35 Burst results for "founder and CEO"

The Secrets to Making Your Company More Profitable with Dr. Hannah Stolze

The EntreLeadership Podcast

02:02 min | 3 weeks ago

The Secrets to Making Your Company More Profitable with Dr. Hannah Stolze

"So when you're looking at an organization that you've done all this research and you've seen these case studies. The has a clear purpose. How does that show up in the way that they're communicating about that. What are the cause. You can have something on the wall or the founder. Ceo can have that written in. It's an adjustment where ba. What are the critical pieces of making sure that purpose is infused in the organization appropriately in a way that actually manifest is more productivity more profit etc. Yeah this is great question. It's really central to the research. I've done for the last ten years. So thank you for this question. Yeah i'll try to narrow it down to less than ten your answer so it's so interesting when you think about how. How do you articulate how you actually execute purpose. That goes beyond prophet right. What does that look like. And you know the older models the focus resources were scarce money was scarce labor was plenty and land was plenty and now we live in a world where you know thanks to bitcoin. It seems like we're just creating new currencies bitcoin and live on mars. If this keeps scaling up exactly we're gonna have robots because layers now scarce and lands now scarce we need to go to mars to get and use robots one big. Can my grandkids can. I'm not gonna go either. So in the meantime what we can do is in order to kind of infuse purpose. You know it's a lot of Socialization and a lot of times when we talk about like employee engagement all of that we think within my company. Like if you're the leader of the company you know. How do i engage my employees. How do i get this culture this purpose infused in my own organization by in in my book a little bit about this prophet is a is a starting line and business standard prophets of starting line. It's a starting lining permission. Play right right your business if you aren't profitable in some capacity wherever that profit comes from he's still have to have more than you spend or you won't be in business long

Rideshare: Revolutionizing Health Transportation With Josh Komenda, CEO of Veyo

Outcomes Rocket

02:25 min | 2 months ago

Rideshare: Revolutionizing Health Transportation With Josh Komenda, CEO of Veyo

"Today i have the privilege of hosting the fantastic josh commander. He's a co founder and ceo and president of ao. He's just doing an phenomenal job. At the company it's a full-service non emergency medical transportation brokerage designed specifically for healthcare vail uses technology to better manage and emt which is the the non emergency medical transportation and emt benefits for medicaid and medicare programs state governments and managed care organizations today. We're going to be covering this in doing some good learning with josh so suggests such a pleasure to have you here on the podcast with us today. Thank you so much. Beat your soul. Appreciate it absolutely josh. Before we get into baeau near company. Talk to us a little bit about why you're inspired to work. In healthcare. i started. I can walk with cla. Health really healthcare family. My my dad was a family. Physicians now retired out a registered nurse. And that was older brother going into medicine while but definitely was part of it was kind of part of my family's culture going up and you know really part of our core values in to the people that i respect the most roller my parents. My dad's asser never ending cluster desired. Really improve the human condition and show compassion. I personally was drawn to. The clinical aspects of health care is always been more of attack nerd and i love technology and inventing things. When i was a kid ended up going into computer engineering studying software design but always wanted to figure out how to prevent things to make the world a better place and as it happens by career really took me in this direction to really build a better any md at her a healthcare logistics system to really improve the healthcare system or work to improve a part of the healthcare system. Statically and so. I'm just thrilled that this company point my career in thinking about how we make the healthcare system work smarter proved human condition. improve lives. proud comes on. I think also systemically. I'm just excited Run this collision course of healthcare costs in our country. And i think more. I've learned about it and studied it and i think really the only way out of it has to make our system work more efficiently work smarter and i think this is one area in will be called population health or social determinants. That that really inspires me to make the system work better for

Josh Medicaid CLA Medicare
The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

Outcomes Rocket

04:41 min | 4 months ago

The Truth About Needle Fear with Amy Baxter, Founder & CEO at Pain Care Labs

"Hey everybody saw marquez's here and welcome back to the outcomes rocket. Today i have the privilege of hosting dr. Amy baxter once again. If you haven't heard our podcast interviews with her one of my favorite guests that we've had on the show episode four twenty six or. She talks about the work that she's doing with her company biber cooled. The product is phenomenal buzzy. Another one episode for twenty six and also at the soda. Five twenty where she goes deep on covid nineteen and some of the things that we should be thinking about just a ton of really good content. Check those out if you haven't already. But she founded paintcare labs in two thousand six to eliminate unnecessary pain. She invented fiber cool. Vibrational cryotherapy for tendonitis and to decrease opioid use and her buzzy device as blocked needle pain for over thirty five million procedures. This is key and what we're going to talk about today around. Kovic vaccination after yale and emory medical school trained in pediatrics. Child abuse and emergency pediatrics. Federally funded for needle. Pain and fear opioid use and neuro modulation research. She publishes and lectures on needles. A needle fear sedation and pain. Scientific contributions include hypnotic enzyme algorithm to time child abuse creating and validating the barf nausea scale for kids with cancer identifying the cause of the needle phobia increase amd buzzy and cool. She spoken on ted man. She's done ted talks bottom line. She's phenomenal and we're gonna talk about some really great things today around cove nineteen needle fear and a lot of her research that he's actually doing and has done and is helping our nation with day with The vaccination so amy welcome back thaw and i feel so. Adhd listening to that list. Well you got a lot on your plate you. You're certainly always keep things interesting. And i appreciate you for that and the listeners. Appreciate you for that so talk to us a little bit about what you've got going on a you know we. We sort of got reconnected. With this topic of neil fear. So why don't you introduce your work. There and the relevance today sarah sure will you know for anybody who's here before the story thus far was that i invented a device that used mechanical vibration to block needle pain got a grant for it found founded. It also decreased other pain. Kinda did some work with needle. Fear needle pain and founded. Americans really didn't care that much. So that's why did the ted talks. That's why did the techs is to raise awareness of the fact that the way we are vaccinated kids causes adults to stay afraid of needles. But because i've got this company in this product i moved on to vibrate wall opioid stuff and all of a sudden needle. Pain is relevant again. Yeah well it is and It's a big deal today because we've got to vaccines available as of now. We've got one more coming with jay and more and more people are getting the vaccine. Many are not and so talk to us a little bit about your research love to hear more about it and how it is impacting people's willingness to get vaccinated sure. Well the go thing is that. I've actually been asked to testify or the art celts. New and services on needle. Fear and needle pain. It had never been an issue before enter. Probably wouldn't have been an issue if the strains of covid nineteen stayed the way they were if the are not if that transmissibility number was at two or even two point five we only would of needed sixty percent of the population to be vaccinated with the v. One one seven with the south african variants all of a sudden. Now you're talking about needing seventy percent seventy five percent of the relation to vaccinated the issue with that is it. Twenty percent of people said they're not getting a vaccine anyway know-how and this means that you need to start working on those people that may get one that not get the second one said. That's where all the sudden it became important to really look at needle. Fear needle dread fainting anxiety. Pain all these issues that may be enough of barrier to someone that they're not gonna get that second vaccine then they're only fifty percent covered or for the people who are gonna freak out and don't get the first vaccine not because they think there's conspiracy or not because they're afraid of the immune system in their body being co opted by space aliens lasers but because they just can't bring themselves to stand gang that

Amy Baxter Paintcare Labs Kovic Yale And Emory Medical School TED Marquez Nausea AMY Neil Cancer Sarah JAY
Interview With Founder And CEO Of Cybersecurity startup, 6clicks

Cyber Security Weekly Podcast

06:04 min | 4 months ago

Interview With Founder And CEO Of Cybersecurity startup, 6clicks

"Hello and welcome to muscat. Etv cly this morning. We're going to be joined by anthony. Stevens found the ncaa of six. This rise five million dollars. So we'll found out. Sort of the six clicks story and what they're gonna do with the money and then we're going to be crossing to the us. How should be logging in Greg ostrovsky at who is the original. Ti guys at don mx and stephen elliott program bonds president with day. Say so we're going to be looking at their application late security and then get some epic market insights from they say is wells but let me bring in anthony stevens search and founder of six anthony. Thanks for joining us. Thanks chris grads vanish wonderful and it was not so easy to get you on as well so i appreciate you coming on Five million dollars. What are you gonna do with it. Now let's start with them. It's quite a bit. We can have a really. Let's let's start with six clicks the platform that you put together and Yeah then now once you sort of rising the top of money. It sounds lucky. Ready to to expand out in the way fan at six backing twenty nine saying Mission was to was to build a technology platform to help businesses with risk and compliance particularly around Major issues locks obscurity privacy. So we did that. What mike sue platform particularly unique is the fact that it's been designed to be used by vases as well so We had a fantastic twenty twenty securing a number of partnerships with some of the biggest names in town saab pure security. A number of Oversight weaver is rice capital now to to global expansion. Is this your first rice. Is it like a series. I or is it privately. Funded years privately-funded. We've raised To win a million becca july last year so we sort of saw that as as precede round so you could call this a lodge saved around or early series. I am not as there's lots of different is described as things but yeah so it was probably founded. We were we were subscribed within a wake side Fantastic support and kids coming incentive pickle interested to invest and get part of what we're doing one of the taglines in the media release was on your whites becoming a unicorn. How has your you'll night is that just a pi. We'd been something in there. I think looking we've got. We've wasted a huge amount of opportunity here as amazing. I think it's way proudly as buys to and supporting the innovation sector in sort of technology around the world Uh think if we continue as we are we've got we've got every shot and i think is You know those sorts of aspirational goals I only have Up sawed in my experience you modest well shoot for those things and if you will join you probably doing pretty well to look at ways. Six has come from because it is a pretty good story. Considering launched in a few years ago twenty teens. So yeah that took a story the platform what you're doing and yet and then there's a bit of here is will. Yeah so we Sipa fully sort of founded a business at the start of twenty nine saying we spent most of the twenty nine saying period in product development developing us strategy looking at the market. Where can where we wanted to focus. launched up product in the market basically around christmas time. Twenty nine saints the twenty twenty and as we all know why I wake or ten weeks later. We were we were into And during that period. I think we Fantasies into position where we really need to focus. And we focused on the saab security improv. Assi market is i Big area of focus ferguson and looked and said the largest plasma successful plaza and the highest profile applies in that market not identified united. The locks of Security trust wide number of allah's Focused on establishing ships with is organizations to help them streamline This livery model. But also the provide technology today clause to help their clot sweets uplifting. Saab security Themselves that proved very successful for assaulted and thus partnerships were suitable september last year. And from there we've just with tons of demand and set up offices in the aci which is in the us as well. We've come from top full fem. Which obviously gave you that market in saw your sounds like a very well connected as well. So that's obviously helped. You already had those relationships moving forward so they kind of knew what you were doing. Yeah yeah i was. I was only pot. Chief digital officer at kpmg in my job was to think about the intellectual property across the fame. Likely globally and hal. We would back into software as a way to provide innovation to clients. And i guess that experience i and Appointed you around science technology. Lock zero has done for the canning industry where businesses use zero as an accounting system. But i also engage with it accountants to help them in that process on the same platform and it became clear to me that we needed when they did something like that. For risk compliance and helping organizations and advises shift off united spreadsheets and word documents. And stuff like that. So

Greg Ostrovsky Don Mx Anthony Stevens Chris Grads Mike Sue Anthony Stephen Elliott Muscat Stevens Ncaa United States Sipa Saints Ferguson Saab United Kpmg
Digital Product Transformation for Healthcare Companies with Jonathon Hensley

Outcomes Rocket

05:01 min | 5 months ago

Digital Product Transformation for Healthcare Companies with Jonathon Hensley

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez is here and today. I have the privilege of hosting the outstanding jonathan. Hensley he is the ceo of emerge interactive a digital product agency where he works with clients to transform. Businesses strategies user needs and new technologies into valuable products and services. He's an accomplished writer speaker. Jonathan has lectured on topics such as the connected consumers impact on business creating value through data driven experiences and user centric approaches to innovation in two thousand twelve. He was recognized in the portland business. Journal's forty under forty as wanna portland's emerging emerging professional and community leaders under jonathan stewardship emerge interactive has committed to a simple the loss affi the relationship between emerge and its clients should exist to create real and lasting value to change the conversation to move people to action to inspire and motivate a team to focus on what matters and we wanted to get jonathan on the podcast today to talk to us a little bit about what they're thinking about digital as we look to transform the way that we touch our communities our patients our customers through digital transformation. It's such a great time to have. Jonathan join us so jonathan. Just want to say big. Thanks to you for for making the time to be with us today. Well you so much for how we saw absolutely so before we dive into what. You're up to within healthcare You know and the work that you're your conducting there and thinking about what is it that that inspires your work in digital overall. Well i think what really inspires me about digital. How technology is fundamentally changing. The way that we live our lives day to day in the way that we work i had the opportunity to grow up in silicon valley and so i was surrounded by incredible people constantly. Innovating looking at how technology could permeate the way that we live and think about our daily lives interactivities and how we connect people and then seeing look how scaled out in really the foothold has taken businesses and innovation driving our economy and our conversations is just continued to inspire me in so over lost. Twenty two years. It's been the same motivation that's really driven and keeps me excited With this constant pace of change of how technology can continue to bring value to people dan. it's It's amazing right. I mean what we could do with whether a campaign to dry behavior or just you know how people access certain things technology can really help. And we've faced a lot of challenges through the covid pandemic and healthcare has really been more open than ever this type of change and this type of digital transformation. Why don't you talk to us a little bit about emerge and what exactly you guys are doing to help. Those of us in in healthcare. Yeah so one of the big areas of focus for merge is healthcare over the last fifteen years and we have really been working with organizations to not just embrace digital as a marketing tool or embraced it into how they can improve patient experience for support caregivers or support the relationship between patients and payers but really to come in in. How do we look at technology through the lens of empathy. How do we drive innovation. That can have sustainable. Long term impact and so a lot of our work is helping our clients wherever they sit in the healthcare spectrum to look at that empathy layer into really focus on digital as product a lot of time digital becomes this disposable thing where it becomes a tool and it is an essential tool but it needs to be managed out the product to drive continuous innovation and serve the providers and the patients that are out there and so i'll give a really quick example. Today's website for any hospital or care provider is essentially your front door in kobe. Just amplified that said okay. Well with a social distancing and being more where we need our websites to do a better job and i would argue that. Most websites are dramatically underperformed. Because they're being managed as websites that are more of information resources than they are as critical products. Meaning how do i help somebody. In an emergency navigate the services we can provide when they're in a state of distress burston being overwhelmed by how much information being presented. Or how do i help somebody or a family. Member find physician with network knowing their available understanding their expertise. And what does that look like provide end to end care. And that becomes very very complex as we all know when we start going from general practice into specialists and moving through the healthcare system.

