37 Burst results for "founder"

Fresh update on "founder" discussed on Mark Belling

Mark Belling

00:42 sec | 49 min ago

Fresh update on "founder" discussed on Mark Belling

"Governor Andrew Cuomo, calling his coronavirus press briefings their daily fix during this state of emergency. Denise Albert 45 year old divorce a on the Upper West Side is officially smitten. For me. It was what I heard him say. My mother is light and joy, said Albert, co founder of Multimedia Company The Moms. What also got me? Was this speaking about family dynamics, disagreeing with his brother about where his mom should be. It's relatable, vulnerable, inspirational. There's nothing hotter. Than vulnerability in a man. Number seven daily show host Trevor Noah, who was crushing on the coronavirus banter between the two Cuomo brothers. I've.

Trevor Noah Albert Denise Albert Cuomo Governor TWO 45 Year Old Multimedia Company The Moms Andrew Cuomo Number Seven Daily Side
Epic Games buys Fall Guys: Ultimate Knockout developer Mediatonic

Kinda Funny Games Daily

01:35 min | 4 hrs ago

Epic Games buys Fall Guys: Ultimate Knockout developer Mediatonic

"To number one here. Of course that Fall guys has been bought by epa game media. Tonic has been bought by epa games. I'm trying to still refresh the faq. It is still five three. But thanks to roger. pokorny. I have the epic statement. I'm on epic games dot com right now where it says tonic games group makers of fall guys joins epic games. We are thrilled to announce that tonic games. Group is joining the epic games family. Tonic games is the development company behind the hit sensation. Guys ultimate knockout for guys fans. Your game play isn't changing. An epic will continue to invest in making the game a great experience for players crawl across platforms. Your favourite colorful beans will still stumble through the chaos on playstation nintendo switch and xbox check out this blog. Post for all your questions. That was the one that i think is four five zero three. It is and it still is quoted. Tonic tonic games group. Which apparently is a reburying. That i think is happening today or maybe happened and we just missed it. We often say that everyone deserves a game. That feels like it was made for them with epoch. We feel we have found a home that was made for us. They share our mission to build and support games. That have a positive impact empower others in stand the test of time and we couldn't be more excited to joining forces with their team. This is dave bailey from the co founder. And ceo of games group the quotes. Go on like this. I tim sweeney from epoch. Says it's no secret that epic is invested in building. The metaverse in tonic games shares. This goal as epic works to build a virtual feature. We need great creative creative talent. Who know how to build powerful games content and experiences.

Pokorny EPA Roger Nintendo Dave Bailey Tim Sweeney
Fresh "founder" from Here & Now

Here & Now

01:07 min | 3 hrs ago

Fresh "founder" from Here & Now

"Areas like North Jackson, the founder and district, which is a popular area near downtown, but they're primarily affecting those in South Jackson. What happened is on Monday, February, 15th. Mississippi was hit with a winter storm that covered much of the state and ice because that happens so infrequently we're not prepared for that kind of weather down here By February, 17th, the main water plant to the city of Jackson, shut down. Boil. Water notice was issued to 43,000 connections, which includes homes and businesses, essentially affecting all of Jackson's 170,000 residents. Hmm. I mean 25% of the residents there in Jackson Live in poverty. 82% of the city is black. I mean, two weeks is a really long time. How are people faring? The short answer to that is not well. You have neighbors helping neighbors and volunteers delivering water and hot meals throughout the city, But two weeks without being able to take a proper shower has been difficult to say the least two weeks ago before the storm hit. People feel that their bathtubs with water so they could flush the toilets. But again that was two weeks ago that collected water is long gone, and from what I've seen, there's a sense of anger and frustration. But the people that I've spoken to her really just weary at this point, they're tired because while it may not have been It may not have gone this long.

North Jackson Monday, February, 15Th February, 17Th 25% South Jackson Jackson 82% Two Weeks 170,000 Residents Mississippi Two Weeks Ago 43,000 Connections
India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

Morning Edition

06:54 min | 7 hrs ago

India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

"Next on a protest movement movement in India. in India. It has drawn the It interest has drawn of pop the interest stars of pop and stars climate and activists climate activists and sent people and sent into the people streets into for the streets a cause. for a cause. What's fascinating What's fascinating about the cause about they're the cause fighting for, they're fighting for, is how is unfasten how unfasten ating ating it initially it seems, initially seems, farmers are protesting farmers are protesting over new rules over new for rules wholesale for wholesale markets. markets. One of those rules One matter of those rules so much. matter so much. The answer reveals The answer something reveals about something a giant about nation, a giant its nation, past its past and its possible and its future. possible future. NPR's Lauren NPR's Lauren Frayer begins at one of the markets in western India. Yeah, I like all day. So this is a wholesale market and sort of a dusty lot between looks like warehouses here. Yes, Yes. This is far. Good skunk. Oh, yeah, Wholesale agent, but this is all regulated by the government. Yes, they're appointed by the government. They're being market fees can vote How is showing me around his local wholesale market, one of thousands run by the government where Indian farmers sell their crops in auction. Takes bids for eggplants trucks disgorge bales of collie flower wave through waist high piles of green beans. These markets were set up in the 19 sixties in India's Green revolution. When the government started subsidizing pesticides and irrigation. It helped boost yields and made India self sufficient in food. It did not lift many farmers themselves out of poverty. My father has not much educated Lord Howe comes from a long line of grain farmers. The average Indian farm is about 2.5 acres. These are not big commercial farms like in the American West, and with climate change, mechanization and rampant development, not to mention the pandemic. Indian farmers are struggling load houses at our place. Water is not Copper supplies water. Not there. That's right. That's water as much as when you go. So exactly exactly exactly lot off problem is that the production costs off. Traditional farming is going higher day by day, so the help the Indian government passed three new laws last year they aimed to deregulate the way produces bought and sold. Wholesalers and grocery chains no longer have to buy it. These government run markets they could do deals directly with farms. Many farmers are not happy, though, because you know Agriculture prizes are subject to a lot of volatility. Economists seem a bad lawyer says farmers got used to selling of these government run markets, which guarantee them a minimum price. So it's a safety net for the farmers. When prices go down, the government says it will still set prices for certain crops, and it's not closing these markets just adding more options. But Sanjay Cohade is still worried. Ginger Allah Miggy. Eventually he's a middle man who buys from farmers here. He says he's worried big corporations will circumvent these markets and obliterate small traders like him. As we chat, another man interrupts. We have brought up Narendra Modi's. You will be the King of World nine innings, and this is basically what's happened with the farm laws. It's all devolved into political arguments. Agriculture reform has long been the third rail of Indian politics. Successive governments avoided it. Prime Minister Narendra Modi is trying to do it now on a national scale. The rules have always varied by state and by crop economist giant ego says mode. I made a mistake by not explaining this well. The amazing thing is that the more the government passed these laws in the middle of a pandemic. They just quickly passed it without any discussion. You could have gone to people talked about it Godfrey back because these are long term proposals proposals now laws that affect the approximately 800 million Indians who depend on farming for a living. There's been a lot of confusion. Farmers here in Western India don't have the same concerns as in the north of the country, but that didn what model? Is it? Me getting shit carry those air. The rich farmers from the north you see protest, Ng says a tomato farmer here named um, but a sun up. He's got nine family members to feed. He can't afford to take a day off to protest. The protests have been dominated by farmers from northern India, the country's bread basket. They grow mostly grain and rely on government markets. More than a tomato farmer like sun up who can sell out of the back of his truck. Northern farmers see these laws is the first step toward dismantling all the aid they've gotten since the Green Revolution. Including price guarantees for wheat, rice and 20 other crops. I'm your bony I mean about me, but not for my tomatoes. Sun up, says he's never been eligible for the price guarantees that wheat growers get a majority of India's farmers or not. Meanwhile, farmers in several states are already circumventing these government wholesale markets and have been for years well, These conveyor belts are moving quickly. This produce packing collective started more than a decade ago, when eight farmers banded together. Now it has a sprawling campus. It's co owned by more than 10,000 farmers. This is the man on I think Chambers Banana ripening chamber. This collective bypasses government wholesalers and sells directly to stores. The last Shin Dae is the founder. Market is ready to pay me back better place then I should capture that market is rapper Depending on government. He says he got fed up waiting decades for government reforms, so he took matters into his own hands and started this collective. For others, the pandemic has forced them to consider new ways of selling their produce. So these air your grapes here's yes. Yes, grandfather and then grape farmer Abby shake shall kisses. His harvest came right when government run wholesale markets closed last year because of Cove. It Actually long known there was opportunity. So he and his friends all farmers in their twenties who've gone to college, started selling on Twitter and got more for their produce. Abby Shake says his heart is with his fellow farmers who've been pro testing even if they don't share all the same concerns. His head, he says, is on how to solve some of the inefficiencies he sees in the way his forefathers have long done business and he doesn't really trust the government to do it when I'm just out to get the amulet and the mighty by it guys out the causal Calabrese. I think our generation is going to have to try to figure this out, he says. Lauren Frayer NPR news in Nash IQ. Maharashtra, India

India Lauren Frayer NPR Lord Howe Sanjay Cohade Ginger Allah Miggy Prime Minister Narendra Modi Western India American West Indian Government Narendra Modi Godfrey Northern India Shin Dae NG Confusion Government Abby Shake Abby
India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

Morning Edition

06:54 min | 10 hrs ago

India's Farmer Protests: Why Are They So Angry?

"Next on a protest movement in India. It has drawn the interest of pop stars and climate activists and sent people into the streets for a cause. What's fascinating about the cause they're fighting for, is how unfasten ating it initially seems, farmers are protesting over new rules for wholesale markets. One of those rules matter so much. The answer reveals something about a giant nation, its past and its possible future. NPR's Lauren Frayer begins at one of the markets in western India. Yeah, I like. Okay, So this is a wholesale market and sort of a dusty lot between looks like warehouses here. Yes. Yes. This is good, Skunk. Oh, yeah, Wholesale agent, but this is all regulated by the government. Yes, they're appointed by the government. They're paying market fees can vote How is showing me around his local wholesale market, one of thousands run by the government where Indian farmers sell their crops Auction. Takes bids for eggplants trucks disgorge bales of collie flower wave through waist high piles of green beans. These markets were set up in the 19 sixties in India's Green revolution. When the government started subsidizing pesticides and irrigation. It helped boost yields and made India self sufficient in food. But it did not lift many farmers themselves out of poverty. My father has not much educated Lord Howe comes from a long line of grain farmers. The average Indian farm is about 2.5 acres. These are not big commercial farms like in the American West, and with climate change, mechanization and rampant development, not to mention the pandemic. Indian farmers are struggling load houses at our place. Water is not Report supplies water, Not there that much water as much as when you go. So exactly exactly exactly lot of problem is that the production cost off. Traditional farming is going higher day by day, so the help the Indian government passed three new laws last year they aimed to deregulate the way produces bought and sold. Wholesalers and grocery chains no longer have to buy it. These government run markets they could do deals directly with farms. Many farmers are not happy, though, because you know Agriculture prices are subject to a lot of volatility. Economists seem a bad lawyer says farmers got used to selling of these government run markets, which guarantee them a minimum price. So it's a safety net for the farmers. When prices go down, the government says it will still set prices for certain crops, and it's not closing these markets just adding more options. That son Jake Ohad is still worried. Ginger Allah Miggy. Eventually he's a middle man who buys from farmers here. Don't he says he's worried big corporations will circumvent these markets and obliterate small traders like him. As we chat. Another man interrupts. We're proud of you will be the King of World Niners, and this is basically what's happened with the farm laws. It's all devolved into political arguments. Agriculture reform has long been the third rail of Indian politics. Successive governments avoided it. Prime Minister Narendra Modi is trying to do it now on a national scale. The rules have always varied by state and by crop economist giant ego says mode. I made a mistake by not explaining this well. The amazing thing is that the more the government passed these laws in the middle of a pandemic. They just quickly passed it without any discussion. You could have gone to people talked about it Godfrey back because these are long term proposals proposals now laws that affect the approximately 800 million Indians who depend on farming for a living. There's been a lot of confusion. Farmers here in Western India don't have the same concerns as in the north of the country that they moved more delicious than me getting shit carry those air. The rich farmers from the north you see protest, Ng says a tomato farmer here named um, but a sun up. He's got nine family members to feed. He can't afford to take a day off to protest. The protests have been dominated by farmers from northern India, the country's bread basket. They grow mostly grain and rely on government markets. More than a tomato farmer like sun up who can sell out of the back of his truck. Northern farmers see these laws is the first step toward dismantling all the aid they've gotten since the Green Revolution. Including price guarantees for wheat, rice and 20 other crops. I'm your bony I mean, bony, but not for my tomatoes. Sun Up, says he's never been eligible for the price guarantees that wheat growers get a majority of India's farmers or not. Meanwhile, farmers in several states are already circumventing these government wholesale markets and have been for years well, These conveyor belts are moving quickly. This produce packing collective started more than a decade ago, when eight farmers banded together. Now it has a sprawling campus. It's co owned by more than 10,000 farmers. This is the banana, I think Chambers Banana ripening chamber. This collective bypasses government wholesalers and sells directly to stores. Villas. Shin Dae is the founder market is ready to pay me back. Better place then I should capture that market is Roper. Depending on government. He says he got fed up waiting decades for government reforms, so he took matters into his own hands and started this collective. For others, the pandemic has forced them to consider new ways of selling their produce. So these air your grapes Here's yes. If grandfather and great farmer Abby shake shall kisses. His harvest came right when government run wholesale markets closed last year because of Cove, it actually opportunity, so he and his friends all farmers in their twenties who'd gone to college, started selling on Twitter and got more for their produce. Bobby Shake, says his heart is with his fellow farmers who've been protesting even if they don't share all the same concerns. His head, he says, is on how to solve some of the inefficiencies he sees in the way his forefathers have long done business and he doesn't really trust the government to do it. When I'm just out to get the amulet and no I did buy it guys off the coast of Calabrese. I think our generation is going to have to try to figure this out, he says. Lauren Frayer NPR news in Nash IQ. Maharashtra, India

India Lauren Frayer Lord Howe Jake Ohad Ginger Allah Miggy Prime Minister Narendra Modi NPR Western India American West Indian Government Niners Godfrey Northern India Shin Dae NG Confusion Government Roper Bobby Shake
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 10 hrs ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

