20 Episode results for "fort belknap"

E33- Fort Belknap, TX

Military Paranormal Investigations Podcast

1:37:09 hr | 11 months ago

E33- Fort Belknap, TX

"You're listening to the. Paranormal podcast where the truth is to be found a podcast exploring all things paranormal. On things. You. We re re. Ripped off. The unknown. Our members believe in the skeptical of. Bought with an open mind, just trying to make sense of it all. I want to get back in there trying to figure that out. Is the unknown I. Don't really have a say on it right now because i. don't know what the video looks like form looking for the evidence. What's the evidence? A story to me is not really evidence because that's one person's experience, and I do my personal beliefs into, but like you said I have might skeptical side. They approved another way. Military Paranormal investigations is not affiliated to any branch of the military. Coming to you from North Texas on multiple platforms for maximum range. Here are your hosts members of the. Team! We're having a very special podcast tonight. We are at or nap in Newcastle Texas. My Name's Jeff I'm Rob I'm Mike. I'm Jim. Jim. We have what you want to introduce him. We have with us here. The he is the. What is your official title? Superintendent whatever he is all traits. Is a master's degree in history, and he's working on his soon to be. In history and he's going to. He is over for about map here and if he's going to talk with us a little bit about the history. Well I think we probably need to. Had it hard Fi. ACA Yeah. You know we were. Being Military Background. We all have an interest. Right so I know I. Think it was you and I. Yeah. It was you and Alison Yeah We. We wanted to start doing like historical battlefields and reputations were all that the old military. Was that right? I was actually heading out towards the old post out behind the baker hotels right mineral wells. When you guys said You were heading down here I was like well. I'll just take a u turn you know, come down and follow you guys down here. Well we got here and we were. Immediately static of how the place looked in the history to it and I started talking to Jim's wife. About you know some of the history, and she said well, hold on, let me let me get you to my husband. He knows all the history of the place. Well he he. She handed me the phone and he was on it and we started talking, and then he found out who we were, and he's like. Oh paranormal says I got some stories. And we'll go into the stories towards the end of the the podcast here, but like I said he invited us out here we greatly appreciate him. Coming out here and giving us the history of Fort Belknap because I will tell you before I got here I had no clue with this this even about it was even here, really because we were actually looking at the trail of all that we were going to take the fort trail, right go. We're going to start up because we already did for Richardson. And then we're going to come down and do this one and then the one gram work Griffin Jim, we have fort well, there's of. Richardson's injects right. We would be the next one if you're following it that way and then. On the. Just north of Albany is Griffin. Yeah, that was the other one that we're going to. So kind of what we're GONNA do tonight is we're not going to do our normal MoD cast. This is going to be a lot about history. We guys we want you guys to hear the history of Fort Belknap and I will tell you if you're remotely close to this place. Take a trip out here. Definitely you need to come. Let me tell you when we were on our way down on you and and I'll say this before we ever start recording here. This place is beautiful. It's gorgeous. It's shaded. It was cool when we were driving down. We loaded up this morning. It was hot. It was nasty. We were driving down the truck and we re passing through the mosquito fields and thought man. This is going to. So we pulled up and it is like a shaded. Out here and it's absolutely gorgeous. There's a lot of history there. There's a lot of unique buildings and I think it's I think this is going to be a really fun time. Thank so yeah. So Jim. If you will give us a little background on on what you're doing in how you got here, okay, and then if you will just go into the history of four Belknap, absolutely so then we'll tell you when y'all showed up. I wasn't here I hardly ever leave the fort and at one day I was gone, so she called is she's always worried about that? Somebody's GonNa Start asking your history question. Is She called in? Did you know that there is a you? You're not supposed to use your cell phones when you're driving in Wichita Falls And I was faced timing with you. So excited about it and of course. Immediately turned around and came back because I was excited about this, but yeah so. This is my wife. And I have been here for six years going on six years prior to that we were. I was a director at a in Fort. Stockton for the Fort Stockton Historical Society over the fourteen of the museum, there and then In prior to that it was at Msu in Grad School. Working on my masters in history And that's when I found really. A New Fort Belknap existed. I did not know its significance until I started oma master's thesis. In just so much in Mash thesis really focused on account of the secession crisis in Texas eighteen, thousand, nine, hundred, sixty, in early, eighteen, sixty one. In all roads lead to Fort Belknap, Fort Belmont whenever four bill was get into this, but it was. It replaced the fourth. That was at Fort Worth was a major crossroads in When you're you real whenever I realized. Like. You said Dr Out. Here was nothing. You're having to absolutely nothing. And then you realize that there was something here that was. At one time. Helped, settle the West. This place had that big of an impact or just kind of amazing. Idea that you did you think about something that no longer exists at once was just such a big deal. Is. kind of the feeling of the ghost towns ashby a town here and there's nothing there anymore. In so that's kind of how. My master's thesis kind of led me to Fort Belknap in when I was in Grad School I taught. Early American history. To, College Freshman, and I didn't want to teach a never really wanted to teach in a classroom setting, I'd always wanted either work with the historical markers or at a historic site or something like that. And so whenever I I was working on a master's thesis found Fort. BELKNAP is designed my laugh. Of getting out of Grad School and coming to work here as Kinda. How 'cause I just love this place so much? When I got out of Grad School I went down to Fort Stockton House down there for two years. The place has got amazing history, but it's post civil war. It's not really where my focus is that and I? I just kind of had this. I really loved this area so then two years later. Finding jobs open somebody let me know and in our plot and showed up and we've been here for six years And kind of New visitors that would come in. We've just done a complete remodel of the museum. In updated it to make it look more like a museum. We're not completely done. We've got a little bit left, but we've done quite a bit here. It's beautiful, really A. Ton Of artifacts that are absolutely we do we have. The amount of artifacts in whenever we did this renovation. Went through every one of these artifice cleaning them researching I'm trying to you know, get a little bit of information. More information than was there because a lot of times it would just be what they thought the artifact was and then who donated it, and you would also have labels that said You know this was over one hundred years old was over one hundred years old in nineteen sixty. Claim, we've you know an hour? Where sixty years pass over one hundred, so I was trying to find dates and stuff. You know just to get it. A little bit more information on there and I went through it, and we kinda placed, and we're not done still got quite a bit to do, but as they were about eighty percent done, but. One of the ideas was. Doing, this kind of will lead into the history of of the four. I had a group from Fort. Worth come out and we've got a direct relationship for Belknap. Has that direct relationship with what were? In the she was probably. She might have been third grade in. She asked her teacher. Why would anybody live out here? And I thought she was talking about now. I said well got its charm I love history and she goes. No, I mean even back then. Why would anybody move out here in a thought? There's nothing in the museum that explains that right. And so that's why we got some funding to to Redo this. So, we could tell the story, but. And that direct relationship before so what happens I'm just going to jump into. The history of the four, so what happens after the Mexican American war ends and eighteen forty eight. Is You got a lot of people that are moving to Texas. The western edge of settlement at that time was roughly where Fort. Worth is at and he goes south okay. That's really I mean. Yeah. There were some other settlements beyond that, but that was roughly the Western settlement, eighteen, forty eight. The Mexican American war is over with one of the things that a lot of the soldiers got whenever they got out of the military was land pinch. That land was now available in Texas so. Not only has takes US secured. Takes us to become a state now is under the protection of the federal government. We don't have to worry about Mexico anymore. Because we just won that war, and now you've got a lot of soldiers that are looking for land, all these things kind of converge at One time, and so takes his. There's just a boom in population. So that western edge of settlement moves further west of Fort Worth in it, they they become. the settlers that move beyond that land are no no longer protected by the fourth. The. Whole idea of these forts was to protect settlers from the native Americans that were in the air. You know. Specifically if we want to get really specific, it was really the Comanche Indians in a little bit later. It was a Cowan's. We had both of those but So. The idea was because this westward. Expansion happened. We're going to build a four hundred miles beyond the closest settlement because nobody in their right mind whatever move beyond that. Ever of course, we now know that. All the way to ocean. But the Ford. There was in Fort Worth said about. If you're familiar with worth, it's about where the courthouses at is kind of where the fort was that there is a belknap street route there. That was a direct military road here to to to Fort Belknap. So, what happens eighteen fifty one? They picked this location. They picks. Pick it because it's a hundred miles. Beyond is actually the closest town that Dan was weather. Whether it's about eighty miles from here, but they chose this specific location because of its proximity to the river where an end of the river. That's a mile away from us. This is actually the second location to the fourth. The original location is where Newcastle is at now. Okay, but it was only there for six months. Problem being they couldn't get. Bottled Water I see so they moved to this location. In May chose this location for two reasons is proximity to the water in the fact that it's on the hugh. It's gotTA hide vantage. Vantage Point sexier thing around. You wouldn't know it now. Because of all the trees go back down, there were no trees. So they chose this location. Whenever they built a fort It took them so eighteen fifty one. They started construction here. By eighteen, fifty three fort worth was closed and everything was transferred here. Everything was here now, and then there was another four just south of. South of Fort Worth about forty miles called Fort Graham, which is we're like Whitney is at now near Cleber. fourbillion it replaces both of those forts, and all the soldiers are moved out here. and. They chose this location. What we consider Fort Belknap today is only about a third of the size of what the actual fort was. We from where we're sitting at in the commissary museum right now to the north of the Fort There's a some up there just on the other side of those houses, the officers quarters rat, and then as you come around to the northwest. That's where the. Hospital Quartermasters Office of Billiard Hall. There was a course with the hospital. There's also what they call the dead house. What we'd consider more now and then there was also a military cemetery. Beyond that that was that was really the busy end of the fort. Worth, that hospital and in quartermasters office at After the foreclosed. The population dispersed through a series of events in these buildings were kind of taken dismantled and. Taken to use for other building, so for instance if you go into if you haven't come out here if you go in. If you're coming from Wichita falls you. Can you come here? You'll go through Newcastle. Here's a gas station near new. Castle called Jerry's. If you look on the backside of that bill initially Thank three of the main buildings in downtown new castle. Well whatever is downtown. If you look you know what to look for you can see. Those buildings were built from Fort Belknap, rock allow. So, anyway in Fort was restored in nineteen, thirty six. That's why the wall is around. Before a lot of people ask well. How's Wall so short? Will that wall wasn't a military? While that this we had the high ground advantage, so you can see from Maoz. Miles around that. Vantage point was the wall. They didn't need a wall around in. None of the forced Texas had walls around them. None of the military for instead in the Comanche. Indians weren't stupid. They weren't gonNA. Attack fortified position so. That's Kinda gives you the layout of of what the four looks like But in eighteen fifty one, they moved out here. In. This is really a the. The fort was really more of A. It was a proving ground. So what happens is they seem all these soldiers out to the frontier whenever they first come out here? They send infantry soldiers out here. He had to remember the the. American, military complex at that time had shown its dominance. We've beat the British Twenty S. we just beat Mexico. We are a dominant force definite, definite superpower now. In West points booming at this time every major commander. In. The military comes to West Point. The Mexican American wars over with now you've, and this is the first time the United States has a standing army. That it's in peacetime. The first Lord that the United States fought with a standing army was the Mexican American war. When now you gotTA soldiers, you gotTa. Do something with them because we're not fighting anymore well, let's put them out on the frontier. Cinema here and they send the infantry out here when a hearing problem because if we're looking at. An US versus them things thinking thinking united. States citizen verse who the enemy is. For them in eighteen fifties, it would be the Comanche Indians. Now the problem is as you just sent a bunch of soldiers out here in bright blue uniforms. And didn't give them horses. Okay, so it's infantry at here, right? Well the Comanche. The greatest lot cavalry that's ever existed. Yeah, so there is no competition when it comes to military battle. They're the only thing that we would have over them is gunpowder. The guns we've