Jonathan Jonathan Stewardship Portland Hensley Marquez Silicon Valley DAN Burston Kobe
"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

05:08 min | 5 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"You because you know not not everybody's asking for it and they've literally just been where you are so it's very fresh you now people reach out and ask me about seed investors For tech companies in got great relationships with a number. But i haven't raised a seed round at like five years so i'm not as close to it versus like someone who just did a seed round last year. Might have their pulse on what you need to do in some advice and then also exactly what you said the there so many incredible people that we were all like just starting out together in the trenches together. Just nobody's trying to make our mark Ten years ago. And it's been really awesome and it's hiring to see where all these folks have ended up. And and i can't even wait to see what the next ten years bring totally and i'm just you know. I think one of the things that we all have to always fear as entrepreneurs creatives or whatever is is irrelevant. Your organization is relevant like. That's the real competition. It's not the other job site. it's not the other you know. Event or conference company. It's whether or not like we are innovating in in creating a conversation around our brands that that matters to people. So i wanna know like for you. You know here. We are twenty twenty. I'm preaching to the converted here. Because like i think that the future of work is like the predominant intersectional issue that we all should be really considering right now but i wanna know for you like how do you. How do you battle that. How do you continue to keep the brand the movement fresh. I think that as as an individual human and as an organization you've got step out of your comfort zone as much as possible. You've got to talk to people who don't like your product you've got to talk to people who've never heard of your product you've got to try things sort of small contained ways where you can learn But i think that that you've got to kind of shake things up because if you stay comfortable you will. You will never stay relevant and on top of that. I think that one of the struggles as well for a lot of entrepreneurs is a balanced between you know. You need to be very respectful of data. Because your intuitions not always right. But you also have to trust your gut because data sometimes incomplete or isn't able to tell you the full story and so you know i think I try and have a lot of conversations with a really broad eclectic set of people. I try and just keep keep my perspective. Really french and This past year. I spent a ton of time. Like digging into what our colleges doing in response to the pandemic hauer students thinking about getting internships and jobs with the whole world being upside down. That was really helpful for staying relevant. I think there's always more work to be done. you know. Part of it is just staying really hungry and staying committed and keeping people around you that push you and that don't just like you know pat you on the back and say nice job and let you pick up your feet. Why really appreciate that. And and catherine i i. I'm so thankful for you and your perspective and for the muse and for the new rules of work. I encourage our listeners. Who are you know in this phase of their careers to go down the rabbit hole here. Because i've found you know. I really enjoyed the podcast. I really love the website. And i always have like you know it's it's it's always been fresh. It's always had energy in a space that is seemingly mostly dry and pedantic and you know it's more databases than it is culture and feeling and content so this being one of the craziest days know probably will remember for the rest of our lives. I want to be respectful of your time but again. Thank you for being on the podcast. Thank you for your work And if there's any other resources that you think listeners should should check out or if there's any deep as old as the trees and the rivers wisdom that comes up in your head on an off and on on a regular basis that you want to impart on our way out by all means well to leave me on a way to leave the i you know i i always love the this the quota the concept that you know if it was easy everybody would be doing it and i think that sometimes we live in a culture where especially for entrepreneurship and building people love to tell the overnight success story they loved to condense things really quickly into like. Oh you know. I i wrote performs and then we all these users like look the real. The real story of everything is like days where it seems like everything's failing and you know nights for you lay in bed like gripped by extra central dread that it's just you know it's all falling apart and a lot of stuff like all. Success is is surrounded by many failures many deaths of your dream And so i think that You know. I think i would just say like you know if you really believe in something that don't let people convince you that That comes easily. If it was easy everybody would do it. But some of the most meaningful gangs are the most challenging as well and i. You know. I've really enjoyed this. Thank you so much for having me. I hope people check out the muse and or you know tweet me at act came in on twitter if you have feedback or comments but this.

last year twitter Ten years ago five years one twenty twenty catherine french things past year next ten years
"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

05:01 min | 5 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"I love that story and it is just so like its soc street level. It's like it's an obviously you. You must have been a very talented writer and a very persuasive person and you know they you you brought content. They wanted so. You are very prescriptive in terms of like you're reading you know the platform and you went to what you went with forbes but i just like saying that back to you because we forget i forget. 'cause they cure you. Are you know like ten years later. You've raised tens of millions of dollars. You've touched millions of people through the through the platform and what you guys do and and at what what you ladies do And and you know we and you literally were doing free. Work for forbes. That was your solution. You're like i'm gonna go and work for free for another company. I've literally not just gonna run my business. But i'm going to write content for you guys and like it's just that's the specific spacious beginnings of like all this stuff like i feel like every the the story for the mind that i that has come to mind in this conversation that i thought you'd appreciate 'cause like it's a different skill sets a different type of product ultimately built with summit and you built with music but you know i remember watching the woodstock documentary probably around the same time two thousand nine and two thousand and ten maybe started summit with within the year and i saw michael laying on the documentary. Was like this dude was a visionary like clearly there's four founders but this guy was the one who sort of had you know the moment and and google them and i found the michael lang organization on google and i literally called the office the next day and i sent him an email and he took a meeting with me. Because do you know how few people who are in their early twenties. Do that like literally. Nobody reaches out to the skylight. That right so so like it was nothing special and i just did it and i think i went in like flip flops. Shorts this guys off as a twenty two year old idiot and and you know. And i was like man. How'd you do it like so incredible. Whatever it is the guy. I built the stage like a really humble guy actually had him on the podcast and therein lies the wisdom of like michael. You know like he's he's he's he's in any hasn't woodstock means peak experience moment right like it hasn't necessarily happened again since then but You know i just. I just think it illustrates like you're like all go right for free at another platforms publication. And i'm like i'll all cold call this guy and take me and like you know of course later on like he spoke at summit and was really valuable to have as a sounding board for hosting events and building events which is something i'm super passionate about and just people don't get the opportunity that i imagine the people at forbes who met you were like wow catherine like loves this space. She really cares about helping job seekers. We gotta like do more with her. Yeah and i think your your story too. I love it because it illustrates so much of that early. Success is a boils down often to the same couple of things. One showing up putting in the pudding in the work. That getting on the plane doing the thing you know reaching out But also i think i early on. I put a lot of time and energy into thinking. What makes a win for them. Because it's really obvious for you what you want but if you can't go to people with ideally something that that helps them and sometimes it's as simple as you know it makes them like you said earlier it it allows them to pass on their experience. Feel good about what they've learned and and the path they've had a but sometimes it's more concrete like hey. Can i write contact for your site. Wherever i think that there's a lot of those little things that can help you get that toehold and what you do with the opportunity is obviously up to you. But but it's it's like sometimes you've just got to put in a very particular type of work to get To get noticed or get that opportunity in the first place and if you're we're talking about the like climbing the mountain but there's also all these other mountain climbers that are starting right at the same time as you. And so when i fast forward to twenty twenty and i think about the greatest resources i have today. It's actually the people that were around me. Then who are also starting their own things and have like whether they succeeded or failed. We all had these incredible shared experiences and built all this different wisdom through those experiences. And i'm curious. Is that something that you also share. Like i just i see that as such a phenomenon when i look back and i'm like man like the printers founders that were around in my early twenties of the ones who you know. I can really lean on him. Rely on and we also have have that shared experience. Yeah yes i mean. And i think that there is a few different layers in which that's helpful one of them is the best advice and mentorship that i got was not from people who were wildly successful five to ten years ahead but in some cases it was from other founders who were just six months down the road and that could be powerful because sometimes they have more time for.

five ten years six months michael ten years later twenty two year old google today four founders two thousand catherine millions of people tens of millions of dollars next day first place michael lang twenty twenty couple ten One
"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

02:15 min | 5 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"You know we had everybody that we knew shared on social. We actually got very lucky in that a former colleague of mine ended up working at aol and he mentioned what we were doing to arianna huffington and so she wrote an article about advice she would give her younger self for the launch of the muse that we put on the homepage and that really helped legitimize us because when people can't decide or like you know. What is this random website i've never heard of. There was an article with great advice by huffington. That's amazing of her. Yeah it was. It was incredible. And i think we were very focused in the beginning. Also on helping helping women navigate their careers and so that was something that i think she really connected with. Content syndication was not that we cracked. That probably drove least five thousand of our first month's users and maybe twenty thousand shortly after essentially me at that point in time a lot of these other sites on the web like forbes and places were first starting to take contributor contents and so i was like okay. Well i have product. I need to get it in front of people. The best way to do that is to find where those people are and go see if i could get in their field of vision and be like. Hey come check me out. And people were on forbes. And so i approached editors forbes and said i'd like to give you really high quality career advice content for free with some links back to this new site called the news and at that point in time i was able to convince them through basically a combination of like cold networking. And i don't know i guess being fairly persuasive to the music a contributor account at one point in time i think we had the number one number four number five most popular articles in the business section forbes and those articles were getting hundreds of thousands of views on forbes which they were happy about but some small percentage honestly probably one or two percent of those people. Were clicking through the links and coming back and discovering this new site called amuse. That was all about helping you. Navigate your career find a job and that was one of our biggest early sources of traffic now overtime. Organic search referral word of mouth like now. There's a a bunch of different ways that people hear about us but in the beginning we had no brand. It was really about figuring out who does have an audience a community brand. And how do we offer them something of value so that they will give us space to.

twenty thousand two percent aol arianna huffington first month five first hundreds of thousands one point huffington five thousand amuse views one four
"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

03:23 min | 5 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"I jokingly call it the blood sweat and rahman phase because from basically two thousand twelve at early two thousand fifteen we just. We just never had any money. We were this like tiny tiny band of you. Know kind of insane passionate driven people that were going up against these huge platforms like At the time linked in and monster was big ben and I think it took us a couple years. To not only cracked the code of the revenue. Model the business but also frankly to get enough traction that investors could look past the fact that we were fairly young Female founding team which is very unusual and once we were really able to demonstrate not only that we could attract you know millions of people but that we could actually monetize in a really interesting way. That's the business as a business really took off. How did you how did you do that. I don't mean to interrupt you but like that's like we just we just blaze pass the fact that you built this and started it and then had millions of people that were visiting the website monthly. Like how did you grow the business. How did you get that that exponential so there was definitely an element of throwing spaghetti at the wall and seeing what sticks basically in the very early days i i knew from my own experience and from talking to others. That many young job-seekers not feel like their needs were being met and less. That seemed like a crazy statement if you think back like nine years ago basically like monster dot com was still one of the biggest places to find jobs and i don't know if you've used that platform in a while but is not not very modern. It's not in. The linked of two thousand. Ten does not look like the length of two thousand twenty totally and you know. Lincoln's asset has always been your network. But if you don't have a network because you're early in your career it. It has struggled to be as effective for younger people and younger talents. Lot of sons that are further in their career. Not only that. But there was a Absolute like gap in great career. Advice you would google different questions like how did it go. Share raise and the context just terrible and it was often from sources. That were kind of didn't really seem that legitimate and so i had started a blog a year before the muse that got like twenty thousand people very quickly through almost entirely word of mouth and so i had some confidence that there was. This need to obviously identifying anita's only part of the battle so when we launched the muse i did a bunch of small almost guerrilla marketing things to get the word out. Let's see so this would have been very late. Two thousand eleven first of all. I personally emailed like nine hundred students and alumni groups that had some sort of career focus so you know stanford women in law the baldwin scholars and basically sent them an email. About why. I was launching the muse and ask them. Can we help your members. Can we help with additional career advice. There were not so many startups at this point in time so it was still a little bit novel at that. Point to get an email about a new start-up we had a very very can clear sense. When you land on the dot com. You could really understand what we were trying to do. So a lot of people came to the site told their friends..

"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

07:49 min | 5 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"Were a management consultant at mckinsey. You worked for the clinton health access initiative and travel the world. How did you end up in these roles. Did you have like a unique or to follow the advice that you're giving here so i do think it followed some of the advice giving here. Although there was frankly a lot of trial and error and i built a lot of the tools on the music. Because i wanted them. And i didn't have them back when i was younger. But yeah the quick short version of my story is that I got into my head around probably age. Fourteen years old or something that i wanted to work for the cia or the state department. So i don't know that television show alias. Back in the day was jennifer. Garner played a double agent city. And you're also from virginia right. You're from adler socks born in texas. Actually but we moved to the area. Like twelve and yeah. That was around. When i started to get people who worked in the foreign service and you know it just. I became captivated by the idea of like international work. It may be undercover. Maybe not but honestly i mean embarrassingly. The tv show was definitely a contributor to what i thought that job was like and yeah it's you know this end. That's very common. Frankly that people get their earliest ideas of what careers are like from the media. And so i. I had this idea i followed it for years. I made all of these decisions and school based on. You know. I'm going to go work for the state department. Boom boom boom and luckily in two thousand seven i You know talking about trial and error earlier. I applied for and was accepted to basically like a summer position at the us embassy in nicosia cyprus in the mediterranean yet it was. I mean it was a wild experience. I did a drill. Got chased the embassy with marines with guns i it. I was part of the drill. I was playing a terrorist. They did a great job. That caught me But you know. I had all of these insane experiences but i realized like this isn't what i thought it was. And so it was the error part of trial and error I went into consulting after that. But you know. I do think i saved myself from other moves that were not that would have been even further away from where i should have been by doing research online. I used to just troll. Like not trolling the way that people use it now but i used to spend hours looking at company career sites and on everything i could find to try and learn like what are these jobs actually like because i realized after that first experience i better get a lot smarter about what the company culture was like. What day of job was like before. I jumped in because for a fulltime job. You really want to try and stay a couple years. And i think that that was a lesson. I learned the hard way. I guess. I'll say yeah totally and i'm curious now like here. We are twenty twenty the world changing. How do you feel about four year universities and certifications and what we have versus where we're going. Oh great question. You know. I think that there. I think that the future is going to see a lot more acceptable pathways and for some people for your university is going to be great. I learned a ton. i had an amazing time like. I think that there's gonna be for individual students for certain career paths. I think that there's you know there's always going to be a place for a classic for your university system. But i'm also a big believer in ways of getting to the same goal and whether that's a certification program whether that some of these organizations that help people leap directly into working Into various forms of paid internships and externships think one of the for example one of the very small crusades. That i've been on personally is that we shouldn't require a four year college degree for jobs. That don't require a four year college degree which turns out is a lot of jobs. If you engineer like just make sure that they're a great engineer does it. Do you care if they graduated from accredited universities. You care if. They're great at coding. And i think if we did that we might actually open up some of these fields to a much broader more eclectic more diverse more interesting array of people than by arbitrarily pudding requirements end. Because maybe that's how it was done in the past. That makes a lot of sense. And i think about that. Because i went to four university and i really didn't learn much inside the classroom but i went to american university in dc I learned so much by having kids in my school. From like one hundred different countries. I went to from like being a jock in taxes. Having like you know not most diverse network. All those sport was really the thing that allowed me to understand. You know socioeconomic diversity in racial or international diversity That's where i got the access to people that were outside of like say my direct community but really going into college was where like completely globalised. My thinking however had. I gone to like you know texas state or how not to talk shit on texas state. Sorry i'll texas state. Grads out there. But i think i would have had a lot of fun in new braunfels and party a lot but i don't know that i would have come out of there with any sort of like professional skill center gains so like i'm just for for for me. I look at this in all the jobs of the future. That haven't been invented yet. In a sense. You know like in the area that you know the crippling student debt and like just the the the math typically doesn't really work out right now for a lot of people i think globally for sure but as in the us now to and you know. I'm happy to hear you say that you think we're going to be in a future where certifications and just capability is going to be the key. Not you know the that you know used to open the door. Yeah and i think your story is such a is such a good one. Because it's often these other experiences that broaden the mind that that broaden your skillset that may or may not be taught in the classroom. And frankly i think any time in human existence that you have people who just sort of hop on the conveyor belt path of life. Like i go here than you do. This next two say that serves some people but it doesn't serve everyone and it doesn't necessarily serve society as a whole and so i hope that collectively we can move towards a world where we're telling young people. Look here's a path juror. The advantages here the disadvantages. Here's other pat's here are some of the other opportunities because it is a great big wide world out there and i don't think we do a really good job. Sometimes of helping people especially people from certain parts of the country certain geographies certain family structure certain backgrounds. And another that. We do a good job of saying like here. Here's what's out there. So at the muse. i imagine. That's changed tremendously for you. You know like the the media landscape is trained tremendously the way that people i imagine they consume. Your content has shifted five times in the last ten years. I mean i can't even imagine so. Tell us a little bit about that journey. Just as an entrepreneur. Yeah i mean it's been a really wild one So if you look at the business today we have Roughly between five to seven million people every month who are coming to the muse dot com and content is obviously one of the things that we're really known for but a lot of people are coming to us as well to research companies and browse the company profiles and watch the different. You know employees videos and we have a text based employees cuny's and then obviously applying to jobs which is figuring out how most of our revenue and and that sort of the heart of the marketplace is when you can kind of connect the right person to the right job at the right company. It's great for everybody. Because ideally if they get hired it's good for them. It's good for the company and then off suit is great for us and i would say it's been a wild ride. Of course i spent the first four years running the with just no money..

texas virginia Garner first four years five times jennifer mckinsey two thousand twelve one hundred today mediterranean nicosia cyprus Fourteen years old american university seven million people two first five muse dot com
"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

01:34 min | 5 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"It can also be really helpful in this phase to talk to people who know you well and when you can start to zero in on some of those things are then. What i recommend is do do a little bit of research. So if you're really at the beginning of your career that research might look like okay. I think that you know brand marketing might be interesting or You know. I've heard consider sales rate. Just write down three to five possible career pats. If you're a little bit further in your career these might be specific job. Titles might be specific companies. And then honestly i'd say just start with google One of the biggest and this is something that honestly it's part of why i started the muse. I wanted people to be able to hear from people in different roles and hear from employees at different companies to be able to go line without having to have a big fancy network and just watch a video of somebody in a particular job at a particular company talking out what they do and see. Does that excite. You doesn't interest you There's a lot of ink spilled about informational interviews. And obviously i'm a big fan but sometimes you don't have somebody in your network who you can sit down one on one over coffee with at but there's a lot of great resources online and you know obviously i'm super bias. But i think that the muses the best of the best googling will lead you down a lot of places. And i think back to some of the the jobs that i took. When i was younger the career paths that i wanted to explore and sometimes it is only talking to someone who actually does that job that helps you realize like oh crap that is not what i thought that is not for me and that's great right. It's great to know what you don't want just as.