Courage to Fight Again

34:04 min | 10 hrs ago

S6 E5 - How do I maximize my VA disability benefits? - burst 1

"Hey just a quick before we get things kicked off here. I do want to let you know that. There is some strong language throughout this episode so listener discretion is advised. If there's five step process but there's indefinite general over overarching rules that she must consider but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at compeer in the wall and analyzing while i'm analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening pay. Everyone welcome to season six episode. Five of we served now. What it on this podcast. I do my very best to answer the questions. That veterans and their families are all ready asking my name is aaron perkins on the host of this show and the founder of courage to fight again an hour parent organization. I'm also the author of resolve. Which is a step by. Step guide for q the veteran to help you rediscover purpose meaning and passion and your post military life. Today's topic when the show is via a disability. What you need to do to submit it and not just what to do with. How do it bright outta appeal it. Should you appeal that well. That work all those things and more in today's show. I had a chance to sit down with a couple of really great guys who have done their homework on this. They do this kind of thing. Every single day. Greg colton and will simmons and we set down and chat or mojos that hour and a half i had to cut out unfortunately a lot of that conversation but the week to that full interview can click on the link in the show notes. And that'll take you to a form review request access to that whole uncut interview. And you could watch that in its entirety video interviewed. Please please take advantage of that. But for now i'm going to get out of the way. Make this intro as short and sweet as possible and let you hear the part of the show. The part of our conversation that i was able to stick into this episode here fleas. Enjoy my conversation with greg. Colton and wilson's check it out. Well i am here today with two honestly powerhouses in this field talking about increasing eight disability benefits. I'm here with gregg golden easy. Us navy veteran. This guy has twenty five twenty five years of sea level experience in financial technology compliance security investigation. All these things he's worked with numerous law firms used his own experience with the va to build something really cool. And i know he's gonna wanna talk about that more on this show but it's very good to have you on the show today greg. I'm also here with will simmons. He's a us army veteran former va founder. And managing attorney at simmons law. And i gotta tell you. I could not have asked for a more knowledgeable. Duo to answer veterans questions about va a disability benefits. So i want to just say to both you guys. Welcome to we serve now. What oh thank you very much Very happy to be here with you. you know my own experience of five years in the navy and thinking i came out and was was everything was great. You know always young. And i was happy in that aitken painted matter a whole lot. You know then. I got my late forties and early fifties and realized yeah does kind of hurt a little. Bit so yeah. I'm happy to be here with you and Look forward to the conversation. Will everybody will simmons Absolutely happy to talk to you today. About incentive Something near and dear to my heart. china passion play for me Having gone from ten percent disabled the a lump sum of less than eight hundred bucks and a holy shit. Now what am i gonna digress. My life to one hundred percent permanent total my law degree and my mba so There are programs out there to better your life and puts you in a position to dramatically. Change your life for the better and happy to talk about that too. That awesome awesome. Well let's start our conversation today guys with the transition out of the military. Maybe greg we can start with you. Tell me a bit more about your own transition story what you did right what you wish. You would have known things like that sure. Well you know when. I got out of those one clive in the military. I went through paramedic school in my last year in the military. So i was busy guy for you know. Fourteen sixteen months in the last days in the military. I was also going to civilian paramedic school. So i didn't sleep in as i got out. I worked as a paramedic and did fine. And then i realized that really didn't make a whole heck of a lot of money for all of the responsibilities that i had and that i wanted to do more but i wasn't quite sure how to do. And if i if. I known then what i know now. I would have in fact on to law school however i was a single parent of a two year old and a five year old and i did that for more than fifteen years and i can assure you that. There's nothing fun about going full time college and also trying to get You know to be a good parent and to provide the income necessary and i had that entrepreneurial spirit and i wanted to grow in in and have a big business that that was bringing the wealth i wanted and building it from my retirement and it just There wasn't a lot of of a maps out there. Do this do this do this do this. And through twenty five years of experience. I figured it out and and we've done well and i'm in. I'm thrilled with my past. The navy taught me so much about responsibility and accountability and and those are certainly tenants to be an entrepreneur. No question about it but there was no road map. There was no getting out of the military. Didn't here's your step plans being successful on your own It was it was really hard. So i'm glad to be your health. Talk about that in the journey Will tell us about you and your journey. It was definitely a different Yeah absolutely so i was. How do i even begin this When i joined the military. I joined in forty days. Forty five days before nine. Eleven and I was an architecture student at the time. Indiana national guard kind of do a my weekend. Warriors thing and In after nine. Eleven i i just couldn't physically sit there and design buildings that we're gonna be used to blow people and caused devastation. I wanted to change that. And so i went active duty and went to school and in sadly my entire time in the military was was spent in school one school to the next and in one of those schools. I got banged up. Injured prior to going getting acceptance to west point from enlisted to the academy so i went to west point for two years while i was there. Got my injury that i sustained during active duty. The kid exacerbated to the point that i could no longer sir and unceremoniously. I went home with a ten percent disability. Seven seven hundred eighty bucks or something like that. Night came from west point to sit on my parents. Couch i legitimately want to move. I didn't even know your podcast existed until last week but eyesight. Now what what the heck am i gonna do the rest of my life. I had zero idea. I went from the premier leadership institute in the world to not knowing. I didn't know what the heck did so I decided that applied at schools Just just keep the ball moving and Quickly went to indiana university. Got into the business. School in really just fell in love with entrepreneurship and i let that passion takeover You know my healing process from you. Know both physical and emotional fiercely all of it. I needed to mend myself after coming out of the military. And it's a hell of a won't talk to make that work but Anyway yeah i mean. The transition was man. I don i even describe the transition with it was so unbelievably difficult. It shouldn't need to in needed to be a conversation with a counselor commonality military that said you know. What do you want. do the rest of your life. This is the direction you go and go. Do it can i. It was a lot of soul searching to find. It ought to be honest. But now i've been imagined doing anything else. Couldn't imagine sitting my day any other way when i do and holy shit i get paid for it. I mean oh my god. That's the best. The best thing in the world i completely agree with you will on on that. Come out and you're just in this hot this this song in this hayes in your you have so little direction and even if you had a career counselor to try to talk to you. I don't know if it's just you don't know what you're doing in life because you're so mean you don't stand different concepts yet but man you're just lost wandering out there in and Yeah i grabbed me by accident eck and smack me up a little bit. I do right by sagar i absolutely. I think if there's one thing that i absolutely did right was i I jumped head head on into school and education and building might tool set. Because i wasn't relying solely on the things that i learned in the military to to be jumping off point. I realized i had a heck of a lot of catching up to do. And and that's where the education started for me And obviously i didn't quit. And in fact i found a way to make sure that i didn't have to pay for which was really you know that was. The true transition story was okay. Hang on a second Your bettering yourself. And you're getting somebody else. Pay the bill. This this is something should write a book about Because a lot of that cedeno that hidden. I mean that was one of my biggest struggles was coming out and being twenty five seven a two year old and a five year old that i was literally racing by myself and i was taking eighteen credit hours Getting my degree in biochemistry with minor in english lit. And i you know eighteen credit hours trying to take care to five hundred worked at the same time you know you can get loans and all the rest of it but if you don't have a good nation in what's possible. I had no idea. I was eligible for vote. Rehab you know. When i went i had gi bill and believe it or not. The college never applied the gi bill. I paid for everything out of my own. And even though i was eligible for the gi. Bill is all the time it's really sad is what it comes down to that. We have the capability had had. I recognized what was was there army. And i recognize these benefits. Were there than i could have slowed down and cast in my kids. Now's a roof over their head and not had trying to kill myself to get through it in a short period of time And it would have changed the trajectory of my life. I you know. I watched medical school. Go out the door. Because i couldn't do an internship and be a single parent and i couldn't do medical school and be a single parent. Too young kids had. I had those benefits and recognized that they were available to me. I could have done more. I could've figure things out that's not bad. I mean i. I love where i'm at today but it could have been so much easier. Had i known about all the benefits that are out there. Not just disability. But is as you're talking about. Well the both rehab and the gi bill and things don't get taken advantage of profitable now. I was just gonna say we. We actually just talked about that. I think it was in the last episode about gi bill and how you can leverage it with the Volk rehab well. Vr program now but Leverage that you know those two you know really great benefits to you get further education. Everything i know when i got out You know. I'm sitting in the end of the transition not unit but are transitioning out processing briefings. Right and they're telling us about the va. I knew zero about the. Va except that veterans. Go to the. Va that's really all. I knew about it and they and they told us like. Hey go to the hospital like on post go hospital get your medical records and take him upstairs. Because i had a v. Va office fort hood. They had a. Va office up. Like start for a said okay. Cool and so. I took them and they said okay. Cool we got your medical records like okay to me. It was just another task. I had. I literally had no idea that i was submitting my va. Disability claim audios. Like somebody told me to give you these. I guess this is how i get officially into the va and become a veteran so to speak at someone like your most crucial claim and there you are getting pushed by the system through their said that you're not on purpose fan. That was done on purpose for years and years. And call me a conspiracy theorist or whatever but the truth of the matter is this is mon mon Insurance company pan out benefits and they've got an minimize this as much as far as sharing and you know the the the the hard part was to that by the time i did my first what do you call that first. Compensation exam with the with the doctor or the nurse practitioner. Whatever she was I'm still in tough guy mode. I'm still like yeah. Her s- i'm good. I can you know. I'm sure i can just suck it up for a little while. I didn't realize it's supposed to go there and just be blatantly. Honest like holy crap. This hurts this hurts. This hurts and i can't do this anymore. And i just went. I was like no. This is fine. Do you have anything no. i'm fine. no i'm good. I had no. I d like there was no. There's no plan there's no. There's no one at that point in the transition to to really tell me. Hey this is what you should be doing. This is the level of scrutiny. That they're going to look at your. Va claim with and this is the level of of intensity you need to put to it when you submit it so we can talk about that a little bit like what. What was your guys. Experience with The va disability claims program. I i know with mine drag. Mom i was cormon and i and i was I was one of the supervisors of the ambulance service in and they will. Hospital orlando in the training center training center there and when i sat down out processing with personnel. I still to this day. Remember sitting down at that gray metal desk. And here's somebody that's not much older than me on the other side of the desk in. They're typing out my dvd fourteen. And they're asking me different questions on a checklist and you know how many problems not have any problems you know. Got both of my legs. I got both my arms You know i can hear you talking fine which goes exactly to the point. You're making aaron. And i don't think it was bravado on my side is much as not understanding to transition process and the purpose of the questions being asked as they apply to me in my future not to mention. Let's let's young. Were coming from the military where it's shut the hell up in suck it up. Well it's not only that pervasiveness in the military will absolutely but there's a pervasiveness in the medical side on top of that of we don't go to call unless we are on death's doorstep i had owns and you know i'm i'm urinating blood. I went to the er. I was terrified. I didn't know anything about kidney. Stones about point. I tell you when you look down. Ten o'clock at night and the toilet bowl is you're ready to go to bed. You see bright red blood. You're going to the er right now when they didn't ask me about that as i al processed. I didn't recognize that. The jimmy stones that my kidneys continued to put out than started in the military. Were something that should have been taking care of for in evaluating before on the disability side. And so you know as as a cormon. My knees hurt my back. Hurt dr a are you know my gird. hey dot. Can you write me. Something for this. Ensures tagamet for this there was never any documentation. It was me and my buddy. The doctor who wrote something if i wanted it or b who went to the cabinet and opened up and took out the a hundred older motrin. It took it myself just like i told my fellow shipmates to do or the. You know the marine corps guys that i worked with to do so i mean there was a pervasiveness medicine on top of. What will we say about. The pervasiveness of we have a missions. Do the military. Our mission is to get the dadgum job done. Every single time is not to be standing in sakala. Whine about how this hurts. Don't it well. i'm sorry. I didn't mean now. You know. i think it's for me. I was you know i dealt with something that i deal with. Almost every with almost every veteran client that deal with. It's it's it's a pervasive problem. That every better needs to know you're going to be under compensated for some of your disabilities and you're gonna be overcompensated for some disabilities and when you're coming out of service and you get med boarded for something you know for me. I was hellbent on getting my chest fix chest and backs back rated properly in even though chefs in particular the maximum benefit. I could ever get no matter how hard i tried and no matter what i did was ten percent no matter what so yourself the net absolutely ruined my military career. That is only gonna ever pay me ten percent. I'm sitting. you're banging my head against the wall for at least five years fighting that fight when there was literally nothing i could do. I had to learn the system the right way you gotta do end arounds and connect everything possible to this in order to make sure that your stated appropriately for the actual shit that you're dealing against off that took years to figure out when you don't have somebody holding your hand through the through the that's really true. I mean in my case. I knew the was there that can provides healthcare benefits. But i had a job. I had healthcare benefits. I didn't mean to be a and i correctly and incorrectly depending on how you look at it. I wanted that benefit to be more available my fellow brethren who actually needed it and couldn't make it private healthcare good private healthcare because the. Va does a as much as they get. Beaten up in the news over. they do. Try very hard. You've healthcare Chewed the veterans other. They can't do better but it's not because they're trying to do that. And so i wanted that that benefit of healthcare to be availed more available. My brother and i never looked into. It wasn't until we want to buy a house and property. You're in texas the realtor said. So what's your your disability rating. And which i giggled including talking about and she goes well with your own. You won't have a fun in fee in taxes. You will either of your property taxes reduced or abated completely if you have disability and i said i don't have any disability. I have both my legs and lower. Did she said idiot. I've known you long time. And i know your kidney stone started in service. I know you're back. Problems started from when you were. Emc girl medic in the military in the military. How can you not have this ability rating. And i wasn't out looking for the money. I was making okay money so i never went searching for those benefits and you know that makes that much more difficult woken. Tell you when you're now twenty. Five years ho service. And the g jared processes are really starting to kick in that began in the military to then through this this connection. It would be much easier on him and i if we get the veteran. Who's diagnosed in service with my backers a bit. You know. I have a strain. I have whatever that turns into severe Disabling degenerative disk disease or herniation in those sorts of things. It'd be so much easier if those that are ins new on the way out. I need a copy of my medical records. I need diagnosis in the military. I need imaging. Studies are is cat. Scans whatever to show this. Something started in the military. Because we can tie that together much more easily absolutely and i think with the be. Dd program the benefits Direct delivery program that the provides This new system. I'm helping quite a bit of Servicemembers transition out of the military the contact meteorology and they want help going through their initial claim. You know it's something that You know you can't charge for it's a you know it's a. It's a pro bono thing but the end of the day were taken bets. Soldiers vets who are transitioning out on their first you know their initial claim walking out of the room with a ninety percent. Walk on service. Now we're sitting here fighting on. You know that most important ten percent on the backside to get you to the hundred percent but we're a heck of a lot closer than that thirty percent of the twenty percent that you're getting when you're walking out of there like a hero like you and i are all of us did back at our generation you know there's various services connection is an art. It is not a science. It is an art all day long you. There are ways to stack disabilities on top of each other to maximize your coins. And if you do not know what you are doing you are doing it wrong here. What it takes strength or something. We said to will as a process that that is like everything else that all veterans doing the military. There's a procedure. Here's your procedure. One five and the average veteran doesn't understand it is a legal process. There are statutes. The congress is there are regulations that implement those statues that the va is put out is a legal process and it involves medicine so it's a combination of the legal side in the medical side and the average joe out there doesn't understand the law at that level and doesn't understand medicine at that level to connect all of this stuff together both legally and medically right and so let's dive into the details a little bit of that initial. Va disparity claim you know. Will you talk about it. Being an art and greg you talked about it being a legal proceeding. Is there even a three step. Five step nine step seventeen step process. That veterans can look at and say. Okay here's what i need to do. And here's how. I need to submit that claim. I don't know if there's a five step process but there's definite general over overarching rules that you must consider and And i think most important if i could say This is your kids Number one takeaway take notes Holy shit do. Not shotgun approach your. Va clays do not claim. Every single fingernail do not claim every single to- fungus. It's not gonna get you paid number one and number two. It's going to paint you in a corner so bad no attorney can get you out of just because you have dirty your file. You're talking about non attorneys who are adjudicating legal cases. These people do not practice law. They are practicing what they feel in. Our job is to show what disability looks like as plainly as possible so that we can either capitalize on that person's Motive to assist the veteran or To somehow paint over bad in a file because you absolutely are are leaving a trail of tears when you are claiming a shotgun approach to your to your veterans claims Number step is only claimed things that you are legally entitled to claim so it's going to require a little bit of research on your part to know what you're entitled to but that's that's my claim to everybody number one only clean things that you're entitled Because once you start claiming things that you're not entitled to the most important thing that you can not lose that you just gave away is your a benefit of the doubt that fifty percent and when it's as least as likely as not it's you're full of shit and you're claiming everything under the sun You just lost your fifty percent when it comes to the thing that's going to get you hundred percent. Yeah i think all take off on that in a little bit of of education. The vast majority of raiders as will can tell you are veterans. They want to help their fellow veterans. That's why they get that job. However the vast majority are not attorneys and just like we were talking about procedures few minutes ago. That's what they do. They have a manual called the young twenty one one and it is a procedure manual. They claim they step through the procedures. Won- jews hyperlink year like there for five six hyperlink there is. I wish it was. It's not to say there isn't some feeling in it. I mean there there is they are the trier of fact they get to be the arbitrator in adjudicate the claim but they do get that interpretation on their side in trying to decide. What's right and what's wrong is disconnected is not but it is very procedural. It's they're not looking at line compeer in the law analyzing walleye analyzing the case law even the references to it. They're not opening. No they are now providing a claim. You know it's transitioning to the other point. He made a providing claims that are not shotgun that you're entitled to. What does that mean rethinks. You have a current diagnosis. You have continuity of your condition meaning you. didn't you know. Get a bruise in boot camp. In your thirty years later. Trying to to say i have a problem. You have to be able to document the progression so he is a little bit different than degenerative disk disease that you may have had back pain and service but it didn't really degenerate until a certain point but then it kept getting worse and worse document how it kept getting worse and worse documented in a law whether it's a blood pressure log a headache log of that in law document the continuity of that condition and the third component of that is the next service. How did that. How did service relate to your claim. It didn't have to 'cause it. You could had a car accident while you were stationed florida. That caused an injury service. Puts you in florida. Therefore that disability the you weren't combat got shot and you got that disability but it's still considered service connected because the military had you stationed there so it's not causation. Its relation to. But if you don't have continuity veterans lose every time is you know. Oh i had this. Bigger hangnail. And i had this. This shotgun approach. Yes but that's not a chronic condition. It's a one time edition. Thank you so much will and greg and has been so great heavy on the show. This has been absolutely amazing. we will share some next steps with our audience in the show notes as we don't have time to cover today but this has been so so great guys. I cannot wait to publish this here in just a few days once we get through the very long process. Now because we've been on here for almost an hour and a half. Oh man what get through this very low process of you know post producing this but This has been really great. I know i've learned a lot. No doubt our listeners have learned a lot. Thank you guys so much for coming on the show really really enjoyed having you absolutely are i would not try and in a motor selves doll. But there's more information both in blogs articles that are on our websites on the im l. a. r. dot com their blogs articles about all his unstuffy also webinars that the media von normal basis. That has a lot of money on and join this martin. I'm ask questions where you're to help end. Try and elton's many veterans hand and your minds and you'll get them guys. Make yourselves better absolutely. I wish i wish. I got a website to promote them in the middle of fixing it right now so Sadly i've got a lotta latin or the we're working on that Were growing like crazy. This last year and a half. It's been unbelievable in worth To do a little self promotion where we're entirely. We're all veteran. were were all disabled vets. For all young where he's All worked on the inside. Su know how all the systems work so there we'd and accurately communicate with the that's how we run a different off practice than everybody else who's We what these guys who they're fighting against and there's a alive easier way that i hope you've enjoyed this segment of the interview. Now to listen to the full interview click on the lincoln the show notes fill out that form and we will email that link directly to you again until next time. Thanks for listening. We served now. What is a production of courage to fight again.