got bodies, but when it comes to maneuvers to tactics to strategy, they've got US whipped. So I mean when you look at that, you really kind of see the failure of the federal government, not knowing who the enemy is because the military everything being taught at West Point. That time is that gentleman's Warfare Napoleonic warfare? We stand on fat. Comanche Indians didn't play by those rules. So. What happens, is they? They realized that they're. overwhelmed. They don't know what they're doing. The, so they didn't. They decide to bolster the infantry by sending dragoons out. which dragoons are mounted infantry. Rather, horse into battle can get off the horse to thought. And then he also send artillery out here and I explained it this way whenever especially when I'm talking to children. In the middle of the railroad tracks, you don't WanNa. Get hit by train. What do you do you get off the tracks? Okay? If you're looking down the barrel of a and you don't WanNa get shot based can and what do you do you move out of the way? So Kenan was pretty much useless against it sound. It was loud. In For. That reason only would have any kind of effect, but it was never put into play for any kind of skirmishes ever. Introduced artillery out here, but steel that Napoleonic warfare is the name of how to play in the military had been told numerous times. You're not going to beat the Comanche by doing that. I think John Coffee Hays. The famous Texas Ranger actually pled with the military department. San, Antonio you've got to use a revolver in. You've gotTA train your soldiers on horseback. But you're say you're a commander in the military and you get this. trashy look in. Texas Ranger show because they were. What they were, they didn't. Tobago stains down there wearing buckskin. Who is he to tell me? I just graduated from West Point highly educated, so you know you just think that that kind of mentality well by eight, hundred, fifty, five, eighty four. They're realizing that they've got to do something else so Jefferson Davis. He was Secretary War Tom. He creates the cavalry. And of course, that's the famous second cavalry is what was sent here now? You're getting a little bit better. You've got a cavalry. You've got mounted. Soldiers coming in against amounted enemy, but the problem was still the strategy the tactics they use. There's interesting thing that I've kind of research. The federal government shows up. The singing calvary shows up two days after Christmas eighteen fifty-five. And when they get here, the. When they really get here the Middle of a blue norther, a lot of these soldiers are introduced to this for the first time. They show up here. In their immediately dispersed throughout the state. What happens so they? They come two days after Christmas. Eighteen fifty-five in early, eighteen, fifty six. You see a drop in Indian attacks. In. The in October, eighteen, fifty, six, those Indian attacks, skyrock, What I think is happening. Is You get these new? Soldiers showed up the Indian. Sit Back in the heels and watch in a learner and then October is. Call it clench Moon October third the big raid with your, so that was their prime opportunity. We we've seen the new soldiers. We know how they were there. Not any competition to us in so eighteen October eighteen fifty six thousand attacks start back up. In eighteen fifty, so come to backtrack and eighteen fifty four. The federal government decided to create the reservation system. So Ingraham. Just south of Graham, there was an Indian reservation there, and then there was another one north of Fort Griffin. Were camp. KUPA was at that was the upper browsers reservation. The upper reservation was for comanche. Lower bracelets reservations for what we consider the Peaceful Indians that Caddo the Waco Tonko. The lower reservation was successful very successful. The upper one because it was comanche was not, but because the upper one was not successful that. What happened with him affected those that were on the peaceful reservation. Now at that time, people on the frontier weren't. Really? Didn't really care to differentiate between what traveler we're. You were an Indian you're scared of you. we see you as the enemy? So, what happens, is you get a bunch of men on the front and you still having Indian sporadic, Indian attacks happening. What happens, is you get a bunch of men? Kinda riled up and they decided that they're going to go storm. The lower reservation, the pre the the peaceful reservation. We're going to storm it and it where he's GonNa kill all Indians or we're going to scare them out of here. We're going to at least teach the federal government that this reservations are. The Indians need to be removed from Texas. So what happens is John Baylor he has a whole bunch of being, and that's what exactly what they do now. The commander that's here at Fort. BELKNAP here's this. He realizes what's GonNa Happen Colonel Plummer. He founds out what's What's going to happen? And so he sends troops from for Belknap to go protect the Indians and one of these interesting ironies of history that I absolutely love so our artillery cannons were put here at Fort, Belknap to protect the settlers from the Indians, but the only time they were ever used was to protect Indians from the settlers. Is Fascinating stuff so anyway, but that incident led the state of Texas and the federal government to to. Decide to close the reservation, so they move all the Indians to. Indian territory, what is now, Oklahoma. In, also at the same time. You've got a situation in Utah with the Mormon that they're sending military. Soldiers there. What happens is general tweaks. Down in Texas. San Antonio this as close Fort Belknap and send all these soldiers to Utah. Well they, after the Indians are moved on the reservation they, start, heading, to Utah. And word gets back that. This situation Utah's resolved itself. Though the soldiers turn around and come back to Texas and come back to Fort Belknap, General Twiggs, says no fort mental maps close, and so he kinda disperses them throughout the state. Okay That's really. So a lot of people when you argue if we're talking about the the laugh of four BELKNAP, a lot of people will say eighteen, fifty one to eight, hundred, fifty nine. I disagree with that because. So eighteen, fifty nine, the soldiers are gone. Well We know that this place was still a booming place in eighteen sixty. Captain Richard Johnson Texas State State Lisa takes his mounted patrol. Would consider. They come military Texas Ranger. Really a militia that they did together kind of under the auspices of the State of Texas. He meets in eighteen sixty. He meets in May of eighteen sixty. He gets rounders. Two hundred men here for Belmont for maps close militarily was he meets two hundred men here to go on an expedition to chastise Indian so the four still being used, and then of course, the civil war wants the civil war starts in eighteen, sixty, one, the man often on throughout the whole civil war with confederate soldiers in Texas Rangers. In and Under studied period of time. whenever you're thinking about Texas history. In Fort. BELKNAP is rich in history especially during the civil war, but what happens during the civil war is all you're able bodied men between the ages of eighteen and forty five, and then later eighteen fifty-five are conscripted to fight in the war. Well, that depletes the frontier of any protection. Except for this radic troops of Texas, Rangers that are running through. It's really women and children. They're left on the frontier. So for protection of women and children decide to uproot and move back east it into populated area have more protection their. Native Americans know this, and so now they're trying to gain territory back and you have a lot of really. really brutal raids that happened in October thirteen, eighteen, sixty four is really. The last big Indian rate takes his own creek rate happened just twelve miles west of here. We've got some artifacts here. That are directly related to that raid. In there were supposed to be a group of Texas Rangers here for Belknap when that happened, and they weren't, and you get some called him. The Paul Paul Revere, the West I believe his name was Thornton Handy. While the rate ran into the rate happened. Rate happened during the day. Started in the morning, it happened during the day by. From what I've can gather. Early afternoon raids over with the Indians. They've burned in killed in kidnapped and they're on their way back to Indian territory. But the settlers are still scared out of their minds, so they're huddled down in there. wherever shelter they could find finally this guy. Thornton Hamby is a young A. Thornton Hammy. Thornton Tammy. Thomas Handy and then. I think the other guy was a doctor Thompson anyway. One of those guys said Okay I'll go to fort Belknap in the middle of the night. Go to Fort Belknap to get some help, so he Raza Fort Belknap. He gets here. The people that are here, say the. Rangers aren't here. No is actually it was a supposed to be confederate. Battalion was here captain. Borland's company D was supposed to be here. Anyway they get Fort Belknap and realize that the soldiers aren't here. They're told their bill station. Which is Over Spring Town. So he rides for Fort Belknap Deville station. He gets to go station. I said no, he's not. They're not here. They're actually indicator. And he goes decatur and finally gets word to him, and he's. He was some historians of called him the Paul Revere the West I. I kinda question whether he made that Rod between Ville station indicator somebody anyway. Somebody got word to decatur but Anyway, and then you know they come back to Fort Belknap and They look at the damage that's happened at Elm Creek. And of course this is October. Eighteen sixty four will April eighteen sixty five civil wars over with. But. What has happened is now that you're populations completely depleted. We had this kind of Adia. The after the civil war's over with these people just came back and picked up where they left off. That's not necessarily the case. These soldiers are tired of fighting and they don't want to move back on the frontier to fat more, so you got a new breed of people that come out here you. If. You're looking at the people that moved. Into the West west of footwork. You got a lot of people that are coming from southern states. There used to creating their own existence. But when you're in the southern, States Alabama Georgia. Florida. There are certain resources available there that you can do that. Namely Timber and water. You move out here. That's not here so the people that moved out here. They've got to learn how to exist you're. Not they're not even look at how to live comfortably. We're talking just to survive and so. You got this group of people that start moving back out here. Because the population was so deeply rooted Young County was decommissioned as a county. There were enough people here to. Keep account going and it's not until eighteen seventy four. And? This is nine years after the civil is over with an account has actually recommissioned. As a county. So I mean it shows how that struggle back here. But so civil wars with. In late, eighteen, sixty, six, early, eighteen, sixty seven. The federal troops show back up here to Fort Belknap. They're here for six months while they're here is really the missions that they're looking at? Are Yeah still. Taking account of a defensive position against the Indians, but they're also doing. Exploratory Missions Mapping rivers and stuff like that. What happens? You got the command here for BELKNAP? Splits the troops. Half of them go north Into Jet County! Clay County. We're buffalo springs is. There's there's a Fort Buffalo Springs that was so what happens is they go up there and they try to establish a fort there. They have a hard time getting timber, making their four and another group that was here at Fort. BELKNAP do these little sporadic missions where they're mapping the river going whist. They decide to close for BELKNAP and what happens is the soldiers that are here at Buffalo Springs. They end up creating. Fort Richardson. The soldiers that went west to the clear fork of the Brazos they end up creating Fort Griffin. Fort Belknap is closed, so if you of look at the Forbes, genealogy Or if or fort worth in four gram create fort, belknap bill net creates for Richardson Fort Roof. kind of gives you kind of an idea of how that a lot of people think that we were contemporary with those yeah. We've got our own existence. That was one of my questions. is how Richardson late into this? Because it's just right up the road, but yeah. That's what I get a lot of that. We were an outpost rigid center. We were the halfway stopping point between Fort Richardson, Griffin. If you look at it in a map, yeah, we're forty miles to fort, but we. We existed before the In the the mentality of the military also changed after. Richardson Griffin were established in Conscio-. Instead of taking a defensive position they now you're going on the offensive and that's mainly because Sherman was almost killed about ten miles north of here and I'm Sherman. The. Scourge of the South he was killed out. I mean almost killed ten miles north of here. He escaped the Warren Wagon train massacre. He had just passed through. This one area gets to Fort Richardson. Do hours later. This router comes into for Richardson, and says he was with this wagon train in Indians just came in and massacred everybody and so Sherman in the reason Sherman was in Texas was because people on the frontier had been sending letters to DC, and you've got to do something about the Indian Problem Sherman had gone to do this inspection to see if these charges were true. In up until he got Fort Richardson He. It's all made up. There's no problem at the frontier within this. Radyr comes into for Richardson. Hey look so sherman goes out and investigates. He goes up to fort. Sill they finally round up who they think. We're the ones that CREATED WORN WAGON TRAIN NASCAR and. That's whenever in it you see. The American military might change. Wow, now I mean you get the Red River War, in Sherman actually exact same plan. He used on the south with Anaconda Plan. We're going to encircle. Comanche Indians and we're going to squeeze them in, and it will slash right through the middle of them, and so you had the battle of the Red River wars and the ballot powder Kenyan. All because of what almost happened him just a few miles or so very. Fascinating stuff fascinates does so I have a question for you. What's the original Fort Belknap? What do you think the what was the land size of the forty itself so okay, so we're on about sixteen acres now. If you look at the map, you look at what they had built structures built on. It was about fifty two acres. We're about a third of the size of the fort was and that's not. They controlled everything to the river to the south into the West. But they didn't have anything built on that. I'm just talking about strictly what they built on about fifty two acres We could probably get more exact on that, but. How How do the town's so like? We have Newcastle optus right here so for that was here to kind of protect this frontier. How were the towns? I mean was Newcastle here the okay so What happens is. The there was