripping down memory lane in two thousand I looked at the election of Gore versus Bush and noticed the difference between married and unmarried women in terms of how they voted and their share of the electorate and unmarried women. Married women voted very very differently with unmarried women voting for Gore in married women voting for Bush and I wondered about that and the share of the electorate of unmarried women was really really small in terms of their strength in numbers in terms of the voting eligible population. So that leads to lots and lots of research and the key question was was this sort of a just an observation or was there causality in marital status in other words does marital status determine whether or not you register and whether or not you vote. And after years of research and looking at things like articles from Census Bureau scholars to doing our own research it turns out that marital status along with age and race are key determinants of whether or not you register and whether or not you vote so then. The question became if unmarried. Women are unregistered and higher numbers than they should be. How do you reach them? So then what we did at the voter. Participation Center was pioneer mail based voter registration targeting particular demographic all across the country and that was really a revolutionary. We created for the first time the first list of unregistered people in this country. Because as you know no state keeps a list of its unregistered citizens so we had to create a list of unregistered unmarried women. Nail THEM VOTER REGISTRATION APPLICATION. And then make sure that voter registration application got sent to the appropriate elections official. We did that after a number of years. And then it turned out that this process was successful with other underrepresented demographics persons of Color and young people. So that is how our program's evolved to include what we call the rising American electric which is unmarried women persons of Color and young people who are now sixty four percent of the entire voting eligible population in the country today. More than a hundred and fifty million people yet. They're underrepresented in terms of their registration rates. And they do not vote and they are not as large as share in. The electorate would suggest that they could be while. That's incredible actually had no idea that before voter participation that there was no way or no one was tracking unregistered voters. And now I'm curious. How did you do that? How did you track now? Who was not registered? Well after many many years and what we have done is refined a system where we match a voter file from state to a list of commercial data and then we delete the names of people or addresses that do not appear on the voter file and then we go through about twenty five other steps to insure the quality of the data. And after having done that we then mail out a voter registration application form that then. The person fills out and sends back to the appropriate election. Official

Voter Participation Center Founder And President Gardner Jim Taylor Skinner Official Participation Center Gore Bush Census Bureau Partner Gardiner
"founder president" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