VA Greg Aaron Perkins Navy Greg Colton Will Simmons Gregg Golden Simmons Law Simmons Indiana National Guard Premier Leadership Institute Aitken Colton Us Army Sakala Cedeno
Clubhouse Becomes the Latest Hot App By Doing Everything Wrong

Business Wars Daily

04:04 min | 15 hrs ago

Clubhouse Becomes the Latest Hot App By Doing Everything Wrong

"From one three. I'm david brown. And this is business. Worst daily on this tuesday march second. Let's say you were invited to a party. Where the guest list included oprah drake and jared lehto as well as top venture capitalist business executives journalists and all manner of influencers. Would you go well. That party is happening on a beta version. Social media app called clubhouse and in about nine months. The app has gained an estimated three million users and a billion dollar valuation clubhouses content is like a series of audio only presentations and panel discussions he s. That's right audio. We'll get to that in a minute. These talks happen in so-called rooms which are really like well conference calls there's a presenter or panel other people are listening to anyone can raise a hand and ask a question or participate in the discussion. You can meet people and have conversations and because presentations are not supposed to be recorded by users. You're either there or you missed out the thing about clubhouse though is that it appears to do everything wrong. First of all as i said earlier. It's audio based that's right. Viral video challenges or memes. Not even a cute cat photo. That means that all of those people who hate to use the phone have to logon and have an actual conversation also android users. Sorry you're out of luck. This app is for apple devices. Only at least for now finally membership is by invitation. So unless you know someone who's willing to fork over one of their coveted invites you're locked out again for now. Clubhouse founders say that eventually the format will be open to all but what is that for now. Exclusivity is what's driving growth in roughly nine months. Fomo fear of missing out has fueled the apps popularity some even say that the old school style of having conversations is the key to its success. You have to listen and be able to say something meaningful. So people are striking business deals finding content partnerships and having conversations with some truly interesting people. Some are even finding romance on the app. According to a report in forbes clubhouses his popularity is even turned the head of industry giant facebook. Which has reportedly started developing an audio product to compete with clubhouse the new york times reports facebook founder mark zuckerberg made an appearance on the app earlier this month to give a talk about augmented and virtual reality. Facebook didn't confirm the report but the times also noted that the social network has a habit of buying upper competing with apps that dabble in areas. That could pose a threat to its user base like most media platforms clubhouse. Has its issues to the app. Urges you to give it access your contact list and uses that information to identify others for you to invite according to forbes quote even if you've no interest in joining clubhouse whatsoever the service may well know your name mobile number and how many friends you have on the network. It may even be violating european privacy laws. The report suggests clubhouses apple exclusivity also has some trying to hack the app so it can be streamed on android devices tech crunch report last week. Clubhouse had its first significant data-breach when someone managed to stream audio feeds on a third party website according to bloomberg the stanford internet observatory or s. I o a stanford university internet watchdog programme race security concerns earlier this month in light of these issues clubhouse says it has taken measures to prevent any such breaches from happening again. But it's not clear. Exactly what is being done.

Oprah Drake Jared Lehto David Brown Facebook Apple Mark Zuckerberg New York Times The Times Stanford Bloomberg
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo under pressure in harassment probe

All Things Considered

04:28 min | 23 hrs ago

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo under pressure in harassment probe

"Harlem, is growing on where Andrew the kitchen Cuomo is busy. after a Even second if the front woman accused is empty, the Democratic This'll New York governor tiny of restaurant sexual has harassment. always relied heavily One former on deliveries. Cuomo adviser had previously But a couple of accused years ago, him of kissing Ding got her without tired consent. of the high fees The second on third woman party told APS The New York Times and that complaints when she was a from Cuomo customers aid, the governor about meals asked being intrusive late. questions So currently about her you sex see these life, orders hear including whether she it, slept but I didn't with order. older Ding men. chose to channel The governor most issued of his an apology deliveries on through Sunday a and service gave New York called State's Relay. attorney general Leticia This James, way. the power He to pays appoint grubhub an outside just investigator. for an order, not New a delivery. York State Senator He shows Alessandro me on his Biagi phone. And is then a fellow once Democrat I'm finished and with longtime this order, critic of Cuomo, and I she would joins just us now press welcome. it and drag it Thank to you for having ready me. and You were then one of the first a driver state Democrats is automatically to calm the governor assigned. to resign. You called Come him and pick a monster it up on really Twitter and also have said lawmakers lets him track should be removed the driver from office. so If they Ding don't can hold answer him questions accountable. from customers wondering Why not when wait to their see food what an is investigation coming. uncovers He can't first? do that on Grubhub So and other it's a APS. great place to start. I mean, Being I want pays I want to be really very a percentage clear about on where each order, I'm coming from. but estimates I it am cost a survivor 35% of sexual abuse. less I'm during a legislator, the pandemic a New Yorker than Grub like many hubs delivery chair of service. the ethics and Internal I think Governance I was just Committee, lucky that I found really and I also Before the am pandemic. someone who has a zero tolerance Ding also policy included for leaflets and each Sexual delivery, harassment in the urging workplace. customers It's one of the to most help him important save money issues by ordering to me. directly It's what I from ran his on. Web site. That's what I've been Overall, fighting for. It's the he legislation says, the we hand pass pulled in 2018 noodle not only survived Andre. 2020 Thank Lee. You know, It it's made part about of 5% why Albany more money has than in 2019. been calcified with the A number secrets of city of eateries abuse using that have relay really like lying jumped the 70% halls and so last in year, order according to to be Alex able Bluhm, to not only CEO rid Albany and of sexual founder harassment of the something New York the sexual based company. harassment working We group had like record Was created numbers of restaurants to do signing up We the have to only have but a zero tolerance is policy these restaurants and so that the are way signing that I'm up looking our restaurant at this that set typically of circumstances have never done is delivery, by and the totality those new clients of information didn't do that a lot I know of volume. about the governor's behavior, Bluhm says relays his revenues behavior declined and what's been described by 20% and also what I know last year from my own experience door working Dash there, and also others that offers I am. delivery You know, only you worked now, in his for office restaurants before looking you were an to elected lower their official fees. yourself. We should note. The delivery That's right. sector That's is right. one That's of very right. So I few was I city worked in industries his counsel's office. that hired more For roughly workers eight months during in 2017 the pandemic, It s would not O. I mean, be this unthinkable. is part of a pattern All of abusive the and manipulative behavior total numbers from him and now it's are It's also around part of a 80,000. bigger culture of fear that is Maria pervasive Figueroa throughout is director his administration. of labor You're and policy saying you speak research from first at hand the experience, Worker Institute But wouldn't there at be Cornell value University's in having a School thorough, of Industrial exhaustive and investigation Labor relations. so that you get things She's on basing the record that and find 80,000 out how widespread figure this on is the number and give of commercial the truth cyclists an opportunity who to were be registered aired? before Absolutely. the pandemic, Yes, plus Absolutely. an estimated Yes, I do increase. support an independent investigation. Like the restaurants. I believe that we're These going workers to be able to have needed that now, the APS since to survive, there will be a special and prosecutor they appointed felt by exploited. the attorney general, so They we include could many be thankful low for income that. immigrants But and people when of I color look at at the the greatest words that risk the governor of contracting used and the Cove. questions It that he asked You seen? Charlotte Aviano Bennett says she spent Which hundreds the governor of has dollars not denied on equipment things to deliver like food Do you on have her sex e with bike older men? company Do you and have sex not the outside of your mother, relationship, she and he repeated says the companies to her over don't and over pay again, for knowing anything. she was a sexual She abuse bought her survivor. own delivery bag, You helmet were raped and and winter abused gear. and attacked Deano and assaulted. lives in Washington Heights These are things and used to that work in a not restaurant. only did he say She to her switched personally to running deliveries and alone, but for he door said them dash while he and relay they were in a couple his of years office ago because in the Capitol she's got a young child in Albany, and wanted and more he flexible mentioned hours. that But you know, she as says his the work response got to this, harder it was meant in the to be pandemic. playful. Yeah, There is when no an gray abandoned area. me in Have you heard A from your Gemma constituents Donati about this? What the are hand they saying and Calvin to you? you, she I think that says there are restaurants people who won't are let her really use shocked their bathrooms that and she this has is to take you breaks know, coming outside in the cold. to the surface. Why? The workers Because justice ah project lot of people has been know organizing the governor delivery from drivers what they see on and television, its lobbying Right? Go the back city to Council last for March a law in April requiring and May and bathroom June and July breaks, the whole summer sick when pay the governor and was protective doing his press equipment. conferences about covert, Its which executive Provided director, a lot of Lee safety Hia Wolpe for people. It calls made them feel the apse really like disruptors. they were like, They're like not the governor really had paying their backs. minimum wage, The which problem is in New here York is that that's $15 the perception an hour. What that's the persona. they're offering is Behind opportunities the scenes, to especially work with Charlotte without Bennett, right. She describes a weight this happening and without during the essential, peak of Corbett. right. Because We these only workers have a minute are left, independent but I'm curious. contractors. You know, as a Democrat, Gord Cuomo Ash, is Grubhub your party's defacto and the others leader pay for in the state. each He's delivery been governor item for a decade, plus tips. and there's a gubernatorial Drivers say election they can make in New York $20 next year. an hour So what or more does when they're this busy, mean for but your party there's no in the state? guarantee I mean, I Relay think the most is unique important and thing paying that we a fixed can do as hourly legislators wage and as of members 12 of 50 any political plus party tips is collectively a few years ago have relay a zero settled tolerance a lawsuit policy after for being abuse. accused And of I think not that paying when we overtime. are confronted with these When kinds asked of whether issues it's independent we should contractors not should be To be classified thinking about as employees. party. We should be thinking Bluhm, about the people the CEO, who have been harmed said. They and usually how we're don't going want to get full them justice time hours, and also how right, So I think we will there's hold a huge accountable flexibility the people that who is actually overlooked caused these that harms. So frankly, for me, this it is would not be a political impossible issue. I know for it's being us seen to that keep way. if But I would have The the same reaction, employee no matter model who it was. got inserted. I

Cuomo Bluhm Aps The New York Times Attorney General Leticia This Grubhub Ding York State New York Albany Maria Pervasive Figueroa Worker Institute Cornell Value University Alessandro Charlotte Aviano Bennett Andrew Andre
How To Make Better Decisions, Faster With Matt Bodnar

The EntreLeadership Podcast

06:40 min | 1 d ago

How To Make Better Decisions, Faster With Matt Bodnar

"Every day were making decisions. Now hopefully take our business to the next level. What do we do with this particular team member. How do we find the best vendor. What colors and fonts should go on the website for next marketing campaign and hundreds of other decisions like these that we have to make every single week. The stakes are high. We can't afford to make a bad decision from the ramsey network. This is the entreleadership podcast where we business leaders grow themselves their teams and the prophets. I'm your host. Daniel tardy am i guess. Today is matt bonner match the chairman at fresh technologies and he's done a lot of cool stuff. He's helped star businesses run businesses launch. New business turn businesses around and especially as passionate about helping businesses scale up from the startup stage to be in a big deal. He knows a lot about decision making strategy and how to align our behaviors with our goals. But he didn't start out in this space in fact he actually started out as a successful analyst on wall street. He was making a lot of money at goldman sachs and so. I was super curious to ask them. Hey matt why did you leave. One of the biggest influences in this is a book. That's influenced me tremendously. Was the four hour workweek. The whole tim ferriss thing and so reading that and really thinking about what do i want to do with my life. And and where do i wanna spend my time and and thinking about. I mean in a place like that you can see the trajectory. Stay here fifteen years. I'm back. I if i stay here twenty years on that guy etc and so i could see what the future looks like and all they wanted to do something more entrepreneurial and i had this epiphany i was reading this article on bloomberg about one of the founders of google. I forget if it was larry page or or sergei would basically set this thing. And they've saying you know which everyone is. The ceo at the time and their salary was one hundred thousand dollars and as a first year analyst at goldman. My salary was more than that. And so i read the article and i kind of had. This chuckled to myself as like a twenty one year. Old or twenty two year old. And i'm like. I'm so awesome like i have a bigger seat salary than the ceo. Google and then literally there was a comma and the next half. The sentence was like andy's worth twenty seven billion dollars stock or whatever and so it was just like an anvil like crushing on the head. That was like oh. You don't get wealthy from a salary you get wealthy from having equity in something and that was really. That was a big difference for me that that made me realize that having a having a high salary doesn't really mean it helps but but ultimately ownership equity is really where you generate the most value. So did that. Prompt you to think i wanna start my own thing. I wanna build something. My dad's a very successful restaurant tour and he he had been doing. A bunch of stuff in nashville. And kind of the southeast. Broadly for you know. While i was in middle school high school all that stuff and he was always when i was up at at goldman he was always like a bug in my ear. Hey come back and you know. Help me out. Come join me join me. And so eventually I answered that call in and move back to national got involved with him in a in a company called fresh hospitality which is an investment business. Essentially that invests kind of across the food and restaurant world and scales various different restaurant brands. How big was the team when you joined basically me my dad My brother and one other gentleman whose name was nikola haggas is basically four of us at the time and There for yeah. Yeah and i mean there were there were other. I mean we were essentially almost like a small private equity or venture capital firm and so I mean the operating companies that we invested in obviously had a bigger sure employees based but really that was it at the beginning. And and since then we've built this whole kind of ecosystem and infrastructure of businesses. You've worked with a lot of businesses here locally many that. I've personally been a patron and i remember martin's barbecue when we went when they were a little like double wide trailer out. South nolansville autobody shop was yes barbecue around. And nobody knew who they were. Unless you live like right in that little community and now i mean if if you know martinsburg if you've been in nashville you know martin's barbecue i mean it's just it's the spot that you go if you're a nashville I'd love to hear that story. You know i mean you you you guys. Clearly were part of them you know becoming a big deal and kind of putting him on the map And i know you guys do that with countless other. You know restaurants But how do you. How do you find the martin's barbecue when they're just this little local story and nobody really knows who they are. I mean we're we're at a point. Now where and i think you see this in a lot of different businesses where you get inbound deal flow right and so i mean we. We met pat actually through a A point of sale reseller that we that we had a relationship with was selling terminals and that he's a hey. This guy's got a really cool thing. You should go check it out and so we went and we went and just had lunch. They're checked it out and got to know him and You know helped partner up from from day. One when they were back over that little auto body shop and You know our whole thesis for for how we invest in a company's specifically within the fresh Platform is we have this whole ecosystem that we've developed over the last decade or so of everything from technology to accounting to Real estate expertise marketing the whole the whole suite of services that sit around a business and we go in and we ate we provide them growth capital but we also provide them what we call our intellectual capital of all those different things to help them scale up and so you know we. We plugged that infrastructure in and really helped him. I identify a great site. And that was their store nolansville. That they moved to that was across the street. The kind of bigger flagship store and then started very strategically looking at. Hey what are some other great opportunities for this brand and and really one of the biggest strategic decisions we made up martin was we ultimately decided that we needed to have a presence downtown and to to truly be a competitive player in the in the nashville barbecue space and plant our flag so to speak. We we needed. We needed something downtown in. That's how we ended up ultimately finding the property at martin's we call it rutledge but the downtown martins barbecue and and that's we now we sort of we. We jokingly referred to it as the mothership because it's it's this behemoth compared to the other typical martin stores but it's been a really great opponent of that business.