A. Just across the highway from Fort Belknap was the town of Belknap, and that was the first county seat of Young County. Because of what happened in civil war with population, depleting in the name taken forever to get back up here by the time young county was recommissioned as in a is a county in the eighteen seventies there manning salting Graham. Okay and they've already just in between here in. New Castle is a place. Called Whiskey, Creek. It's called Whiskey Creek for a purpose. There was A. Ton of steals found there. Evidently, it was its own little community had their own doctor, and you couldn't go in there unless you were invited in or whatever, in eventually that town kind of creeps north, because what happens is Okay so from your from Wichita falls camp in Kale. Yeah, they created the Newcastle Coal. Factory and they built a train. You know created the real that ran from. Wichita falls down. Newcastle is named Newcastle because of the coal. That was there, so they were exploiting the coal. So what happens is their mining salting? Graham, and then now you've got coal discovered in. New Castle which they knew Cole was there. Even the soldiers here used that coal. So there's no reason to stay at Fort, Belknap anymore because the military is gone. There's no money to be made here so the popular I mean they slowly can. Disperse for Belknap Graham Kane. I. If you're looking at the name, Graham came I eighteen, seventy, two grandma's created nineteen eight was whenever. Newcastle was commissioned. incorporated as a town, but there was a town there. That existed there I mean. Only north of here in eighteen ninety, there was a cowboy that's started because of the cowboy. Camp Cowboy gathering areas so. But whenever Fort Belknap was, there was no mean this was yet. So in not to take away from the four bounce story, but so now we've. We've through that town. The Ford is dispersed. Towns are popping up. Did all play a part in this area? Yeah? Yeah But only oil only played. So south of here in south being, there was a lot of oil there. Fifteen miles. I guess his bird flies. But that I don't think the oil had any direct relation with the the the. I, guess thinking of Fort Belknap I. Don't think that I mean. He was really the coal Newcastle, and because those were the big. Businesses going on, you really don't see oil playing huge part in young county until really the turn of the century. Okay so then. I know it's like you have the artifacts Texas. Rangers you said they come through here. So what about like? Outlaws and in those sorts of. In the air. Were there any popular things that came through here so one of the whenever these guys came out? A. Kind of excited about this because there's. One particular story that I didn't know until I moved here to researching it. So what happens is the the town of Belknap right after the soldiers leave in eighteen, fifty nine, the town of Belknap. Kind of encroaches on this property. And they use these buildings. So then after the civil war when people start moving back out here, really where the town town Belknap is at, it straddled part. Of what is the Fort Okay so if you've ever been out here, you're in if you haven't come out of just begging to come out and check this place out, but Whenever you come out here and I can show you where these places were so I live here on the grounds. My House is on the south end of the of what we call Fort Grounds now where my house sits at was called the lauderdale, there was building there the Lotto Hotel. Rat next to the lauderdale. Hotel was what was called. Holly Saloon. Holly Saloon was not a saloon like we think while and he was more of a general store. That had bar inserts so liquor. Or spirits. And Eighteen Seventies. So. There's the. Guy Inside Holly Saloon. His name is Buffalo Bill, not the Buffalo Bill Cody, he was evidently an outlaw that was also a buffalo hunter whatever he's sitting at the bar. And then there's a sheriff here in Young County he's a young, very very young. Sheriff. I WANNA. Say Twenty four years old, but evidently very good, because the anybody lives young county loved him in a way. The story plays out and tells you why, so what happens is. It the sheriff's name Sheriff Kirk. Sheriff Kirk has a warrant for the arrest of this Buffalo Bill. Is I. AM guessing it's murder charge. Why else would you risk your life to go after? Like Buffalo Hunter. The Sheriff Kirk walks into Holly Saloon. Buffalo Bill I've got a warrant for your wrist. Buffalo Bill is sitting at the bar either his buffalo gun is on the bar. or in his lap either way it's pointed at the door. Buffalo. Bill Shift Kirk says I'm here for your wrist. Buffalo Bill says. In squeezes off round, shoot sheriff. Kirk gets him in the gut as Sheriff Kirk is falling. He pulls his pistol out. Of Bill both of them. Now the interesting part of the story. One of the interesting parts of the story is because chef Kirk was so love. He was buried in cemetery over here and then reinterred later Ingraham, and they named the highest point in the county Kirk Mail Because, either because Sheriff Kirk was so loved, or because buffalo bills so hated. We don't really know what happened with Buffalo Bill's body. Some say he was buried in an unmarked grave cemetery. Others say he was dragged down to the river, and the cutlets coyotes heavy so. Anyway. That kind of leads to while y'all are here. There's this interesting phenomenon happens where Holly Selene sits at. There's an outline in the ground there. What happens is during the spring whenever all the grass starts turning green. This little outline stays dormant stays Brown. And then during the fall when the grass starts going dormant, this'll outline stays green. For just a little bit longer in any time of the year you can walk over there and see where this little outline is now. We had some work done in our cemetery. Archeological work done our cemetery. You say archaeological work in a cemetery. People get really curious. Now what happened? Is this inventory was still active whenever we I? I got out here. But. We also don't know where all there's a cemetery plot, so we don't know where people are buried out there and we needed to do some kind of archaeological work to make sure if we're putting out new hole in the ground. We're not digging up an old one. Anyway what is Texas Tech? came out and did this while they're here. The professor who has. Just absolutely loved. History and love, we just got along really good. Dr Tamra Walters out of out of state I said I got something I'm really curious about need. Come look at it, and so I took over there where this outline and the ground of the saloon was. And I told her what was happening. You know explained to her. How the grass they dormant, and then how state green and I told her what lived mean. What was there that that was a saloon and I I kind of imagine trying to make. To reason with this. I was thinking okay, so they had. Spirits alcohol or whatever maybe whenever they cleaned the bar. That's where the spirits fell into the ground. That was in nineteen seventies though. We've had one hundred fifty years since then. The soil would have replenished itself, and that's exactly what she said to me. She said it's not the soil in that. Are there any foundations underneath there? So we did a we? Will archaeological dig there in. There's nothing. There's absolutely nothing in the ground. No rocks, no timberlake nothing in that soil. That would no foundation at all that would. Lead you to say that's why this grass is staying this way. always absolutely thought that was the most amazing thing in the world pretty neat. Yeah, it is, it's it's really curious. Yeah it's really well in in whatever you all showed up to as mowing or whatever and I was over there. Oh, I don't WanNa I. Don't WanNa know over this. Matter Stop But Anyway, so I think I got one part of it mode, but you can still see it. Yeah, we could see the hour. It's amazing. It's amazing and that we haven't been able to explain what's going on there at all, and now of course. Around Halloween whenever people come out here I love to tell them that story and I love to show that and there were two people that died right here, could that be the reason you know? We! Never know you know but. Absolutely absolutely. It's it's. It's a neat little in one of the funny things is a house right next to that both my kids I've got five kids. Their bedrooms around that into the House and they hate that story. But at the same time it's it's A. It's a good way to get them to behave. Share stories. Will this work the first one is? There's a gentleman and I. Don't remember his name and you can tell us that. Truly was. A, native American ambassador. Okay. Rubber neighbors yes okay. So Robert. Neighbors was when I was talking about the Indian reservation system in in the reservation closing. Robert Neighbors. Was An Indian which was he was a liaison between the federal government and the Indian. Indian tribes or whatever? Of the heroes of the frontier in my man Robert Neighbors is one of those. He's right up there because he accomplished, what they said could not be accomplished. He get when you're looking at the reservations. The lower reservation was successful. That was under the direction of Robert Neighbors. Upper reservation was under the direction of John Baylor. Okay in the salt. The story all comes together. Well. Because of them, storming the reservation, what we call reservation where because of that the federal government decides to close the reservations in Robert neighborhood served his laugh. I mean he was arrested. He was in a parolee castle in in Mexico during the. Texas revolution I, mean He. His whole life had been in the service Lou State of Texas is all law. When they decided to close the reservations. In Robert Neighbors was loved by. Every native American, whether Comanche or Kiowa or in even today he's love because he was so good at what he did. So what happens is the reservations are closed. Robert Neighbors assists in taking them north to Indian territory. Whenever they get Indian territory Robert. Neighbors is now retiring from public life. He's done he's going to go to. San Antonio to live with his wife and his brand new baby daughter. He gets comes on his way to San Antonio. He stops here at Fort Belknap which was Kinda his central location. Is Absurd. Fort BELKNAP and he? is finishing up some some of his affairs some paperwork stuff he walks outside of this office. Somebody else's name, so he turns, and he looks, and he shot in the back killed. Now. In kind of the story there, there's there's a lot that we don't know. There's some legend that goes with it and stuff one of the stories that goes with it. Is that his body late in the street all afternoon? Because nobody wanted to go help him because they didn't want to be seen as Indian sympathizer. Because the two men that killed him were friends of John Baylor who hated Robert Neighbors, the to the only two men that were brought up on charges were. We know cohort cohorts with John Baylor so anyway in kind of with his body, laying in the street. The way the story goes whether it's true or not I don't know who ever. No, it was a slave when got his body up and he's buried over a Robert. Neighbors made over in our cemetery over here. And the two men that were brought up on charges the. Charges were dropped. Was He native American or no no Rob Nabors was not native, American He just knew the plot of the. He understood more than he was a very progressive thinker for that time. And he was a smart Aleck to you. Read some of his letters I mean this guy was. He was very very quick with his tongue, but it was very intellectual way. He just kind of blows me away. One of those guys just admire how how good they are, but he. He was killed over here in. I don't I want to say. It was Keto, but it might not be. There was one native American tribe that every year would come out and do A. Ceremony at his grave I think they stopped doing that. Two Thousand and one two thousand somewhere around there I'd like to get. That started back up, but he's buried. In his grave is more of a mausoleum. It's above ground. It's you know rock, and it's got a large slab on top of it and. It's easiest one absolute wonderful, and there is some question on whether he's actually buried there that marker that's on that. It's the nineteen thirty state markers. Put their. Whenever. They decided to put it there. They didn't know what grade was he, so they ask. Some of the old timers in this one old-timer, just kind of say. He's buried in the grave twenty feet north of the new brothers. We knew the NEUHAUS brothers. If you go out there. so I mean. That's how they identified the grave. It wasn't an exact science. It was oral history so. Anyway that's. Robert Neighbors that's that's very interesting story, the other one I want you to share with us is. You know. John Wayne being you know in the Western movie John Laura There was a movie. In fact, it was interesting when you and I were talking, but two weeks prior to that I watched a movie called the sons of Katie elder I'd never watched it before my life. found it very interesting, and so, how does that movie play into this area? We have a particular artifact. Here at the Ford that is probably the most macab. Artifact, we've got here. So the sense Katie elder is based on a story that happened in Graham Cau-. Based on the Mario Brothers okay. What happens is there's five marlow brothers. Historians, debate, and you can tell where somebody Leah's on have either Mario. Brothers were all bad or they were all good. If you're from Oklahoma. They were all good if you're from here. but what happens is you get these fab? Brothers as a historian somebody who researched this and I try to do it. We can never be completely unbiased about anything. You try to be as unbiased as you can from what I've researched. It seems like you had the one brother the little brother who was the bad apple. That's kind of what I've seen I can see both sides of the argument. Yeah, but kind of what I is. One brother is the bad apple and what happens is. there's incident in Oklahoma. where he's accused of. Horse stealing, and then somehow murder and I don't know the story of the actual charge were the first charges. Go home and I think murder is. Anyway what happens is the Mario Brothers. Their mom lives were possum. Kingdom Lake is right now. Okay, so they're the. They're moving down here to be with their mom. Well, what happens? Is that charge that's on the little brother gets attached to the big brothers so now they want all the Marlboros. Okay well. The Mario Brothers are down here. In. This is really I mean. This story is get so convoluted, so what happens is. The marlow brothers have a friend. I can't remember I should've read this before. They've got a free and in one law enforcement person. Share for the Marshall or something like that is a friend of the Mario Brothers. There also friends with the newspaper editor. Okay. But you've also got a federal marshal and another law enforcement officer that are doing everything they can to. Arrest the. The marlow brothers. So what happens is. The MODEL brothers arrested and they're put in jail. This becomes problematic for the vigilantes. Because the newspaper reporter lives next door to the jail. Okay, so the