Bitcoin Radio

11:24 min | 1 year ago

"founder president" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

"If you wanted to make a quick buck you could already done that. I have no doubt and you could have been gone on. You're in bore bore somewhere you know drinking your are your nice little. Margaritas or whatever it might be over there and bore bore but but regardless you know I love the way that you kind of shape that and explain you know the way that you have approach this so let's kind of move into where we're at today. In obviously we can talk about two thousand seventeen for for years right. I mean there's enough information in that but twenty the eighteen really kind of highlighted a lot of the problems and you know we can crashing down expectations crumbled people kind of backed off in a lot of ways of the that traditional what could well. I'll say that traditional. ICO raise from two thousand seventeen but now we're in this new age where the expectations are higher and investors are smarter thankfully obviously but but you know what is happening right now on the space and are you still optimistic about where this is going to be. I'm very optimistic. Unsurprisingly we're still still working here for the record. I know that was kind of a question right. We're talking. I think the what's happening is the norms are slowly being set in two thousand seventeen. It was a free for all right. There was so much capital available. There were so many projects out there and so everyone is just sprang pregnant every direction twenty thousand like you said things crashed down in everyone pulled back really aggressively and now the feelers are starting to come back out and everyone's saying well listen. We're still bullish on this space. We want this. We believe that there's something here we just have to be more more diligent about it and people are saying that on the project side and on the investor side and on the user side and and so those people started to explore what actually makes sense one one thing that happened happened recently hosted the Algorithms Auction and that was interesting because they tried to auction right. They tried this whole new mechanism for running a sale rather even setting a price of an auction of a a token selling their auction ran at that way and seeing exploration with us and that approach of running a sale alright as it goes live almost more like a traditional. IPO where there's immediate liquidity so people that invest in in that offer and I think you're you're seeing a whole bunch of different expression play wherever discussions with a ton of different token issuers on different models and that's exciting because that means that we're getting a chance to try out this remodels see what she's and it's GonNa set the expectations for the next years when these models start to solidify and we see what actually works yeah no doubt and I think about the show and although I don't know if that's the ideal way that I could write it myself. That's how I want this space to be driven. I guess but the I yo- brings up a lot of a lot of accountability and it's not just from the project that went. It's also from the exchange in as the exchanges have to attach themselves allow this if this constantly gently scam after scam well. No one's GonNa believe in this anymore and you know it's another huge black guy for the space so I find that the I. E. O.'s that I'm seeing especially in the credible whoa exchanges or at least really well vetted and they do. They take a lot of risk. I don't want to say on a financial level because it's very volatile but at least on whether or not scam am or not scam. They're taking a lot of the risk out at least in my perspective and I don't want to this is not an endorsement for IOS or does or does this is more so just on a my personal feeling do you do you see what I'm saying as kind of social norm now or would you say that's kind of the industry norm. You know I think I I think it's happening. I also think it depends exchange to exchange how much they're actually doing right not every exchange just doing the same level of diligence or vetting as every other one. I think it's just becoming a necessary serie. Reality investors are expecting it and so even if you're an exchange out there and you don't want to do that sort of work the projects you want everyone to raise money in your platform investors. It's not gonNA go for investors. Look equality and that's been our Bethel time as if only work with high quality projects investors will recognize that and come to us and that's been certainly true over the last couple of years and I think as this flight qualities happening through two thousand eighteen twenty nineteen. It's just becoming something you have to do. It's not even so much the best practices it is a necessary factor to to make sure you're not working with people yeah. That's that's a really good point man all right so let's talk about. Where do you think we're shaping up into. Is this something that you know you're looking at and you're seeing traditional investors starting to I this space a little bit more or would you say that we're still trying to prove ourselves both right. I think traditional investors are certain either space. We are seeing some people move in and make bets. I think we're very early and we hear over and over again that the institutional wave is coming. The institutional wave is coming. People are gonNA start investing lots of capital. I believe that's true. I don't necessarily believe that it's going to happen in a flash and and that you know in two months we're GONNA wake up and there will be ten billion dollars of inflows from institutional investors into the crypt base that seems unlikely and and so I think it's it's just a matter of kind of slowly moving up the chain getting more investors on board and we see this. The market goes up. The market goes down but every single month more people are aware of Cryptos. It was a market more people are buying in and you're you're just exposing a broader audience to the network and so that that's really exciting to be something that I think is driving. A lot of adoption will continue to over the years but it's also important again. I'm a broken record on this. We need to have high quality projects to hold up and show those New People. We need to have success stories right others. ICO's from two thousand seventeen or just launching now and hopefully some of them will be massively successful in their adoption and actually drive usage wjr and that's a