three google five possible career One one zero
"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

07:05 min | 5 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"And when you think about you know let's say fifteen years ago. The biggest thing that a lot of college students and young people looked at worthies publish lists of the best places to work. And i'm making that voice for a reason right because they were often these vary like kind of classic lists full of the same classic employers and now i think when you look at the diversity of things that people are looking for from their employer. The idea that you could just stack rank every company in the world on a single list. Frankly to me. I think it's a silly. It's like ridiculous. Invest people to marry a new york city. Like what the list is that. It's much more about what you care about that. Yeah thank you. I just you know. It's a big part of what i'm doing at the muse. It's frankly it's a it's it's a big part of the for section of my book is like you've got to as an individual understand what matters to you. What do you want and you need in your career. Obviously also what can you bring to the table. But what do you care about. What are your values. Not just big picture values. But but what are your preferences. Do you want to work in an organization where there's a lot of clarity and a lot of consistency and a low velocity of change or do you want one where things are always changing and always moving bam bam bam you know nothing's stable because you strive on that. Those are both acceptable. But you've got to understand what you want and then you can go out there and get it and i think it's giving companies a lot of flexibility to be themselves rather than saying you know we're going to check five boxes and be on this list there like okay. Who are we. What can we offer to employees. But on the flip side you've got practice what you preach because employees can be they can be very punishing if companies are making big expensive promises and then not living those up. I think there's a there's a real desire for what's said externally to match what's experienced internally. That makes a lot of sense and i'm thinking back a historically like that vice where it's like okay. You're young person you're entering the job market. It's like just do anything and figure out whether you like it or not. That was sort of the advice. I got was. We'll try it and through that experience you'll get to know yourself and what you know you enjoy the most and now i i'm listening to you talk man. That's actually kind of terrible advice. Because if we examined motivations the types of environments that we feel most comfortable in that we thrive in. I think that would probably lead to a greater level of engagement which would make it more fun and read perform better and we'd be out like time seems to be a little more finite as things accelerate. We'll a couple of things one first of all. I love that you brought the focus too when you get that right. Fit people perform better like they do better and it shouldn't be. It shouldn't be this big idea. But it's actually fascinating to me that talent and hr as a function are just starting to get really smart about connecting prehiring post higher data. They're just starting to get smart about saying wait a second if we do a better job of being honest and authentic before someone comes into the company and we therefore make sure that they're better fit with our organization our culture our values our way of working and their role then they will be higher performing. They'll be more likely to stay. They'll be more successful here. And i think that's been such an interesting part of my time leading the muse frankly Because you know early on especially when the business was small. I often really struggled where sometimes our early customers were so used to measuring you know is a higher successful based purely on. How cheap was it to fill that role. And i'd be like okay. Yeah look we all want to pay less. But wouldn't you rather get the right person and then to your point about about young people today. I do think though we've got cut ourselves some slack because you know ten twenty years ago. There was not the sort of information available about different careers. Were even out there. I mean i remember. I was in college. I went to the career center like a book and it was like four hundred ninety eight unconventional careers for liberal arts majors. Like okay. great wasn't the sort of richness of information. There wasn't this focus on understanding yourself and matching that with a different path. And so i. I tend to think like people did the best they could but now they're they're tools. There's information there's technology that allows people to make smarter choices. A little sooner. That are maybe a little bit less reliance on trial and error even though frankly trial and error still has its place. And i did it a lot in my own early career. Yeah it's so when you find people that are motivated by passion as an entrepreneur as a founder. You wanna hold on to them for dear life because you now have someone that is going to grow themselves in the sense. Their curiosity is going to lead the next lead that they unearth for the company or their own career development. And it's because i also i'll talk to you know x. Ge executives who blow my mind and they're like they understand career development and leadership and executive training and development and away in an a science that is just beyond me. But when i when. I hear again when i think about like you know. Young people dedicating themselves to something that they care about like. If i'm in any of these you know spin and it can be very long tail especially to the point. You made that you know we now know about all these jobs. We all can find all of these people if you're into like one particular type of molecular biology or if you wanna make meatless fish or whatever. There's like multiple companies out. There that are doing all this crazy shit in the world. And if you truly have a passionate about it and you talk to somebody who is in that organization that shares your passion. It is a breath of fresh air. Because i talk about the thing. I love i get impart my knowledge and this thing that i loved someone else therefore extending myself and you know the body of work so i just i love i love. This has been the focus of the muse and to know more like a person. I'm going down that path. You you recommend like anagrams recommend like what are some of the ways that you think. Practically people can help themselves along this journey. Yeah so okay. So i think there's a few different things that i'd recommend step one is to start with your values so i often recommend and we've got a whole exercise in my book about a longer form version. Best but i often recommend people spend a little time thinking. About what sort of life do you want to to lead. And not what job do you wanna do or what functions you do but literally what is it. Looked like is flexibility important to you. Do you want to work in an office in one place. You want to travel. Do you want to always be talking to people. Do you want to be buried in. Microsoft excel or in a lab like what little sorts of activities day to day matter to you and then start to to put down on paper The way that you want to experience where for some people high compensation high prestige others might value creativity and things constantly changing. You can keep it again very very high level at the beginning because that's just about sort of what sparks joy if you wanna use marie kondo expression but you know what is it that excites you..

marie kondo Microsoft fifteen years ago ten twenty years ago excel both today step one one place five boxes four hundred ninety eight new york city one particular type one single list second Ge
"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

Art of the Hustle

06:38 min | 5 months ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Art of the Hustle

"Thanks so much for having me. I'm excited to be here absolutely. We're recording this on the day after the polls closing for the presidential election. So what a wild time to be alive. Ha it really is. And it's been a wild time to be a leader to right trying to figure out how much to to lead from your personal beliefs and how much to allow space for just the wide diversity of experiences that people are having right now. So it's it's an intense time for sure. I'm so happy that you're here on the podcast with us. You know as the founder of the muse and the host of the new rules of work one of the topics that i just find to be the most intersectional and important right now for us to be considering is the future of work and to your point. I'd say the other is how we bridge that delta in that gap between everybody's disparate and wide perspective here. I think it's a really. It's it's a really interesting time for all of us. As individuals as employees as leaders and in particular. I'm also just fascinated by how the pandemic the protests this summer around the murder of george floyd so many different biggest things are happening. That are changing how we work and how we show up in work. I happen to think a lot of the trends that are being accelerated or really positive ones. But it's a time of a lot of change. And i am sure it's it's very overwhelming as well while unpack that further for us if you don't mind just because you get to think about this. I mean you've worked on this for a very long time. I remember a decade ago. You were already putting together and hosting communities informs for young entrepreneurs in female entrepreneurs and that of course grew into your career seemingly you know for the last decade plus religious leaned in on this subject. So we'd love to hear more about what you're seeing and experiencing absolutely will. So i started the muse about nine years ago to help people and especially people who are in kind of early and mid phases of their career. Find that right fit job company and and career. And i think you've gotta hit on all three right because if you're in the right job the wrong company or the wrong career path You're not really firing on all cylinders unless you can kind of get people in the middle of that ven diagram and so. I've been building the news talking with job talking with employers everybody from like big companies like nike facebook and apple to a lot of small and mid sized says. And i think there's a couple of trends that i'm really interested in in in this sort of quote unquote future of work. One is there's there's just a real redefinition happening of the expected relationship between an individual and the place they work right and and this is not new but if you think back a couple of decades work was your time and your you know your efforts. Your output in exchange for a paycheck. There was there was a clock in clock out. There was not the sense that employers are sort of taking social issues. There was much less of a sense on behalf of employees that they should be asking and demanding so many things from their employers. And i think we're seeing with the rise of knowledge workers with the increasing competition for lots of types of talent technical talent and sales talent and frankly millennial and gen z talent. I think we're really seeing a lot of big changes and so i've been fascinated by what talent is asking for. You know this is like this ten years of research. So i'm going quickly but you know a lot of the talent that uses the muse. They're they're not just looking for a job. They're looking for a pass. They're looking for an employer with values that aligns to their own. You know if you think about as well. A lot of young employees on the coasts being vocal in their workplaces as one of the perhaps the highest leverage places. They have to affect change. You know especially if you live in a in a state where the state's outcome. When the electoral college is fairly predetermined you might actually as person make the calculation that being active in your employer and pushing for things like racial justice inclusion flexibility. All of these different seems that pushing for these seems. Three employer is maybe just as effective as fighting for them on the streets or at the ballot box and so i think we're seeing a lot of just again interesting activism on behalf of younger employees for companies. They really have to work for talent in a way that they didn't ten years ago. So if you're aware yeah you've gotta you've gotta say why us. Why would you pick my company. Over all of the different companies that are hiring marketers. Financial analysts engineers. And i think that's really redefining the relationship. We can talk. Maybe more later on about how that that manifest in authenticity how workplaces overcoming more human. But i think it's a it's a fascinating time to be in this space because everything that you thought you knew about how. Hr work is being questioned and a lot of it is is really. The rules are being rewritten right now. Yeah it's interesting to hear you unpack it. That way i think about how back a decade ago there was still dislike breakneck competition for best in class. Say engineering talent or like best in class. Say enterprise sales people and you would essentially get them by overpaying or by a better like food program in the cafeteria or like a bus issued palo alto or whatever but what you're describing is an intrinsic motivation. It's internal not external and i think back to myself as a young professional and i really didn't have an intrinsic compass like i think young people today do we had more of a life that we knew we wanted to get to or a professional reputation. That would unlock the lifestyle that we were seeking. I find that young people today. That is the secondary or tertiary. I don't mean to speak like this gross generalization but like to your point it's the culture. It's the community. It's the values the mission of the organization that seems to motivate our best workers to get after it absolutely and i think it's it's it's so interesting for a number of reasons you know first of all. There's that as a society. Many parts of our society are becoming very values driven. Very mission aware. We're seeing this in consumer behavior. So there's that thread. There's also i this really interesting. Impact of social media and specifically the fact that we are not only for many people We're living our lives and seeing other people live their lives in real time all the time..

apple nike ten years ago ten years facebook george floyd Three employer nine years ago last decade a decade ago this summer three one first One college today topics about
The Next Evolution of Vaginal Health Awareness, Screening, Practice, and Policy;

Outcomes Rocket

04:33 min | 6 months ago

The Next Evolution of Vaginal Health Awareness, Screening, Practice, and Policy;

"Welcome back to the outcomes. Rocket saw marquez's here. And today i have the privilege of hosting sherry palm. She's the founder and ceo of a pops. The association for pelvic organ prolapse support. She's the author of three editions of the award. Winning book pelvic organ. Prolapse the silent epidemic a pelvic organ prolapse patient advocate battle and intimate health activists international recognized speaker pop key opinion leader and prolific writer regarding pop. Which is the pelvic organ. Prolapse will using that acronym pop Emotional social sexual fitness and employment quality of life impact. She writes on all of these things and today. We're learning more about pelvic organ prolapse how it affects folks. Why and what we can do about it so sherry. Thanks so much for taking the time to be on the podcast with us today. Thank you so much for this opportunity. So i really do appreciate the time. Share information with your following absolutely and so sherry. I'm excited for our chat to before we dive into your organization. I want to learn more about you. And we'll catch you started in this. Healthcare dernie well is a classic case of discovery diagnosis with a health condition. You've never heard of. I was a diagnosed thirty and had done everything. I could to change the dynamic of my life. I was told. Mb wheelchair-bound short timeframe. And so. I did a lot of proactive engagement with what i can do that. Optimize my health and it worked. What i've done did work so moving. Forward into my mid fifties. I started to notice symptoms. And i was a little curious what those symptoms meant not give you the condensed version of it. I'll you of tidy for your when i would go to the bathroom. I've always worked to sixty hour week. That's minority and go the bathroom to he and after about three months old noticing. A bulge down around my vaginal area got a little bit curious and god a hand held mirror out to take a look to see what was going on down there and discovered a walnut sized. And of course your brain goes to tumor right away when you think about on So i was. I wasn't freaking out. Completely because i had no pain with it. It was just something. That was weird. And i knew it wasn't normals had to be addressed so i sent an email to my buddy who happened to be a doctor. Lucky beam and she's combined. We'll do a pelvic exam upon examination. She told me very matter of factly. You help pelvic organ prolapse. I will fit you with a pessaries and if you're not happy with the past three. I will recommend a highly skilled euro gynecologist to address it surgical angle. Why never heard of any of those terms before. So i was a little coffee this to say but she for the past three. Which is actually an incredible device that you can but in that kind of like the diaphragm support your internal organs and backdrop is leaving harper's and prolapse. I is a condition. Where is the organs in your pelvic cavity. Start to move into vagina and push their way down and out. All of the vaginal canal as your pelvic muscle isn't strong enough or is damaged and cannot support those organs from underneath them anymore. So i am home from that appointment and did what most people will do by dr google. What up with that. And on tons of information about prolapse and everything that i read said the same thing. It's so common and my take away from. That was how come i've ever heard of this before. But so common so within a very short timeframe my curiosity turned to anger and frustration. To be honest with you. And i knew that if i didn't know about this condition at other women didn't know about this condition because i had been so proactive about my health so i moved into action quickly. I knew that it was only one way to really optimize getting information to women and that was during a book and have any knowledge about writing books but it just felt right so i went off in that direction and with two weeks after was for that test. Pessaries from my doctor. I realized that that wasn't going to work for me. I mean she great job you re different on the inside as we are in the outside and so what position fits omen for pessaries. Sometimes go through two or three or more tries to get the right fit with me. I was lucky. I had a great doctor. She got the right fit right. I'll shoot and i went home and i was happy. I could take it out in nighttime and embrace of insert in the morning and it worked wealth me at provided support from april. But within two weeks of doing that. I recognize that. I just didn't have time to deal with that.

Sherry Palm Association For Pelvic Organ P Sherry Marquez Harper Google
Juan Benet, Founder & CEO of Protocol Labs Discusses Filecoin and the Vision for a Decentralized Web

Epicenter

05:40 min | 7 months ago

Juan Benet, Founder & CEO of Protocol Labs Discusses Filecoin and the Vision for a Decentralized Web

"Now. Let's talk about five point. Five point is the incentive layer that kind of brings it all together. What happens another would say. I am someone who wants to retrieve some content that i know is somewhere out there so basically what would happen. Whom would i pay. Who's incentivized by. What's what are the economics going on. Here yeah so basically you're saying hey like let's walk through kind of the the life cycle of data and kind of like follow it and so on Yeah so maybe. That's our with a three. So i that think about adding capacity to the network than adding storage. So you know a client hiring hiring a minor to its data and then the third is a another client retreating. Something that exists there so the first case A minor that has sort of provide. And i walked up to the network and up pledges. Certain amount of sectors and a pledge is a commitment to the network that you're going to store a certain amount of addison capacity and you're going to produce some proofs for that capacity and you also have to of because this is a relief to consumers. You have to have something at stake here. You have to discern conditions in which the might eat. Certain kinds of you could play That includes kind of eighty positive. A falcon A minor add smart of the networks some actual capacity than gets a random seed from the network to start Some data and kind of to produce a kind seal. What is right now. An empty sectors know capacity. And this is a kind of a sector today thirty two gigabytes and then there'll be kinda size actress in the feature on in what they might or might walk in with satire by or something like that you're by terabyte into you know thirty two gigabytes segments Any now Seal all of these segments in the ceiling processing in a reputation that you actually have that capacity to provide the network and the minor you have now signed up with an hour to for the this capacity in addition to monica sets a an asking price which is how much they're still is going to go for when clients are going to hire less storage What go right now. The sort of a global ask bryce on minor mostly use cases. Miners have one price in that set. In the future winters debate we want to have a flexible and fluid ask model where minus can have many different prices for different tiers Looking to stuff But for now sort of a very simple one price for all the storage so that point kind of the minor has committed to to of this and now other parties can can view it so now along comes a user client and says okay great like i want to store this data. And so the data they can just added with. There's different kinds of tools. So that can i get a hash or they can add with a five win with the latest client which is kind of look at the one of the main pump implementation's or a bunch of other tools. That that speak these protocols like exile arrogate or slate which is consumer lincoln application. There's a bunch of different kinds of things and that was the You can now hire. You can kind of create a deal to hire minor to back this backpack this data and that deal is of a relationship between a client and it client in a single minor and a single piece of data just kind of like the unit of of agreement as a. You probably want to do this with multiple minors because he want to replicate your data with multiple different parties and and so you now sound good data over to find these miners in the network by you. This number of ways you can either a numerate them from the blockchain you can find them in a buck explorer this much tools that can show you what miners what prices they have and so you select which minor you want and you could be maybe presented but you might also take into account other important details about the minor so for example they're kind of reliability. There's a different kind of schedules features about the minor that tracked by the blockchain and can score ran others. There's no emerging score the everybody's using yet but you could put these kind of like rating style numbers from the kind of like a very simple way of selecting minors klein right now. Uses a minor and sensor data over to the source provider one source brighter receives that they the deal is completed and the minor. Alicia the deal into the network. There's a bunch of operations that happened underneath a hood in order to like actually making that make that work this in preparation of the data that has to happen in order to make it easier to prove on and so on and definitely a different sizes of the data really matter writes a few set sending a little. Bit of the nsa. A few megabytes few kilobytes megabytes. That's going to be the kind of distribution very different than if you're sending gigabytes or terabytes and so for example in the smaller scales that just a very simple protocol where right away i can just over and make the deal and whatnot user Completely hidden from you. You know the client and the mine are doing this. This software is doing this under hud users themselves. Don't have to be exposed to all of this going on but it's kind of like a like a bitcoin. Transaction in theorem transaction. There's a lot going on happening under the hood where transaction to move to a certain place get validated execute on. Not but all of this kind of hidden from from the actual users