Mario Brothers are put into jail. They escaped from the jail by cutting stone in jail is still there? It was too story jail. They were on the upper floor. The top floor is not there, but the jail the still there in in Ingraham. They evidently knock one of the rocks out of the wall, and they all escape, and then they go to their mom's house. Because, they're innocent. I mean from their point of view. They're innocent, so they go to their mom's house. Well the Law Enforcement Officer that is their friend wants to get to the four. The other ones due to tell them. Hey, you got to give yourself up. They're gonNA come back and kill you while he's there talking to him. The other law enforcement show up shootout that happens. One of these law enforcement agencies cute. Well, now that's got more people mad into him. So the Mario Brothers are rearrested and put back in jail now remember he's lived the jails right next door to the newspaper. Man Who? Marlboro. Vigilante mob wants to go in there and kill the Mario. Brothers the inside the jail. But they've got to be quiet when they do that because the newspaper man. So what happens is they go in and. TRY TO LYNCH HIM Marlboros. Put fight and they can't do it. So, Vigil anti-mob lease do days later. They decide come up with this plan, and if you've watched the sense of Katie elder you, this is of the big scene in there. The Marshall Show up with couple of tax cuts to carry them. They're going to take them to into to know town. For Federal Protection. Now some say they were going to Jack Sparrow. Others say that we're going to Dallas. Some say they're going to weather. Different reports. I can't remember which one was actual one anyway. They were taking him to another town for for federal protection. They get in the wagons it with the interviews and everything you Kinda know the marlow brothers. No, this is not on the up and up because it's cold, they're not giving jackets or anything like that to carry They're under protection. Their guns all around them. There shackled together in the shackled to buy to this plays into the store. Their shackled to buy you got two brothers shackled each other in two different wagons. So what happens is they get just west of Graham at Dry Creek? If you've seen the sons of Katie elder is big ambush seemed say so. The Mario Brothers are attacked by this vigilante. Mom In this fat ensues. What happens is so the the chain to to each brother. That's CH- is chained to another brother. That does whatever okay, so the brothers that are living, grab a stone or rock in. Two different ways. But bash the chains to come free or they baxter dead brothers leg to come free or whatever? Both of them do that anyway. In this ensuing firefight that happens because the. They've got a friend in law enforcement. That's trying to help protect 'em, but vigilante mobs trying to kill him, so there is a gun, and then of course. The brothers ended up with their own guns in the middle that. In the middle of this fact, this man who killed who's part of the MOM. His name is Franz Harmensen. France Harmensen, whatever the way that is connected directly before Belknap is we have his suit. He was wearing when he was killed over in. On display over there and got the whole story with and everything. In the, he was The the label. That was on there originally, which is pretty much just copied it Redid? It said that he was shot between the eyes, newspaper article says he had a long shot under his rat arm, and then he was also shot in the head. If you open the. pull the arm up on there. You could see a whole there and there is something inside the jacket that you could easily say. Is Blood this us? What I'll say is the most macabre whether it's blood or not, whether you might be a moth, hold or something I don't know. Anyway, but his daughters are the ones that actually gave the suit. So. That's that's that's an interesting. The Sons of Katie elder base and John. Wayne, there's two movies. A gentleman did based on here. The other one is the searchers. The creek raided I talked about thirteen, thousand, six four, and that's based on they create. Searchers is based on the Great Britain. Johnson's family was. Killed and taking captive. and. He goes and ends up getting his family back MS. eighteen sixty four. Here's the most amazing thing about the story brick. Johnson is a black man. Johnson is a slave. But, he's really more of a business partner with his owner and his business partner allows him an extra supplies him to go get so Johnson not only gets his family back, but he's also credited with getting a lot of other captives back to so. Anyway so yeah! John Wayne in John Ford also working with John Wayne Root. He knew the stories, because there's some and I mean there's there's a reason for Larry mcmurtry rats lonesome dove. Charles good night in August Charles. Good not in. Oliver Loving. When you portray them as fictional characters well, that's August. This mccrae and woodrow call from though. and. Charles good not with sworn in as a Texas ranger here for Belmont, so that history runs really really deep Texas towns named after them? In The. I mean this was the start of the goodnight. Loving trail Fort Belknap was. In! A lot of people don't realize that, but their ties are absolutely. Charles good wouldn't be Charles good night. Had Fort Bill? Not here, because as here, he decided to go and talk to Oliver Loving. Who is the older one? WHO DID KETTLE DRAFTS HE GOES? Ask Oliver Loving would do you mind helping me with this cal Dr Oliver. Loving, says yeah, and so you know they meet here at Fort Belknap. Charles good goodness first wife that he met. Wife. His wife that he met, he met her here she was. She ends up becoming a teacher and Weatherford so. I wanted to buy? So the John Wayne Movie, this searchers is based on the real story of what happened at little. Is that what? On Creek Yeah. Okay, so the searchers is based on The creek raid and a little bit on. Cynthia Ann Parker. has absolute ties here to. Charles good night actually is. One of the Texas Rangers. That the Cynthia, Parker is recaptured. He's she's Rica captured in the battle of the Peace River which was not a battle, and it was not at the Peace River. It was a the Mule Creek which is a tributary there. And it was not a battle at all it was. It was an absolute slaughter, but good. That was part of the Texas, Rangers they left from Fort Belknap to go to peace river. They recapture Cynthia Ann Parker and her daughter prairie flower. They take her to Camp Cooper, which would have been the next fort in line from here. She tries to escape from there. They! Bring your here because they're taking her to Fort Worth to reintroduce your with the Parker family. once they get her here is actually officers, wives and laundry that get her cleaned up and a little bit more pain, and so she's here for at least that before they go yup Yup. Yeah so I. Mean it all it all inter. Here's what you WANNA. Talk about these is Arnie's of history. There like what the Cannon? Only time it's used A. It was opposite of what it was supposed to be one of these little ironies of history. Charles good. That's part of the. Mob. They goes and gets or the Rangers. Clarify that part of the Texas Rangers they go in. Recapture Cynthia Ann Parker. Recapture is definitely in quotation, right? Well you know that's the thing rescue I. It was not a rescue according to her for her. Point of view was not a rescue but Charles as part of the Rangers that go in. Rescues recapture. Cynthia Ann, Parker. They. There's quantum parkers, mom. Another relationship between my wife and my son. If. There's one person in your life that you hate. It's going to be the person that does something wrong to your Momma rap. So for the one person in the world. That you would think quantum parker would hate. It would be a guy like shows goodness. Now, here's the irony of that. Why does Quantum Parker go to? Why does quantum parker go onto reservation? The reason he goes onto. The reservation is because good not convincing to do that because they have become friends. So you think the NS that rem talking about, you would think that one person that You would hate. They would never get along. They end up becoming friends so much so in Charles. Good goodnight admits his wrongs. He knows what's happening. Hey, tries everything. He can to correct the situation with the buffalo and with the native Americans. And he becomes friends with Quantum Parker. Finally convinces to go onto the reservation so long. Did you say Cynthia Parker was here? You said A. Day or two I, don't I I wouldn't say it's more the forty eight hours because they didn't keep her in one. They got it if they wanted to get her to her family. In to finish that story L., I've got a picture hanging up here of the famous picture of Cynthia Ann Parker Holding Prairie Flower. I know this is. Kind of a family thing that picture to me is Cynthia Ann Parker giving the white people, the proverbial middle finger. Because what's she doing? She's breastfeeding her. You did not do. You absolutely and she saying I'm Indian and this is my life and I mean she's you can tell. She's miserable in that picture one of the things I would. Oh, one of the things I would suggest that you do is look at our hands. Look how big her damn hands on! You can tell she's work hands for so long so anyway, and she's reintroduced their family pictures taken fort worth of she's reintroduced with her family and then two years later. She's dead. From depression broken heart i. mean she just could not in. Here's the sad thing about her. Fam- her her. All she wanted to do is be reunited with her boy. She wanted to be reunited quantum parker shadows two years later, she buried. On the. Cherokee Henderson county line a little cemetery there. Then, she's dug up. Exhumed and reinterred in Fort Worth at the park or cemetery there. Quantum Parker's last wish is for his mom, and to be buried next to him. He's so whenever he does. They exhume her in re. Enter her if seal on chief snow up there. Up There She does not get rest until she's reintroduced whether signed and it's. She even in death. She still wanted just one of the sad things that allow you just. That's that's why I love history to me. I mean those connections. Is Not just about. Who in what we really got to look at the wine. because. There's no reason to research history. If you're not looking at why something happened the way it did so. and. That's kind of my mission. Here I wish that you know seeing a lot of people don't like. Oh absolutely I absolutely love history, but I wish that. Everybody had somebody like you'd it's. Actually so. pro-choice whenever even like I'll go to the schools and I'll be dressed in a cavalry uniform and everything and I'll talk with the kids and stuff, but one of the things. I'm careful not to do whenever I'm talking with kids is I. Don't start off with names and dates. Because if you're talking history with somebody, and you start off with names days during eyes, glaze over, and that's all they think history is in. It's not it's so so as is so and he always trying to find something relatable Something that a child likes to do now. In look at that through the through its development through history of how did they get to where they like that now? Because every person has a history in one little part of that history is removed. Everybody's history has changed so everything comes together for that one. And Anyway, that's that's kind of how my approach to history is more looking at the Y. You. You need to know the WHO and the win in the what happened, but why it happened is it in what happened though the what of it is debatable? The why it happened. Is debatable to a point. But we'RE NOT GONNA learn, and then the result of what happened After that you know the domino effect happens there, so. That's kind of my approach to history because I. Do When people come in. It's usually the very first thing that I. Do is i. tell them how the museums laid out and then I ask them where they're from. And if they're from the METROPLEX, I'll tell them okay. So if you're familiar with Fort Worth and explained that part of it in the so now it's relatable now i. take possession of it so. That's kind of kind of my approach. I will say that's one of the things when I met. You could tell you had a passion. If this story, you really could and I. Think a lot of wished a lot. More museums would have. That passion, I love it. If. You know I didn't want to teach in the classroom I wanted to, but but now getting to the point that of course got five kids and they hate history. Anyway though. I. Was GonNa? Say I like how it came full circle for us because we. We actually investigated Mill Creek. AT THE BATTLE! Yeah, we sure did yeah. I had no clue about no. I didn't either not had nothing. No I mean I knew about the cavalry coming out. There will not the calvary that Texas rain. I knew about them coming out there and how they? Air Quote captured recapture. But I had no clue about. Yes like I, said we. We investigated the Mule Creek for them. Yeah, we had access out there and we also go out to the copper breaks state parcel. Yeah, and they had that the Cynthia Parker Air Little Area area. Yeah, that had some stuff, but. At. That picture gets me every single time. Something that is one of those pictures, and it just sent so much There's so little going on there, but it just says so much, so yeah, yeah, you know in in you know like. When you look at history. So. Battle of the Peace River the reason we call it. The Battle of the Peace River solely depends on one man telling a story, so Ross. You look at the first time you tells the story, and then you look at the last time. He tells the story. It's completely different story. What happens is as he's running for political office. The story gets bigger and bigger and bigger now. Here's the thing he so Ross who are we to question him? Whenever he says he was a witness, first hand account as a primary source right there and really with that. There's a great book. Talking about this, it's called myth, memory and massacre about Paul Paul Carlson in another gentleman wrote the book, and really what they do. It's not a retailing of the battle of the peace. River It's a breakdown of how that story has been written through history the history. Of It so? It's it's. It's really fascinating and I always say that you know. My wife says that I'm a crusher of souls, because people come here and they win if They want to hear these stories. I was told this and I was told this. Now I'm always. Yeah, that's not really. Here's the thing is if it's your granddaddy told you that story. That's the Gospel Truth you know you don't. You? Don't in case in point. Had this gentleman come out here? Probably in his, forties. He came out with a friend. The gentleman in his forties had come out here as a child. In out numerous he was. He's from around here and he comes out with a friend WHO's never been out here before, and as they're walking through the museum. I'm listening to tell stories cringing who? Finally they get over to where I'm at and we start talking and. Listening to their conversation I realize a he came here with his granddaddy. A lot is granted. He told him stories and stuff like that. Now I'll say this. Those are those need to be treasured memories. He