good story to be able to tell new investors and convince people to to start paying attention to the space absolutely man and really really well said I. I'm somebody somebody who is dealing with the public on a social level right. I I'm I'm on facebook community on facebook. It's gotten over one hundred thousand people we have seventy five eighty thousand active members per Vermont there on Kripa Coin Trader and I love that group but man it can't be it can be as toxic as any space an in the history of the world right. I mean it's can and be so nasty because people are so devastatingly broken over what happened to their coins and from two thousand seventeen and I always try to remind people were in a in a area and in this space that has not been figured out yet people have no clue really what the blockchain's doing ninety five percent of you if not more have no idea yeah which actually holding and I mean we don't have we don't have a choice but to be patient or you can just get out of the space whatsoever and if we're not highlighting for not appreciating shading the good projects the ones that are actually doing things to help the space then. We're doing a disservice to everybody because we're just going to let the bad actors be the ones that are in the news so I love what you're doing Andy. Where what do you think we're going to see over the next year. Yeah I think I see a bunch of these projects that were super ambitious rushes and raised in two thousand seventeen to build something really challenging where to send them launch and you know I'm thinking about you know top mind from his file coined the I O conceal. We ran we we just helped the block stack reggae off from just ran and a bunch of these projects going live and that will be proving ground seeing how those things pan out how much start to use these projects going to be at a keystone woman for the space. I'm not something I think that we're going to see a lot of right now and the second thing I think we're going to see is a lot of experimentation in the models for how these token sales token distributions run now talk about auctions I use. I think every variation of those is going to be tried in the next year. You're so desperately searched for the right mechanism for fundraising and distribution in in the space and I think we'll see a lot of interesting experiments there. What do you think so attractive about blockchain ability that that is going to propel this next wave. I look at this. This is from a non technical perspective you know and so I never claimed to be an engineer or developer. That's not what I do but you know there's a lot of things a lot of projects that have wonderful intentions engine's great and awesome ideas but just simply have no place on the blockchain right and I'm not gonNA give you examples. I'm not trying to sit there and crushing based token hopes but but you know we have to deal with the fact that not everything is supposed to be on the blockchain and the things that are that that deserved to be on the blockchain that may not have been highlighted jet or discovered or even created those those things. We need to support as a community. How do you guys go about really getting the attention for some of your projects. I mean like I it's hard enough for me just to kind of find some products times and you know. I remember file quainton. You guys had a great gel coined by the way because I didn't even know that you were behind that raise and you know the things that I saw about foul coin. Were for the most part very positive as far as when the raise as race was going on but what is it like. You're doing differently as well like how how just tell us. What's the method man about telling you about new secrets great yeah well. I think one recognition you have to have you. Were talking about kind of use cases and what's going to happen here. I think if you're excited about the space which I know you are. I certainly am You have to believe that we do not know right now. What some of the best is application of blockchain technology going to be in the same way that if we were talking about the Internet nineteen ninety-two you can definitely have some interesting applications. You can brainstorm. Oh this'll be interesting. We'll we'll be able to do that but a lot of the most interesting ones you could have had no idea until we actually advance further space and so a big part of what we do is just exposing people to that. Make people realize think about this new concept. This product is transcendent brand new. You've never heard before. Let's try explain that and taking the time and having the trust for us is a really important important piece to be able to explain that people is is key and again for US along this around our brand and the trust that we built investors are willing to listen to us in here we you have to say about new project they of course make a decision on their own and judge the project on its merits but but we're able to spend some time educating about what's is going on myspace and where things are actually you know and we can kind of. Let's talk a little bit about like actually Queen lists per se here you know and obviously I mean I'm not part of coin. Listen listen. We're we're just getting to know each other first time ourselves anti so you know some of these are actual questions that Joe personally but you know. What is your involvement post sale though once let's say sales sales over you guys did a great job? I obviously you're rooting for the success of that project. Is there any involvement post the post sale yeah absolutely we still spend a lot of time with projects Jackson. It's a few different ways that happens. One is just informally right. We try and position ourselves as a trusted adviser to these projects. We have a great view of what's happening the space so once we work on the project just having them come to us. Ask US questions about equity or how they're going to drive adoption or things like that we cannot be really helpful as we were kind of the center a lot of things and we can make introductions or offer them advice on what direction deterrent or or look since won't be peace sign that we do offer some services for after sales one is helping with the token distribution itself when it's time for the network alive for Tokens to go to investors. We often help with distributing the actually getting them out to investors. Now we have other services to help with hosting hacker thon to build developer communities for these projects. We have airdrops product help..