Addison Bryce Blockchain Monica Klein Alicia NSA HUD
Critical Practices Your Sales Team With Membrain Founder & Ceo, George Bronten

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

02:58 min | 7 months ago

Critical Practices Your Sales Team With Membrain Founder & Ceo, George Bronten

"Let's get into membrane. And so that's part of your solution is member in so tell me a little bit about membrane and how. It's different from other solutions. So what i what. I visualized that the point was eight. Nine years back was a tool. That was very visual. And it guided the salespeople through the entire process and i to say sales process. I'm thinking about b. two b. complex sales cycles right a month or longer month to a few years maybe sometimes multiple stakeholders multiple milestones. One example was the one with the stakeholder by that was an obvious thing that sales people were missing in the sierra. There was nothing really saying that. If you skip this. You're gonna kill the deal. So the visualization of the process was really my main focus in the beginning so member and i would say the a differentiator is that we. We've we create sort of a checklist on steroids so you can see not only your stages but also milestones since actions steps that you have to do and inside of those milestones. You'll we can also put educational content so sales enablement content like okay. Let's say the first step is a a research step. What does that mean like in your previous company of meant one thing but in this company might mean something else right. We want you to do research like this. Abc etc so you can have the sales leader in that step in a video. Explaining this is why we do research this way. This is why it's important and these are the main things you need to figure out unless you already know them. Really guiding Guiding is a keyword for us when we develop the each view needs to be visual and have guidance for the sales person. Stop you so you've built in a lot of the coaching and the training Kind of right into the product for your customers. Yes although we don't really built in so it's not like membrane has it all. I mean cookie cutter ready for you but we make it very agnostic of the customer or the customer sales coach or sales trainer will put that type of content inside of the tools we make the tool. Various economic methodology pulses but just enabling that content to be at exactly where you need it at the right points today. I think you're doing sales training. And then you'll get access to an lms like learning management system on the side after the training. Nobody goes there anyway. So you need to have it right in your face when you're working near deals

ABC
Imran Amed and Tim Blanks on a Most Unusual Fashion Month

The Business of Fashion Podcast

05:53 min | 8 months ago

Imran Amed and Tim Blanks on a Most Unusual Fashion Month

"Blow everyone. This is Imran Ahmed founder CEO of the business of fashion and I am here with my friend and colleague Tim Blanks editor at large of the business of fashion, and usually around this time of year timid I do a debrief on the fashion week has gone by and it's usually been informed by some of the chats the Timman I have. In the back of a car shuttling from one show to another in in all of the fashion cities. But this has been it goes without saying a fashion season that was very different but we wanted to continue our tradition and as it's been such a unique and unusual season maybe it's even more interesting to talk about the fashion season that's gone by so. Cam Maybe, we could just start with. The decision that both you and I made not. Any physical shows season in what what led you down that path because of course, there were some things you could have gone to here in London but in the end that didn't transpire. Well, my husband Jeff is very high risk and we have been so extremely careful since March. That it just seemed the sensible decision to extend vet caution and keep on extending it until we know there's not some kind of. Remove as much as remove as many random elements as possible from alive I I feel. Schizo being out of the House for all the months I found it so. Wasn't even the novelty I just found. The options that we would given. If we wanted attending things in person, we could zoom with design is we we could dive we can do deep dives into collections I ended up quite seduced by the virtual option I have to say. Come on a room. That's a surprise because you know at the early. Onset pandemic, we were talking about Sasha demonstrating graying potentially. Some shows never happening again. You know you're quite pro fashion meets Elliott. and Pro fashion shows because fashion shows have been my exposure to fashioned for my entire time working in this industry and I was definitely on the side of. You know that way of that way of encountering fashion, but this has been an education in. So many ways a pop aside from the fact, I've actually you learned to use technology and in a way I never thought I would I would ever be able to. It doesn't kind of. Terrify me Oh bull made whatever. You know the as so many people said, and it didn't matter whether there were people like me who just sit and look at things or whether they will buy as you know people who have whose bread and butter is the touchy feely side of the industry seventy people were saying the. The ability to go back and look at things and to have to think of something, and then be able to go back and see whether it was what you were thinking of old. To cross-references and to. and to be entertained as well. I think the difference this season as people really really got their virtual presence together. You know we've had a couple of. Dummy, runs that went. Wildly convincing. And I think this time there was so much thoughts and creativity and ingenuity applied to new ways of doing business that anyways. Bringing us to the world that that it was a very, very different game I felt. Yeah. You also got to spend. More time with the designers because. So much more I. Mean that was a mixed blessing in a way because normally it's three minutes backstage a few questions and he whiz off and do your review, and now it was forty five minutes zooms and so you having proper it reminded me actually it's funny. It reminded me of. When I first started covering fashion and I would go backstage interview designers and and people weren't that many people doing it in those days when there was a handful of camera crews and and you would end up in these. You know half hour forty, five minute conversations in depth with you know it was a novelty for you to be told to. It was a novelty for them to be talked to, and you would get people. You'd have these extraordinary conversations that would then be brutally truncated into like a thirty second sound by something for the for the broadcast. Meanwhile, the these conversations floating around in an archive somewhere at this, this is in a funny way. This is what it was like that. You would be having quite you. You'd be having talks with people and so when you went to write about the collection you when you're approaching collection a whole different level of insight I think you know it's so in a way, it was more time consuming and even though I wasn't kind of car with you driving from place to place flying from city to city all of that. It was more time can I was sitting in my room it was more time consuming and Matt sense that and more sought consuming and more and ultimately more rewarding in a funny way. I guess.

Imran Ahmed Tim Blanks Schizo London Sasha Editor Jeff Founder CEO Matt Elliott.
Interview with Bethenny Frankel

Skimm'd from The Couch

05:05 min | 8 months ago

Interview with Bethenny Frankel

"Hey everyone. This show might sound a bit different today because we're skimming from three different couches. The skin is still working from home for the time being because of coca nineteen. Today Bethany Franken joins us on skimmed from the couch. She is the founder and CEO of Skinny Girl, a company that offers lifestyle solutions for women, but you also know her name from her time as a cast member on the real housewives of New, York, and as a guest shark on Shark Tank Bethany we have found your career for years. We are so excited to have you with us today welcomed to skin from the couch. Hi thank you so much as we're GONNA start the show with our question that we open every show with which is skip your resume for. Cod a resume. I've never really I haven't had a resume in so many years but I would say entrepreneur author. Mom Philanthropists Entertainer I guess TV media personality PODCAST PROPRIETOR One thing we wanted to say actually from the beginning was that our chief of staff is from Puerto Rico and her family is there and she wanted to thank you for the work associated with be strong and she raised about. Thirty thousand dollars for the global empower mission and just wanted to thank you for the work that you did there. So wanted to make sure that I said that from the top. Oh, that's amazing. We promise the I. Would Tell You. So obviously, for those who have like Danielle, myself who've watched fear years on TV and studied your. A businesswoman, we feel like we know everything there is to know about Bethany, but it's probably impossible. So what is something that we can't Google about you or that we haven't seen on TV that we should now. I think people I don't know I'm seen as a homebody. Pandemic has been that different for me from. The landlocked being home perspective at all I say on ninety percent home by ten percent lunatic. But it's really probably ninety five percent homebody that was one of the things that was probably good about reality TV for me. It gave me a reason to wear my clothes. It give me a reason to put makeup on and I think that you fit in really well with Daniel and I are also big homebodies and our lives have not changed that much. I'm not really that social. I'm sort of antisocial in a way I have a very, very tight circle and I like it that way and I really don't let people in I really don't knock would get burned and I just don't spread myself too thin I don't I don't connect dots. It's so funny people people are dot connected and they don't even realize they're like, Oh, I just saw this person and they were doing that and did you go there of did use it like people always want to know what you`re Doing what information and connecting dots about you and I'm not a doctor at all I just don't need to provide any extra information than is required. I love that phrasing 'cause it does describe a lack of people that I know. So one of the things that I think is you know you've been so on us about is how you grew up you spoken about your childhood being raised around the race track and you've talked about how that upbringing influenced your understanding business. How did that frame the hustled that you clearly have? I mean it's only what we can speculate I can't know because I didn't live any other life in any other environment but I know that I grew up. Very quickly, I was going to nightclubs and I was thirteen years old getting myself in handling myself. I used to go from I have some island into the city and take training and. I was just living like an adult when I was thirteen years old but handling myself, I worked at the racetrack. I was a hot walker which meant that when the horses come off the track after they've exercise I, would you walk them? You give him a bath and then you walk them around the shed row until they cool down and so I was working I was a hot walker the when I was like. Seven if I had to get six seven until later in my life and I used to. Spend the day at the racetrack. Around gambling, going up to the betting window myself meeting all kinds of crazy unsavory characters. This isn't like the fancy wearing hat Kentucky Derby part of the race struck with the backside. My father was a horse trainer. So you're hanging out with jockey agents and bookies, jockeys, themselves grooves, and it's very gritty. and. The race track itself is about gambling and that's the whole thing. So that's how they make their money. So you're basically growing up growing up casino, and in fact, we used to go to Vegas again when I. was like thirteen years old and I would be going to the craps tables and so I just had a very nontraditional life very, very young. And it was really well that I knew a lot of violence in my house and you know drinking and just fighting and just being an adult as.

Founder And Ceo Bethany Franken Daniel Bethany York Danielle Google Chief Of Staff Puerto Rico Kentucky Derby Vegas DOT
Your Most Powerful Asset

Accelerate Your Business Growth

05:47 min | 9 months ago

Your Most Powerful Asset

"Over the years, the accelerate your business growth podcast has enjoyed inclusion unlisted the best podcast to listen to for sales business growth of small business entrepreneurship leadership. We've just been really fortunate to just the on a ton of lists, and that's because of the guests. These are folks who have expertise in a particular area of business and they join me for a conversation little. Chat. Where they share that expertise with all of you. That way you can get the information age get connected to these folks and you can do better things in your. Business. Today is no different. My guest today is Chris Yoga. Christmas the founder. CEO of Yoga Company. Chris focuses on helping people in the organizations they belong to pave the road to a more Utopian world. He empowers heroic organizations to build a champion, those styles using their most powerful assets, their web presence. Chris an expert in Web design accessibility. Digital Marketing. Company culture and Social Responsibility. His Gold for HIMSELF THOSE HE AIDS is to be driven by a purpose beyond Prophet Excel much for joining me today Chris. From Yoga. I am thrilled to have you now I would love it. If you would explain to the listeners, why use say that our web presence is our most powerful asset? It's the one. Then you have that's speak can speak to everyone similtaneously knocker taking phone calls. If you're at a meeting a conference, if you're doing sales inbound sales, your, you've always got some limiting. The chemical equation of your success that is install eggs out whereas your web presence is. Similarities available to everybody and is also worldwide so. Used to have local footprint canals international footprint. On it. Okay. So He said in your bio that you are looking to these organizations pave or. Pave. The way toward a more Utopian world which I love that purpose at but understand how my web presence makes the world a better place. So. It starts with thinking about the organization itself. So the folks that we help tend to all into one two buckets, it's people who know and already calculate the type of impact they wanna half, and then there's those organizations aspire to have a positive don't really quite know either what it is or exactly how to accomplish it and It's interesting because let me see what persons can help boost in the latter case with relation that already knows the impact that wants to have. It's a matter of execution the more fun one in the one that might be worth likable. Your listeners is the wonderful renovations that are still trying to figure out exactly what they want that to look like, and that is where I think about the value of the web presents not only as your marketing tool, a communication tool, a chance to interact with clients, but there's also whenever you go through that process of rebranding redesigning a website specifically. There's a window. Right there's a certain amount of almost like vision boarding that happens where. I kind of figured whenever you start to plant that flag as renovation. It's almost like somebody who stopped smoking where they're like, Hey, I stopped smoking and it's like okay well for how long for four hours. But you got. The same thing with with the website whenever you say we are organization that does these things. Maybe that only lasts. You know it's been four hours since you started that put that out there and it starts to become true and the way that we find it tends to really impact organizations with Joseph Campbell's Hero's journey. Now I'm not okay good deal. So just the Campbell, an amazing offer this book called out hero with basis where he breaks down all of these tales from the Odyssey the end all the way up to storm wars wizard of Oz Harry Potter all of the movies stories you likely love follow the Hero's journey, which is that the hero goes through these kind of same twelve steps and it starts with. You know the call to action understanding. There's a need for change not really wanting to address it of being reluctant going through it as a path of self transformation with happens and that sell transformations what enables bureau to go out and. which the beast find the Elixir, whatever the case might be, and then better impact their community or Kasa characters around them, and then ultimately transformed the world, and what we find is when you go through a brand update or web transformation, the right way and with that kind of attention -ality, it serves as that vision board that is essentially like a crucible cell transformation. So you start to change yourself your team sources st like this is how we impact the world. Now I kinda have something uncrowded show Hama data show my spouse. I'm proud to show my the work I do does this kind of impact? So it's not just about the dollars and cents it's about making impacts. And now I'm a little bit more excited to tell that story people that land on our website. Begin to hear that story. It allows us to transform ourselves before we can then transplant relationships we have with our clients ultimately grow hopefully or more clients and a broader community, and then subsequently through the were affects we all have a world create a better world starts I believe with that what presence that I can happen food multitude of levels but I think one of the most important is being able to find that kind of vision and crucible assault transformation were.