Goldman Ramsey Network Daniel Tardy Fresh Technologies Tim Ferriss Matt Bonner Nashville Nikola Haggas Larry Page Martin Google South Nolansville Sergei Bloomberg Matt Andy PAT Rutledge
Interview With Ilya Gelfenbeyn

The Voicebot Podcast

04:43 min | 1 d ago

Interview With Ilya Gelfenbeyn

"Yulia gif bain. Welcome to the voice. Podcast hey breath how are you. I've really i'm really good. It's great to finally get on the bike. We've been talking about this for at least two months. So i'm happy that we're able to arrange the the funny thing is in the interim we seem to have spent a lot of time on clubhouse together so maybe we could have just done this year like two weeks ago. Yeah yeah spending a lotta time there all right so i think there's a there's a lot of story to be told here because you've you've been in the industry for a while but i think there's an interesting i that i wanted to start with. I wanna talk about speak to it. Maybe maybe your journey in voice day. I started before that. Because i i know that you study computational linguistics as an undergraduate but what i draw you to the idea of of using speech technology and actually building an assistant. Yeah so i would say like initially it was not about speech was about like chat bots and chat right so i started to work on some like chat bots dick like question answering systems back university as you mentioned yelich. All i was doing the computational linguistics relatively randomly so i was like interested in an internship in it company and the a guy who was like my manager there. He was a computational linguists so He had some interesting like thanks for us to do to research. Soviet play with chad bots. So i remember. I think like i published my first article question answering systems back in two thousand towards southern three and then later maybe in two thousand seven i was also working on the project related to chat bots. We created a platform where users could create their own chat bots like mostly for fun Trades they're like our cars teach them to Like teach them different things And then place them to like blogs Social networks websites and see how they shot to like their friends read logs and and Correct them so and later Like when the star to speak to There was this kind of state where got relatively good quality of speech recognition. Then mostly available. Either roy door or some commercial solutions like like from nuance. You've got a mobile devices that our full enough and Kevin good interfaces such as like iphones and androids and There was like this tendency of Api's of like web services so mehan co-founders. We basically thought that if we combine all of this right open api is and and smartphones and voice. We could get A voice personal assistant. That will understand what you are asking about support station and then like connect to a those. Api's and get an answer for you or like have an action Down for you. So this is how this idea of speak to appeared and what year the little. Yeah the end of two thousand ten and to ten okay. So that's around the same time that the siri app. I came out and ios correct. Yes yes yes frankly. We didn't know about siri when we started to sing about the same main difference was that we started with. Hr bought right so we'll just because of our experience chat bots before idea was that won't i. We create a bot that you can talk to about anything and it supports conversation just question answer and then starts like injection different services to you know. Let's add the weather. Let's add local storage and so on but initially we would say you know you can just talk to talk to it Speak to about anything and by the way to also help like multiple different requests

Yulia Gif Bain Chad Bots Mehan Co ROY Kevin Siri
Black Men, Disproportionately Arrested For Marijuana, Are Left Off New Jersey's Cannabis Commission

BBC Newshour

00:47 sec | 3 d ago

Black Men, Disproportionately Arrested For Marijuana, Are Left Off New Jersey's Cannabis Commission

"Prominent social justice advocate in New Jersey, is criticizing the makeup of the state's new Cannabis Regulatory Commission. Governor Phil Murphy announced the final appointees to the commission on Thursday. But Reverend Dr Charles Boyer, founder of the group, Salvation Social Justice, Justice, pointed out that none of the members are black men who have long been disproportionately arrested on marijuana charges. What do we do in regards to making sure that the license distribution are done in such a way that they were informed by people with lived experience from the drug war? And, frankly, that's just not there right now. Cannabis Regulatory Commission will determine who can legally grow and sell marijuana in the state. A spokesperson for the governor says the commission will prioritize diversity and its hiring in the months ahead. A New

Cannabis Regulatory Commission Governor Phil Murphy Reverend Dr Charles Boyer Salvation Social Justice New Jersey
Record Label Quality Control invests in XSET, more closely linking music and gaming

Esports Minute

01:27 min | 4 d ago

Record Label Quality Control invests in XSET, more closely linking music and gaming

"Minute for me Sports Network exit in Esports organization founded by three former FaZe Clan execs and Mark Romero has continued to expand since it was founded this past summer. I've had the four Founders on the E Sports Network podcast split across two episodes. I think they have a unique vision for the org one big focus of theirs is the crossover with the music world LED primarily by DJ Clinton Sparks One of the founders yesterday that music crossover went to another level as exit received an investment from quality control a leading record label quality control or QC is a record label primarily foam on rap with major artists like Migos Lil. Yachty cardi B and the baby on its roster we've seen a lot more artists get involved with these Sports in the past years Drake is an investor in 100 thieves rektglobal has quite a few dead. Is this investors and energy has Jennifer Lopez through our connection with a rod among other celebrities even some of these artists including offset and Lil yachty are part of e Sports organizations as a sports organizations continue to focus on becoming hubs of digital culture musicians and record labels have another benefit to work specifically they can help streamers and players get around dmca takedown. This is a huge issue for streamers being demonetized when they play music on their streams, theoretically by partnering with this record

Faze Clan Execs Mark Romero Dj Clinton Sparks Migos Lil Yachty Cardi Lil Yachty Drake Jennifer Lopez
Netflix will spend $100 million to improve diversity on film following equity study

Papa and Lund

00:35 sec | 4 d ago

Netflix will spend $100 million to improve diversity on film following equity study

"Followed the lead of founder Reed Hastings and made a real commitment to diversity as the company just released an end up self study examining the diversity of Netflix is on screen talent and behind the camera employees. The report shows. The company has made progress but found the Latin characters or underrepresented as well as members of the LGBT Q and disabled communities. Netflix has announced the creation of the Netflix Fund for Creative Equity, which will invest $100 million in companies that help underrepresented communities, train and find jobs in TV and film.

Reed Hastings Netflix Netflix Fund For Creative Equi
How to build a successful value-driven membership model

Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism

05:29 min | 4 d ago

How to build a successful value-driven membership model

"Read many stories about news innovators in europe and the united states. But what is it like to lounge digital bone outlet in the global south. What are those challenges and opportunities for funders who take the plunge in those countries. Our guest today is one of those founders. He's name is tiny gut. He was editor chief. John one of argentina's newspapers and in two thousand seventeen. He laughed to find rhodesian one of the most innovative examples of digital newspapers in the global south today china will talk about membership human journalism and social empathy and how to measure success of audience participation chine- welcome and thank you for being with us today. Thank you very much thirty for this invitation for having here. I'm regulatory audience of this podcast. So pleasure and a privilege to be thanks. Thank you so much. So i want to start with a personal question. What did you do. Why did you leave a good secure job at an established newspaper to lounge a small new startup. that's a person in question and to make the long story short. I would say i when i was twenty seven year. Old longtime ago any flow very particular path. Down there are a decider graphic. satoru Decided rector innovation director and finally eighteen chief and twenty one is at the company and for years eight chief. I decided to step down And i would say sort of to change the nature of of my challenges. Of course it was a big and beautiful challenge to lead that talented newsroom of almost two hundred people And we work and we do have a lot of fun and success in bringing into the twenty first century Great media brand Born in the nineteenth century But on the other hand today i feel that is also an enormous and also beautiful challenge to create a new media bencher from scratch So to bringing a small but also very talented team That by building this this new media we are trying to answer some essential questions to to our craft journalism and also to me. So how can we acknowledge the the media fatigue And media avoidance phenomenon for example. Or or how can we cover the most pressing social issues we face as society and covered in a different way and probably the most interesting question. A how does this. But equally experience of the twenty first century people's participation can affect journalism. So i would say that the coral of of We are trying to hook like the broadcast. One way or the model per line that was born with us media And he's one of the challenges. Our industry spacey facing. I'm sorry it wasn't short. The the answer but i have two more things to say. There is almost no secure job now. Our industry I think everything is at risk An acknowledging daddy. I think it's a good thing on the other hand. I believe that in the end. I guess That why i step down being there to of great media. Well i guess it has to do a lot with a very personal calling on that I read a sentence which i found very very interesting. What you said. Human journalists can rebuild social empathy. Can you explain to us what it means Yes we believe that the problems we are facing us society. The challenges are very complex and of course Demands complex many times complex solutions and we are not going to find those solutions without an open dialogue between institution politicians and citizens So pariah station. For example. it's it's it's almost the name of the social conversation today at is preventing us to find those solutions. An in-depth sense. i believe. Journalism has an important role in terms of showing Other words helping us understand other opinions For amd we'd take this very seriously advocates axiom. So we been trying sort of new full matz that help how to help us our own To have more empathy with different lives people that lives in a different way of thinking in a different way than myself So it has to do with how we build a more robust set citizenship. That helps that public dialogue to evolve and on find real solutions. Gus dose dilutes might should have at the end semaine back in personal and institutional decisions

Satoru Argentina Europe United States China John Matz
Bumble Goes Public & Bans Body-Shamers

Business Wars Daily

03:22 min | 4 d ago

Bumble Goes Public & Bans Body-Shamers

"Past year between the presidential election social unrest caused by racism and discrimination. A lot of companies have had the chance to come forward and make their missions and values known. But there's one company that's been forthright about their stand on social issues from the beginning and it may surprise you but that's the dating app. Bumble unlike other dating apps bumble allows only female identifying users and heterosexual matches to make the first move or send the first message as it were the app which launched in two thousand fourteen seeks to empower women. Looking for love and make up of the company itself is full of women in power its founders female and seventy percent of its board members are women that's basically unheard of in the corporate world. Bumble hasn't been shy about taking a stand before in two thousand eighteen in the wake of the deadly school shooting in parkland florida the band users from sharing images of guns or other weapons at the time. Ceo and founder. Whitney wolf told time magazine quote we will always put our values above our bottom line unquote well. The company recently had a chance to once again. Put that promise into practice. In late january bumble told it's now forty two million monthly users that it was explicitly banning any form of body shaming on the app in a statement they defined body shaming as quote forcing. Your opinion of a good body onto others unquote. They said they would prohibit users from sending messages critiquing. Someone's body or sharing that a certain body type was unacceptable or undesirable in their user bios and they explicitly said language that could be deemed fat. Phobic ablest racist colorist. Homophobic transphobic had no place in their app and algorithm will flag such language bumble will give rule breakers a warning and repeat incidents can cause a user to be banned from the app entirely anyone who feels like they're the victim body shaming meanwhile. Ken report a user through the app. The move came just a few weeks before bumble went public which made ceo and founder heard the youngest female founder to take a us company public and the youngest self made female billionaire bumble sold fifty million shares in its initial offering reports. Cnbc heard is no stranger to dating apps she cofounded competitor tender and twenty twelve. She left tender two years later and soon after filed a sexual harassment lawsuit against the company the parties eventually reached a settlement tender has community guidelines that discourage users from harassing and mistreating other users and relies on its estimated fifty million users to report violations of these rules last year the company began using a new machine learning to the help flag offensive messages according to wired but it's diverged from bumble and other ways following fumbles move to ban images of guns attender spokesperson told mashal that quote. We're not banning guns. We don't have a blanket ban of guns unquote tenders owned by match group which also owns dating apps hinge match and okay Prior to going public bumble said it acknowledges its competition but that online dating is not a quote winner takes all market reported. Cnbc that's because the company said most people have an average of two different dating apps on their phones and with this move bumble is hoping that if you were tired of body shaming and other offensive comments that can play the online dating world. You'll make one of those apps bumbled

Whitney Wolf Bumble Parkland Time Magazine Florida Cnbc Mashal KEN Match Group United States
Black Lives Matter-Los Angeles opens campaign against police unions

KNX Afternoon News with Mike Simpson and Chris Sedens

01:17 min | 4 d ago

Black Lives Matter-Los Angeles opens campaign against police unions

"Police unions are the latest targets of black lives matter L A. The goal of the end Police Association's campaign is to get rid of the unions representing LAPD officers and L, A county sheriff's deputies. And it's part of a larger effort to fund services, not police. BLM L. A co founder Molina Abdullah says she thinks both unions should be kicked out of the L. A County Federation of Labor. Neither the Los Angeles Police Protective League or a leads represents the interests of working class people. L M L A for years held weekly protests demanding the ouster of then ta Jackie Lacey. Now the group plans to hold weekly demonstrations across the street from the protective leagues office were prepared for a long fight. If anybody looks at black lives matter and what we've done over the last 7.5 years, one word should emerge that we are relentless. League President Craig Lolly describes the campaign as another dangerous idea from anti public safety fringes. We have the largest increase in shootings and murders in the last 10 years. We should be working together for solutions They want to defund and abolish law enforcement. That's their ultimate goal account, he said. Spokesperson tells the L A times the organization believes every worker in every field should have the right to collectively bargain. Claudia Pests. Utah KNX 10 70 news radio. Nursing

End Police Association Blm L. A Co Molina Abdullah County Federation Of Labor Los Angeles Police Protective Jackie Lacey Lapd Craig Lolly Claudia Pests Utah
What Will Amazon Do Next in 2021?

The Small Business Radio Show

05:29 min | 5 d ago

What Will Amazon Do Next in 2021?