ICO developer US facebook Algorithms Auction Cryptos E. O. myspace Kripa Coin Trader Vermont Joe Jackson Andy engineer ninety five percent ten billion dollars two months
"founder president" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

Bitcoin Radio

10:01 min | 1 year ago

"founder president" Discussed on Bitcoin Radio

"I'm your host Joe and we are going to have a a treat today. We got any Bromberg. He is he's from coin lists. He's the CO CO founder and president of that project and we're about to get a really cool insight in really good look into you know the nature of of the of the crowd rays of the Seo Oh of Sto in where we've come from and where we are today so in the meantime. I wanted to bring up a couple of things I've got a kind of cool announcement that I'm going to be sharing with the community community and I really WanNa bring about that that live audience interaction soon so we're GonNa start doing some live videos on the bitcoin channel on facebook and probably twitter's well. Maybe even instagram and will include Youtube is that and that as well but but before we get into the interview I just want to thank everybody again for their participation in for their influence the success of this show so far and I can't get great guests without people being interested in having people listening and watching you know Andy's a example of that you know the Eto. Pr Agency which is one of the top in the space. I mean they're not just with the CRYPTO. They're all over the place but I want to give a big shout out to them and trey and Liz and everybody else involved over there. Jake Cetera and thanks again but you know we'll we'll bring on Andy here in a second but keep in mind folks were in a very beginning of the show and I'm just so proud proud of where we stand today and I look at like you know where I'm at in Crypto coin trader what Bitcoin radio is doing and it's all collection of people who care about the space care about transparency care about the blockchain right and so it goes without saying though we gotta do this together support the good projects and that's exactly why Andy Fits in perfect today with that messages you know he's in the front end of this and you know as a as he went to Stanford he was a CO founder of the Stanford Bitcoin Group and I'll get him to explain a lot about that. I'm just learning some of this for the first time obviously but you know Andy has brought about a opportunity in a platform. That kind of vets lot does a lot of different things that we haven't seen quite done the way they're doing it in the space and again. I'm I'M LOOKING FORWARD TO HAVING MON and so I'm not GonNa wait too much longer. Andy upbringing you on now actually all right everybody. This is anti Bromberg. He is is the CO founder and the President of coin. What's up Andy. Welcome to BITCOIN radio. I'm Geoff. Oh Man my pleasure dude in fact. I've been looking forward to this interview since it. It was a proposed that we'd have opportunity to bring on just because you guys have such a unique perspective on this market right now and I mean really does it. Get any deeper than you man like. Let's kind of get a little bit of a background story first before we get to the questions but tell us oh but a little bit about Andy so I like you said I got started in the space when I was at Stanford sitting math and computer science and started the Stanford Bitcoin group with a few other folks and that was led at the time by about son who most recently was the CTO of coin base and before that ran earned dot com and was ordered recent Horowitz and it was him and the professor and then seven of US students and we did a bunch advocacy work we built school projects Ettelaat of academic research on Bitcoin says back in Twenty twelve twenty thirteen there was not a lot of that happening and so we got an early start on that got his attention to the space meet. Everyone and it was a really small community in those days. I was excited absolutely and you know although we weren't connected or we didn't really know each other. We all share that similar experience about that time period especially early on and where we're at today is a direct reflection from people like me and you and I don't want to put myself in the same category as you of that at least that interest that that desire that passion to promote the space and take its assets and what blockchain's able to do this this world right and really present it to not just the community but to the world and I see what coin is doing and what your goals and your missions are but let's start from the foundation. Why did you even start Queen List Andy. Yes aucoin. Lewis got started originally as a collaboration between protocol labs who's building file corn and angel. EST atop started fundraising platform and and file coin protocol is needed a platform to run the following token sale and so they enlisted angels help with compliance and actually running that process and as they were going through that process. I'm getting the foul quinto concealed live. Everyone's step back and said wow. This is really hard costs a lot of money to these token sales right every single token issuer where is going to be this exact same set of services. We should spend this edison new companies we spun out of angels. APP In at the end of twenty seventeen after completing the file coin token sale and and I was one of the founders of that time of the project so this five of us that went out the start of this new independent coined list to provide exactly the services to the broadest array of token issuers can and so from that one four in the last couple of years. We've helped run a lot of token sales help with compliance help with at managing the actual process logistics marketing and have helped whole stack of of helping projects raise money that have started some other services while along the way but it really came from genesis of