Chris Yoga Joseph Campbell Social Responsibility Aids CEO Yoga Company Assault Founder
Zhenya Oganian Founder & CEO, ESCS (eSports Championship Services) on How His Product Can Change Esports

The Business of Esports

04:10 min | 9 months ago

Zhenya Oganian Founder & CEO, ESCS (eSports Championship Services) on How His Product Can Change Esports

"But I, always full east and I am not as the sometime ago is it Growing, but it's still like you know what happens you have so many tournaments that from o'hare, and if you WanNa do championships really you have to manage different systems in discouraged by the tournament you names him. And it's difficult. I mean as a blades difficult and then you have to Luminol roker incense again, game have to find the open anthony so. Maybe it can be done better actually, and this is how it basically came to our. Eight year is traveling tranship services stacked up so These my team we decided to dry and change this. So graded that from that, literally, as you said, allows n game of Brown to integrate is put services around it in just fifteen minutes, ano- every every game every every sauce says, Hey, it's easy just to come on come on you can do that and then two hours of later who come with. And you're like, yes, it's fifteen means you're doing some syndrome. Beneath. Two minutes. Walk. In the integrated stream essence, you sent up your Chanter Simpson, our extremely who's a friend of front and you're done you open your game you see southern the our beautifully assists lager. You last opens assist system as Tappan Zee see immediately, your game east I think of logging ends ACC teams in leagues though Elleray in ongoing. Championships. And Emerson houses ultimately did. So when for example, the chimp turns ships automated you set up a bouncer running on schedule you can change your goals again. EMBIID new service. For example, in game streaming, you don't have to incomes. IMPO game. So it's really literally that simple and. Offered as a game do it'll but you can one thousand. So, you'll set you decide how much you'll bless shoop bay was an expert service inside your game. And you'll bless pain and the middle ramming share as usual. So this. So we roped on it was in months via launched, rated like a couple weeks ago you can save yourself some basic in rent. More or less and. We stopped at to reach out to Gandhi little I find. because. You know we need to choose a market. You'd have great vision. We need some sales so far IRV disrupt last week it was as you said, it was like rain rain. Go Away. About via getting basically great few Basal Osorno no matter who are we in two guys you're interested in the right time and so. I WANNA have. I WANNA, have it with player I won't I mean it's so convenient that basically makes hosting comfortable and those programs Bluey. Yo. This is a basic bedroom. What I, what I thought originally was so interesting about your business is and I was talking actually to my class about this today 'cause we were discussing leagues in League business models and things like that, and you know the differentiating between third party organizers like ESL and Dream Hack and and publisher own leagues like Overwatch League or call of duty great and and one of the comments I made to my class. Which I believe very strongly is that because East sports is all of a sudden seen as a revenue source not as a cost right as an expense but as a true potential source of revenue more and more game publishers will want to control. I. Think Their Own East sports destiny right? We'll want to have their own functionality will not want to outsource to third parties to to do that and I think. What was so cool about what you're doing is in some ways, you allow any publisher to that to take control of their e sports. Destiny

Publisher Luminol Roker Tappan Zee O'hare Chanter Simpson Shoop Bay Anthony Basal Osorno Brown Emerson Gandhi Elleray Overwatch League
Interview with Khalil Zahar, Founder of FightCamp

20 Minute Fitness

05:45 min | 9 months ago

Interview with Khalil Zahar, Founder of FightCamp

"Guys that's Martin from shape. We're here right now in San Francisco Studio and unconnected to aid today on with the founder of fights cab Saha. Could you why don't you deduce yourself? It'll. Yeah. Awesome. First of all, thanks a lot for receiving me on the PODCAST. Martin. So my name is Lil- I'm the CO founder, CEO Camp and weekly started Fi Kim about a year and a half ago. So. If I is an interactive corn boxing gym, it comes with everything you need to start boxing and actually follow videos that are built by the best trainers of all the west coast they all fighters they all have obviously a tremendous fight expands but they're also great fitness instructor general for the listener on on our show that has never seen. It's what should be should be mentioned punching back and a pair of gloves. So what be? Yes. So it comes with a free standing bag. The best standing back on the market with a pair of didn't win leather gloves made an approved by fighters with a workout Matt, a pair of with be called quick grabs and the special sauce is who? Motion trackers that you put into quick wraps Ma and detract your hands a thousand times per second trek speed and my my punches. How many punches I'm doing per minute of what should I expect? Yes they tracked the type of country throw the measured the speed of the bunches basically build your output profile from one round to the other. What about impact? Not The impact is really the velocity. Okay. The of your hand and which actually throwing and how does like the coaching look like you were mentioning that you have coaches of all over the place and should I imagine like watching them like on my TV or iphone ourselves for me? Yes. So it comes with an APP you can the. Myriad on a large screen TV or you can watch the workouts on an IPAD whatever you prefer, and then from there, it's Kinda like all you can eat buffet. Really. So if you're advanced, you can jump straight into the advanced workouts right away we go and deep into the complex combinations. We'd practice footwork and the workouts very intense. Otherwise, it can literally start at the very first time. You've you're you're throwing your first punch. So we have what we call the prospect where it takes you from zero boxing experience teaches you to six inches and then at the end of the prospect path which. is about a four weeks program you actually know how to six months probably you know how to stand you know the basics Balkan it's mostly regular boxing the offer classes for a time boxing mma Nelson actually were focusing on boxing at the moment but we're having a lot of internal conversations around providing kickboxing as well as a kickboxing in multi, really as a as a an expansion and so so who's like you you're right now is it really like what you just mentioned on the beginners or is it like somebody that's been into boxing all their life or hundred, seventy, four for you Guys. Yeah, it's really seventy five percent beginners, but it's actually very interesting to see like a lot of them are now not beginners anymore So you know we kind of took a bunch of them. You know through the program you get to see videos online and on the social media and they're getting very proper form on have the basics of boxing. Of course, they don't have the in ring experience right visit steely it's a home virtual experience. Yeah. You can't really compete against somebody else right right. So Yeah, you actually can compete but on up put and precision you can't compete on. Actual defense offense. Of course, you're not going to get him. You know and does like a class look like, is it one on one coaching tailored to me or is it like a big class like pedal tone style or yet is really a group class? So it's you'll have usually the video stream will be divided into not that it's divided on the screen per se but vary between having the camera centered on the coach, and then you're getting bureau that is very dynamic. The camera moves around in the class and focuses on the participants taking the class live at our studio in Newport beach. For for me, you know like me having like an iphone like my supposed to put up my iphone like somewhere like on a on a counter, and then look at it while I'm like punching out on my back or how should I mention it? Yeah. That's a very good question like there's not a lot of people use it only with the with the iphone unless they're traveling aren't as they're actually using it in a gym gym or their apartment Jim the vending most people digging each day my cable upload, the Stream directly on on a big screen. TV. Your accent. Yeah. Oh we have a portion of our users. We actually are doing it on the night pat about Apple TV, that works as well Yeah. You can mirror exactly. You can use apple TV to mirror the the stream directly on a big screen TV as well. That's definitely the best experience you're getting very loud sounds and music. You hear the voice really really properly, the nose of the bag doesn't supplant the voice of the trainer lifts. Your stats are displayed very big for you. So like you're really into it, you feel like you're you're being tracked in. Really part of a group experience and it's both IOS and android os mostly s right now. Saying. It's only on ISLA, its and so why are people doing it Do they just WanNa, get a workout and they are not happy with you know like an experience like Peleton or maybe the half a pedal tone and want to supplement it with something else or do they actually want to get into boxing learn those skills forward let's say self defense. Yeah it's interesting. So. Like calm, we have two types of customers. The first type of customers really just will always intrigued boxing They want to do it because it's a work of that Jesse get something out of it even though you would stop working out after a year like you would still acquire the skills and those are self defense skills. You know a lot of people are mystified by you know. How to actually throw a punch and Hudson do properly. So that was one of our customers the other portion of because there is actually coming from the idea that boxing is the best workout to get in shape and the discovered the fundamentals and techniques through fight Cam. So the first reason they joined is for fitness purposes really assuming that boxing is the best workout out there the. Other portion come straight because they want boxing, but they can't attend to have a busy lifestyle. Their young parents hitting the gym is increasingly harder would a busy schedule? so that's the other proposition that they really resonate with and

Boxing Martin San Francisco Founder Apple Newport Beach Instructor Matt Fi Kim Co Founder Hudson Nelson Jesse Ceo Camp JIM
Dan Robinson, Research Partner at Paradigm.Xyz, on Starting at an Investment Fund

The Bitcoin Podcast

03:38 min | 10 months ago

Dan Robinson, Research Partner at Paradigm.Xyz, on Starting at an Investment Fund

"Our research partner. Paradigm Fund. Tesla Blue, paradigm and and what it means to be received partner at a fun. Yes. So I was lucky because I was close friends with math long who was one of the CO founders of paradigm since childhood and Qian. Fred. Essentially design this role for with with with me and mine and served with my health I'm trying to figure out what would be most effective for me to do and when I most enjoy doing. So I really get a kick out of that although it may not be for everyone. So a lot of what I do is. Normal parts of the investment. Team function and that includes Projects that are starting to be successful diligence potential new investments valuing with the rest of the investment to make decisions. Another big part of the job is helping portfolio companies and there I think one thing, one way paradigm maybe different from other funds as we get pretty hands on helping out with things like mechanism design. And zones technical. Issues with with early out. So I was out there on the UNICEF did your white paper. Just I just recently published White Paper with another portfolio company yield on new am that they're using. And just generally helping folio and then the third area is this kind of independent research and that's where I think. As really appreciated, having having a place where they would welcome me doing that and that's publishing publish. Sort of you can call them favors by really sort of a sketches of ideas for things that people could build and so I came up with one of them called Rainbow about a year ago and then another. Just, under a year ago called yields which. Eventually turned into a project that we're incubating. That's implementing these these y tokens, and so that was a case where I think we weren't sure exactly how publishing these papers would help the firm but we thought you know one of the one possible outcome would be that we end up incubating a company based on what happens here. I find that very interesting in in did see that progression happened over the last year. It looked like you you put out the White Paper a few people. Read it someone came in. Thank you said suggested improvements even. That led to. Basically handing the project them, SACRA. That's right. So so Allen, who's the CEO of yield now? Came to me and I think he he fixed one of the core problems in the protocol which was settlement and he had he figured out a way to settle it essentially directly to die or directly to make faults as opposed to. Acetylene using using an auction or oracle or something that was one of the big missing pieces, and the other was just we wanted somebody who could really own it as a as a founder CEO. And we think Allen's that person another former lawyer. For some reason. Yeah I. Think I get along with them for that reason? Okay makes sense. Yeah. I. I think it's just the power of putting your ideas out there and actually seeing it a comeback improved in better and. Without providing. Opportunities for Reunion in the fund makes sense. Yeah. It's it's extremely rewarding although. Sometimes. When so there's there's another project at least one other project implementing the protocol. and. Sometimes I think like this. Why do I do I do this to myself but honestly, none of this would have happened without publishing the paper. I'm sorry I can't actually regret it that much.

Paradigm Fund Qian Allen Partner Tesla Unicef Founder Ceo Fred CEO
Better Food, Better Health with Lauren Driscoll

Outcomes Rocket

12:07 min | 10 months ago

Better Food, Better Health with Lauren Driscoll

"Welcome back to the outcomes rocket saw Marquez here. Today I have the privilege of hosting Loren Driscoll. She's a healthcare strategist and entrepreneur and founded project well to support health plan's efforts to address critical non-clinical needs of their members nutritional and social isolation. Lauren is also a senior adviser in the strategy practice of partners, a health intelligence firm founded by former secretary of human health, and Human Services. Michael. Abbott Prior to partners Lawrence, served as corporate director of Oxford Health plans. Medicare business learns also co chair of the United States of care entrepreneurs. Council Lauren is also a board member at health works a healthcare organization that addresses the root causes of illness, poverty and neglect in Burundi. Africa she served as the Acting Executive Director of village health works and has also member of the University of Virginia College of Arts and Sciences Foundation Board. Lauren grew up in Baltimore Maryland, she received her bachelor's in University of Virginia, her masters in public health from. University today, we're GONNA be diving into the topic of really health through what you eat and the work that they're doing it project well as fascinating food as medicine and Lauren. is going to be helping US understand how they're helping people stay healthy and thrive with what they eat or in such a privilege to have you here today. Saw Thank you so much for inviting me to talk with you absolutely now, I love the focus of food are you and I had a chance to connect before the interview and it's near and dear to my heart might my family's heart what we matter so much before we dive into the value prop you guys have. I love to learn more about what inspires your work in healthcare. Sure. Yeah. There are really three things. So that have really told me end healthcare I would say I is just my beliefs that older adults really deserve better. There's just so much sort of preventable hardship and suffering with respect to health and you know I guess I feel like it's just super unfair that after spending their lives doing the best they can and often nurturing sort of next generations that we aren't doing a better job out with respect to the crowd disease that. So many of our older adults southwest so that that's number one number two I would say is just the unfortunate inefficiency of our US healthcare system. Part of me I, almost think I might have been a process engineer or something in another life that drives me crazy to not take the shortest path between two points and so I look at situations in our US healthcare today especially say with dual eligible 's the care for those who are eligible for both Medicare and Medicaid and therefore sort of among the most vulnerable in our country, and yet there's just there's so much inefficiency with these two payments streams and the two sets of rules really creating just you know perverse incentives that. End Up causing these folks to sort of Ping Pong around our system and Drive exorbitant costs and not even particularly good health outcome. So I would say it's inefficiencies like that that. You know really draw me into healthcare. and. Then the final one is you know you you introduce which is just I am such a believer and food as medicine I. Think it's very simple. Good food leads to good health and so as simple as that sounds and sort of even elegant. It's clear that there's just a sort of glaring missed opportunity and our country to really leverage the power of food. So it's really a combination of these these three things that inspired me to start project well. Get for you and You captured some heavy stuff there lauren, you know older adults deserve better and you know we're inefficient and food candy medicine and it is. So let's dive into this. You know what? What exactly is project well, and how you guys adding value to the healthcare ecosystem. Sure. So our mission out. So to start out by explaining project, well, tell your mission. Is really just to improve the lives of those who are suffering with with chronic disease. Often food insecurity and loneliness, and to bend the healthcare cost curve as we do it. So our solution is centered on food and. Look, at food and. Medicine but also as an anchor for socialization and Education Man's the end of the day we know people come together around food. and. So we are a young company. So we are really starting with home delivered meals and meal kits for those who really have sort of the most nutritionally sensitive chronic disease. So thank diabetes and heart disease and we're starting they're both because these are the people that have the greatest level of need we can help them us. But also because are proof of concept pilots drive results there must quickly.

Lauren United States Oxford Health Loren Driscoll Acting Executive Director Of V University Of Virginia College Marquez Social Isolation Michael Senior Adviser Ping Pong Burundi Secretary Baltimore University Of Virginia Maryland
Virtual Reality with LIV - AJ Shewki, Co-founder, CEO & COO At LIV

BIG Esports Podcast

04:35 min | 11 months ago

Virtual Reality with LIV - AJ Shewki, Co-founder, CEO & COO At LIV

"You for the people watching and listening to the podcast just tell a little bit about yourself in your history and and how you came about to be sitting in front of us today. Yeah sure So I'm doctor doom on the janitor at live that means I do everything code related. Making sure everything's cleaned. All the cogs are running the way they should. Have, a background competitive gaming. Starting Gaming General I used to play competitive is back. Then there wasn't really a professional seeing the way it is today. By compete in the Marvel Capcom primarily. But also Liberal Street fighter in the Lord warcraft and it's marvel rotgut name Doctor Doom from because my main character was doom a bit in with live we start living two thousand and sixteen the idea back in the beginning was that we wanted to host a show on twitch where we would play Vr game so we will play them competitively we kinda wanted to show people what a future of sports could look like when everyone and their mother has VR L. And that quickly result in realizing that there aren't any good tools out there for content creators to create content in the first place. So that's really what we started out. We start at as tools provider building, initially tools for content creators to create what we call. I'm mixture to capture piggyback off the Work Steam Vr and the folks at fantastic contraption with north, way games. and. Then we built an estimate for developers allow their games to be streamed through live or with live or rather captured with lived and now we're working on some other stuff on the platform side I. Think we'll get into a little bit later. Let's pretty much else. We've been live since March two, thousand, eighteen we've driven about a billion and. A half star videos, craters video so far. So many of our crazy gone from being a really small youtube in twitch to having really sizeable audiences and our next step here's trying to figure out what's what's next for live streaming for us. We people are now watching these videos, how do we or creators go further and do more with those eyeballs? It's like the stuck standard of of how you know they say the Kasich. Company, right it's like you have a problem with pining you personally. So you go ahead and fix it, and now you vote if he's into fixing it and you. Were sure. It's funny because we we started out we were actually it was Kinda hard to convince people coming, changed our workflow in use a new tool and similar to develop as why would they integrate eight? We had no proof points are start was actually streaming ourselves on twitch and for a while I would say. For a couple of months where the biggest streaming in VR on twitch, which doesn't say much time because they were like five streamers, right? Maybe sensory. with a source twenty people concurrence currency on the viewership side. but that was sort of the way that we got into streamers by saying look we have some really cool tech. We're using ourselves because we think it's great content. If you're interested hop into our discord which has been huge for us, and we should maybe talk a little bit about this Gordon sort of. Marketing and that's how we grew organically. We've spend zero dollars in marketing today. So it's all really been organic and through the community. Yeah let's let's chat about discord I. Mean It's a pretty it's pretty unlikely for traditional papal. Eight. Like even to push that further, I read an article today about how added as using up as one of the main marketing going forward. So yeah, let us know a bit. It'd be. Discussed and build community. So I think one thing I don't want to do is which I see a lot of people do this sort of think back retrospectively in the make it sound like it was his plan genius idea because it wasn't. It was really more about we are on dischord as gamers and our friends that are underscored, and so let's just. Multiple. Our internal comes on the score to be closer to the platform. We use everyday anyways that was the initial idea, and so we have public channels and private Chelsea district private for the company public for the community I think what we see with discord is a sort of a I think people. Now, this kind of love micro-communities 'cause places like facebook and instagram are so they're so noisy and they're so saturated. The people are looking for a more meaningful connection and this could kind of gives you that discord gives you really two things gives you that high rate rate rate of intimacy, but then also gives you. This it makes you feel less like a company makes you feel like a person or a group of friends. And I think that's the place where especially. More corporate comes very corporate at all live. We're very approachable were considered as. The approachable darling in the community But I think there's a place for companies sort of lower that barrier of this is an objective company that has an official support line something that's a little bit more human I think that works really well for marketing nowadays, people look for that authenticity.