"The other day announced a new ceo. And so we're is amazon. Going in two thousand twenty one and how can small business owners actually participate hit. Help is jason boys. A season entrepreneur and nationally rise x. nationally recognized expert on amazon. He's considered the world's leading expert in dot com third party sellers. He's the founder and ceo of avenue seven media llc a seller group that harnesses the power of amazon for direct to consumer product brands. He's also the co author of the amazon jungle. The truth about amazon and the sellers guide to thriving on the world's most perilous e commerce marketplace jason. Welcome to the show. Thank you bury. Congratulations to you. Six hundred and twenty six show twelve years you know. He started with just one person. So tell me how you've been doing during this pandemic. Our business has been booming Amazon scott galloway came out and wrote a book about The pandemic amazon a company that was built for something like a worldwide pandemic and they've benefited greatly and frankly so's my business. Because so many small businesses that had regional brick and mortar retail store outlets that. Just shut down on him and folks were were kind of on the fence prior to the pandemic called and said jason get amazon tomorrow. Can you help me so our business has been. I mean we keep up very hits been it's been You know a bittersweet story. It's good news that our businesses doing great as results pandemic. But it's been a really difficult time for everyone. Any recession is always winners. And there's losers. But i tell you one thing jason happen. This year that i never thought could happen in relation to amazon. I couldn't believe they couldn't deliver in two days. Came buried i. I made some predictions in early october. That fda and amazon delivery network was going to break. It ended up not breaking but they broke the post office. They bury them with so met much volume that they literally couldn't couldn't handle it and you're absolutely right. There were very few packages that were delivered to people's doors within two day window within that one day window even still though what they did. This holiday in terms of ramping up delivery final mile warehousing added fifty percent of square footage and like four months. I mean it's historic area. It's pretty incredible what they did so just recently announced. Jeff bezos is going to step down. Ceo and there was a joke on facebook. That says well i guess he's fully invested 401k. Now that's why he's stepping down. But one predictions you have for twenty twenty one with amazon given a new ceo and the hopefully the winding down of the pandemic. Yeah well you know. I hope jeff vases is going to be okay with the pay reduction. Moving from fulltime. Ceo to just executive chairman. You think you'll be okay hope but yeah you look i. I don't think that amazon is going to miss a beat. You know the minute. The announcement came out which by the way was interesting enough announced around the same time as their blow out. Q four earnings call Historic in its own right Potentially to deflect which amazon's pr department is really good at About how great they have benefited in his really tough time for our country But look amazon's not going to miss a beat andy jazzy. Jeff clone bleeds amazon. Blew has been basically attached to jeff bezos hip for more than twenty years. He's an incredibly talented competency. Oh who took. Aws from zero to fifty percent market share in the cloud. Space according to gartner so He's incredibly talented. He will help Execute on jeff bezos division. Basil's we'll take a back seat behind. The curtain is gonna shove jesse in front of congress and answer. All those difficult antitrust questions and basis is going to work on what he loves doing which is invention and future technology. Whatever amazon looks like five ten years from now will have been developed from. Basil's mind so he's not going anywhere. He's just removing himself from some of the shall we say more uncomfortable task. It's going to land on jesse's lap in the next You know one to ten years. As i trust drums or are beating louder and louder. So let's talk about some of the trends that you've been discussing Tell us about how you think. Amazon is getting into healthcare. They are already in healthcare. I mean they're providing primary care for you know scores of their own employees tens of thousands of their employees they They famously removed themselves from joint venture with jamie diamond and berkshire hathaway recently In the rumors from within inside amazon at the reason they did that is because they were holding back and the amazon pharmacy group which spun up recently. we're saying we can't move fast you know. We can't move fast because we're being held up by chasing in berkshire hathaway. So i saw that. A lot of a lot of people in the press came out berry and said oh. This means amazon can't figure out healthcare. It's too difficult. It's too challenging. I didn't see that at all. I just saw that you know amazon. Saw this as cutting weight so that they can really focus on what they do. And that's innovate

Amazon Jason Boys Avenue Seven Media Llc Jason Scott Galloway Jeff Bezos Jeff Vases Andy Jazzy Jeff Clone FDA Basil Jesse Facebook Gartner Jamie Diamond Berkshire Hathaway Congress Amazon Pharmacy Group Berry
How Facebook is Planning for a Post-Lockdown UK

The Leader

01:45 min | Last week

How Facebook is Planning for a Post-Lockdown UK

"Steve. Let's start with the big news this week. Which is of course. The boris johnson has announced the uk's roadmap out of lockdown is the role for companies like your social media platforms like facebook to play in bringing the uk outside again getting us away from screens and getting back to something like no malady. Yala david and i think that it's been ready clay roe that we can play and i think that like all organizations immediate moment when we saw the pandemic arrive any company is going to be going. Okay what can we do in. How can we help people. How can we ensure our employees siphon well enabled upright. And how can we contribute. So what is clearly a global knowledge In the uk so that was almost the mindset. We set out with a nano ten months ago. We won't be able to back in any time. Decided we do everything we could do. But certainly the kind of is important areas for a facebook have been. How do we make sure people see credible inaccurate information of course the other big paul is helping businesses in a business as large and small but particularly small businesses and founder over two million small businesses are us all platforms in the uk alone to be able to sell within the uk and actually beyond the yucai expos have. How can we help them. Develop the skills the knowledge and the capabilities to enable them to To in some cases survive and get through this and another case is really thrive and make that pivot towards online commerce.

Yala David UK Boris Johnson Facebook Steve Yucai Expos Paul
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

03:10 min | 9 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"I mean yeah. She was seen the severity of it, so she was. She was more worried. and also like you know. We were like lower class working class, so she didn't. Like I don't even know where she got the money to pay for the lawyer, but you know she she. She wasn't GonNa Let. She wasn't GonNa Levy take oppo defender, my mother always. My parents gave me everything and more. You know when I was growing up as a little kid, I wealthy because I just get everything and more than ever wanted. But as I got older than I understood, it was like it was too hard work and you know credit cards and. It was you know easy for my parents to do that, but they wanted to keep me interested that. Sounds like you had it I mean mom definitely came through. Clutch and helped out with the Yeah, that sacrifice just to make sure his son was in. part of the system that I'm pretty sure she's probably. I, Dunno, she's witnesses. The any type of issues like that of the past where it's you know when people get wrongly accused but yes, you believe in the innocence inch your mother. Who knows you better than anybody, right? And and she really made that sacrifice There's a lot of families out there like your friends. For instance. They weren't able to have that opportunity that you had. So so yeah, thank you, thank your mom. Because I. Now your friend Dave got out of it so. Yeah Man. Yeah man and that's like. I mean there's. There's there's like one other story that I'll say really quick. When I was a little AL's little kid, I was about probably ten or eleven, and I was at the I was at the Boyega and that was. Crossing the street to put my grandmother's house, but I saw my at the door, and I wanted him to hold the door so I ran across the street and ran up to the door, so he can go with him. And as he's opening the door, I see a cop car jumped the curb and just curb, and in my head, and I told my uncle ocean something must have happened like they're driving really fast lights on. But then they stopped right in front of my grandmother's house. WHO THE COP! The COP and the driver's side comes out and now I'm on top stoop is three steps. He pulls me by the back of my shirt. Out from the. Third Step. Do onto hit onto the hood of his car. My chest is hood of his car. It was so loud that my my aunt was upstairs the second floor. She thought it was a car taxes. She came out the window to look and when she saw that. You know this cop had be Ma had thrown me onto the hood here already had he had turned me around, and now he was screaming at me and she screamed she.

COP oppo Dave Boyega
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

14:42 min | 10 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"Back on a podcast and Solo founder. And this is after a couple of weeks after the either pitch. And I'll go through that pitch the route. This podcast episode. But I got a Man. Edwin is back on the PODCASTS. With me and we're working together again and we've been working together for the past three or so months than really been added every day and I'm excited to be working with him again and excited to be talking to him tonight on my balcony today again. So what's up at? What's going on man? Has Everybody doing? Hopefully everybody's doing create more time. the M and it's been an exciting Spent a crazy couple of months right. Yes with things in our society but then also businesswise. That's pretty Nice What's going on? We've seen a lot of positives throughout this time. Yeah we have we. We started working again and right away. We got to it right away. We started preparing for the Pitch. Friendlier for about three.

Edwin Solo founder
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

05:19 min | 10 months ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"<Music> Quickly <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> built a <Speech_Telephony_Male> web product <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> to go with the <Music> APP <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> in the last <Speech_Music_Male> two <Music> weeks. <Music> <Music> <Music> What else have <Speech_Music_Male> we <Speech_Music_Male> done? <Speech_Telephony_Male> <SpeakerChange> Yeah <Speech_Telephony_Male> we started <Speech_Telephony_Male> started marketing <Speech_Male> doing some more social <Speech_Telephony_Male> media marketing <Music> so <Speech_Telephony_Male> we can acquire more <Speech_Telephony_Male> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> therapist. <Speech_Telephony_Male> The platform <Speech_Male> also <Speech_Male> been reaching <Speech_Telephony_Male> out a lot. More <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Sitai slow things <Speech_Telephony_Male> down and <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> I went through <Speech_Telephony_Male> Adler looking for <Speech_Telephony_Male> Co founder <Speech_Music_Male> by <Speech_Telephony_Male> the way I did find founder <Speech_Telephony_Male> at Atlas <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Telephony_Male> actually <Music> Edwin <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> Engineer. <Speech_Telephony_Male> That was working with <Speech_Music_Male> back in <Speech_Music_Male> the summer. <Speech_Music_Male> So we linked <Speech_Telephony_Male> up recently <Speech_Music_Male> and <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> worked <SpeakerChange> harder <Silence> than ever <Speech_Telephony_Male> another reason. <Speech_Telephony_Male> I think they <Speech_Telephony_Male> may not <Speech_Telephony_Male> are. <Speech_Telephony_Male> <SpeakerChange> Yeah <Speech_Telephony_Male> a reason that say <Speech_Telephony_Male> my it <Speech_Male> was they invested <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> no revenue <Speech_Telephony_Male> so <Silence> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> obviously <SpeakerChange> revenue <Music> <Music> and <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Telephony_Male> one of the prerequisites <Speech_Male> to getting <Speech_Male> funding <Speech_Telephony_Male> at <SpeakerChange> Adler <Speech_Male> to not include <Speech_Music_Male> revenue. <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Telephony_Male> Nice to have. But <Speech_Male> we aren't <Speech_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> just aren't <Speech_Telephony_Male> ready for that <Speech_Male> this <Speech_Telephony_Male> moment we <Speech_Telephony_Male> will be <Speech_Telephony_Male> in the next <Speech_Telephony_Male> thirty days <Speech_Music_Male> but you <Speech_Telephony_Male> know as as of right now <Speech_Telephony_Male> you know. We've had an <Speech_Telephony_Male> APP on my <Speech_Telephony_Male> and <Speech_Telephony_Male> wants to do. <Speech_Telephony_Male> I build <Speech_Telephony_Male> build <Speech_Telephony_Male> out the back end <Speech_Telephony_Male> and API <Speech_Telephony_Male> so that <Speech_Telephony_Male> the APP and the web <Speech_Telephony_Male> product <Speech_Music_Male> can <Speech_Telephony_Male> talk to each other <Speech_Telephony_Male> so <Speech_Telephony_Male> the update <Speech_Telephony_Male> on the APP updates <Speech_Telephony_Male> on the web <Speech_Telephony_Male> the update on the web <Speech_Telephony_Male> on the APP <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and I'm <Speech_Telephony_Male> pretty sure can explain <Speech_Telephony_Male> that better but that's <Speech_Telephony_Male> hard <Speech_Telephony_Male> layman terms. <Speech_Telephony_Male> We're building the foundation. <Speech_Telephony_Male> They <Speech_Telephony_Male> see of the product <Speech_Telephony_Male> of the structure so we <Speech_Music_Male> can <Speech_Telephony_Male> so for first <Speech_Telephony_Male> candidacy reasons <Speech_Music_Male> <Speech_Music_Male> and then <Speech_Telephony_Male> from now moving <Speech_Telephony_Male> forward <Speech_Music_Male> There'll <Speech_Telephony_Male> be easier for <Speech_Music_Male> engineers <Speech_Telephony_Male> that join team <Speech_Music_Male> <SpeakerChange> to <Speech_Male> to build <Music>

UK's Digital Economy: The Future of Payments

The Economist Intelligence Unit: Digital Economy

02:30 min | 1 year ago

UK's Digital Economy: The Future of Payments

"K. Is a country that is adopted many payments innovations faster than most and it has risen to the challenge set by the European Union's Second Payment Services Directive which requires banks to open up their payments infrastructure. The resulting open banking promises to unleash even greater innovation by reducing the barriers of entry to the payment services market the UK's experience therefore is likely to foreshadow the evolution of payment systems around the world. My guests this month are Adrian. Buckle head of research portrayed dissociation. Uk Finance Steve Everett Managing Director of payments for global transaction banking Lloyds Banking Group and Fiona Roach Canning Co founder of UK based Fintech pollinate. I started our conversation by asking Adrian. What explains the apparent outbursts of innovation around payments in recent history? That hasn't been a lot of innovation. I'm payments in recent years. Although I think the changes in consumer behavior the patterns of payments that we've been seeing over the last five years probably driven more by innovations. That happened in the five years before that because people are very much creatures of habit when it comes to the way that they pay for things. It takes a lot for people to decide to change the way they pay and slow for example. The things that we've been seeing really growing over the last five years one of the key examples would be contactless payments and that has really exploded since about two thousand fifteen but actually the first contact and contactless cards were introduced in two thousand seven. So it's taken a long time for consumers to come round to the idea of contactless cards and then really take them and use them in a huge way such that by twenty eighteen. I think one in five payments made by consumers were made using contactless cards so we have seen some real innovations and real changes some of that due to changes in technology so for example contactless technology coming in but also mobile devices. And the fact that we're now all essentially carrying a mini computer around the time which gives us access to a huge amount of data and huge mountain information but also regulatory changes which have opened up the information that banks provide access to in the ways in which we can interact with all banks and those are going to provide changes that perhaps haven't had an impact on consumer behavior in recent years but are likely to be really key defining factors in the way that we pay for things over the next five or ten years

Steve Everett Fiona Roach Canning Co Fintech UK Adrian Lloyds Banking Group European Union Buckle
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"Right right so today I have y'all and he's another founder in the atler accelerator slash incubates Ormat Having talked much about that on this podcast but I guess we'll go into it now so yeah thanks for joining the podcast exciting to be yeah yeah this is cool because we I'd like to learn more about like I know what you come from I know what your interests are what kind of businesses are you trying to build here okay so I think it hard the type of business I'm trying to build is one that is very people centric and the purpose of the business is to either elevate communities that are overlooked more help people who aren't compromising situations just like deliver results that very directly influence people's livelihood their job prospects or whatever they're working on their mental health like anything that I can do to make people's lives specifically gutter Something that I mentioned working on and so it's kind of your typical starter founders like I'm going to be to be Saas product I'm GonNa sell it and that isn't to say that I'm not going to build a BBC response as a result of the larger thing that I'm trying to work on I think the big thing that drives me and has always driven me is people really making direct impact on the lives of people and not just organizations which presented some challenges but is something I'm excited about figuring yeah that's cool so I remember when you does your founder intro talked about being from Ghana and said he wanted to I don't know if you want to create something that helps people backing you wanted to give doc somehow is is that something that you're still focusing on an interested in doing or is that something you want to build activate your main company yeah that's a good question I think it's we more so the second thing that you said where I may be more down the line type of thing I'm trying to work on on a big thing for me is that I don't want to I don't want to start a company press like I don't want to do something that on on its face looks great but when it comes down to the details of how it actually works it's not actually that effective faces significant barriers doesn't actually and I think the more time that I spent reading ideas in this incubator the more I started to see that a lot of my lofty ideas and goals that I want to accomplish and gone on require like a d mount of either I don't know commitment to living never really long time or like deep amount of experience in like a huge network within the system and like as much as I love to be doing it myself as a person who is firmly rooted in the US right now it's like very difficult for me to do so you know my heart goes out to like you know the communities that I'm from and I see myself as almost like an ambassador for what type of person linked I can do and I still get back send money back to my family members donates organizations like I do these things but I think where that actually intersects with my business needs I think is going to be more of a down the line right now but asked me again tomorrow and have you have you found anything you're interested in doing on it you talk about the person system and marketplaces for consultants Have you like if you had to choose one which would be like the one you'd be passionate more passion Wa so the truth This is surprise me but I I think I'm most interested in the personal systems a service concept because the more research I into it them more deep but I see that the need is so for listeners the basic idea is you know the future of work is going to be very different than what it used to be right and everyone's thinking about houses going to change house automation GonNa Phase People's jobs what are we going to do with humans universal income Andrew Yang all that stuff and I think what people are really forgetting is they're trying to look at the industry and saying how can we ship people into industries that are maybe not going to be affected and thinking how can.

founder
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

08:07 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"And then there was one again not even sure what happened or how it happened I know how it happened but I guess I'm not sure where things went wrong but he goes so a couple of weeks ago I put out an episode about Finding clovinger finally for Santa Mine something else called reload and just like that back to square one Noko founder so he decided to part ways it was best that we didn't do business together anymore for the sake of our friendship I don't know man to go to the whole story I guess it goes back to around little bit after we still Arctic I'm not a designer I can't design anything from scratch like illustrations but oh I think I'm decent at building user interface I guess you could say maybe slapping things together and making it look okay but I enjoy doing you X. Y. whatever call it user interface US experience and I learned as I go every action they do on an APP opens another screen that's more to work on you other interface to work on or screen to work on I like that but I think what my my co-founder wanted to build an I do too but it's just not feasible at the moment because I don't we don't have the money to pay designer but he wanted to have a the best looking product out there which the I'm I'm with that but it's just right now it was just me and him all right now is this me like I think we should work together on things and make mistakes and learn and have fun with it and just put something out there what I did want to pay for was A freelancer engineer developer to help them with any coding that he needed to do like front end because he was back in guy likes likes to work more on the back end but anything he had he needed a to help on that could free up to do more important things than we I couple occasions I said listen if you don't trust me are have faith in me even we shouldn't be in the other and I guess at the end you know the last time I said that he said enough if we're talking about these things now we don't have any pain users or employees are funding now than what's it gonna be like you know months or years later wished I said is that I think we should these are minor things and we should get them out now but as any relationship there's always gonna be disagreements is never going to be perfect but he's a real cool dude he's is really smart and it's a shame that we couldn't keep working together but the show goes on so beg square one co founder and I think.