saying these token projects need to go through a fundraising process that is not their expertise. What can we do to make it really easy for them so they can focus focus on going back and building products need to exist sure and you know. I think about all the different projects that we've seen from the twenty sixteen twenty seventeen time time period up into now and with what you offer you know there's a lot of risk associated with with just attaching herself to any project right right and I know you have to be impartial and you have to be very committed to doing your job at the same time you gotta be careful who you work with. You know so what what does that been like in that in that evolution of where the market market has been starting back in twenty seventeen when all this stuff was happening. I'm assuming time period for pointless was was even back then you know but but I know in two thousand eighteen because I saw one of your interviews. That was that was on. I think it was on NBC. You know it was really neat to hear the way that you explain this but I'll let you kind of take it from here. What is it like that you had had to look for especially early early on man like where did you draw the line. What was right? What was it right. You know what was wrong yeah. No you're absolutely right. We put projects through a long long hard vetting process for we actually publicly work with any projects and that's really important for us because there are so many bad projects in the space that we're just not comfortable putting up on our website and and you have to be really careful when we think about that process we think about what we what smart investors should do when they're looking at oaken project and that's really what this boils down to your smartvestor in token projects. What is it that you're looking for in the framework that we've come up with their and I'll go through this quickly. We can dig in deeper after really has six points. I four of them are things you should look at whether you're investing token project or just normal start up even if it's just normal star equity the team the products the market market and the deal terms so team is a strong team that you're willing to bet on for the future product is a product needs to exist in the world that actually going to make a difference market are they going after a big market and deal terms. The deal terms make sense of the price reasonable for what it is getting those four things. I would say every venture capital firm. The world looks at those evaluating deal feel every crypto firm looks at them and those are important start with then you layer on these last two items that are specific to crypto that you don't have to look at if you're investing investing in a normal startup. The first of those is the legal structure. This is not fun to look at but it's really important. There's so much innovation happening at the legal level in how people are structuring these these deals that you know it's it's just such a new world and you have to be able to look at that. Make sure that they're doing things in a compliant way. You can feel comfortable with backing for long-term so yellow legal structure and then the last piece most nuanced piece is called a token economics. So is this token who can going through a crew value in the long term. If the network successful will the token actually grow in value will be a good investment and and that's a really important piece of it and then there's other kind of smaller pieces of the token economics are the incentives on the network properly lines that good actors do do the right thing bad actors. Stay away from the network. Don't try and attack it and so you get into all these details so for us again. Just stepping back the team the product market the deal terms all absolute baseline foundation items you gotta look at providing vetting a project crypto investor on top of that we look at the legal structure and then the token economics is those criteria like you mentioned and you know those first four that you'd obviously spoken about. I mean that's that's everybody that's like whether you're a you're trying to your angel veteran to normal start up in San Francisco or if if you're in where I'm at and near New Orleans and you're trying to do something similar quality or capability you still gotta get investors and they're still gonNA be looking at their smart. At least you know they're gonNa look things things but you brought up a great point with specially with the legal right and to me you know the space is still the chapters are being written even in whether it be the legalities or how you can you can raise or whatever it might be you know an ever changing space with grey areas being filled in. I mean this has got to be frightening for someone on your shoes deal. You have to be really careful. I think everyone doesn't in this space. There's so many many laws are unwritten and there's gray areas. You have to work your way around that and do what you think is best and so we've in some sense. It's challenging for us the the flip side of that is that at times it's not that hard because we tend to just take a very conservative stance. We're out there saying. We're building this business for the long run. We're on and make a quick buck in the next year to get out of it. We're saying we're building this for for a long time and if you're doing that if you're taking that approach you have to be conservative about these things because the legal side tide can pose an existential risk. If you step over line that can be the end of the story. Your Business can be done and so for us. Our has been the super-conservative. Yes does that mean that you give a few opportunities on day one but it ensures the around on day one thousand and keep operating and grow the business in that point yeah and especially especially someone doing what which coin is doing as a whole..