Doctor Doom Kasich Official Chelsea Facebook Gordon Instagram
Growth in Turbulent Times

a16z

07:00 min | 1 year ago

Growth in Turbulent Times

"Begin by describing a typical growth model and discuss how that fundamentally drives a company's business strategy the first voice who here is Brian's followed by Andrew when we think about a growth model. The question is how does one court of users lead to another cohort of users? And how are you answering that question? In a way that describes not only how you acquire users but the actions they take in your product what those actions generate and how you reinvest whatever that output is back into generating more new returning users so within this model you have hypotheses around the who the what the why who were doing these actions. What are the actions that they are doing and why they are doing them? These are all fundamental hypotheses whether you have it written down or not. I think like a very very simple simple shortcut version of this might be something like I find yelp because I searched Best Dumplings San Francisco and then a yelp page comes up. I'm excited about yelled at some point. Some percentage of those users end up actually than leading reviews and those of us get index like Google and then they end up in Google listings and more people find it right. And so that's kind of how one group of users might indirectly than lead to another group of users versus something like linked in which is focused on getting people to invite their colleagues at people that they're meeting through professional networking and is very focused around getting you to send invites and that's a very different type of loop? It turns out that there is like many many many flavors of this. This is kind of like a verbal version when you go deeper. You're actually able to translate this set of hypotheses and ideas into spreadsheets and numerical models for what's actually happening business and understand with lows right. You're operating against this hypothesis right. That hypothesis gets stronger over time. As you run experiments you validate them. You see the data in data kind of feeds the quantitative version of this in this environment. A lot of those hypotheses are thrown out the window. And what we validated in the past might have changed as a result. You might have tailwinds or headwinds right. The quantitative variables behind these things. Either get stronger where they get worse. But the only way that you actually get a decent picture about is by going through each one of these individuals steps asking those squash right once. You drill down into a spreadsheet. What kind of data are you tracking? What are those metrics? Like if you're a travel company right now I think you're seeing very specific metrics Right if you start with the end of the funnel. What you're saying is a number one. There's going to be fewer people actually like booking and converting like if you're expedia our king regardless of whether or not are looking at flights my guess is percentage of people who actually look out the flight versus. Actually Book. The flight like that conversion rate is probably down. You probably have folks that doing research. Because they're not quite sure. Like when defy or the wafted shut the State Department website where I can actually go and then all the way to the demands question of how many people are in that activity versus. I guess. Light if you're you're inside of you know one of these collaborations tools what's going to happen. Is All of a sudden every is going to be sending more invites other users. Because we're the meetings in right now and says results of that all of those metrics go up when it's happening is if you think about the verbal version of the growth model as a series of events that chained together than what you start to realize they're going to be certain steps that are. GonNa go way way up. 'cause the entire growth models like really radically amplify or there's going to be ones that dramatically tempings out and if step one or two is the growth model start hitting a lot of friction than of course. It's just going to get harder and harder because each group of users going to produce fewer and fewer users if you think about it from an acquisition standpoint saint big engagement well. There's a couple things about this though one is that. I've seen a ton of categorical data out there. People saying this is what's happening to be to be south or this is what's happening to this category and I think I specifically founders. Who Probably. Let's do this. The category is interesting. But it's actually not that helpful. Everybody sits on a spectrum of people who are experiencing extreme headwinds class pass for example would probably seen what ninety percent of their business disappear overnight. And there's people who are seeing extreme tail and if you're sitting on one of the spectrums your job is easier the data's clear it's immediate of what is happening and what the net result is but the founders who are in the middle of the spectrum the hard job you actually have to look at each one of these individual steps to understand what might be changing. What might be happening to build specific. Hypotheses of how. Your Company should act and respond. Most companies will need to go back to basics and reassess their businesses from the bottom up if you are a travel company or an in person fitness company. How do you go about completely? Revamping and reevaluating your growth model. How can founders be proactive rather than reactive? I know it's like Old Silicon Valley message of talk to your customers but honestly this is one of those times where you need to be talking to them at least a couple of customers at a couple times. A day founders. Ceos executives the leaders of the team. Because the only way that you're really going to be proactive is going to get a sense. For what is going on in your customers. Lives and how things are changing what questions they're asking and how their behaviors are changing. And by the time that comes through the data. It's just GONNA be too late and so if you WANNA be proactive. You'd have to go back and rely on a little bit of basically founder intuition in the way that you build that founder. Intuition is just by having lots and lots of conversations very close to it. I think a really big thing strategically. That's changing right now. Is there's a whole discussion for flex? Even be the output goal at the moment. I think this is where the growth model overlays with. Some of the financials the company wildfire. You know we've had several years where it's all been about top line growth and you have a lot of companies that are looking for two x three x five outs year over year growth and then the growth model ends up meeting to support that but I think the whole industry is saying okay. Well maybe actually top line growth of that type of several hundred percentage points. Italy is actually not the focus. Is Everything so uncertain you? We have to watch our cash. So then what I've seen in conversations I've been in is then. Your growth models are actually as much about. How do you grow efficiently from a cash standpoint? And so if you're thing about okay. We need five x growth. And that means that people need to invite each other as at a certain rate. And if they're not then maybe you need to make that up with a marketing spent with financial incentives for users to use the product whether that's in the form of free subscriptions or in the form of a lower priced lane or if your marketplace company you might give people discounts that are dropped into. All consumers

Founder Google Yelp San Francisco State Department Brian Expedia Andrew Italy
AWeber Founder & CEO Tom Kulzer Tells The Funny Story Behind The Company Name

The Hustle & Flowchart Podcast

01:47 min | 1 year ago

AWeber Founder & CEO Tom Kulzer Tells The Funny Story Behind The Company Name

"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

All's Fair with Laura Wasser

11:17 min | 1 year ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on All's Fair with Laura Wasser

"It was a cash flow positive business for until Basically Venture Capital Cayman unbelievable. So when did that happen? When did you okay? And I didn't go out and raise. They were like we heard about this thing. That's exploding because I had gone from Seventy Five K. My first year on Ebay. Which is a Shitload of money? Dad Myself because I didn't want things don't even know what luxury wise right I think eventually had a blackberry. Pearl really fantasy. I drove an eighty-seven Volvo and I lived in a pool house for five hundred dollars a month with the hot plate and I was pretty satisfied. A lot of Boston market and drink a lot of starbucks venti soy chide. No water no foam every day. An upset my stomach every day prior back upon it the fact that this all started so early on for you and your life but also in the life of this kind of business is kind of amazing. Thanks so then at what point? At what point did you decide to do the not side they came to you again? Tv Show Book. Come in all of this stuff. Nasty Gal is like huge still Liz. Yeah Yeah I did it for ten years. Twenty two to thirty two. So I'm like I'm glad it happened. Yes but I was also kinda trapped in a business where I couldn't quit and it couldn't be fired right. 'cause I had raised money So in twenty twelve venture capitalists came knocking because they had watched or somehow heard about a business that did seventy five to fifty K. One point one six and a half and then twenty million in profitably with strapped. Why owned one hundred percent of the company and twenty twelve index ventures came in and said. Okay you're doing. Twenty eight thirty million in revenue. We're GONNA value you at three hundred fifty million dollars And so they put fifty million dollars and delays on the pool. House like what's happening. I moved the company to Los Angeles during Twenty eight million revenue. I probably had like thirty. People's tastes okay And so I sold twenty percent of the company fully controlled it for fifty million dollars injected that capital into the business took a little bit for myself which I don't really talk about but it's him homeowner. I still need to work. Yeah I have a mortgage but not. I have a lot of equity in my home. So that's nice. I blew way too much on furniture. Be careful I've rancher so expensive that was when you know the the mandate was to go as venture capitalists Demand from twenty million one hundred twenty eight million a year and we hired a hundred people. I had never worked in an office. The only office I've ever worked in today to date. My name has been on the lease while it's like the businesses aim on the least right for a while. It was my name as early in the business. I know that feeling. Actually I didn't know anything about you. Know I knew how to buy stuff and sell it and manage a few people to do tactical thing leadership and growing people and Like nurturing edges. No one has ever nurtured on the fly whenever nurtured my career? I'm still learning as just like it's taken so long and they still I'm still alive. You're you're doing okay. Wh- at what point did you meet our friend Gary Steph woman? I make areas diplomat in twenty twelve. Okay Gary diplomat is an entertainment attorney. Who's been twenty five years at different Britain Ham which is a well known entertainment firm here in Los Angeles? He spent most of his career in music but I was introduced to him by this money manager person who was like. Oh we're going to you know. Get an early and be there. Awesome but They like managed. Sheryl Sandberg's money or something and they were like you're worth so much on paper. We're going to manage like the cash that you have. Which wasn't enough to normally work with people like that but they were like when you actually have two hundred and fifty million dollars which eventually Forbes said I was worth will manage when anyway move to La. And I just needed an attorney to negotiate some contracts and for some reason they enter introduced me to an entertainment attorney named Gary Stillman Amen. By the way guys yes yes and I'm so glad we met. We talked about PRENUPS. Actually I don't know how much I can talk about. You can tell me what the terms of the of the of the separation agreement on what you call it our anyway men and he was like you know instead of like. Let me connect me to your architect. And we negotiate their contract which he did gas which is Kinda below his pay grade He was like. Do you want to do a book? Do you WanNa do a TV. Show the singer doings crazy. Oh my God and I was like TV. No gross like what is what would it be reality TV. Like I don't want let's Tacky I think non scripted has gotten a little bit like classier net flix. Yeah he classy. Anyway I was like I don't know maybe a book. My story is pretty interesting. And you know the press has written a lot about it but I haven't put myself out there and told the whole story all of the shit that I just told you about. I'm not gonNA tell that to a reporter them. Write their own shoes. You do it yourself. I wanted to control my narrative and I hadn't seen myself I bought you know Ebay for dummies and a whole bunch of business books and this was a year after a Leinen came out and there were no millennial women in the business book section writing books about their experience or really books at all right. They're pretty dry books. It was like you know suzie. Orman WHO's awesome? I should have her on my podcast time. Just a different generation primarily men and primarily people who weren't accidental entrepreneurs who had used the tools that have got to be totally didn't relate and overall accidental entrepreneurs in a wave though like you're extremely accomplished in a educated. I'm sure I'm We lost like world of Star Trek new things differently. So many of us aren't groomed for this in technology today has allowed us to start businesses in ways that we weren't anyway so wrote a book about my craziest story building this company up until it was worth basically three hundred and fifty million dollars and we were aren't close to doing one hundred million dollars in revenue and it just it just exploded A named Hashtag robot thinking that would be viral. But there's no way that Hashtag gets as far girl boss Scott without it writing on a certain amount of merit So girl was at that. Point was just the name of your book just a book okay. It's the book and you know I put that out into the world and spent eighteen on the New York Times bestseller list and to date has sold over half a million copies and and then became a whole bunch of other stuff. I figured out what intellectual property was and I've dragged it real far impressive extremely impressive. So I've met your mom before and we know Gary like who's your support system not just for business we'll get to some of the personal seven Who who supports via Mu Gary officiated. My wedding yes which is really cute. Just so that we a little background. So I wrote Sofia's Prenup and then a few years later no eight months. Oh okay that was. He was like eight months later. If you're called and said that prenatally get together again so we also did the divorce and throughout that as you can imagine. We got a little bit close. 'cause that's close period of time. Usually I do a pre nup. Neither I never see the people again. Are I see him again? So long after that. Like I've had a couple of kids or something so this all happened relatively quickly and just to put a pin in the support system question for a second. What's that like? I mean being a very strong very successful young relatively speaking. How old were you when you guys got married? Like twenty nine thirty so getting married and then having it not work and really trying to do all the right things having the pre-nup having the conversations I know you were very supportive of him in his career financially therapy yet that happened and You know he was very his mind was made up that this just wasn't right for him after five years of dating which was like. I wish you'd told me that before. I spent so much money on a wedding and had published and Martha Stewart Weddings. Which was like so not me. It's not a whole nother story. About how my life became not me because I could do things right rather than you know? It's like you have money for the first time you're like well. I should be doing these things right of access her can go on vacations or whatever and this is what really matters in life and kind of ended up not being what really mattered in life is nice perspective to have anyway Yeah eight months later did my best I mean I think I'm probably pretty. I think I'm challenging and I think I'm increasingly aware of how challenging I am but I also think everyone's challenging. That's what I was gonNA say everybody's telling my boyfriend's challenging right Oh so who is there for you? Mom Who's there for me? My mom was there but I was really there for you. Yes thank you. Thank you Yeah it was a great pre-nup I'm glad he left when he did. Because it would have gotten a lot more expensive for me. Overtime as how it was structured And my mom was there but she was like get angry right and I was like get out of here like I'm super sad getting him like you can't tell so. She came down for a few days and we had like a blow out and she like drove home early. She's like backed into the neighbors. Tesla Cross and then like went home. Okay that must have felt Super Shitty. Okay so now. Mom's not even their mom was there but mom like wasn't just wasn't giving the right advice. That's okay I think it's always a struggle for MOMS and And so after that I went to the Beverly Hills Hotel I was like I gotta check out of this House. His like wine glasses out. This is like a crime scene like we live here right and went to the Beverly Hills. Hotel with my three poodles checked in S- cried and screamed into a pillow for a week. And my best friend who was in Grad School. At the time this is in the summer was off school and so she came and lived with me at the Beverly Hills Hotel for a full week and I was lost my appetite. I lost weight. I was chain smoking in the courtyard on a bench wearing a bathrobe with three poodles with like really long hair. Extensions coming out of a baseball CAP. Uh-huh if you can imagine the dislike Hollywood caricature of like woman unhinged dray. It was that And I wasn't completely certain that it was like really over. I still had hopes and you know was trying to like not text too much in you. Know I don't know be like gentlewoman or something and Lived there for a week and then went back home and I wound up in another relationship really fast. I never expected. And that's this relation that this one and that's lasted spent almost four year. Congratulations thanks very tall tight. Yes yes it's a trying time. That challenges all of our basic assumptions. However one thing that brings us all together is our common humanity now more than ever teams must come together and.

attorney Ebay Beverly Hills Hotel Los Angeles Basically Venture Capital Caym Volvo Gary Boston index ventures Sheryl Sandberg baseball New York Times Grad School Gary Steph Liz Beverly Hills Britain
"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

02:51 min | 1 year ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

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"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