founder co-founder developer co founder Noko US engineer
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

09:41 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"Still yet to be made that's strictly for producers and more so for independent producers because making been making shit you know they're making music in they're trying to get out there but the only music that's being really pushed hard on spotify the platforms are the big artists little artists has to promote himself on instagram on social media facebook twitter everything all him or herself breath and there's no company out there really supporting the house music independent Dj are slash producer so I felt like like maybe we should try to do something and that's when Ed was like so let's build it near because it's not only that but the events that we have over big companies that were agile they give something doesn't work I mean you can talk to us yes like you're not going to be until I the main CEO you know spotify account manager spotify probably getting technical support you're lucky if they're even in your area and they understand what you've been talking about so we have that advantage right like we Kebab and we you know we could dodge things we could we could do crazy the ideas that nobody's ever done because we I mean we're trying to push boundaries were we are being creative in our own I'm nick base right but we're using our creativity to empower other artists yes so where in the sense artists of course artists are is different from there but we're GONNA tag team and try like that we're we're we're literally teaming up with producers mhm an artist that just giving an empowering them because assembling a team together and everybody has their gift and this was like let's come together and make something great is these big juggernauts men that I don't feel like they're going to go anywhere no of course you know what I mean but definitely there's an opportunity to space is definitely opportunity there to do something great and impactful and we could yeah I think could make a lot of change and that yeah and I think if we can be those people just a spark change spark conversation once we started doing different model that empowers artists and seeing now that the power of paradigm is going to shift now back to the artist yeah where it's never been before where it's always been my you know these labels the big companies and things of that nature then now we can he was targeting better music is we're giving more access exactly yeah everyone right now music is GonNa get pushed to its limits that's right 'cause now going back to disability of information and things of that nature now we're GonNa make it more accessible yeah you're not I mean it's like people are GonNa want try more yeah I mean try harder in the main so I'd have people people are probably thinking way rate end to reload and they're probably thinking oh you can only focus on one thing if you want to really build it because that's what everybody says if you have a startup the product focused on that one thing and do it right you know you can't do two things but I don't know rules to this right but psychologists and they're both creating content pushing it out on the platforms so to an audience to northern so it's kind of the same you know you're the one the builder but it's kind of the same back in you know so why not were distributing clash and why not we do not try you know I think that's that's why I said to you you know when I when I asked you I was like hey why don't we do this together no settlement as well because it just would be silly and harder on me to have two different co-founders and it just be it just made sense let's just do this together you know we're going to do one thing I got this other thing let's just make it happen together you know and it's Kinda the same mm-hmm theory was just disturbing not only that man but I like working multiple things going back to creative it's kind of like dude I like I'd like getting pigeonholed into anything that's just like one dimensional man because what happens if we're working on one thing right for reload and olives how can we use this for Santa Mind yeah vice versa yeah right it's Kinda like interdisciplinary earning it kind of helps to in like building the product that's what it is it's interdisciplinary earning it's like mixing disciplines together like what happens if we figured out something that nobody's like for instance I'm just thinking right now let's up all right so now it could be an algorithm that literally just play the right music for you for the mood that you're in yet you know what I mean I know exactly I've thought of that yes so the whole thing is is like music is therapy yeah it's a different form of you know what I mean I I love listening to music it changes it literally changes something in your vibe how many is the modern terminate with the youth divide yeah yes they literally speaks to your to a different part of your consciousness yeah different genres make you feel different things young man so that's why they're they're wondering this right one is through music instrumentation electronic instruments the other ones verbal. You're not I mean but I remember to tell you I wanna get into using therapy yet one hundred percent so it's it's literally so it just it's offering together and I thought it would be great if we just did awesome together and I'm glad and I think another thing that you're going to do is you're going to inspire a lot of kids And even older older men and women to maybe Puerto Rican Puerto Rican known for being you know computer scientists like they don't really do that thing you know I mean a lot of minorities really have given the opportunity like you know what I'm saying they were just literally what we technically equal rights one was that pass that was only like a early years ago like the first generation of my favorites have really experienced that freedom right so it's like we're finally given Oh you know technically legally some type of equality so it's kind of like which is another thing right being pioneers right and and being that beacon of light and saying other people if I did it you can also do but if you feel like you need help you can reach out to me because I did actually right so it's Kinda like everybody's is helping each other on black there's video of somebody trying to save trying to save a dog or something from a river and they nobody had rope right so all yes they did a human wrote like everybody just grabbed one one person was the anchor on land and then everybody just hold onto each other yeah and lift each other up and it's as what we need to do is needed we need each other and people you know what I mean like that's world here for a short period of time while we here at least while I'm here I would like to create I would like to do something impactful and if I can help anybody I mean that's more rewarding than anything else right you know what I mean so that's dilute goes beyond material that goes I mean that is thing is what our real purpose is here but that's another we talk about that another time but yeah I think giving back is amazing you know what I mean that's that's that's the reward it feels good man and I want I want people who you know if there's anyone listening to this I want them to feel comfortable in reaching out and if they have I'm not an expert but if they have any questions you know whatever I've been through I could I can help out and yeah it feels great man and you know I'm Puerto Rican too so I remember when I met you like a million Puerto Rico Puerto Rican that's computers computers like why I've never never met one so I thought it was really cool and now that's another thing we got an aside you know like I don't think there's any other founding team that's cool us either I don't think so I don't think there's another team cooler than US man oh man I hope there's other people out there uh-huh.

spotify facebook one hundred percent
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

23:04 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"They never encouraged at least from my experience from my point of view I don't know what everybody else's point of view was eh I mean and and and and not what's different in what I mean now it's completely different and I'm grateful because if I had yeah I like that guy over here yeah so yeah so like that there was that but I like I'm not saying not all of it is is necessary but the fucking if it wasn't for the artist you wouldn't exist yeah I know you're I mean it's a dude it's so we're trying to flip that yeah we're flipping that we wanted to be lower we want empower individuals right we want people to you know feel better mentally healthwise right and then we also want people to create right and just focus on that man yeah create create create an just don't worry about don't worry about you know the money's there and yeah and we were talking about how his access to opportunities and right now the artist gets better equipment get now you're going to now the fan ends are getting to get a better product right has acknowledged gonna be able to invest more or maybe that money goes now more into tours now the tours are going to be better yeah I mean the shows are going to be better now they expect expert Saadi Wins Yeah you know what I mean it's Kinda like these middlemen happier artists better music well I mean not I don't want to say that because we have to make great music if you're not happy you know that's when a lot of I'll do bruise EXAC- that's like that was that came up from that literally the title of that Genre speaks for so using how we started and you know what I really like how we didn't have to ask each other like Yo can we work on this together it just happened naturally like when you hear stories about founders it's always say like oh no we either in school when they were talking like all right let's build this or they kinda man they were chatting they said let's build this doesn't really happen the way I've been trying to do it for the past few years like looking for someone that wants to team up with me and it just happened and I said you know there's one thing I wanna do after Santa Mine is a really want to build this product for music you know and you said old and it kind of threw me off and I was like all right let's build it Ma'am and this is the kitchen in the kitchen kitchen cooking up ideas yeah and the kitchen cook enough ideas man yeah it was just organic due to it's just like I don't know if it's the right thing to do why not you know what I mean like what's is holding us back in nothing like you have the insight into the music industry you have experienced to that right meet have the technical ability and I also have a passion for music as well so it's like let's hope those that we to be we we appreciate art so why not help the artists like I want to hear more heart and just people probably whoever listening but Sata mind together during Santa Mine in Santa Mine is Santa Monica podcast Solo founder podcasts or you know what Santa Mine is reload is something that because I you know I come from music I produce music I always wanted to do something for producer producers last season so I know there's apple music tidal but there's nothing or a house music industry just for the House music industry just that niche and I know there's going to be people out there but I listen to house music on spotify or apple music or Amazon Music Yeah but I feel there's a cool it's like a different experience for people that listen to her music go to house music festivals I know spotify tapping into that market a lot more now like actually like networking but you know the two there huge now and whatever nobody you can't stop someone for trying something you know but I think there's a there's still yet to be made that's strictly.

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

08:00 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"The house now I'm going to call but I was messing with the contract things I had to learn the whole the whole Stereo CISA right it was a wall unit this way if you have an hour long movie let's say double the speed of movies on our you half an hour you gotta wait for one more when I was young because we then get cable until I was about eleven years old but before that and I remember just having to always knows the kids so you know my my father would has made me get up and change the channel but I always used to have to get up type in the number because it was it wasn't even have upper down had like a little keyboard yeah I had to type in the channel go to next channel and Dude I don't even remember I remember it he's right I'm thirty one all okay okay hey I'm I'm thirty five zero four years I missed that wave of TV's yet well the cost remotes came came a little bit maybe when you maybe you can around for a while I don't even yeah it was expensive it was more okay so you you grow boozy I didn't grow a boozy I don't even remember TV of me growing that's what I'm trying to tell you I remember the TV when I was like wasn't seven seven if that you're saying but I remember remember the TV when I was yet like I don't remember why you know what I remember as a kid what Chord board boxes are no I had I had so we had those like furniture TV that it was a piece of furniture with the TV built-in you remember the law yeah we have one of those living room and then I had little one had a little one in my bedroom you had your own TV your wallet yeah that's ball and ball on TV with a VCR player on our yeah is that you start watching porn and stuff no I didn't I didn't know about until how I think a no I she found that found that pretty early but no I didn't have any videotapes gotTa have anything that's crazy how would get as little kid there was no way for me dogs no family here just my father mother you said you're talking about electronics and computer engineering so computer science how did you get into how did you get in that honesty meant I was working for one company actually now I'm not lying and it was a girl your motivation is the girl I've always liked computers I've always dabbled they're saying being broke you gotta figure out how to make things happen fix things and I know how to build computers I knew how to work with them you know all that stuff but yeah when I really got into it was when I when I was a girl and then I was like dude I got got official job you know what I mean I can't just be like you know some reckless nomad savage I'm smarter than that so I started I started I was certifications okay and then just get into like the it world like networking and things of that nature network security Mhm they didn't they didn't really offer that so that stuff is still like you know what I'm saying people really weren't that interested into and that was to be honest men when I got out of high school I was really more into like design was very into like I was one of four people that were accepted into this war in class and it was just all about learning adobe programs you know what I'm saying so it's funny you say that because complete opposite because now you're like I don't WanNa work undesired I wanNA make sure works and you like back end telling me I I like functionality jake if I have a vision it's going to irk me until I get it very right yeah with code I might say this code might be a little bit I don't WanNa say easier but it's a little bit more structured yeah when it comes to being created to.

thirty five zero four years eleven years
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

07:44 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"The house now I'm going to call but I was messing with the contract things I had to learn the whole the whole Stereo CISA right it was a wall unit Expensive Yeah Lemme mess this up yeah so I was the one that had to go through the instructions because you don't want my my mom is definitely not messing with that she it it was the broke into box it was nine I was the Freedom Act box was freedom freedom freedom hacked the box I remember just having to always knows the kids so you know my my father would has made me get up and change the channel but I always used to have to get up type in the number because it was it wasn't even have upper down had like a little keyboard yeah I had to type in the channel go to next channel and Dude I don't even remember I remember it he's right I'm thirty one all okay okay hey I'm I'm thirty five zero four years I missed that wave of TV's yet well the cost remotes came came a little bit maybe when you maybe you can around for a while I don't even yeah it was expensive it was more okay so you you grow boozy I didn't grow a boozy I don't even remember TV of me growing that's what I'm trying to tell you I remember the TV when I was like wasn't seven seven if that you're saying but I remember remember the TV when I was yet like I don't remember why you know what I remember as a kid what Chord board boxes are no I had I had so we had those like furniture TV that it was a piece of furniture with the TV built-in you remember the law yeah we have one of those living room and then I had little one had a little one in my bedroom you had your own TV your wallet yeah that's ball and ball on TV with a VCR player on our yeah is that you start watching porn and stuff no I didn't I didn't know about until how I think a no I she found that found that pretty early but no I didn't have any videotapes gotta have anything that's crazy how would get as little kid there was no way for me dogs no family here just my father mother you said you're talking about electronics and computer engineering so computer science how did you get into how did you get in that honesty meant I was working for one company actually now I'm not lying and it was a girl your motivation is the girl I've always liked computers I've always dabbled they're saying being broke you gotta figure out how to make things happen fix things and I know how to build computers I knew how to work with them you know all that stuff but yeah when I really got into it was when I when I was girl and then I was like dude I got got official job. You know what I mean I can't just be like you know some reckless nomad savage I'm smarter than that so I started I started I was certifications and then just get into the it world like networking and things of that nature Network Security mhm they didn't they didn't really offer that so that stuff is still like you know what I'm saying people really weren't that interested into and that was to be honest men when I got out of high school I was really more into like design was very into like I was one of four people that were accepted into this war in class and it was just all about learning adobe programs you know what I'm saying so it's funny you say that because not only cut you off but now is complete opposite because now you're like I don't WanNa work undesired I wanNA make sure works and you like back end telling me I like I like functionality Jake if I have a vision it's going to irk me until I get it very right Ed with code I might say this code might be a little bit I don't WanNa say easier.

Jake adobe Ed thirty five zero four years
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

10:08 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"About it and that integral not yeah no definitely not I mean no no I'm not not Buddhist okay I'm the joys Ian Okay you know what I mean Okay Yeah we've got the pork rolls that they could hear that we'll we'll we'll do New York is US that they never gone out at all no I don't WanNa go it'd be like it'd be like probably going somewhere in the south yeah yeah yeah yeah well you have that everywhere do you think every state has won I mean I wouldn't expect a New York New York's yeah if you can hear hot ninety seven la mega and still people exist there's a problem here that everywhere now within the -cational podcasts now we're talking about air we're talking about still am fm be you know what I mean like the the the I'm not gonNA say dial yeah Okay and this will surfing you know what I mean they still they stand out by the radio every night at six PM saying for the latest dialogue did you ever have to put this just reminding did you ever have to put when you were young and you had the TV remember like the regular tennis the we'd like the two dials did you ever put. AM on one of the metal things that fell off. Did you ever put a hanger on there and you have to put the hanger but Abdun if there's no hang because those are exclusive those hangings if you got money for draconian and if you any of the drag Lena gave you the hangers correct Pam's hang back in the day things we're limited edition because back in the day all right we will leave we will leave the paper on it that said we love new everybody Yeah I love dry cleaning one hundred percent not yeah you have to but if you don't have that what I've done this aluminum foil oil I've seen done all so what you do so basically what you do go right so the reason why you're doing is basically you you as hi old as a youth you figure this thing is made out of metal for Areso yeah right so that's why you like let me get something metal and replace it right so then what you could do though engineering youth engineer a computer engineer curiosity this is broken fucking okay engineering so survival things like you'll matter was shiny and my house aluminum foil so boom you get the aluminum for you got a toothpick because now you're like I need a stick of some sort so use the stat stick as a staff staff in bloom all of a sudden you just made a conductive thing I never I never did that all on another level I never did it I just did the the hangar one time I had two hangars train them out I had them just like hangers sticking like the hook and everything you didn't even by the training I just put him in the way they are I just put them in the you know how easy it is to like unscrew like the well I don't WanNa do it for me it was a it was looking back looking back it was like a design thing 'cause I don't WanNa straight up I wanted a different type of antenna now headed nicely the design not I'm thinking they look like maybe like some sad dog puppy ears they look nice like two years yeah yeah but floppy but it was cool though loppy nobody was doing that my friends houses nobody was doing that because they were buying a new one exactly yeah it's crazy how now you get those things at the dollar store I know back into the you need to go to radio it was check minimum thirty Oh my God remember fuck that now you have the digital converter box now you can get ten eighty p Channel Two for all of them all of them aged equality missing the news so you see that's so you were has not little engineer before you to even thought about going to school for you WanNa go to be a computer engineer that's crazy computer science computer science computer science decide Oh yea not not a not a boot camp four years of university to get a degree computer science one hundred percent computer scientists yeah but I I can't yeah but that's not just me it all started when my dad though I don't know because my dad because all right so I'm Puerto Rican so I don't know if it's known throughout the interwebs that international but we like hug and sound systems so Oh I you know I know that we liked loud music we can't just play regular like we have a five hundred dollar car but we'll put two thousand is with the speakers and a radio and they're gonNA back to make sure everybody knows the mix were playing in our web you like it you may not love it but is what we're going to listen to it because we spend a lot of money on this boy yeah so basically a party so boom so my dad it comes from Puerto Rico the land of opportunity starts working and then he has money so he's like okay let me get my speaker is on you know what I mean so he would speak as he will get sound equipment he would get so back in the day you had you had to get the whole sound system you had to get the the amplifier this guy and if you had a CD player with the dual take that was on the boom amplifier would go like sometimes in the passenger side on the side of non talking about from the home all yes it was yeah took up the whole wall it was like you had to buy a house big enough or an apartment big enough dedicated a whole of this house five feet with the with the speakers that are five feet tall skinny so it's ironic though because those systems were actually better than what we have now but I don't want to really get into that too amazing sound systems amazing and there were crude but it's like their way better like it was bigger because of amplification and obviously electron components have gotten smaller Dong but yeah he would buy this equipment but him being from Puerto Rico and being here on for a couple of years I'm a little kid he would just open the box and throw me the manual okay so I'm over here like I got this thing it looks like something from outer space is Dino Miss and it looks like expensive yeah Lemme mess this up yeah so I was the one that had to go through the instructions because you don't want my my mom is definitely not messing with that she molly asking why is this shit in this house yeah so that was basically a VCR's remember VCR VCR's deeply remember do you remember the little the little VCR reminders it was all yeah yeah one hundred because if you're going to blockbuster take charge you like please Rwanda Tate returned charge you a fee like five bucks or something so they were winder paid for eh to avoid avoid the penalties yeah man you need it to Rwanda how you how it would it would be a wild for something to rewind needless to say you know fifteen minutes whatever you know what I mean so it's like a great and then hold up it was revolutionary when you had the VCR that once you're the end it automatically rewind Oh yeah dude that was the also you didn't even have to get up you didn't have to hit inject I know and put it in the other thing you just got the one unit thousand luxury remember now that that also reminds me of remember normal controls for the TV where you to actually get up and change the channel you remember that I mean I think I was lucky so you add remotes cable like we have the cave like the legit cable the cable it it was the broke into box it was nine I was the Freedom Act box was freedom freedom freedom hacked the box you act box you know what I'm saying so that's basically was it was like one gay and so you don't have to worry about none of that stuff but remember the guy that remember the Knob you don't WanNa mess that that was the only way to do it yeah I remember.