needs ahead. Those memories whereas Grandad anyway gets up to talk to me and. What he asked me, he says. Tell me it till my friend here while the wall is so short around the four. I've been through. I've been down this road before and I said well I'll tell you. What you telling why so sure I'll just kind of throw in some some historical facts there? Then you got to remember. This is a sound reasoning man because he's able to tie shoes drive to the fort, so he's able to think for himself. He turns to his buddy, and he says the reason to Wallace so short around the fort is be. They didn't need a tall wall because Indians were scared to jump rock walls. Exactly exactly! This man, his bow and I think what happens is he's out here with his granddaddy granddaddies, telling him other stories and his granddaddy. It probably gets tired of him asking questions. So, he's going to pull his leg and he tells little younger version. He says Indians scared to jump rock walls. And that man believed it until he's an adult. And that's why my wife calls me a crusher of soul. Because well, okay, listen. And I didn't, I did not chastise him about the and no actually I don't know if they were scared. Jump rock walls or not, but. The wall was built in nineteen, thirty six had nothing to do with Indians or anything. Else I did not say this. Thing, but you kinda get where have heard so many here, I just. When people? kind of I don't. Kinda like it when people argue with me on points of history. Because then it really gets me to thinking in being one of them. They argue with me. A lot about is that we are contemporary that we are just the outpost for Fort Richardson. Because in their minds out, that's how he always seen it in. They don't know the the the true story so. And that's also another reason for upgrading here to tell those different stories and stuff so. While he's told us the story of the Saloon. We have one more right. Yeah, and that was one of the things we were talking about. Okay, you know we're all about history and you know we have the the. Were also military paranormal. So. How does the paranormal tie into belknap why he told us? The one about told us the one about this loon, so we know there was deaths. There I as you were talking, I was thinking. This was inactive for us, so people are due to illnesses. Oh, yeah! On this property, absolutely absolutely so you know you're going to have those folks that have passed away on the property as well, but if you will share the story with us after. I believe you said it was the early nineteen hundreds right over the powder magazine. In a swear look for it. I can't find it a square. I've read this A. Article. And I don't know if maybe that's A. It was a retailing of this story I. Don't think I don't know that it was the actual event that happened. It seems like it was. But anyway I read the story, so the powder magazine is the only building that was left completely intact after the soldiers left because the people that lived here just dismantled these they'd fallen down to ruin, but the powder magazine was left fully intact. Well away this newspaper Article read was that evidently, the powder magazine was still used to store powder whether that was leftover from the soldiers, or whether the local people because it was a powder magazine powder there. Yeah, and what kids will do is go get and make their own little fireworks. Set it off with whatever they could. Well. Evidently, this teenage boy was in there, getting powder, something happen, and there was an explosion, and he was killed in a knocked a part of the wall and you can see where that part of that. Anyway he was, he was killed in that explosion. The when we talk about death on the four, that's one of the most traumatic in the for what? So In a looked I can't fund story. No of read it I just. In newspaper article I don't remember if it was retailing or the original, but that's what happens. You went in there, getting some powder or whatever he was doing here. There was an explosion and he was killed there So. What Year did you say that it was in the early nineteen hundreds hundreds I can't. Put a specific date it was. No later than the nineteen. Okay, it was a long time ago, but it wasn't contemporary with before you know, and that's another thing. Like, you say the worst sicknesses and illnesses that there were people that died out here. Soldiers out here case in point. We're talking about the hospital. Behind, the hospital was the dead house or what we consider more ground, and then a hundred one hundred yards beyond that would have been the cemetery. We had a military cemetery out here, and there were soldiers that were buried in cemetery. Well, what happened in nineteen seven? The federal government came into four BELKNAP. Zoom those bodies to reinterred them at national cemeteries, the national cemeteries them San Antonio. Not just here, but to all the other. Well, I've looked at. The research on them coming in an zooming these bodies and their man. This is one of the like how they found Robert. Neighbors grave just about oral history. That's they out where these so what happens is there's a list of men we know. That died here at four. Federal ones. soldiers. Here for. Whenever they came to zoom the bodies. I don't remember the number. They were going to dig up twenty eight graves in an exam them. One of the graves that they dug up two bodies in it. So. What happens and here's one of the reasons that she researched history. For Yourself Conventional Wisdom. The stories in Young County of that cemetery. said that the soldiers were buried with wind crosses. And that it was just in that those bodies were exhumed and reinterred at Sam Houston. National Cemetery in San Antonio. That's what just. Way The stories always been told will start researching on my own. There's two little things here. That are just mind blowing to me. The Sam Houston National. Cemetery didn't start burying people until nineteen twenty eight. That he twentieth nineteen twenty one nineteen twenties. Start bearing people there, but yet these bodies were in nineteen, zero, seven so I thought. How does that work come to find out? There's actually two national cemeteries in San Antonio. There's a same Houston national cemetery and then just south of town. There's a smaller one called the San Antonio National Cemetery. In in. The headed goth. Take pictures for me. In that cemetery. There is a common grave that has all the soldiers from Fort Belknap. Most of soldiers from Fort Belknap buried into it. But then there's also two separate headstones individuals one of them. His name is John Bolger. He was with the second dragoons. He died in eighteen, fifty four out here as interesting okay. If they were buried, okay. So. Now, I'll get. John Bolger. His headstones at the San Antonio National Cemetery. In the nineteen forties this road. Is a dead end road west of the Fort. They were doing construction work on that that. Whoever was riding on the maintaining? Road grader. got off smoke cigarette and he looked over, and he sees the stone, and he's always interesting stone. He flips it over, and it says John Bolger died eighteen fifty four second dragoons, fort Belknap okay. Yeah okay. Hold on, hold on. Discuss Great, this is. Great in two thousand and fourteen I'm on facebook I'm I've got a bunch of military history. So. The Second Cavalry Museum, the Read Second Cavalry Museum. is in. Germany. Is there, because after world? War Two the and then I guess it was the home of a century for a while or something like that, so the read Second Cavalry Museum is built Germany in two thousand and fourteen. Posted information on there on our facebook page I read this one in. It is a picture of John Bolger headstone. His headstone is in the museum, and Vilsek Germany. The reason is there is because the guy that was on the road. maintainers and I'll get you about until the guy was on that road maintainers. When he found that he knew was an artifact while this wasn't an active museum at the time, so he takes it to the closest military museum which is foreseen. He takes four zero four seal. We're not saying Calorie Museum, but we'll get it tour in so now. That is gone now. Into Tau this all Leeann. Conventional Wisdom. The story, the oral history and it's been told of the Fort Belknap cemetery, as they were buried with wooden crosses that. Shows that that's not the truth that there was an actual stone there. And also is said they were buried at Sam Houston. National Cemetery well not true. And so you do research on your own. Another interesting thing with that cemetery is we know okay. I don't believe they got all the bodies. In the reason. I say that is because. The only women recognized by the military in eighteen fifties where the laundry's not even officers wild were recognized by the military. Say recognize about the military what it means. They got to use the commissary. got. Pay The they were guaranteed. Pay Actually so what happens is these laundries are paid a dollar a day to soldiers lobby, whatever if a soldier gets martial? What's the first thing that they take from? Be? Take your pay well. If you take that from the soldier, you're also taking from the laundry, so that laundry was going to be paid anyway whether you're Marshall or not. She was guaranteed her pay. Also recognized by the military means that she got to see the posts surgeon. Okay there's this one particular laundries inter names real simple. It's like Mary Adams or something like that She dies while in the care of the post surgeon. She's not buried in the civilian cemetery that we have over here. I think she was buried in that military cemetery now whether she was that extra body or whether they just didn't give her. But whenever they came and Doug. They swore they only got soldiers. They got twenty eight, but we know one of them had an extra body so however, however that worked, but anyway that's. So I really think that we're that cemetery is in another guy that owns that property. Yeah, he's a great guy. He's army. Gap Retired Captain Army. has his Bachelor's in. History I believe he's working PhD in Working, no, he just got his masters in divinity, so he's going to a Bible College Great Guy Actually Great Guy and he. Just absolutely fascinated with that story, and I've done some overlays of the historic map. There's only one map of the some historic overlays. Onto Google Earth to try to triangulate. The map doesn't show the cemetery, but we can kind of guess where the cemetery was because of other forts and cemeteries how they designed, it was about one hundred yards because of diseases stuff. They kept far away, so we kind of have an area. Leading up until. A really started researching this. The only the best guess we had was over in that area. There was oral history. Is over in that area. I'm real really trying to triangulate. See if we can figure out where where that cemetery was at and I mean I really I honestly believe that there's more than that story. that. What the cemetery they exhumed the bodies in nineteen o seven. I mean it's a good chance. If you could location anybody you'd be able to. Know Yeah absolutely absolutely. Yeah, it would. It would be It would be fascinating. You know, and I've heard that this the the story of the. A lot of these stories I've heard told me different ways. The Way I'm telling you is the way that I've. Research should have heard the story that him and try to dig it out myself. There are things that you know. Some there are things that could vary. Like with that. It was nineteen. Seventy exumed the bodies We know how many bodies they got other. We know where they were buried, and that was the only reason we know exactly where they're Betas because I started researching it a couple of years ago because everybody assumed it was Sam Houston and I've even seen published material that says they were buried at the Sam Houston National. Cemetery what that is a somebody, just believing somebody else's word for is not doing the research and said I. AM The reason I found out. They didn't start being bodies in Sam Houston National Cemetery until the nineteen twenties was wikipedia. Just a quick search I wanted to say there was a list of of people on there right. I saw that and I thought well I. Guess this is a end of the road for this cemetery so. I thought well. We're in the crap. Are you know and then I Kinda Li? Oh Okay and And I did find I. Don't know if it was a to grave or ancestry or like that I saw where there was a list of names. Okay. We're now going to listen as it says at the San, San Antonio National Cemetery. But I'm not going to believe that until I have eyewitness proof. I want a picture of it and through linking up of friends. Somebody was just happened to be right there in the area and went to picture of it and found it so two bodies. Because I think what happens is. So John Bolger was one of them I think has headstone in nineteen zero seven was still probably standing up, and then whenever they move the body. They just discarded the headstone and it wasn't found until the nineteen forties in probably the other name. Probably same thing was he had a stone headstone that was still, and it could still be laying out. There were no no, but that's why. That's how we know in the rest of them. Maybe they did have wooden crosses. I don't know. They just didn't have any way to. They didn't identify. They're just buried in. There actually is not just for soldiers in that common grave. I mean it's. It's a couple of other force that are buried there so. anyways FA fascinating stuff. Definitely. Well we've been going at this quite a while I know it's addressed. It's Yeah I. The time I didn't even really think about. I guess we need probably start wrapping it up here. You now I wanted to ask. I had one final question as we're wrapping up on this. Is this an actual? Texas Arkansas State No. This is the only fort in the state that's run by the county. For Richardson is Texas Parks and Wildlife Griffin's takes US historical commission conscious city own where the only one that turn by Ford so were funded by. Were set up kind of like our own precinct We have our were under the auspices of precinct to, but we've got our own budget. and that's all tech young Kenny taxpayer money except in that that tax payer money is just for the maintenance of the Fort, the grounds maintenance and Building up keeping stuff like that everything that we've done in here, what renovation we? Got A hotel motel tax passed in that all all that money has to go back into tourism. and. Remodeling Museum is definitely part of tourism. So that's kind of how now we're funded. And, that's where I was kind of Segue into were Jeff was going? So how can people I mean? How can people in other than coming out as their away? They can support the museum. Unique gas have like a friends of will Yeah, there is. There's a a fringe fort Belknap which is people that support volunteer and we've also got if you're interested in it. We've also got four Bennett Leaving History Association. in if you want to get involved that way, absolutely. All this information can be found on our on the Fort Belknap facebook page okay? We put when whenever we do events or anything. That I think is interesting. will put on there and then also historical information. You know I I'm pretty. I find something new about Fort Belknap. I'm pretty quick to get it. Put on. The pay for page what I find interesting in that so and I'm not knocking anything, but it's obviously because I always assumed that it was a state park sure well, and if you look at Google earth or Google maps, it says. Park I don't know how to change that, but it's not as though, but what I find what I like about this is you can tell upon arriving here is there is no bureaucracy and deciding what artifacts? You find is a genuine historic. So when you come in here and I can't stress this enough people. You if you'd like museums in particular, even I mean this is amazing. When you come in the the, they have the artifacts in the descriptions and they're. They're and and I mean. When you look and there's a real Texas ranger. Yeah Yeah on the wall. In. That a sorbonne sets from the local area there's. The of everything mobster unify our suit hanging on the wall. I mean there's. Is just absolutely well you all kind of even with some stuff that has nothing to do with Fort, Belknap or even, Young County, yeah but. The reason they're here is because somebody. A governor allred allred unit up in which was named after going well whenever Fort Belknap was. The museum was being turned into a museum governor allred in a state Senator Been O.