Andy Bromberg Stanford Bitcoin Group Stanford CO CO facebook instagram founder and president Joe Pr Agency CO founder twitter trey Youtube US blockchain aucoin Jake Cetera quinto
"founder president" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

04:31 min | 2 years ago

"founder president" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Six six five zero five four six two six with our guest, David Theroux, founder president a chief executive officer of the independent institute and the eighteen to twenty one year old's the youngest of the of the young voters that is the group which has consistently election election out not voted. They they vote, but the the least of any any age group in the country for reasons that I've never understood I remember casting my first ballot. And I felt a a sense of empowerment tend to when I got my driver's license, which of course, is another area in which many young people cannot identify with with me in that regard. But it's unfortunate because this is the method by which people have an option of this country. And if you don't use that that at franchise if you exercise your franchise, we have trouble, but nobody likes the flabby franchise. Yeah. I think I think that's true. I do think that this reflects the the cynicism and powerless nature of their outlook now, but they make themselves powerless. I know you don't you? Don't get involved. You learn the issues you don't register to vote vote. Well, whose fault is it that you're powerless? I know part of it also is the fact that they don't they don't have civic education. They don't have accurate education American history. They don't understand the world they live where does that go. Because we're failure of the of the school system, and that's one, you know, that's another whole issue of the case registration choice and so forth, which I think is is definitely in the ascendant. But it is a reality. And so that's why we were focusing on the hook for them being the questions they were asking, and the fact that they were not willing to trust the usual suspects site guy, so to speak and the so the commanding heights culture, they no longer trusted the political elites, which is sort of catching up with the rest of the country. But in their case, especially now millennials have left college and are starting careers and families, and so they. Have to buckle down and figure out. How are they going to get through all this? So there look, there's, you know, they're even more interested in answers and practical way to get through this. So that was the the motivation for creating the series imprinting catalyst. And so on. So our our interest is to push this as far as we can. We were talking before about the view that many millennials are supporting socialism. And people like Bernie Sanders talk about the Nordic countries. And your your reporting are correctly that these countries after quite robust market based economies and to give you an idea of the percentage of of ownership in these countries is about seventy five percent private of the wealth. And if you compare that to say a country, like China, China is just slightly lower than the order country is in and of course, is a very robust economy despite the problems with the government. So the I think the opportunities are enormous and just to give you further idea if you rank the the levels of private wealth. By country. It turns out that Denmark is twelfth Switzerland is for Norway as twenty third Sweden sweetness fifteenth North Korea is at the bottom of one hundred eightieth, but the US is eighteenth. So the so the US is lower than Denmark and Sweden, which is remarkable. When you think about it? We're gonna come back into talk some more with David throw is founder president at chief executive officer of the independent institute the website, independent dot org. Learn more about these series. The love gove and the catalyst one eight six six five zero JIMBO is our number. And we'll be back with more on the Bohannon show in just a moment..

chief executive officer David Theroux founder president US China Denmark Sweden Bernie Sanders Bohannon gove North Korea Norway Switzerland seventy five percent twenty one year
"founder president" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

Talk 650 KSTE

04:15 min | 2 years ago

"founder president" Discussed on Talk 650 KSTE

"Six six five zero five four six two six with our guest, David Theroux, founder, president chief executive officer of the independent institute and the eighteen to twenty one year old's the youngest of the of the young voters that is the group which has consistently election election out not voted. They they vote, but the the least of any any age group in the country for reasons that I've never understood I remember casting my first ballot. And I felt a a sense of empowerment tend to when I got my driver's license, which of course, is another area in which many young people can identify with with me in that regard. But it's unfortunate because this is the method by which people have an option of this country. And if you don't use that that that franchise, I if you exercise your franchise, we have trouble with nobody likes the flabby franchise. Yeah. I think I think that's true. I do think that this reflects the the cynicism and powerless nature of their outlook now, but they make themselves powerless. I know you don't you? Don't get involved in the issues, you don't register to vote vote, powerless. I know part of it also is the fact that they don't they don't have civic education. They don't have act education American history. They don't understand the world. They live in where does that go? I mean, because we're failure of the the the school system, and that's one that's another whole issue of the case registration choice and so forth, which I think is is definitely in the ascendant. But it is a reality. And so that's why we were focusing on the hook for them being the questions they were asking, and the fact that they were not willing to trust the usual suspects designed guy so to speak and the so the commanding heights of the culture, and they no longer trusted the political elites, which is sort of catching up with the rest of the country. But in their case, especially now millennials have left college and are starting careers and families, and so they have. To buckle down and figure out. How are they going to get through all of this? So they're they're, you know, they're even more interested in answers and practical way to get through this. So that was the the motivation for creating the series imprinting catalyst. And so on. So our our interest is to push this as far as we can. We were talking before about the view that many millennials are supporting socialism. And people like Bernie Sanders talk about the Nordic countries. And you're you're pointing out correctly that these countries after quite robust market based economies and to give you an idea of the percentage of ownership in this country is about seventy five percent private of the wealth. And if you compare that to say a country, like China, China is just slightly lower than the country is in and of course, is very robust economy, despite the problems with the government, so the I think the opportunities are enormous and just to give you further idea if you rank the the levels of private wealth by country. It turns out that Denmark is twelve Switzerland is for Norway as twenty third sweetness fifteenth. North Korea is at the bottom of one hundred eightieth, but the US is eighteenth. So the so the US is lower than Denmark and Sweden, which is remarkable. When you think about it? We're gonna come back into talk some more with David throw is founder president and chief.