New York Abdun Lena Pam one hundred percent five feet five hundred dollar fifteen minutes four years two years
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"So what's up Yup it's been about six months but I'm back and I'm back with a special guest you're hearing this episodes about an hour eighteen minutes nausea out here because I'm in the city walking kind of Santa Monica Solo founded podcasts and yeah we just had a conversation recorded it for unedited natural like everything else I do on this podcast so I'm really excited about this episode man longtime common listened to that episode let me know what you think is starts really funny and then gets a little serious maybe a little boring at times depending on what you like what you don't but yeah cool turning point and onto chapter two I hope you enjoyed the show pace per ten you fucking yeah good enabled sin yeah yeah so I think that's a good trip to Asia Abelson said yeah who'd you start recording already I started recording we're we're live live ninety nine live action so I mind nice food we have anti today what is beautiful breeze beautiful the baby baby grasshoppers what else holding their grasshoppers they could be some cockroaches that are upgraded hopefully takes green green cocker on Ah yeah ankles all you have to check your jerseys crazy with the ticks mine disease control I know disease L. Joke man there's no cure for that dogs well there's no cure but it can be cured I have a friend who's a naturopathic doctor and she's held that people with lyme disease it'd be cured with time a long time yeah long everybody's times were she's had it for like ten years and she's I think about like seventy seven five percent yeah but that's one of his crazy ticks figured that out but we got we got schiffer AIDS and you know there's one one take that jumps ooh I could jump from where I'm at to you that what's up come on Bro we'll be like brothers I mean back in the day they had what is it like when you were like blood brothers take brother Kinda like blood brothers will be a tick mosquito bites you let's go bites me and we're kind of blood brothers I'm sure yeah yeah it's just safer yeah which is not joe it you know how crazy it is uh-huh if somebody had HIV and they get stung by a mosquito say you're on a beach the Mosquitos Mosquito okay jumps off that person to call a high five and then they come over me and they stink me I don't get it you don't get it got it how come how do you know you don't get it though Google's that's why Dr but there was somebody did the research somewhere somebody had it available on Google I don't WanNa mosquito a bit you you could get guys right away died like a little later he also being mosquitoes so be that's why they don't WanNa problems all we technically doesn't WanNa problems that if you fuck with it they fuck with you defending themselves yeah but kamikaze fucking themselves they're like all right brought me that like the Japanese so fly away they like the Japanese Pearl Harbor Bro you GonNa Fuck and take me down we'll go down I you know what I mean you know what I mean okay kamikaze kamikazes the animal kingdom that's crazy yo so I don't know why this maybe Bat now so you have had remember what Louis let's talk about this senior though right now because we're on top of a mountain over seeing Manhattan and Partner Jersey is definitely more Jersey noticing well you can't see because of the trees but I've been here before when they weren't leaves yeah but they'll fuck that that's not even highlight Manhattan Fuck Manhattan Lakers Jersey Brown's New Yorker so I have to Jersey which I know New York is New York is used like New York state yeah yeah yeah yeah everybody thinks the little the Little Peninsula Ryland I think that's New York's NYC burlap thing is John West has to I like I like upstate upstate is nine yeah yeah definitely run into some shit there some people.

Santa Monica Solo seventy seven five percent eighteen minutes six months ten years
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

05:34 min | 1 year ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"So what's up Yup it's been about six months but I'm back and I'm back with a special guest you're hearing this episodes about an hour eighteen minutes noisy out here because I'm in the city walking kind of Santa Monica Solo founded podcasts and yeah we just had a conversation recorded it for unedited natural like everything else I do on this podcast so I'm really excited about this episode man longtime common listened to that episode let me know what you think is starts really funny and then gets a little serious maybe a little boring at times depending on what you like what you don't but yeah cool turning point and onto chapter two I hope you enjoyed the show pace per fucking yeah good enabled sin yeah yeah so I think that's a good intro to the Shaw Abelson said Yeah who'd you start recording already I started recording we're we're live live ninety nine live action so I mind nice food we have anti today what is beautiful breeze beautiful the baby baby grasshoppers what else there grasshoppers they could be some cockroaches that are upgraded hopefully takes green green cocker on ah yeah ankles have to check your jerseys crazy with the ticks mine disease control I know diseases L. Joke Man there's no cure for that dogs well there's no cure but it can be cured I have a friend who's a naturopathic doctor and she's held that people with lyme disease it'd be cured with time a long time yeah long everybody's times when she's had it for like ten years and she's I think about like seventy seven five percent yeah but that's one of his crazy ticks figured that out but we got we got schiffer AIDS and you know there's one one take that jumps ooh I could jump from where I'm at to you that what's up come on Bro we'll be like brothers I mean back in the day they had what is it like when you were like blood brothers take other kind of like blood brothers will be a tick mosquito bites you let's go bites me and we're kind of blood brothers I'm sure yeah yeah it's just safer yeah which is not joe it you know how crazy it is uh-huh if somebody had HIV and they get stung by a mosquito say you're on a beach the mosquitos mosquito okay jumps off that person to call a high five and then they come over me and they stink me I don't get it you don't get it got it how come how do you know you don't get it though Google's that's why Dr but there was somebody did the research somewhere somebody had it available on Google I don't WanNa mosquito a bit you you could get guys right away died like a little later he also being mosquitoes so be that's why they don't WanNa problems all we technically doesn't WanNa problems that if you fuck with it they fuck with you defending themselves yeah but kamikaze fucking themselves they're like all right brought me that like the Japanese so fly away they like the Japanese Pearl Harbor Bro You GonNa Fuck and take me down we'll go down I you know what I mean you know what I mean okay kamikaze kamikazes the animal kingdom that's crazy yo so I don't know why this maybe bat now so you have had remember what Louis let's talk about this senior though right now because we're on top of a mountain over seeing Manhattan and Partner Jersey is definitely more Jersey number thing well you can't see because of the trees but I've been here before when they weren't leaves yeah but they'll fuck that that's not even highlight Manhattan Fuck Manhattan Lakers Jersey Brown's New Yorker so I have to Jersey which I know New York is New York is used like New York state yeah yeah yeah yeah everybody thinks the little the Little Peninsula Ryland I think that's New York's NYC burlap thing is John West has to I like I like upstate upstate is nine yeah yeah definitely run into some shit there some people.

Santa Monica Solo seventy seven five percent eighteen minutes six months ten years
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

14:58 min | 2 years ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"I'm back everybody was up it's been a while since I put another podcasts out there I want to do things consistently but a here comes the excuses just had a lot going on in just everyday life and yeah I guess I over think it and I put it he still winging it but have a couple of things on this podcast that I wanna talk about but I if you haven't download the APP please go down the APP it's available for IOS is cold Santa Mine S. A. N. O. M. I N. D. Santo Mine and just give me your thoughts ideas feedback it's still pretty still pretty barebones simple MVP but the whole point of it to to get the content out there and to see people listen and people are people are listening check those numbers every day and I think we're about to go into being able to build more features and products so yeah that's coming soon but we'll see we'll see what happens but yeah I still been working on it I hate I hate to admit it but as far as the product yeah guess we are Zombie mode which is is the worst multibillion having build any features and just been out there with the same with the same product and just been focusing on getting content out there for now which which is the most important part but there needs to be an experience on the APP there needs to be a couple more features than like to add for now an you know if we want to be a technology quotes startup or at least product than We need to work on that but yeah so besides being Zombie mode where I think into health is going I I mean I don't WanNa say where it's going but because there's a lot of things going on in mental health out a lot more people are talking about it from a hot topic but there's there's still there's still a stigma I wouldn't say stigma is the number one reason that people don't seek help and it isn't the number one reason the number one reason people don't seek help AK therapy because of the cost and that's that's sad I don't think unless the government or insurance companies pay therapists and psychologists their full rates I don't think it's ever going to be cheaper and when I say when I say cheaper I'm talking about face to face one on one therapy in an office setting that's not going to be cheaper you know reality is the therapists and psychologists they go to school for a long time it's not easy and they need to be paid for their time so I'm glad that there are a lot of other ways that people can work on their mental health but when I say where I think mental health is going I think because we have a lot of APPS and you know meditation and there's all these other ways of self care and taking care of your mental health I I I think preventative is debased because get to prevent the onset of mental health issues such as depression and anxiety because nobody has ever taught us to you know Armenta health work on on mental health or do any sort of preventative care for mental health when we were kids growing up and I think they're starting to do that a now but it's taken a lot of initiative from individuals like teachers they're Biz everyday people and like me that talk about it put out podcasts work on products for it but I think Oh people with serious mental health illness they need you know to see a therapist to see a clinical psychologist psychiatrist but as far as just everyday general anxiety and depression and people that they might think they're depressed but there not really depressed there's just you know in a bad place in their life or you know a lot of things been going wrong and throughout the roller coaster of life emotions I think there are still ways for those people to management to health You know using a lot of the self care tips that are out there are or doing whatever you like to do whatever they enjoy doing whatever it takes their mind off things but another thing is is asking yourself the hard questions and answering them honestly listening to your body and you know focusing on what's on your body's telling you and and then just push through and talk to people right Journal every morning Do something like an audio an audio journal where you talk into voice memos and you just just let your let let words right and just get everything out sometimes it's not enough to to write it down or sometimes people don't like to write so talk it out just put it hit record and just let go or if you're in the shower talk to yourself and when I say talk I mean verbally not in in your head because there's a there's a big difference they're just talk it out when there's some there's something powerful about just letting it go from your you're from your head and listening to yourself talk and just putting it out there I know I'm going off in Tangents but you know I just wanted to see talk about you know mental health and this helps solo founders too because this is what gave me the idea when when I'm out running obviously I don't talk out loud because people just think I'm crazy but I talked to myself inside my head all the time when I'm running and I I've been running semi consistently for it'll be two years in June and I see highness I've kind of seen that I kind of on my own on my own therapists because I'm talking to myself and I'm asking questions uh-huh giving myself ideas I'm giving myself advice and I'm trying to figure out issues and problems and come up with solutions for myself and you know anything going on in my life which includes building sat on mine and you know trying to build this product to help others so although well I'm not speaking it out this kind of like a mental inner chatter that's been helping me and it's kind of weird I mean it also helps to that you know I read about psychology and I talked to therapist so a lot of the things I've learned I'm just repeating in my head and just figuring things out on my own and I I kind of enjoy that challenge and I don't know it's part of growing but as a solo founder especially if you're alone most of the time I think that's great I mean you know try it go run see what happens if you don't like it you can do other things just the key here is do whatever works for you whatever makes you happy and whatever you think is helping if you see results but yeah moving board with Santa Wine I was worried about you know building the right things for people and just just worry about what people are thinking and I just went back to the basics is listen it's it's about helping people with content you know I'll listen to feedback if it makes sense you know we'll put it into the product if it doesn't we're going to keep going the way that we wanted to go mission follow the mission and follow intuition and you know back to basics to why started this because I started for one reason and that's the only reason if people don't don't want to join or don't like the APP or it can be this or that you know there are other apps you can get onto do those specific things and there are other ways you can do whatever you do it is you wanna do but yeah after going back to the mission it just makes it so much easier and way less stressful on myself suggest focused on why why why why why why why we're doing this and I've just come to revelation you know when I first started I heard everyone saying you know focus these are focused tunnel vision on that Y and block out the chatter follow the data and just go with what the data saying if you have to if something's not going wrong if something's not going right the data's going to tell you fix it it rate and fix it and see what starts right but if everything's going right and it's going right based upon your y than just a stand that seeing that lane I can't stress enough we listened to many people there's so much information out there you know there are a lot of their VC's their aims Dell's there are other founders their soup assessment what works you you're welcome to to read it all you do learn about things but it's just simple men it's really simple focus on the why follow the data and if it's working continue that way that's it doing anything else you just going to you just go nuts nuts in your head and another thing is that there's another point I wanted to make about but you know the truth is a lot of people don't know what they want or especially what's going to work if they do what you feel is right and do what you want and again follow the data but give people something news you know different activities and they think that feature would would be perfect on your APP because then they would love to use it I think it's cooler and it's a a better explain if you give something if you give people something different and that excites them that wiles them and that's the hard part but it's fun that's all that stuff out so yep this was a little bit about Samba Mode Mental Health and where I think you know Santa Mine should go or where it's at now and you know you should do when you're building a product I'm not an expert this is just little things that I've thought about it and things I've learned along the way and hopefully it helps somebody or are hopefully you hear this and you know what I'm doing is cool and you WanNa meet and you WANNA help out join the team that would be great right now it's just me and might be one of the person pretty soon we'll see but some you're more strategic but it's been digital content digital it just takes up a lot of time and I love doing but it's hard to do all by myself and so I'm looking for somebody that's that's interested in digital marketing when I say to the market I mean across instagram facebook twitter Lincoln and somebody that loves creating content love creating good headlines or good copy nothing of that Corny Witty Shit that's a lot of people do now on just I don't like it to be honest but cool but the copy I like copy to be more creative than witty something that makes people think I think you have to be into you know more than anything mental health wellness mental wellness wellness and strengthening your mind you gotta be.