09:56 min | 1 year ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

"And culture think things gotta get better. This country was built and I. It's a cultural central. Tried to be more just and it's not about in Oh meets about us On the first Olympic. But no. It's always do. We always tried to give the food pictures of what it choose. What is Dale part instead of innovation? Why would they really matters? And is a big part of the big story in in all seven factors but as equity everybody on you give you give equity employs. Everyone mean I mean anybody from company Integrity So they feel part of it and it's about company meetings. Will you emphasize what each one does. But it does anybody else knows what each one on does so everybody sees the picture and and so Kvant atmosphere so far being professional and and executing correctly and Delete which is supposed to being a comfortable just bombed and without being nick at four and friendly and positive There's always a big challenge of trying to somehow fight it negative politics. A natural situation in a way is negative politics. Aw and for people to know us you as the CEO others the way to confront each other so you have to wait for energy or the fighting in the south Keep open communication between people When people come through and and start saying that guy so bad because does that not not you know become part of that to join that but the opposite figurative? Okay got it so one more question with with excellent and then we'll go into fresh off and then from there we'll go onto what you're doing now the white you step down. Seo Did you feel that you want it you time you know. Let me give it to somebody else could do do other things within the company or was being burnt out. What was the? I'll get a lot of people that do that right. I know Dennis Crowley who's on the show from foursquare. He stepped down after a number of years and you know he ended up just focusing on the RND and development and he said it was a great decision in that sense that he could really help to build more products at etc.. Actually the big trigger was accelerator which his viscous Company in Komeda wanted which was a really good decision for me to move to. US With my family. Which I did and my wife was amazing? Came with me and did his anyway but starting with by she wasn't happier and Co was in stock and I felt birds. It's unfilled for me to be the When she's unhappy that I thought that you know some do i? Do you know a good job in the company of the time could find somebody who's is going to know a job that in actually four thoughts multiple do an amazing job and I was pushing the ball for that and ended up and accepting my mom commitment accommodation which is also being good with external trim. That's great here that so you're saying earlier in the show right so connecting the kitchen you. Why did you get into to decide to really make that shift from ethic into something totally? I O T in the kitchen are pretty far from the tech world. Basically failed the not not want to be in by not only at Dick and bench. Not good things about at that. which by the way becoming even worse now without the favor on site to find something new and don't think by the way I dilettante smart way they mentioned I had to deal with a great idea? Started executing it so it's not such a but after being in the industry of supermarkets in was this actually was disappointed initially was supermarkets not guilty After being in that space for many many months really begin to learn that space facing status and then followed looking in all around and singles GonNa which began picking up. I did come up with this concept. which book concept to connect anti into supermarkets? So I've been off from experience markets to compensate you. The did make sense of this initiative initiative you so you know. The MODEL was what for the supermarket. Stuff to pay you for the the the supermarkets factor. That can win win for everybody. President factors it was a big deal because it gives them kitchen presents. I mean if you think about we make decisions about buying groceries. Most of them have been indication. Simple your milk is out Tabei milk so being able to execute decisions the benefit consumers and of course big supermarket Arkansas John Incentive as has become incentivized to get into the kitchen. They won't head depress manufacturers themselves. MM set have been in places into the kitchen start becomes interesting. The plasma factors under this busy had both Pinkus us both the president factors and markets. And so you know the market size. Did you realize how big boys when you started like you. You know when you're thinking about it did you see yourself. Did you know that the manufacturers would come on board or did you realize that you know martin pain to in the kitchen or did it come at when you start. Do you have a different idea. Mind I mean this. This concept physically. Getting the supermarkets to the constant presence in the kitchen was quite news. It was no numbers Saying you know you couldn't understand that they should be kitchen just minute up sense since and by the way pretty soon if the we began doing another little company figured out made sense Supermarket put into the kitchen which has ECO system with Alexa. which they know in America but I Cathedral shortly before in the field with traduced the concept of for example shows. You Know God if my yeah manning. The voice in the agenda does this stick undertook barcode. So just made sense. And that's why US and other companies began offering guy and so you have fresh up when you when you merged with I can. Was it merger aquisition I mean it was. I mean they can be equity pisses. It's emotional yeah. So how many people did you have there at the end we had. I mean when we began basically the peak we are not so many eighty people. Uh but but then when we begin Jonah's income competitor charge you to to secure funding branding because invisibles boom to invest into your competitors especially when Amazon's and then when we took that merger a juror path actually wind good down a little bit.

President sense Supermarket Olympic Dale Dennis Crowley Jonah foursquare CEO Kvant Seo Komeda Dick Arkansas nick Amazon martin America Alexa.
"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

08:04 min | 1 year ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

"Hunt people and did you. You know building the team at growing it and this is over. What four or five years or longer it was longer it was launched in two thousand seven? Okay actually the last week or so six and and Dan. I was founded on sale for the first first four and a half years and Theodora then in two thousand eleven and then the government will quickly we almost. Every month was recalled months or for the ten thousand seal We made like fix real quickly. How did you bill well? How'd you scale that there? I mean you know you so you brought your co founder from or already. Did you find other executives. Did you network do you recruit I mean how did you build the wellbeing and Mexico. Okay was the sale all we use the according of the day we got funding for me. Commend ventures on became the active chairman MHM. Then we use the quoting from mark. US wouldn't family. Did it. Then executive in America and he was a good is it time at God n show. Was it hard. You know. Go to be a CARAMEL. Was it hard to raise the funds early on like where people skeptic of of the adequately skeptical of the New Orleans the marketplace at your building in a sense. We're like well you know we just don't see it or you knew that was happening. Was You saw. Aw is that the issue on investors is pitching very different than you believe in the they need to see. The vision is what I think was very positive with. I'm at because the great reputation so I took was not an issue as a buzzword thing. It's always tough. Though say compared to my other government does maybe the easiest round but it was tough anyway. Most people in all did not believe this concept like some big questions encouraging maybe considered to John DOE panels sitting called. How do you look back and see many small businesses big name uses? This is no. It's nothing let me just walking in and then we do next company. It's based off before I saw things turn out so don't be in college by smart people walk but this is this a lot of things you can just believe everything. uh-huh yeah I mean so as you're closing and building the company you had partnerships dealing with you partner with Google Yahoo Nielsen icy with with a hard to sign them up or they were just coming to you. Want is what you proved that once you put the marketplace things tend to. There's always proof right. Everybody wants to see a working product etc usually usually ah those liberal companies. Come to maybe willing to listen to do to engage. Do if you walk into other we companies when you have enough brand improve on but usually you the small company have the you company and how is it chase. How was the? Was it hard difficult time so long. It says on business is an art. You can over pressure but you have to be persistent and you have to find opportunities to know cooperates of the play the corporate game you have to understand the politics Yeah Yeah it's out that takes time to muster Bu- The again focusing on those two aspects persistency and over pressure those two actually concepts a lot of I know that of other. CEO's they tend to want results like they expect you know okay. Can we deal especially with the become visit. Visit Your partner partner with interstate time to close closed. That deal as well So I had to come about all right so you know you pretty much the two rounds you both the company you know Twenty fifteen here. You're doing well how did you do you have. Do you WANNA WANNA get out or the opportunity came upon you. We we as the bold gut to suit with the decision that the company we fear that you know the complexity had somebody supporters and and and we thought you know and we saw the market maturing and numbers were great lighten with position and felt in all of the the somebody came to our went pushes. Some kind of uh-huh wake up call where we have a bit of serving. The company process took a banker the then in all which Delta Marquez in everything by the Book Bank job and there's a by the way well auctioned client early on I for many years Actually they will be dependent on us because we did it off of them more in partner. There's some old economy type company the wound so home so digital and so we will in a way the digital arm and we offer digital capabilities to them so the way they needed us and and that also numbers to this competition the cellphone four companies but ended up being two companies competed increasing and all the things on one sixty two million to complete. Yeah it's always nice feeling. They did a good job and process in Bandung. Isn't really you know basically really squeezed out. You know. It's not at all and happy about it but then don't onto extremely happy. Basically numbers we gave them ended up. Doing one hundred percent from those numbers and will to the best of Nixon did until now we'll an exit is a big part of nuisance on separate entity. That's the good part is exit area. They also ended up doing very happy. We squeeze them out in that competition with unhappy. uh-huh okay so two more things here so you know you have a company culture you built an did you feel that. There's a culture you know. Did you have any mindful culture. Just came natural.

partner Theodora Dan MHM New Orleans Mexico active chairman co founder Bandung mark Google Nixon executive America CEO Delta Marquez interstate Book Bank
"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

11:12 min | 1 year ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

"We come back to that that is well. It's not a problem. That part about about the the recent example of farm fresh up basically you know we saw the mark terms changed physically. I do WanNa now like John. Wait over jump up the pressure will go back up on my jump around and basically After an attic space freshman which was in the IOT space basically collecting supermarkets walking with the plasma factors to make it possible for people two older and it will update shopping cards from the kitchen. Schulman's out in buffalo you can use voice and update your shopping cart and also was stolen and challenges and but we were strong company with big big supermarkets on nuanced in your pocket with us Customers any loved US made nice revenues but they and became actually competitor of ours could begin doing both thinking over in the way the kitchen appliances and the homeschooling with the assistant and the other things and also they became like the service provider for supermarkets. Basically doing what's called Google expressed which is solving online charges for supermarkets so both inside devices in the kitchen and collections which made them competitor and Google is not a good so I think at this point. We realize that even though we had a beautiful company on it's probably a good time to sell the company and look for a way. Well we will fortunate to find good exits of Donald Gould Anyway. But the thing that you have to all the time around figuring out of is the son you know. Is this about a direction or not but you have to go forward because many times you WanNa give up and it's hard but it's not to give up because there's always a struggle so that tension between when it's time to switch to people to sail and when is it a good time skip fighting in keep building the wall until you break it you have to figure out and learn about in always looking to be long. Aw I am I am. I wanted to give up now because you know todd all three list logicoop because the decision to give up gone and so we'll come back fresh you know later on in podcast. Let's go to excellent so after you. You know pretty much sold to break on. Why back then you know you started actually right you we did? What did you take downtime? Did you jump right in. No why'd you say like. Oh okay I just finished one. I worked excellent time. I I just had the tickle back like what what he didn't want to take any time off so negative on and off because they started the excellent actually student doing gone again was done with the boot is concerned. Actually on the show. Those in the Wigan got equity in Excel. Excellent was sort of spin off. Sort of a spin of for me Arabian so it was done in pilot a I would say the aftereffects rated it took off rush up. That's I commended. And don't cheat you serve you can do it and don't think that You know the the embarrassment stuff you know do something else. I specifically studied the awful you but you know do whatever makes you feel pretty good but very different from lunatic. It would help your career would help the company with your family life. I I know commend taking breaks from. Today's you can but anyway and always started. We started launch. Tom Exit from within Vinh way down. And and we're GONNA find this data again becoming an interesting element and important asset in ethic and we saw this opportunity wanting to quit the company that enables Zahn industry to have more there. It was data. I think it important take from that is that it's always very big advantage to think of companies and build companies where you have an expertise. We've when doing something for many years That's a good place to come up with ideas and billion companies on it's extremely challenging bill the company and to get funding and and to figure out the right business mothers and so many challenges. At least you have to come equipped as much as possible and they sense a quick means equipped with the knowledge college and relationships and so on cementing him people want to infants More and you idea and and jumping new field where they have no previous experience and and I would say that. That's that's a big take and beyond the big takes studying coming thick framing new relic. You can really try to build something or you have some advantages got and so did your your experience at a ringing help you excellent did you. Do you feel that okay. I learned some things that happen. I'm building new the company I see the market. I've been in it and you say okay. I'm GonNa do this differently now. And how did you build you build from within. Did you take a lot of people from already into excellent. If you start from scratch you know you know. How long did it take you to get your first custom research that I mean a lot of questions but we'll go back to subsequently absolutely it was a big advantage to fit with molitor had took a lot of both both in all to identify the paternity and then relationships for example as mentioned right media which was a big player so they'll Gresham and their will the first big powerful affects it so that of acid able to bring to start up when you studying in a field that you are already in those relationships sign advantage of that is it took a few people from the dame again everything was done with the and consent is down there but he got those shares in next right So it took a few few people from the team actually. The CO founder allowed was walking in the end of the timing now with to accelerate in Kim but as I mean so did you when you started out you have the vision of what you wanted excellent to be very clear vision John Okay and and excellent example. Actually that vision was really what ended up happening by the way when it started to live at the start for example to finish up and the vision which turned out to be done to invent it. Because I did do the field. But he'll send you the bill. The will which really made sense to be. So what was the vision. The vision was what the marketplace for their data be become become began becoming an asset on. And then you had those companies who had a lot of data and are you getting the data from different websites and you were in different. I mean if you analyze the intimate before you know they. Google guests and their stuff in different full-face bookings on so then the big data was concentrated under a small number of websites which didn't have massive traffic so think about traumatized in price line those companies and didn't think think about you know the the auto calls like Ed Malls and causes of call and so on Saturday those specific verticals with was viable and uses. Those were there but not to use not too many expressions and impressions and then there was the other part of internet which was accompanied the works website which had massive traffic and Muslim views. But no there was to link make between in all those websites. The ETTL's data with with with traffic on the website the data always also very expensive. CPM'S APM's expensive rates and the website to reach had noted at very low to say the mentally and there was a few years the GO-TO expedia. And then if you're gonna go to live in an article somewhere you sit user and hopeful if people we're going to pay fifty zero scipion only when he will expedient you'll stairwells that out of money not only five cents when you go to and I was young. Yeah so basically in this marketplace and then have expedia on and caused the comb become the sitters the mass media websites become the buyers then and other ecosystem players like the agencies and the ad that walks says ads and disconnection between the settlers bias of their data. And show you know so you help pretty much with relation with the right media and you know. Did you win Amdi people in the world where it was a company one hundred hundred people.

Google Schulman John expedia Donald Gould Amdi todd Wigan Tom Exit ETTL Zahn industry CO founder molitor Gresham Ed Malls Kim
"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

PLUGGEDIN

06:54 min | 1 year ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on PLUGGEDIN

"I can't take in June two thousand nine Erie. Currently is the founder and CEO of defying Erie. Welcome to the show. I hope I covered everything I know. There's a really really a lot that you've covered today so if I missed anything I'd feel free to fill in the blanks. Thank you and I think those that was a good overview and yeah okay so we'll jump right in and this where people I've known earing for really almost ten eleven years or any when he was actually living at the time as well so okay so from teaneck so so starting your career I mean you know before no it was really so you were an ethic before actually it was. So how'd you get started in there. What was your first? I thought actually before everything happens you. They started being ninety six in a way I started thinking about the first thought of actually the friend and technion student taking on and my friend in actually invited to join startup. Not In another fund will willing to that is quite a new dating in the Internet This new thing. It's prior to. I think when Yahoo was ninety five but on when the stores may be created. John Thought it to me look exciting thing nobody did startups. No there was nothing there. But you know it's on made sense to me to do dating Internet so I started doing that within the French left. then he left dating concept builds it was called in the club built a little bit necessarily need to cough. You didn't have any money. So I moved to beating websites and plug which was successfully did some big websites for the government of the corporate rate. This there was using zip. Tips on fire is now is weighing down no zip at the time took maybe like half communities still the ball I was thinking old should should be adds to waste of dying. ADS began to happen. Due to Nathan said came to meet with Allison software applications A new building startup ecosystem. Nothing those on ninety seven when that idea came up but started building dot and the loud into I dust cider the radon which was in two thousand seven to buy electrical after a bunch of different changes and developments whatever for the process became the adviser for because ah which became the most popular download amid a lot of money and some other stuff in the industry came into challenges. When are the record company? Burqa sued Kazaa. They began aggressive stuff. And putting our was called down spy will into the program which reflect negatively take on the phone industry so we moved to change the company become successful again and seven gun show prayed to company to company called White Brent Walgreens Indian morphed into break COM- com- e- so from that experience. What did you learn What was one of the challenges right when let's say when all of a sudden the Spiro came that was really a big issue back then it was for people that I would say who aren't old enough to remember devils? was everything before he was speaker. So slow. Tom had software downloaded and with it back doors and everything right so that was a major issue. I think privacy issues were just starting right to really bubble up there. So how'd you Adad. You rebrand yourself in saying what was the. That must've think to yourself. Oh my God like this is it can be disastrous. So how'd you get around that. Yeah I've learned a lot. Maybe one figure that you will. I learned from this experience. Is this tension between just keeping on doing what you're doing that giving up and finding adding both on the charges because you always have to fight The attention of saying okay. That's not a good direction and and you have people in. It's really very hard on sit. was I really keep on rising distraction with. Ask yourself should I continue the same path. Should people attractively looking at. It was a good decision to people that I was bunch officials spivey I wish was also the development of of the Internet And then the decision to pivot to Dirksen where we had ad in meaningful assets which is advertising in continuing to being the attic space which which was a good thing just moving from software to mall gentlemen websites and then analyzing the market in finding the lights niche community community time remember the Real time bidding began right media Otley and by for exactly so we were able to the first series play all that and likely they walked with and got the two terms from them defy. Then you know the the choice in of course we did in a way where we had to away brand name Lebron everything because the SPA will issue in stockton everything that was often so good way to move the business got it so one of those are like this was also you know that you fill that or you had. I had a really big challenge early on that. You're that you had an ED. You overcoming.