David Theroux founder president US Denmark China chief executive officer Bernie Sanders North Korea Norway Sweden Switzerland seventy five percent twenty one year
"founder president" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"founder president" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Six six five zero five four six two six David Theroux, the founder president a chief executive officer of the independent is clearly an innovator, and you were mentioning the love of entrepreneurship that exists. Among these a good are they at it. I mean, some of them are quite good. But as a group did they know enough about business in about this this cursed, free enterprise system, and that dreaded disease known as as greed. I mean, they sound at times a little starry eyed as a group to really have attitudes that are necessary to make entrepeneurship work. Well, the BNP parabas does a global entre entrepreneur for each year, and they found that millennial entrepreneurs have launched about twice as many businesses as baby boomers. And there's still in the process of doing it. And of course, boomers are retired by and large or retiring. So I think that they're in part of this study interest in tech based businesses financial tech, Ed tech med tech. And so on so and that comes through in the love of episodes as well, by the way, one thing. I should also mention this that a lot of people who educators are up the logo series is very useful for their students. Business people use it for their their employees parents and grandparents use it young people use it with their friends and so on and the the two seasons breath security sort of a feel for them. The first season the title of it is from first date to mandate and the second season title is a crisis not to waste. So it as I said, it is humorous in yet. It really has a very clear message for people that they can get hold of and what they can do in their own lives, first of all understand the need liberty. But also what they can do now in overcoming these problems? They face what what next I gather. You're continuing these are there others that that you are contemplating. Well, the the part of the original thought was if we can build sort of a fan base for this perhaps having a regular program on on TV, or Netflix or whatever. Another part of it would be to develop a series of graphic novels using the Gulf character. There's just many things you can do in the popular culture and to make it more accessible and appealing for different kinds of of markets and audiences. And so they they find that the ideas of liberty are really enjoyable and meaningful, and so we're very grateful to Jim Jim for expressing interest in this. And we hope that your your listeners will find it a value as well. Well, I would certainly think so in particular, those who are are young, I suppose would automatically have some into the approaches that you offer a perhaps those of us who are older might point others to this. I would I be able to assume that all of the details about the love gove and the.

David Theroux Jim Jim BNP chief executive officer Netflix gove founder president
"founder president" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