S. A. N. O. M. I N. D. Santo M MVP two years
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

14:08 min | 2 years ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"I'm back everybody was up it's been a while since I put another podcasts out there I want to do things consistently but a here comes the excuses just had a lot going on in just everyday life and yeah I guess I over think it and I put it he still winging it but have a couple of things on this podcast that I wanNA talk about but I if you haven't download the APP please go down the APP it's available for IOS is cold Santa Mine S. A. N. O. M. I n. d. Santo Mine and just give me your thoughts ideas feedback it's still pretty still pretty barebones simple MVP but the whole point of it to to get the content out there and to see people listen and people are people are listening check those numbers every day and I think we're about to go into being able to build more features and products so yeah that's coming soon but we'll see we'll see what happens but yeah I still been working on it I hate I hate to admit it but as far as the product yeah guess we are Zombie mode which is is the worst multibillion having build any features and just been out there with the same with the same product and just been focusing on getting content out there for now which which is the most important part but there needs to be an experience on the APP there needs to be a couple more features than like to add for now an you know if we want to be a technology quotes startup or at least product than We need to work on that but yeah so besides being Zombie mode where I think into health is going I I mean I don't WanNa say where it's going but because there's a lot of things going on in mental health out a lot more people are talking about it from a hot topic but there's there's still there's still a stigma I wouldn't say stigma is the number one reason that people don't seek help and it isn't the number one reason the number one reason people don't seek help AK therapy because of the cost and that's that's sad I don't think unless the government or insurance companies pay therapists and psychologists their full rates I don't think it's ever going to be cheaper and when I say when I say cheaper I'm talking about face to face one on one therapy in an office setting that's not going to be cheaper you know reality is the therapists and psychologists they go to school for a long time it's not easy and they need to be paid for their time so I'm glad that there are a lot of other ways that people can work on their mental health but when I say where I think mental health is going I think because we have a lot of APPS and you know meditation and there's all these other ways of self care and taking care of your mental health I I I think preventative is debased because get to prevent the onset of mental health issues such as depression and anxiety because nobody has ever taught us to you know Armenta health work on on mental health or do any sort of preventative care for mental health when we were kids growing up and I think they're starting to do that a now but it's taken a lot of initiative from individuals like teachers they're Biz everyday people and like me that talk about it put out podcasts work on products for it but I think Oh people with serious mental health illness they need you know to see a therapist to see a clinical psychologist psychiatrist but as far as just everyday general anxiety and depression and people that they might think they're depressed but there not really depressed there's just you know in a bad place in their life or you know a lot of things been going wrong and throughout the roller coaster of life emotions I think there are still ways for those people to management to health you know using a lot of the self care tips that are out there are or doing whatever you like to do whatever they enjoy doing whatever it takes their mind off things but another thing is is asking yourself the hard questions and answering them honestly listening to your body and you know focusing on what's on your body's telling you and and then just push through and talk to people right Journal every morning Do something like an audio an audio journal where you talk into voice memos and you just just let your let let words right and just get everything out sometimes it's not enough to to write it down or sometimes people don't like to write so talk it out just put it hit record and just let go or if you're in the shower talk to yourself and when I say talk I mean verbally not in in your head because there's a there's a big difference they're just talk it out when there's some there's something powerful about just letting it go from your you're from your head and listening to yourself talk and just putting it out there I know I'm going off in tangents but you know I just wanted to see talk about you know mental health and this helps solo founders too because this is what gave me the idea when when I'm out running obviously I don't talk out loud because people just think I'm crazy but I talked to myself inside my head all the time when I'm running and I I've been running semi consistently for it'll be two years in June and I see highness I've kind of seen that I kind of on my own on my own therapists because I'm talking to myself and I'm asking questions uh-huh giving myself ideas I'm giving myself advice and I'm trying to figure out issues and problems and come up with solutions for myself and you know anything going on in my life which includes building sat on mine and you know trying to build this product to help others so although well I'm not speaking it out this kind of like a mental inner chatter that's been helping me and it's kind of weird I mean it also helps to that you know I read about psychology and I talked to therapist so a lot of the things I've learned I'm just repeating in my head and just figuring things out on my own and I I kind of enjoy that challenge and I don't know it's part of growing but as a solo founder especially if you're alone most of the time I think that's great I mean you know try it go run see what happens if you don't like it you can do other things just the key here is do whatever works for you whatever makes you happy and whatever you think is helping if you see results but yeah moving word with Santa Wine I was worried about you know building the right things for people and just just worry about what people are thinking and I just went back to the basics is listen it's it's about helping people with content you know I'll listen to feedback if it makes sense you know we'll put it into the product if it doesn't we're going to keep going the way that we wanted to go mission follow the mission and follow intuition and you know back to basics to why started this because I started for one reason and that's the only reason if people don't don't want to join or don't like the APP or it can be this or that you know there are other apps you can get onto do those specific things and there are other ways you can do whatever you do it is you WanNa do but yeah after going back to the mission it just makes it so much easier and way less stressful on myself suggest focused on why why why why why why why we're doing this and I've just come to revelation you know when I first started I heard everyone saying you know focus these are focused tunnel vision on that Y and block out the chatter follow the data and just go with what the data saying if you have to if something's not going wrong if something's not going right the data's going to tell you fix it it rate and fix it and see what starts right but if everything's going right and it's going right based upon your y than just a stand that seeing that lane I can't stress enough we listened to many people there's so much information out there you know there are a lot of their VC's their aims Dell's there are other founders their soup assessment founders they're found is who are early their founders who are like into thick of it now and everybody has the different what was I gonNA say everywhere everybody has different feedback or advice everybody has different advice what works you you're welcome to to read it all you do learn about things but it's just simple men it's really simple focus on the why follow the data and if it's working continue that way that's it doing anything else you just going to you know just just focusing on what you WANNA do everybody has ideas of what they wanted an APP or what you what you should put in an APP but you know the truth is a lot of people don't know what they want or especially what's going to work if they do what you feel is right and do what you want and again follow the data but give people something news if you give something if you give people something different and that excites them that wiles them and that's the hard part but it's fun that's all that stuff out so yep this was a little bit about Samba mode mental health and where I think you know Santa Mine should go or where it's at now and you know are hopefully you hear this and you know what I'm doing is cool and you WanNa meet and you WANNA help out join the team that would be great right now it's just I love doing but it's hard to do all by myself and so I'm looking for somebody that's that's interested in digital marketing when I say to the market loves creating content love creating good headlines or good copy nothing.

Santo Mine S. A. N. O. M. MVP two years
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

09:14 min | 2 years ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"Guess who's back your nose back because you are you clicked on the podcast and it's been a couple of weeks in heaven Dropped an episode maybe because I had nothing to talk about nothing was really going on this is going to sound terrible here right now because I am getting ready to go to work yes bartend at a nice upscale Japanese restaurant I used to bartend years ago and I decide I did hey instead of you know just try to look for a full time position because gotta make money while you're building something way trying to pull the because Santa Mine is not bringing in any revenue or money in my pocket we're not charging anything yet but so I thought Oh shit what am I go back to bartending so did just that and I forgot how much fun you get to meet different people fifth grade the place that I'm bartend at is called Dodie it's carmine street downtown Manhattan what's it called it's not so he's I think he's back but anyway so always was a slow month for Santa Mine it was the slowest month for forgetting on any therapists on the platform I think I only put up two or three pieces of content and I choked up to August being the slowest months of the year for everybody because the last month of the MAR people on vacation everybody's checked out at work and nobody's going to be thinking about really recording audio content for for Santa Monica at least not yet because everybody was still posted on facebook twitter instagram so they seem to be doing all right which is good for them but anyway so a couple of things happened last month I well everybody that apply got into Y combinator start school it's not the y combinator a celery later with a provide funding but this is the start of school that S- run by Y combinator alumni and who partners at y combinator but for me the only difference is actually getting funding at the Y.. combinator celebrator and meeting investors. VC's because I mean the content the lectures that they've been putting up have been amazing and one thing to me that was that stood out that ever since I launched Santa Mine January seventeenth of two thousand eighteen I've been working to get users and get contributors licensed services that causes and I just been catching them however I can you know and social media being on podcast engaging people on twitter linked in writing me podcasting anyway possible I can to get you to attract users on groups on facebook and I thought that you know I was like Oh man what's what see what's the best to do this because I'm growth is good but it's it's slow I wanted to be a lot faster and and yesterday there were two lectures about building products getting more product market fit and there was an ask me anything with it the partners that Y C and he was also I think he was head of Grove at Airbnb and everything that he's nope all the questions that he answered were mostly around growth and a lot of them were around BTC which is business is consumer ABS- or companies and he said there's no magic formula it's basically doing everything that I've been doing already you know just going out there and agent with TV using every every site every tool imaginable that you can track those first users because it's hard to get massive growth until you have product market fit you know product market fit is actually something that people actually want to use need and and and also something that they're using I guess every day and can't can't step away from like instagram for example facebook or twitter their way past product market fit you know people millions and billions of people use these products everyday and that's where I wanNA get Santa mine the way the product is now I know that it's not you know at product market fit and I knew it wasn't going to be a part of market because there's still a couple little features that are needed for both users and contribute to actually want to use it more often but I'm excited that everything I've been doing today is actually the right thing and I've been thinking that in the right spot the founder of Whibley to talk on product market fit and growth and when they launched they didn't get product market fit until about eighteen to twenty four months after they launched and their grass look the same as mine up and down up and down not much growth but you know everybody has been saying you know all these talks and the C O only side and I will continue to do what I've been doing which is every social media tool available to man and posting an engaging with people anywhere I can up to even on the street and and you know meditation and Mindfulness but there's a book that I've that I've had here that I've been wanting to actually read because I only read maybe about one two three chapters probably mid August and I started really reading it every day and the book is called Mindfulness I'll I'll put the why you're feeling that way what makes you feel that way but not shying away from your feelings.

facebook Santa Monica Santa Manhattan twenty four months
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

10:39 min | 2 years ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"What's up everybody I'm back I was away for two weeks not because I'm lazy just because I had nothing to really put out and I was also way for a couple of days for a wedding so outside of the country and as soon as Shen not really have to think about much until two days before I was coming back I guess subconsciously mine new you know I was getting back into the stress to work mode and I started getting really really just and the breathing again that that shall oh breathing's happening but when I got back I started managing it with running so I've been running for the past year and I used to run in high school and I used to run in college of on my own and it was mostly because try now for baseball teams and just having been on Jim Beam in gym and playing some baseball in the summer so you have to run a lot so I actually enjoyed running so last year I got back into it so I could get back into shape and got back into shape got good stamina back but now I'm running for Stamina and speed so back in high school when I was sixteen seventeen ran a mile and five minutes and that's pretty fast so last year when I started running my first mile was about somewhere between twelve and fourteen and a half minutes I I don't remember probably on the higher end forty minutes but I I was in shock and not in shocked at how how shape I was so thirteen months later my fastest mile to date has been seven minutes and seventeen seconds and that was yesterday so I've been pushing myself every day too beat to beat the fast time Monday I got back to running and I did seven thirty seven minutes and thirty seconds yesterday I did seventeen seven minutes and seventeen seconds today tried to beat that but wasn't happening first mile Iran was nineteen twenty five and it's I try to get an A. second mile seventeen twenty six but that's good though because I'm still running at a great pace and it's only gonna get it's only a better so now I'm training like I said for speed and stamina so I'm focused on doing hit training on the treadmill for speed I'm focusing on my core so I can it's good for running 'cause use your core lot so whatever I'm I'm working on my core you're and I didn't see much anything about doing any work for the legs but I'm more into that another thing Ed is I read that the best runners do one hundred eighty strides per minute so I counted my strikes today oh I think I did the first one I did one hundred seventy two and the trick is to take shorter and faster strides before I I was I was taking long strides in trying to go faster because I thought that that just I would run faster but I would get tired faster than that wouldn't work but now the short strides I saw that when I was getting tired mid mile or the second the second mid mile that taking those short fastest strides was really didn't have an effect on getting me more more tired and also focusing on my breathing while I'm running so you've gotta take deep breaths into your stomach and exhale it all out so you can continue deep breath because your blood needs oxygen and that's when you get really tired when you blood doesn't have oxygen and you start breath really fast but anyway this podcast is not about running is just it's about Santa Mind but it's also about my Life Buildings the mine so I use the running to get mental strength to get all that negative energy and all that anxiety the and depression out and it really works and it also gives me a ton of ideas and it also boost my confidence to do things that I need to do for Santa Mine Aka raise money and I would love to build a company and get it two hundred million in revenue and not raise time but the company I'm trying to build I need Technology Team Aka I need a team of engineers and some designers so that takes money that salaries so I just made the decision to start raising start get the ball rolling and raising money it takes awhile especially for someone that's not in the in that tech startup world because they only really take warm rose so that sucks but I really don't care but what really pushed me was I saw this is article on tech crunch come out and forgot her name but she's the founder and CEO of a paint company So she her background is interior interior design and she just saw how terrible the whole experience for of buying paint is for your home or office whatever and and she's so low nontechnical founder and she raised two million dollars with just a powerpoint deck just a pitch deck so I see that and I'm thinking I'm working on Santa Mine want to help bring therapists into the like new age where everything is about content and awareness and attention and if people follow you and love you that most likely for therapists at least will turn into hopefully a client but it also I'm also working on helping people there's twenty five million people they don't get the mental health help they need and the number one barrier and this is this is this comes from these are real what's the number one barrier cited is cost so listening to content prerecorded by therapists which you can access demand I think will be a game changer not only for people finding people trying to get the help they need without going to therapy they have different mindsets so when you're on Lincoln your mindset is business business networking connecting with people for business finding the job whatever when you're on facebook your mindset is different you are in I guess maybe family mindset because connected with your family they're close friends maybe like the other thing you know they have you can read reviews of restaurants and events so that's another mindset instagram different mindset you there to see picture and also bringing people that suffer bringing them together and they all talk to each other within these smaller groups and communities to build where people that suffer that need help that want to get educated on what mental health is or what they might be going through can come on discover new therapists from all over the country in America hopefully one day in the world with them I mean how does that and they're going to be other features built in within the APP which are going to be making more socials read about the female founder that raise two million on a deck and I actually have a product launch eight traction and it's known that it's needed by the people and the people want it still little if he if therapists are fully on board with this because you know it's like a.

Shen seventeen seconds seven thirty seven minutes seventeen seven minutes two million dollars thirteen months thirty seconds forty minutes seven minutes five minutes two weeks two days one day
"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

05:48 min | 2 years ago

"founder" Discussed on The Solo Founder - Building A Mental Health Tech Startup

"What's up everybody I'm back I was away for two weeks not because I'm lazy just because I had nothing to really put out and I was also way for a couple of days for a wedding so outside of the country and as soon as Shen not really have to think about much until two days before I was coming back I guess subconsciously mine new you know I was getting back into the stress to work mode and I started getting really really just and the breathing again that that shall oh breathing's happening but when I got back I started managing it with running so I've been running for the past year and I used to run in high school and I used to run in college of on my own and it was mostly because so I actually enjoyed running so last year I got back into it so I could get back into shape and got back into shape got good stamina back but now I'm running for Stamina and speed so back in high school when I was sixteen seventeen ran a mile and five minutes and that's pretty fast so last year when I started running my first mile was about somewhere between twelve and fourteen and a half minutes I I don't remember probably on the higher end forty minutes but I I was in shock and not in shocked at how how shape I was so thirteen months later my fastest mile to date has been seven minutes and seventeen seconds and that was yesterday so I've been pushing myself every day too beat to beat the fast time Monday I got back to running and I did seven thirty seven minutes and thirty seconds yesterday I did seventeen seven minutes and seventeen seconds today tried to beat that but wasn't happening first mile Iran was it's only GonNa get it's only a better so now I'm training like I said for speed and stamina so I'm focused on doing hit training on the Treadmill for speed I'm focusing on my core so I can it's good for running 'cause use your core lot so whatever I'm I'm working on my core her and I didn't see much anything about doing any work for the legs but I'm more into that another thing Ed is I read that the best runners do one hundred eighty strides per minute so I counted my strikes today oh I think I did the first one I did one hundred seventy two and the trick is to take shorter and faster strides before I I was I was taking long strides in trying to go faster because I thought that that Just mid mile or the second the second Mid Mile that taking those short fastest strides was really the mine so I use the running to get mental strength to get all that negative energy and all that Aka raise money and I would love to build a company and get it two hundred million in revenue and not raise time but the company I'm trying to build I need Technology Team Aka I need a team of engineers and some designers so that takes it takes awhile especially for someone that's not in the in that tech startup world because they only really take warm.

seventeen seconds seven thirty seven minutes seventeen seven minutes thirteen months thirty seconds forty minutes seven minutes five minutes two weeks two days