`Neil. Get behind getting artifacts here so going, allred donate a lot of stuff. To us and so the Mexican. General's. Suit this umbro and all that's all from governor allred that story in itself is absolutely amazing who that suit belong to so I mean it's. It's just one of those things that everything is here for a reason. Right it. My job was to interpret that for everybody to know to show why that's here so. Anyway. It's yeah, we've got a great rate collection stuff. It's like we said if you're even remotely close to Newcastle Texas, please come out and check out for bell. No, please. It's great well I. Know a lot of people come out to The drive in movie theater any Graham. Literally twelve miles down there. We definitely you're going to come out all the way to go to the drive in movie. Stop here. Texas forts trail. Yes, we. Are there what we didn't there? because. We're historic site. We've always kind of been included with it, but there would never there wasn't a working relationship until. In of course, I'm going to work with him because it's free advertisement for me. But Yeah absolutely I know for Richardson I. Know The history of Fort Richardson of the people that work there for Griffin's same way fort. Cacho I'm friends with all these people because we all kind of do the same thing. In so I know for a while at Fort Richardson they had. The lead interpreter there whenever she first started. She was sending people to me to get the story fort. Richardson said if they knew that they were going to Fort Griffin for four Richardson. You GotTa Stop Fort Belknap, and and I'm not saying that about me. I'm just saying right. I can't tell the story of Fort Belknap without putting in its proper and hat, no Fort Richardson and Fort. Griffin history to be able to do so. I can tell you that I think you're absolutely amazing. You go to a lot of these museums I. Mean in some of the people will tell you some stuff and all, but I mean this is an amazing experience. Thank you also because we done. What for interested in? Two or three times. We've been out there now and I had no clue about Fort Belknap. None and coming here, I got a different perspective era of the history on how now for interesting was created and had no clue. None. Like to say we used to. People used to see Fort Belknap as the step brother. or We're not anymore. We're the big brother actually. Yeah, so I know I know you worked with Light Youth Group? Scouting You said that you guys. You can rent your. You can we have if you we rent? The barracks out for family reunions, birthday, parties and All kinds of different, the relationship with the boy scouts is one of my favorite things that we've got especially with with. In Wichita Falls. Those guys are amazing in I will do everything. I can to cater to the because not. Because they're so well behaved. But they're very respectful of the grounds and so I'm going to do everything I can for those Kiddos to have a good time when they come out here, so that's like when we took the boy scouts. Or Richardson they were great. And I'm still involved with our local. Units no I mean. Brin De. Let me say this we do it. We also have an another tie with Wichita falls our cannon that we have here is the one that starts hundred hill rates, so we're there every year to start the Hud and we take. That canned up there to shoot it off. So if you're not listening hotter races in the middle of August in Wichita Falls Texas. You're not familiar with falls Texas in the middle of August it's not called hotter. Inhale hundred for a re. It is extremely extremely anyway. It's about I think they've had ten twelve fifteen thousand. Started it. Years ago in it was just a couple of like locally. And now there's people coming from Germany shipped. Internationally in it is an absolute honor that we get to go up there because I'm at the starting line, yeah, and I get to shoot a cannon to start. What's funny though is. That morning. You know there. I mean there's tens of thousands box everywhere and I'm trying to drive through the parking lot to get to. The candidate and people are screaming at me because I'M GONNA truck in its. Listen Lady. You don't get to do this unless. So, yeah, so, there's another I i. we have a really close relating course. Melt Milwaukee from Wichita Falls, and we go there all the time so You know we I have absolute which were kind of the Stepchild at Texas too so? Here by considers us. Oklahoma. So so jim before we shut this down. You said you can be found on facebook. Is there any kind of website? Somebody can go to Google. I'm sure you can go google. We don't have a website. Because we are county. We don't have the funds for that so. I started a facebook page. That we could have some kind of presence online, okay, but as absolutely public. You don't think you have to have facebook to be able to look at the facebook page. She goes through all okay, so any other social media twitter instagram. Any of their best. Okay. Well. I know I can speak for for the rest of our team. We really appreciate your time tonight. Go talking about the history were all three of us our history buffs. We like it when we're going to do an investigation. That's for me. One of the big pieces, the investigating spun and all of like the RECON, but actually doing the recon getting the history of the location. And we just all you come here and listen to the sheriff. Here, that I mean that's. Yeah So there before we shutdown one more question. Sorry There was actually no battles rainy kind of skirmishes on for BELKNAP that you know. There wasn't there. No No, no The I mean you. There's countless accounts of People getting attacked just a few miles outside of. I mean. There's this one newspaper article. It was actually out of the Dallas Herald relayed from Fort Belknap of Wagon attacked. Two miles north of here and coming in hot. into the four in it had eros sticking out of. It looks like a cartoon I mean when you read it, it'd be thinking something. You've seen a cartoon before, but there's that there was an incident incident in the town Belknap. Where a guy got drunk. There was a whole bunch of Second Cavalry. This guy popped out to Saint Calorie bullets flying. and. General. Ends up becoming General Thomas George Thomas. The Rocket Chick Maga. Commencing Cavalry. He actually goes over there and Kinda breaks that. That that but Yeah, there were. There's definitely a wild west style thing, but there was whenever you think of of Indian. soldier marriage nothing. And the soldiers that were here were very possibly though involves air. Mitch's Royal. Absolutely they you know one of the things one of the problems with The soldiers shown the. Fort Belknap is the monotony was killing them. Alcohol was a huge problem, but you did have instances of these excursions the way the soldiers work twice a week. They would leave Fort Belknap and go to the next in line what they're doing. It's called cutting for sign. They're trying to see. Indians Crossover A. Warning to the towns in east if they saw where the Indians had come. And Gone Back. North or back West would follow that line, so you get a ton of expeditions on the Wichita Expedition. Where the soldiers leave out of here in I. Mean there's battling Wichita. Oklahoma. That that has. Drink tots here about a wasn't. But. Yeah, the soldiers here definitely. They did see action. It wasn't like the biggest. Thing. It was rare, but there was a when I did see action. It was usually hot, really really. Vista. And, as we close up from I, guess from what we're here for right. We're GONNA WE'RE GONNA check it out. We you know we don't consider ourselves. Ghost hunters here. We we usually go investigate claims of the paranormal. We're here to see if are, there are places you know done the same thing in a little town on from We went through, and we actually found a couple of buildings that were like. The amazing. Yeah, yeah, well, you know an interesting I had the. There's been quite a few people that come here. They feel something experience, something simple like that, and so that's kind of you know being here all those figure this stuff out. Let's see if we can. May, maybe it'll break some people into absolutely see the. Do Horton absolutely. Okay, well. Let's close up this podcast for tonight. Are Typical podcast. Yeah, 'cause we normally try and do one once a month, but it's been a while, but this one is the whole Kobe things kind of knocked down Tang and we've been. We've been really busy. Trying to get back into the swing again. And A run we've done this. We've got a cases coming up in North Oklahoma. WE'VE GOT A. Bunch of. Mini expeditions Bingo going. And I will say. We didn't open up with it because we're kind of doing this a little dry here, but you can always find us at military paranormal dot com. You can find us on facebook twitter instagram. INSTAGRAM's all right. Our and our youtube channel correct. and. Don't get about your Youtube Channel Oh yeah, undiscovered origins origins, and I have all the social and then rob here since we've met last. Up doing the paranormal road writer and that's how actually came out here to meet with you? Guys and GM XS. Motorcycling goes around investigating. And always remember. We are not affiliated with any branch of the military. Retired Jim thanks again absolutely, thank you and like I said come out here. Visit for Bell Nationally. Spend some time talk to Jim. He will give you the whole history of this area. So, thanks a lot and we'll talk later. We'll see you guys next. Allison's on her way out for by by aggie night. Thank you for listening to the API paranormal podcast. This podcast is brought to you by military paranormal investigating. Since hope you all enjoyed the show, dover get to connect with us on facebook, twitter and Youtube until next time. The truth is to be found.

Fort Belknap Fort Texas Fort Belknap BELKNAP federal government Fort Belknap Fort Richardson Belknap Fort Griffin Wichita Falls Belknap Fort Belknap Deville station Robert Neighbors Mexico Bill Shift Kirk Belknap Mario Brothers Fort
Biden's Cancellation Of Permit For Keystone XL Pipeline Faces Mixed Reactions

Environment: NPR

03:45 min | 4 months ago

Biden's Cancellation Of Permit For Keystone XL Pipeline Faces Mixed Reactions

"Now president biden isn't just focusing on the pandemic one of the first things. He did after his inauguration. Yesterday was to cancel a permit to build the keystone excel pipeline that pipeline would transported crude oil from alberta to the texas gulf coast would have entered the us in montana from their yellowstone. Public radio's kayla roche reports on the mixed reaction to the cancellation tribes and environmental groups. Here and in other states the pipeline would have crossed have been fighting the keystone excel pipeline in court for roughly a decade last year in a video by indigenous collective buffalo defense. Roughly ten for pet tribal members protested in northern montana. They lined up with their hands held up fists and repeated a lakota phrase. That's become slogan. For the movement against pipelines like the dakota access pipeline keystone excel. Johnny were drawing. Water is life. The canadian company behind keystone xl tc energy operates a pipeline which spilled thousands of gallons of oil in south dakota and twenty seventeen and in north dakota in nine thousand hundred activists and tribal members say the pipeline endangers water-quality bricks tribal land treaties and pipeline. Construction brings the threat of human trafficking. Biden's decision to revoke a presidential permit. Donald trump granted canadian developer energy in two thousand nineteen puts a heart stop to the billion dollar project. Among those celebrating was fort belknap indian community council president. Andy work a member of the onny tribe. I'm just really happy. I'm really happy. And i'm really thankful in south dakota the rosebud sioux tribal government. Join fort belknap. In suing to stop the pipeline. Rosebud sioux president rodney bordeaux was busy coordinating cove nineteen vaccinations. When he heard biden cancelled. The permit agreed victory. Hopefully that's the end of it but will continue to fight it we're gonna watch it but pipelines supporters are seeing the collapse of ten years of work. Tc energy which declined to comment for the story. Released a statement in anticipation of the permit cancellation yesterday and said it. Suspending further activity on the pipeline county commissioners in rural northeastern montana where agriculture is the dominant industry said they had been looking forward to the tax revenue which the state estimated at sixty three million dollars. A year extremely disappointed mary. Armstrong a commissioner in montana's valley county where very large county with very few people seems like a perfect place in Perfectly compatible with us montana. Republicans strongly criticized by an institution. But keep an excel has also been supported by democrats here. Including former governor steve bullock and senator jon tester yesterday tester said he still supports the development of the pipeline but with conditions he had encouraged the biden administration to meet with supporters and opponents before making a decision while the pipeline from alberta looks dead for now the premier of that province jason kenney yesterday pushed for consequences the canadian province of alberta invest in one point. Five billion dollars in the project in a statement. Yesterday kenny culver biden and prime minister justin trudeau to discuss the decision. However the us government refuses to open the door to a constructive and respectful dialogue about these issues that it is clear that the government of canada impose meaningful trade and economic sanctions to defend our country's vital economic interest canadian prime minister justin trudeau in a statement expressed. Disappointment invite is decision but acknowledged biden's choice to fulfil a promise. He made during his campaign run for npr news. I'm kayla garage and billings montana.