Tom Erie founder and CEO teaneck technion White Brent Walgreens Yahoo Dirksen Kazaa Lebron John Nathan Allison software devils Adad stockton
"founder ceo" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

Marketing Upheaval

14:58 min | 1 year ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

"Stuff going out your doors as you better make sure it's all correct and Within your company purpose and values I understand the need to have to constantly produce content because audience audience so splintered and you don't know who's going to see what etc I'm just overwhelmed by the amount of content that we have in the world that I can keep up with a small fraction of it. When do you think that will just keep going? That will just keep having all this content and it'll be more and more and more or is it will there be some I'm sort of Plateau at some point. I think humans in browns are going to produce content and they have been producing On ten forever we are creators at the or so. I don't think that's ever going to stop but I do agree with you. That there's an issue. She also quantity over widely and the moment a and I would go for hunting the quality I rather than quantity and two. It doesn't matter to producing less content but it's beginnings a huge effort for your team in both situations. You need to think about operation questions you need to think about. Structure Your team. How could you robbery? What should teamwork look like For Your own organization so the problem is still there with Quality over quantity. Thank you for saying that by the way as someone who owns a creative shop. I've seen that it's just so much. Content is not as just here. Let's put some bullet points in this. There's a really old saying old ad guy though Burbach. He is my favorite quote about advertising in. It was this when a person talks to himself. We call him crazy. When a company talks to itself we call it advertising and I think a lot of content is that let me tell you how great we are? I think good content takes longer to develop than sometimes people are just in a hurry to get something anything out. Yeah I totally agree there. There's an old by at think. Mark Lean something related to the fact that he broke the law because he didn't have time to write off in mass. The that's right. I think it was in a letter hero. They said Apologize to the link this letter. I didn't have time to to make shorter. Obviously this platform form that were multiple can look at it and evaluated may commented streamlines that process. Do you ever run into the flip side of that where you'll have the client saying move this make this bigger and and making design decisions when in fact they don't know about design and what I'm getting to his. I've found often when creative is presented. People understand the thinking and why things are the way they are but we moved so quickly. You can't do that. They just it just gets sent back and forth and then people make it comments. So how do you think that sort of back and forth affects the the actual creative content. I think the way we it incredible is that it's so flexible. They can build whatever way of working again he need whatever way of working comfortable to Kim. you move. E Year type of funeral teeing dead justice extremely nimble annual fee ship context ass and you can make that for yourself so it feeds very well into the type of work so marketers have in different in different companies. I fear the type of Human wants to take time and explain that to the client. You can do that as well. You can eat showcase the work the client when you're ready going back to your e book for each team member. You include the primary responsibilities in review them daily weekly and monthly which seems like a lot but now that you've mentioned it you do need some sort of governance. DD recommend that people create some sort of governance in review it that frequently in terms of what should and shouldn't go out content wise. I think it really depends on your so So you know there's brands that Atlantic Grand Plan Mafia recommend planning more than a month ahead. Dennis streaky not real time at all. But I think he's really depends to your specific low on the way you build content but it's it's extremely important to do this. Type of analysis says like to look into Hoggart gains working and to audit everyone's responsibilities. What everyone is doing day today because that's GonNa give in strengthening people you have to have a clear understanding of what everyone is doing? This part of your entire arche effort. WHO's in charge of publishing? WHO's in in Georgia? The creative science charges strategy. And so on those committees have to be very well-defined because otherwise it was time you have a new person in we have some more than Li very cards. Just entire system. Auditing the way your team works and hopefully looking into your team works takes a lot of time you know. It's a big deep dives and time. Consuming disciples initiatives. If you don't do it you're not gonNA find bottlenecks. LX You're not gonNA understand. What are the issues that you have in your e able to truly seeks to improve your process tend to send was working and the more the more you accumulate what I call this operational debt? That means that it's GonNa be harder and harder for you to work together because because those issues are humiliating and this debt is increasing. Get to you need to do as early as you. The Angel how have you seen the plannable and its technology transformed. What's it before and after look Mike is brought into an organization? I love that question so I think before plannable a lot of the teams were using includes like a spreadsheet and emails and they had a lot of Mesh national tools of phone calls texts emails else. Bedsheets somewhere using trello somewhere using slacks more using Google Docs or Microsoft office tower using neutrally Whiteboards stickies on on a wall. You know a lot of meetings two meetings. I think those tools. It didn't work for them. That's they switched flammable and and made them more productive a lot of our clients answer stating that. They're saving percent of their time on those tasks that they are using and they're not stressed and overwhelmed as they were before her her. Everything is really really organized that radically year and they have more visibility on what's happening and communication has improved can occasion between themselves internally but also communication with their clients. They don't know inundated with emails. Taymor so I think things have changed a lot for some of the people that switched for Animal so what do you think think is next in the evolution of plannable in terms of technology. Because obviously any technology you have to keep or what are the next Maybe goals or things that you see maybe incorporating into the platform big all this just raise the productivity of marketers everywhere doing for social media content already but we want to move into law formats contents. I think that's the next step for US edition. Taking collaboration to the next level Dhingra during the FERRUGIA job with improving the way teams King members collaborate. You want to do that as a lightning speed. This is collaboration and content formats. Our two biggest goals were some of the big barriers that you hit when you go and try to pitch to people. Teaching is is hard but he has to do it allowed. This is a founder Yokich Pitching to to customers as well so he change change itself is hard people are used with the way they're working anything that's the biggest barrier to just make them understand that it's a problem and that we can really sold that problem that they might have not thought about this. He convincing people that have already identified. That problem in the works. Always stays consented. Solution is simple rights. Bring everyone on the same page. Engineers wants to go to those other chosen. You've been abusing but for those people that are you happy with their current workflow even if they we haven't identified that it's actually not their productive and think just shining some light dot. Problem is the biggest barrier here. Okay that makes sense. A lot of it is automated. Correct a lot of plans on made your technology. What aspects of content d think are are things that ought not be automated or automated? Think all the tedious mechanical tasks should definitely be automated identity. Creativity aspect of concert. Production can't be automated and at the moment and my personal personal opinion is that it. It shouldn't either. I think it's such a human base and amend based function the amputee the OC communication skills psychological aspect Or buildings like the cultural aspect of building content dined. I find it hard to be one day is going to be able to automate and that I can't imagine that in the next few decades AIDS and I don't even know if I wanted that research that was honestly a loaded question because that's what I wanna do to say there. You go these seeing some trends and content at UC happening better bitter exciting. Yeah I think He turned in on in in in our future Knowing it's probably nothing new for people during following chance but storytelling VR AR is probably you know one of the big transparent can happen in the future because it's just again creek very nurses its contents experiences. It really takes a lot of time to think about them. Invest Energy resources in producing experiences like that. We're probably not going to st those types of storytelling in yard stories. Having any time soon just because of the type of Requires Yeah and they're no more than the girl that are more in in overseeing Interactive Video Nets pioneering that with their shows Contracted you think it's GonNa take off once Just going to be more flexible to allow that in the end it's up to the platforms when we can produce live with us. There's obviously he has been surge in like the production the same you know with three hundred sixty Images and it just really up to the bathrooms two tickets fan Dan on those formats are emerging. But I think attracted Vigo's this is one of the the next ones are really gonNA conquered the space Khakbazan Here requires a lot of Structural contents to build ready personal experiences with chat bots. So so. That's already here. The LEGO case study where they created a chat bots to help parents choose the toys for Christmas for their kids. First first of all solving problems so parents can It's personal experience. Asking all those questions about your kids in order hard-edged help you select the right product. Those are very useful Type of of endure engaging content experiences that are already here. Here and then I hope more interactive video and maybe being the future of three ten weeks near maybe and UH. None of us will have time to work. We'll just be absorbing this content branded content so of all the changes you see in marketing a next year or two three to five years. All changes do marketing. What excites you the most and what concerns you the most? I think what excites me the most host and scares me the most at the same time is this deep deep personalization of content can have the effect of being very useful and very efficient where the end users. Because you're getting exactly what you need but at the same time in this queasiness effect dead you might get with the personalization. I think one one the trend for the Senate's for I've heard other people and I have the same concern. It's yeah and it just creates this burn we're GonNa play on your giving personalized content in debt. You're asking yourself. Where did he get the data? Just crazy Roya annoying around that. It's fun it's useful to it's creepy. Yeah Yeah thank you so much. This has been such a wonderful people treat me. I've I've learned a lot and enjoyed talking to you very much. Well thank you so much. Slow with the glass yeah..

robbery US founder Yokich Pitching Burbach Georgia Mark Dennis streaky Taymor Li Kim. Microsoft Senate Mike VR AR FERRUGIA Vigo
"founder ceo" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

Marketing Upheaval

14:29 min | 1 year ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Marketing Upheaval

"Hey everyone this is Rudy Fernandez some creative outhouse. What a pleasure it was to speak with Zanny Moon on the CEO of plannable? It's a content review and marketing collaboration. Platform form. She had some sharp insights into how companies need to rethink how they get their social media content done. Let's face it. Social media can't continue to be handled in a loose way. Hi It's officially reached the grownup stage and requires the same type of processes in review is more established media and had some smart thoughts and solutions to that enjoyed her thinking and the conversation. You will to check it out. Welcome to marketing up evil. You're listening to marketing. People broken the marketing people. My guess is semi semion Montagne. Co-founder plannable a social media collaboration and approval platform for agencies in large France Hughes named in Forbes thirty under under thirty list for two thousand nineteen She frequently speaks about social media. Content trends including at cans. Sania is an expert on creating social W. programs and has a lot of insights into content distribution and collaboration. And how it could be better. So this is GonNa be a great conversation. Thanks for joining me. Well thank you so much inviting me. Ask while I'm excited to do this. Well I before we talk about plannable and socio content you had just I think an extraordinary the meteoric career. I think you started your first social media company when you're still university. I believe yeah that it wasn't agency so we're doing a lot of socially get content production for Branson. I started at during my second year in university. So you started in Moldova. Where you're from? Yes and then went to Romania and now it's just it's just taken off. Research is very much important. Yeah congratulations so do you find that your age is A benefit when you approach the new business. That's a good question. I think you know in the beginning has thinking that people are GonNa oppose more to talk with me because I'm very a young. I don't think it hurts anything because I'm building a software company social media marketers. They are young young as well so I think he's been better. I think it helps. Because we're on the same page. We drive to work in Microsoft. Alcohol aalto Canyon Micro says you know we can resonate with me at. That's right. I think the younger Generations have a much better handle on it. Yeah I agree. Yeah so tell listeners. Well plannable just so they know little bit more about the company with us. I started it. S You mentioned. After I had my own Social Media Marketing Agency and I started the company together. You get there with Michael Saunders. Because all of us work in the industry were frankly a bit frustrated with how everyone was working in in the industry for the people that are not very familiar with how social media content lanny happens. Usually you plan your content calendar contents editorial calendar other in spreadsheets spreadsheets. Woke sarongs in the entire team. And if you're an agency and you've got lands you're sending that spreadsheet to clients CI- on a distant back-and-forth happens on email. That is big a waste of time. It's not streamlined. At all it's very fragmented your keeping the assets for the content itself like the videos the GPS the the images itself keeping somewhere else. It can a Google drive folder. The jury broken. And it's not seamless. Work and a lot of timing is being wasted just by doing goal does tedious tasks like having to formats. That's spreadsheet having to call everything from that stretch it to like a scheduling tool. You know just trying to centralize all the baggage receiving receiving from everyone from your internal team but also from clients stakeholders and so it was not a pretty process and having grown up with Lake APPS MOBILE APPS it has beautiful design. Three good wine. You actually expecting something else. Your professional workspace. So I was trying trying to find something that was laboratories designed for teams. When I didn't find that then spoke with microphone while they were working in different against at the time and they have the same challenges we decided to plannable to? Joe Stats you. Empower marketers to be accepted and their day to day. WHOA so people design the content for various social media platforms for example and then Nat live somewhere on a cloud so that everyone has has access to it and see okay? This is the right message. That's wrong message. There's not a lot of back and forth to Holloway. Yeah Yeah Donegal is. The Iran is literally early on the same page in real time. It's just helps. Content creators in brand marketing team. Create everything quick older their content Visualize how those posts phase the fit. INSTAGRAM ARE GONNA look like in which is tasked that you know. This is like an internal joke. I I tell to every social media manager there I need everyone of us have a fake page where we go in there. We like mall Cobb. The social media posted planning to publish. Just make sure that it's GonNa look good dragged so I had this taste but baked back in my agency days. It was like could chance on published page of going in there. I was creating the post just to see how it's GonNa look like sometimes been taking shots sending it's my clients because they were asking the same stage sending ten in photoshop to mock it up. I was just going down the page so they danced. Hannibal at that Visual separation everyone can exactly the competition look like in the end. It can experience though. It's already lie so I think that's this. This type of accuracy and disability is crucial for efficient collaboration and then publish it in the ends to those social media channels. I imagine you Seeing your message spread across the different channels also helps you understand how it all fits together as a campaign helps a client as well. Well that's actually one of the other bands that's right because you can just see how everything ties together can make sure that it's cohesive at all make sense you know message message in it also helps you understand if you if you're not sending confusing messages across different channels else. It just helps you have more united brand. I take What are some common mistakes you think brands are making in terms of their content? In terms of consistency the head compost social media manages. The company has grown a lot in the past years it has become very very or attend function of the entire marketing mix. Yeah due to the fact that you have social media managers in different departments in different business units in different regions. They are all working across the world role. And you're not giving them a platform to work together on this invasion. You think that's one of the biggest mistakes because your morning. Some use socially. Yeah intern in there. They might not know the brand values tone of voice that you wish said thank thank being more secure with a distribution of content having some mechanism in place to ensure that your brand is safe dead. You're not Ghana boasts an empty black Friday weep Donald's dude a few years ago it banks insurance. Those kinds of safety safety mechanisms in place is extremely important and those that just mechanisms are in place for traditional media like TV commercials. Commercials are reviewed used so many times over and over again. There's no mechanism bag that for social because in the beginning it was is just a toy for marketers. It was nothing serious. You are getting to your ancient. There was no dedicated team so there was no workflow system no reviewing doing approval system over everything else there is for additional marketing there is platforms like plannable arena starting to cure because because now social media marketing has become so so so important for organizations that they need to improve the way their capricious. Yeah I hadn't thought of that but you're right a TV commercial for example is reviewed quite a bit and it's almost like social. The media has is growing up this natural process of of being a grownup medium and with social media..

Zanny Moon Rudy Fernandez Michael Saunders CEO Microsoft plannable arena Google aalto Canyon Micro Sania Ghana Moldova Romania intern Co-founder Hannibal Joe Stats Holloway Hughes
"founder ceo" Discussed on Messari's Unqualified Opinions

Messari's Unqualified Opinions

12:04 min | 1 year ago

"founder ceo" Discussed on Messari's Unqualified Opinions

"Uh this episode is brought to you by our friends at voyager trading cryptocurrency can be tough not just talking about making smart crypto investments. I'm talking about really I lease slow loss of space and use roads segments crate and I said no no no I know I agree it's great but literally I do hoffy on chain police so I think we just had this experience where we built this entire startup on top of the chain that really wasn't role to sword thanks natively would would you say to the criticism was unrealistic and nation which is totally true yes so I mean so don't get me wrong for months I was like very because I just said why why can't why are we segment by solve these businesses Meyer sacrificing with an option These sort of like it felt like I mean I'm an engineer traded quote lake bike shedding a little bit why we're not doing this and it took me a long time understand that it is more important the show that we're resilient to pass than it is to support by coaching so whether whether or not we need security hundred that it's not it's not about whether you need a case and we paid for different pay on chain coffee morning I think for me it was I'm not saying humble pie that definitely might awesome that you all of it and realized like Okay maybe the store value ideas of censorship society is more important than thought it was mentioned serve as a turning point for you ought to this is twenty sixteen again I developed and seventeen it becomes clear that they're going to be a version disagreement after zip we're way and then all of a sudden nobody really need tension I and is this out in early August when when did you stars too the question is this is really interesting because you save what's the switch but just clear after touch Bitcoin we still never touched it sure but it instruments so so yes I so for me so I actually had evidence of using our service with novello action he's buying our coffees actually expect and And I think you know I think we just under protest honestly I just didn't even if you see something like that we won't ask please keep saying no I think it was I wouldn't send my attention shifted so much of a direction Paul very much like I was like oh you guys don't care about me he's case because it wasn't I think that I knew all of Bitcoin for work it was he's don't do this without an alternative lightning was ready at the call you know and you don't some people say it's not ready today I strongly disagree but but there wasn't announced this looking back if I had had the right mindset a little bit earlier we could have done like some really cool stuff came and chances along Congo and most of us would not have these issues like old have been a simple unilateral came at channel wallet and we had any issues but because we were so focused on and on the half and on chain we would look at it so it's like there's no reason to wait for lightning but you just you know you look at people complaining about like Coin Base funding credible of all these players you know what it's totally true most of the Ruben Kruger skill over time and the irony is that for all its loss Lee Icu Boo Salsa right allies soaps that whole mindset that so rosy Yeah I know you're not ninety nine percent ninety percents check percentage even the ship actually useful two and when you as as you about what as ditch shutdown fold we're not gonNA pay it was actually you know I was thinking about the time line my attention really shifting away January seventeen so I know Sirtzi craziness not leave hold phrases Louis Louis later in the year but we started to see think like I had I bought I bought some eat their way back when you know.

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