Talk Radio WPHT 1210

02:58 min | 2 years ago

"founder president" Discussed on Talk Radio WPHT 1210

"Do not have to union just to keep your job and so they've been relieved of that legal financial and political benefit that unions enjoy in twenty two states it's the twenty eight states that have full right to work and so in pennsylvania we're talking about three hundred thirty thousand public employees they didn't have now regained their first amendment rights now it also means that one hundred percents of public employees can still voluntarily join a union this doesn't mean that people can't join a union that just means they now have the choice of whether or not to join and pay dues to a union that to me is really the american way that was finally restored after four two years of a bad supreme court decision abboud boo versus detroit it so the supreme court finally reversed that wrong that has for too long deprived public employees of their first amendment rights map brienne is with us matt of course is a great friend of the show to our station he service president ceo the commonwealth foundation for public policy alternatives for fourteen years now he is the founder president and ceo of commonwealth partners chamber of entrepreneurs inc yeah the the issue here of course is a guy who's watched this and been in politics you take organizations such as the teacher's union this union that union and they tend to get incredibly political and they have messages that are often very contrary to a lot of their members views but the members have to be part of that and they don't want to be part of that so now it's a great stand to be able to say hey look if i don't like the crap that the n j is spewing here i don't have to take part in this nonsense i don't have to be part of this but of course the question then becomes will there be any state laws that override this map do you think this is the final answer on this are you concerned at all that there might be state initiatives to try to tighten this up a little bit yeah there certainly are in fact as we were talking getting information from pennsylvania legislators who are all funded by the government unions they're beginning to try to push legislation that would somehow circumvent the ruling of the supreme court but i think it's pretty clear this decision was very clear that violating public employee's first amendment rights by forcing them to pay money to a third party private organization i e a union is a violation and will not be allowed to stay in so i think you're gonna see lots of legislators who get funded by these union organizations trying to do whatever they can to reverse the genus case but i think that this is where freedom is on the offense and i think it's going to be very difficult for them to get back to the days where they can force people to pay the unions just to keep their job ma prieto is great to hear from you and where can people find you yeah go to.

four two years fourteen years
"founder president" Discussed on WJR 760

WJR 760

02:25 min | 3 years ago

"founder president" Discussed on WJR 760

"And founder president and ceo of conservation visions you've got a compelling slogan i picked up and reading some background materials you call it and you alluded to this one natural world one humanity one chance conservation matters elaborate on that a little bit we have come to understand that the globe really is contained entity the amazing advances in space travel and so on have given us the incredible photos of this one blue orb spinning on its axis we no longer have to doubt whether the world is flatter around we know we settled that debate so we know that we have this you know this this this one glow and when we look at you manatee today and we see the amount of interchange between races and cultures and so on as the world becomes globalized we really do come to understand the the depth of sharing in terms of values and principles that good people have everywhere and so uh it is very clear as one looks at this globe and look says one walks through an airport and cease all the different nationalities and races of people moving about the world that we really are in this together because there was nowhere else for us to go um and so that's the idea of one humanity and of course um you know uh one chance well you know we now are rising to the eight billion mark in terms of our numbers we will go to nine and many believe that we will actually reach this extraordinary number of 10 and if you can imagine what just here in a country as wealthy would you know with as much which is healthy and environment as you have in as much opportunity is this country has and as few people as it has relative to the landbased if you can imagine even the kinds of pressures that are going to come to this country if we reach the nine and ten billion people i think we can all have some vague idea at least of just the pressures that are gonna come on other parts of the world where you in populations are already extremely dense and wherever you meant populations are extremely dense and particularly winds to to sion's don't work as well as they might we see a major uh taking of wildlife and then engagements with wildlife either through.

president and ceo sion founder
"founder president" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"founder president" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Well i guess he's looking at this like you're doing a real estate deal in the whole thing is you always tried to crush the other guy that's not the way you do business overseas uh i wanna bring clyde prestowitz founder president the economic strategy institute former councillor top trade visored to the commerce department back in the reagan administration been following this for a long long time that prestowitz thanks so much for being with us we know it's late there for all of you thank you for joining us today good to be with you thought so if we were going to overhaul us relations with china around trade and economy what would that look like clyde to get things on uh on a sustainable and promising kiel for the us within a relationship we have to have it they're they're a gigantic trading partner but what would have better way look like yeah that's the big question um i find myself largely in agreement with your two previous guess um look i think this three or one uh investigation th that was mentions the nuclear legal that is clyde can explain to 300 one is yeah 300 want is a section of the us trade law that's called unfair trade so under 300 on the the us government doesn't investigation other finds that some countries acting unfairly in the old days before the advent of the wto the us could unilaterally slap on the uh a a terror for uh a and import quota or something to punish the offending country theoretically we have agreed or i shouldn't say theoretical we have agreed as part of the wto um that any such action will now be taken through the wto so it's a little bit unclear how that's gonna work out but the key point is that there will be a.

president economic strategy institute commerce department reagan administration kiel partner wto us real estate clyde prestowitz founder