texas gulf coast kayla roche northern montana montana keystone xl tc energy biden fort belknap indian community south dakota rosebud sioux tribal governmen fort belknap Rosebud sioux rodney bordeaux alberta Donald trump buffalo north dakota dakota Biden Johnny
03-22-21 Native women leaders make history fighting for the people

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 2 months ago

03-22-21 Native women leaders make history fighting for the people

"Welcome to native america calling from studio eight six nine in his letter pueblo. I'm surrogate would. There are several exceptional native women who've spoken out broken barriers and in the process the lives of indigenous people who could activists elizabeth piracha vich challenge discrimination against alaskan natives. Eli's shell went toe to toe in court with the us government and deb holland is the first native american secretary of the interior. We'll talk about historic native women after national lead of news. This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzales. In montana covid nineteen vaccines will be open to. All on april first yet is yellowstone. Public radio's caitlyn. Nicholas reports vaccines on. Tribal nations are already available to everyone. Jennifer show is a nurse. Practitioner at fort belknap tribal health department. She says they are. Well positioned to distribute the vaccine because of partnerships with indian health service and a longstanding public health nursing program that trained nine local nurses who handled contact tracing at the beginning of the pandemic girls. Were ready to go ready to start helping. Get the axing out with our population which is another plus for us. The girls work out in that area and they know how to get a hold of them. Which i think kind of helped us with getting. This rolled out so much faster as well. Tribes are also try and create a vaccination strategies show says fort belknap tribal health began vaccinating teenagers in the area. During the week of march fifteenth by partnering with local school systems both on nearby the reservation by this point teachers in the area. We're already vaccinated bubble. So you know the more. We can vaccinate around us as well as us ourselves. The better off. We're going to be trying to keep our numbers on black. Sea nation is currently reporting ninety. Five percent of eligible enrolled members are vaccinated ihs data from the pakistan and born in sioux tribes and the chippewa cree of rocky boy's reservation show a third of tribal members in these areas are now vaccinated compared to about fifteen percent of montana as a whole molly lind the tribal health director for the little shell tribe of chippewa. Indians says. The tribe has partnered with alluvial health. Great falls and is trying different. Vaccine approaches all the time instead of appointments one week. They offered an evening walk in vaccine clinic to see if that attracted members working day shifts. Were really trying to make it. As convenient as canaan for all of our members to get vaccinated vaccines are coming to tribes from direct federal allocations to ihs and sometimes through the state native americans are also prioritised under the state's vaccination plan due to higher risk of death and health complications from covid nineteen little. Shell health director. Wetland says. i really do think that tribal nation have done a really good job. It's hard to disagree. Look at montana's covid nineteen vaccine tracker map. And you'll see the dark. Green areas of high vaccination rates almost perfectly highlight tribal nations for national native news. I'm caitlyn nicholas. Group of pueblo. Leaders met with the second gentleman of the united states. Doug emhoff's last week when he traveled to new mexico part of a nationwide tour to promote the biden administration's covid nineteen recovery plan pueblo of alabama governor brian bio was one of four pueblo leaders to me with 'em hof at kua pueblo via says the trip to meet with the vice president's husband was only the third time he's left akamot pueblo in the years since the pandemic began aca has been under a number of emergency covid nineteen orders including a reservation closure bio says he shared with emhoff how the tribe prioritized elders and cultural leaders. I for covid nineteen vaccines. He stressed how the pueblo has had to put culture on the side which has been a great sacrifice. We remain rooted in our culture. that's what sustains and well we can't do we cannot practice what we not when we are not engaged in that process. It's painful and that was the case and still is the case during this time of what we are doing it because we have to protect our people file also shared with emhoff how the pueblo is continuing. Its vaccine. rollout plan everyone who is eligible every travel member every resident here. The people of alabama has an opportunity to receive the vaccine and doing all that we can also to ensure that our trouble members who do not live on the survey ship are also afforded the opportunity to be vaccinated and locations where they live one of the few tribes in new mexico working with the state vaccine distribution do its current legal battle with the indian health service over a reduction of care at a hospital on komo lands. I mean antonio gonzalez national native news is produced by coca broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by the american indian college fund providing scholarships to native students of every age for over thirty years applications for the upcoming school year accepted through may thirty-first college fund dot org support by the sonam ski chambers lawfirm championing tribal sovereignty and defending native american rights since nineteen seventy six with offices in washington. Dc new mexico. California and alaska native voice one the native american radio network. This is native america calling. I'm tara gatewood joining you live from my homeland. Who do it's women's history month and we're continuing our celebration of indigenous women who've made history through leadership elizabeth petrovich day is is something That is celebrated for the clink activists who stood up for alaska native civil rights in the nineteen forties and help get the antidiscrimination act of nineteen forty five in alaska past. President obama awarded. Elliot's cabal the presidential medal of freedom. The highest civilian honor in two thousand sixteen cabal from the black feet. Nation sued the federal government over its mismanagement of native trust accounts. The case resulted in a three point. Four billion dollars settlement and some of the settlement funds were set. Aside in the scholarship fund continues to help hundreds of native college students today and deb holland is the first native american to head the department of the interior of position responsible for overseeing management of native land as well as public lands in resource development on those lands and she was also among the first native women elected to congress in this hour. We're focusing on women who broke barriers and stood up for justice in need of america. And you can join us to. Who are some of the native women from your tribe who stood up and fought for change. And how have some of these women impacted your life. Join us by calling one. Eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. It's also one eight hundred nine nine native and joining us today from outside browning montana at his family's ranch is coble and he is a son of elway's cabal he is black feet and it's our pleasure to have him here. Turk welcome to native. America calling tara. Thank you for having me well turk. It's an honor to you. Think about the legacy of your mother in everything that she did To bring things into focus in so Turk what's one thing you would like everyone to know about your mom look era. I think everyone A lot of people know my mother for her work on the case That you mentioned but Those folks in our local community here on the black reservation really really know and remember my mother from years and years of community involvement Both in the browning area and rural areas of reservation She was you know she was well. well known for her efforts in bringing the first native american owned a bank In the lower forty eight states to our reservation in and it drastically represented a community in terms of banking Grassroots efforts in terms of of helping neighbors with understanding their taxes misunderstanding statements or lack thereof from the opinion affairs and interior regarding their trust assets You know there's years and years of of that of those memories that our community really w- remember my mother or Obviously she did not wake up one morning and decide to sue the federal government. It took it was years and years of firsthand. witnessed the mismanagement That caused the hurt for a lotta people on on our reservation that she decided to which which allowed her to make that decision to the federal government later on in life but Really that's what myself our family and and the rest of the community here on the reservation. Really remember my mother of four was her shirt carrying or willingness to jump in and help the community individuals in the community to really fix things. I might be wrong to assist in and this help anyway. she could. That's what everybody here remembers her for. In so turk. Do you remember that deciding moment or or chain of events that took her to the point where she said you know what we gotta do. This do a lawsuit. Yeah you know. I think initially as a young boy. I remember her as the treasurer of our tribe Where she received first-hand knowledge of of just how bad it was a bad. The system is broken and corrupt in years and years of tribal elders. Begging her to help in any way that you possibly could Because they had no money no they weren't getting paid for their wrath sets And that went on for years you know so it was years of of Of of that type of stuff. That really went to her decision to the federal government. You know there were periods of time where she said oculus reach out to our senators this week to reach out to a congressional delegation for assistance. That's reach out to people within the interior In every step of the way it was it it was it was a wall was a hurdle Up until she met with the attorney general at the time At the white house and was told basically okay sue us and i think that That meeting at that time really was the deciding factor of For making that decision to sue the federal government should be able to visit the memorial and sit there and make her decision. She called me when she made her decision and she founded a tremendous attorney to to assist her with the process And from that point her life changed From that point but it took you know better part of thirty years for her to occur to get to that point. What wasn't her initial intent that just the way direction life tucker So yeah that was kinda progression of her as the young of young adult treasurer of our nation. Wouldn't they sing the the Broken system and then trying to adjust it address it with local politicians and local figures state nationalist figures in any hitting a wall every time realizing that it is wrong it needs to be fixed and the only way to do it is to sue. Sue them hold them accountable in so turk thinking of your mother who saw something wrong in did something about it and i think many people can relate to that when our mothers stand up in take action and so turk just thinking about her role to and you mentioned it with the bank She really had understanding of obligations that fiscal entity should be having. And when you take a look at how bad the mismanagement was It's really really amazing. That you know How bad it is. And just knowing somebody who knows you know the obligations you have With a financial entity that there are certain things that need to happen and to see that the federal government was not coming through on their part in any thoughts of that of you know just how big or maybe she even talk to you directly about that of the atrocity of this mismanagement of funds. You can't you can't decide. You're not going to pay your bills. But that's kinda what was happening with the whole issue with the trust mismanagement glad turk anymore. Yeah i just think that anytime you take on this monstrous project of soon the federal government at this level. And you start peeling back of mismanagement You start finding many many things. That are can take you in different directions. Directions in terms of how bad the system is broken and that was was the case with with this lawsuit is that it started out as an accounting. No there there was never an accounting of the individual indian trusts for a hundred years over one hundred years and then what's what's or as time went on. They start realizing that look. There's a lot more to this than just an lack of accounting goes mismanagement. There's A lot of other things that you know are part of public record now but we're not was not part of public record then so you know as things progress. It's not a cut and dried Process it's a very arduous And and it's a process that exposes a lot of things federal government Did not do and a lot of embarrassing things. The federal government did you. So no you you add all those together and comes out of that is sixteen. Years of a heartbreaking work Which arguably may have lent to her her lifespan being shortened But when you step into that arena and you take on the federal government at that magnitude it is. It's you have to expect that you're in. You're in for the long the long haul if you wanna see the through so you know that's and you just don't do that overnight as i mentioned before you know recognizing something is wrong in your community is typically. What a lot of leaders Do you know they recognize things at the local level. That are wrong. They address it. Did they fix it and they move on and any recognized something else. that's wrong. And they justice kitchen move on. No so i think there was a pattern of that over. Her current. Tighter lies that Definitely helped with the tenacity and her compassion. To get this thing. This case settled and And help to those individual trust holders hus account holders that needed and And we know this affected a lotta people we are remembering the legacy of elway's cabal walk done You would like to share some thoughts. We're gonna hear about some other. Indigenous leaders women leaders coming up in our too but right now if you have any thoughts about the life and legacy of elis cabal calling now one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is a number and you can share your thoughts. Ask your questions. Phone lines will stay. Help give us a ring from historical monuments to sherman alexi. Even dr seuss past actions are coming back to want. Different people once held in high regard but so called cancel. Culture is getting backlash all on. Its own we'll talk about what's fair and what's over the line when it comes to accountability. That's on the next native. America calling program support from americorps americorps members who serve in vista. Make a difference in the fight against poverty while earning money for college and gaining valuable skills. Rewarding service opportunities are available across america focusing on economic opportunity healthy futures education and more. It will change your life and the lives of others information at a. m. e. r. i c. o. r. p. s. dot j. o. v. v. i s. t. You're listening to native america calling. I'm tara gate. What from slow pueblo. And we're celebrating historic indigenous women today. Who are some of the women in your community. You'd like to tell us about we're talking With different folks who are connected to these great individuals and you can also join the conversation by calling one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native in here with us on the line. Today is turco bell. The son of the late elouise cabal also here to out of norman. Oklahoma is alex pearl and he is the chairman of the bell. Board of trustees in a professor of law at the university of oklahoma and he is an enrolled citizen at the chickasaw nation. Welcome to native america calling. Well alex thanks to brought to beer and so we heard from that personal perspective story about mom in alex you also know a lot about l. louise's story and just you know what all of this meant especially when we talk about holding the government countable for promises made you know way back generations back in so this kind of accountability is definitely historical in our native nations but also historical in the sense of us. History and alex when we think of everything that came about because of the cabal Lawsuit and she was a lead plaintiff in all of this and there were other names and people were involved in this but the enormity of what this decision meant. Can you just jump into that. 'cause it's huge. Yeah that's a great question. And i think it goes directly to what what i sort of love about. Indian country is that individuals can really make a difference in their communities. And it really doesn't have to be A huge conglomeration in an organized movement. Louise took this on her own shoulders to do this And i don't think that she ever set out to be an activist. I think that that history and circumstances put it on her to do that. And i think that she's sort of thought. I'm the person who's best able to do this in this moment. And we have an obligation to to see it out and I mean this. Her lawsuit is is really sort of chronically. Misunderstood chronically sort of Not well known And that's one of the things that we hope to do. The turkey and i hope to do through the the scholarship fund which is which exists solely because of the settlement and elway's efforts is to increase the awareness of her and how significant this lawsuit was you know i think for the settlements you occur where we have an acknowledgement of significant historic wrongs. And for that to be made public. I think that that's something that is incredibly important for native americans for indian country to see the federal government Acknowledge so. I think that you know we see this century of mismanagement and just a rejection of the basic humanity and dignity for individual indians treated by the federal government. This is an important shift in that cultural Attention provided to native people. So i think it really. Is you know it really is momentus. Because the lawsuit also spurred other tribal communities to initiate their own tribal trust mismanagement lawsuits and not enough itself. created a sort of additional reckoning with this the the centuries mismanagement in alex stone the settlement was three point four billion. But what was the original esque. So i was not directly involved with the settlement negotiations I did a three point. Four billion dollars is the largest settlement ever my into with the united states In history native american or not So i think that when we start your trying calculate las That's a very very difficult Econ economic analysis to to engage in But we know that what the three point four billion did go to was to address the fundamental concerns that allotment created with fractionation of land. And also to provide some recourse to those individual indians Affected by department here. federal government's mismanagement practices. Thank you enter anything ed. No i think that You know to touch on one and one thing. That mentioned is that When she made that decision it was not a decision that she made For any type of notoriety for any type of recognition. It was simply a in. It was something that needed to be done and in her mind she was a person to bring this lawsuit at that time. And that's what you truly believed in. Is that if not meet. And then who is going to hold them accountable so that's all i'd like to add on that In i gotta get your thoughts turk win. Your mother was recognized by the president of the united states in received the medal to Just any thoughts or anything you want to share about that special moment. Well look. I mean anytime you recognize that that level The highest level that. You can't use a citizen it's it's it's very humbling. And if my mother would have been alive at the time she would have been extremely humble receiving the award and And i think that it really just Captivates her life. It really does because her entire life sh. She was that person that everybody turned to because she was willing to help and whether or not she knew the answer right away. She was always willing to help. And everybody knew call elway ask galloway's or there's always think So and it's not just within our family within our community. And i think that's what be she would be most proud of as her hard work. Her entire life was finally recognize at the highest level. Possible and i think that would be very humbling to her Well you know it is great to pick up on this story. Remember where a lot of this came from an especially knowing that there have been a lot of recipients of the scholarship and maybe your Young individual in your household and your family circle received a co bell scholarship. And you'd also like to add some words you can give us a ring by calling one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. You know what let's take a call. We have nadine on the line given us a ring out of cheyenne river. South dakota tunde on k. ip p. i. Needing thank you for giving us a ring. You're on here. Hi i just wanted to add a comment. regarding alleys Coble i did my research paper on her and It was a what. I call my greatest work because she was my hero I came into. We heard through How a treaty meeting that. This is going to that. She had sued the federal government and all the tribes were in discussion about that and it gave at the time. I remember there was just kind of like this. Hope you know like yes you know and You know prayers were sent up and there was a lot of discussion among the people there and so we kept. We kept i own and kept it and watched it and watched it. And just you know twitter evolved in and that to me. I can tell the story to my kids every day. I can talk about her and what she achieved. Because that was something that was great to the people you know Like her son said she was humble. And so i was just so amazed to read a fun. I was To this day. I still off. I just wanted to add that comment. That to some of us she. We still hold earned in high regard for what she had. You know what she achieved. Thank you will nadine. Thank you for remembering her with us today. And you can add thoughts to by dialing in one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight and we're about to learn about another individual out of alaska before we do. Alex did want to know because of this settlement. What has changed. Has anything changed in terms of policy or the way funds are managed with the federal government in need of nations. Anything at alex us. A great question I think that's a lot of what was really started to work on. You know in the nineties and and continuously was to reform these. Trust practice and honestly. I don't know that that much has changed. I think that there's a lot of goodwill that can be generated from native people that work in the department of interior but ultimately we need some of the laws and regulations to change but also we need new l. louise's to come forward and say know and to demand improvement and to man to demand dignity and fair treatment. So i think you know. Hopefully her story and who she is inspires other young women To stand up and to demand better. So i think there's still a lot of work to do. And i'm hopeful that with secretary holland's there now that you know that that's going to be a focus as i would expect it would be well. Thank you for that. Both alex Pearl is well as terkel bell forgiveness insight into life and legacy of co bell and speaking of standing up. We have another story to share with you right now. We're gonna go to juneau alaska on the line with us. Today's dr rosetta worl. And she is the president of the sealaska heritage institute she is it and dr world. Thank you for joining us for another need of america calling. Thank you so much and thank you to our and also Native radio colleen for recognizing elizabeth proud of it. Thank you so much in. There is a lot to be said about What elizabeth did in. I'm just gonna give it to you. Dr world just kind of give us a little bit of history of what exactly elizabeth did four. Nita people there in alaska. But before i do that could i just say that. I was very privileged and honored to know. Elliot's co bell. We served together on the anime. I board national museum of american indian board and it was so neat to hear her son talk about her. As as the woman at home the mother and i knew our as as a woman and as a friend and she was a beautiful person and i just wanted to say that know. I'm so glad to have that. She's recognized and honored and she lives on in history making such a contribution to our people saw. I just i just had to say that but yeah getting onto Elizabeth elizabeth First of all. She's clink it and her name is hook up and she is from the call. Hoodie clan From day shoe the lukaku lanner known as a they're sockeye salmon. That's their major crest and She's was from hanes which is actually My grandfather's Same clan so. I'm she's very special to us But to a lot of people not just just our claritin. But we're so proud of her but elizabeth You know grew up in a time where racism and discrimination and alaska was very rampant. And this would be. You know doing the forties We had segregated schools. We had surrogate of schools. Here in alaska up until fifties We had Residential areas that were segregated in fact when elizabeth. I came to juneau. She she and her husband. Roy tried to rent a place and and they found out she was native and they said no. We're sorry You can't live here and we also had discrimination in our facilities Public facilities my mother went to have her hair done and she was thrown out of the beauty shop We used to have signs around saying no natives allowed. But my mother didn't believe it and so she went in and they refused for a service and she went on to have two of her daughters become hairdressers And even our churches were segregated. We had a white churches and we had native churches and one of the incidents were dealing with right now is we had a very famous doctor. Job off who is so admired throughout All of alaska and his church became so popular. He he was teaching. He was preaching at a native church and White people started to go to his church and the church close to his church. Doubt so you know was very rampant in alaska and Elizabeth became very involved in the alaska native sisterhood and should married roy perovic who was also very active in the alaska native brotherhood. And this is a part you know that often gets lost in in our history. Is that these two. These two organizations the sisterhood and the brotherhood were all very active in in a seeking civil rights for alaska native people and they will be. They worked on the voting rights. Act for us so we could vote but she became very active in that and then they started to promote on the nba and promoted the anti-discrimination act and elizabeth as as a young mother says she was a young mother a homemaker but she traveled extensively throughout our region. You know promoting the The antidiscrimination act and her and her husband along with a lot of other native brotherhood and sister who had people went to To the territory territorial legislature in nineteen forty five and this is where she you know she makes his very impassioned speech in nineteen forty five and and and if i could just read portions of it she said i would not have expected that i who am barely out of savagery would have to remind the gentleman with five thousand years of recorded civilization behind them of our bill of rights and then she goes on to talk about the discrimination she had in any way it was very impassioned speech that you made before the territorial senate and one of the senators jumps up and challenges her and says we'll the propose bill eliminate discrimination and elizabeth In a very calm cool collected voice and she'd been raised by her her father who is also a minister and so and also in the nba in public. Speaking is highly prized. So she was great or at her and she respond. She says do your laws and against larceny and murder prevent these crimes. No no laws will eliminate crimes but at least us legislators going to sir to the world that you recognize the evil of the present situation and speak your intent to overcome discrimination and Everybody you know was really profound speech. And i think for for a lot of people that one. That's a microphone job kind of moment and very strong words. In sometimes these words they carry on beyond the moment of win. They're being said and we know her. Words have impacted a lot of people and just revisiting some of what you just shared. I think i'm even inspired about the possibilities. When we use our voice maybe there is an indigenous woman who is using her voice. He'd like to honor call in now. Phone lines are open. Did you know covid financial relief. In the form of forgivable p p p loans is available to small business owners and independent contractors including artist's dream. Spring has worked with mexicans looking to open or expand their business for over twenty five years and now they're helping provide p p loans information including how to qualify at dream spring dot org that's dream spring dot org dream. Spring supports this program. Thank you for tuning into native america calling them tara gatewood and we're continuing our indigenous women's history month celebration today and we're focusing on fierce women in these are need women who have shook things up for the good of their native nations and who are the indigenous women warriors. You look up to. There's still time to join the conversation. We're at one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native. Let's go in here from one of our callers. We are going to go ahead and say hello to rebecca who is in albuquerque. New mexico tuned in on k. Unm rebecca thinks reaching out. Go ahead. you're on air warning Good i just wanted to. I just wanted to say on very proud of louise's cabals and all of her hard work and her sacrifice and her love for our people and it's because of her that we now have a lot of native professionals and needed leaders to help us to help our people into the future legacy continues to help us and to help all of our people into the future. I just wanted to say thank you. Thank you god. Bless her and her family for everything. Thank you thank you rebecca again. You can join us one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight and here with us today as dr rosetta world. Who is the president of the sealaska heritage institute. And dr whirl where do we see elizabeth's legacy living on today. Some of the inspiration you know came from that moment that you grace's graciously shared with us before the break go ahead. Well i will say that. I mean you in alaska and at the national level you know. She continues to be with us We've had our young artists. You know put Murals and public places for her parks have been named after her. We even had you know. it was in twenty twenty where the us Minted a dollar coin after elizabeth pirata. Vich she's very much part of our of our. She's right here with us today. We see her images everywhere Parks are named after her murals coins. buildings and rooms in the state capital are named after. And so you know she has a. I mean she was a homemaker she was. I mean so you don't have to be you know a professional person you. She was a stay at home mom but she saw in equities and she worked for it and you know and she traveled around with her baby. I don't know if that was the best thing going on those small planes to our little villages. But she did it. And i think that that's inspiration. I think you know In the previous talks about About ellie's i mean. It was the same thing she was. She was she. She was a big person but she was also an everyday person and she became a role model for us. She became a local state and national leader for us. And you know she. She rose from very humble beginnings. So i think. I think she can be a role model for for women. And for people seeking you know seeking social justice in dr world just thinking of you know where she stood on issues or how she thought about things or you know new you needed to stand up against discrimination and you think about the times that we're in where we are seeing more of that happening in any thought in view into what may be elizabeth would have thought of where we are today especially when it comes to discrimination in need of nations. Well i i think she would have been happy about some of the progress. You know that That has been made. But then i think she would be heartbroken to see you know what i mean. Especially the alaska native brotherhood worked on voting rights and to see what is happening right now in this country today where our nation and particularly one party seems to be trying to erode all the progress that we've made towards you know Civil rights and voting rights. I think i think she would have been unhappy about that. But i think she would have also been pushing young folks you know forward and and teaching them about what they can do and what not to give up hope and i and i think more than anything you know she. I mean i mean discrimination was well it was over then and i have to say it's over today unfortunately you know and But she didn't give up and So i i think that's the kind of message that she would want to young people. We just have to continue. You know to to seek are equal rights and you know she lived and she breathes that and and from the chilled her children and her grandchildren continuing on in her path. So i think you know. She definitely showed that she was a good role model and her teachings are living on through her children and through a lot of art. You know people who are have been active in organizations like the nba and the nf. Well you know we are getting this lesson. What we do today affects tomorrow in just hearing about What both of these women have done ford today we can. We can't help but think about two of what else is going on today in thinking about people who are making history We the people we won't get to all of them in the hour and even look back in in The few programs that we have this month that are taking direct look at women who impacted history indigenous women. But you know when we think about those who really doing things today again. That list is big somebody who is on them who is on this list who is also making headlines. Is deborah holland and here with us today at espanola. New mexico's dr corine sanchez. She is director executive director of women united and she is sent l. defensive pueblo. Our pleasure to have her here. Welcome to native america calling dr sanchez. And you're here to tell us about. You know this person who's making history right now. Deb holland go ahead and share and of course if there any word you'd like to start off with go ahead tell everyone so good to be here with you today. Nah okla pep over a move number. Who radio little. Na woman united executive director. We'll hello everyone. Good morning it is so great to be here with you and listening and hearing about these beautiful powerful strong women From our indigenous communities and the the strives they've made to make our lives but also all lives better And holland is definitely following in their footsteps and is an amazing Beautiful pablo women that we are proud of here at home in united and that i know that all of new mexico is very proud of You know her her work and just hearing the stories today are just really uplifting I know it's a hard time To see the violence directed at indigenous women and women in general And and those that have had that courageous voice those that have had that fighting warrior spirit but that is always connected to the whole and the healing Is just really inspirational for me to hear a table woman And someone who really Admires and looks up to the women in my life And that is definitely one of those who was broken a lot of barriers for us as pueblo. Women here in new mexico She's just been a strong champion of are not much a wheel. Which is our earth mother in her fight for climate justice She's been a strong voice for our murdered and missing indigenous relatives here at the state and national level And to take on this historic role is just brings tears to my heart Thinking as a young woman you know if you would ever see someone who is like you look like you Just like you Puts on moccasins. The way you do For ceremony And now is in when of the most powerful positions for us as indian country That she can be It's really spirit-lifting and I know that she has always promoted others. that are going to follow in her. Footsteps mentor moccasins. And so i think as young women. I know Just been really hard lifting Time in and also to for us to realize women like it takes a long years right for us to get to those places And secretary holland has definitely put in the time knocking on doors here in new mexico for for candidates on the democratic party June the renzo. Who's a really good friend of mine from laguna same place that debits from laguna pueblo. you know ran for senate in two thousand eight and deb. Was there knocking on doors for her campaign. She was knocking on doors for obama and Clinton and others that are that were part of the democratic party and running. And so i think you know put in the blood sweat and hard work to get to where she's at and her business savvy right so she's also a businesswoman the strong businesswoman And says really powerful to see. And i'm glad that to be here and to be able to share some of her accomplishments and our hopes as pueblo women And our prayers for her as she is you know in this role that you know we know has a lot of healing unraveling to do for us and then country Around our land around that trust responsibility around Our young people because she's also in charge of the bureau of indian education And and when we think about the history of boarding schools and we don't think about the history of where education has been as indigenous people of this land there's a lot of that intergenerational in historical trauma and complex individual trauma to to overcome and as the first woman you know the first indigenous person in this role and the first woman in this role. There's going to be a lot. That is is gonna be put on her and that'd be heard the stories from the other women That was shared today. You know they need our our thoughts our prayers. They need that strong circle of support. And i know that here in new mexico. That has all of her sisters. you know From all of the different trouble pueblo communities Here for her praying for her being there with her in dr sanchez. We've heard her say a lot. Be fierce what do you think about somebody who says something like that stepping into this kind of position I think she's She has fierce grace right. We have to be Strong we have to be fierce. We have to let our light shine What sometimes contradictory in our pueblo communities for very communal and it's not about standing out right it's about always the whole And i think she brings that balance Coming in with the western world Work and theory and also are indigenous work ethics and theory Are indigenous. Women's heart felt Theory and practice. I think she brings knows And most definitely we all need to be fierce we are all warriors Spiritual warriors for our community grounded Failed warriors for our community. There's a lot of islands that is directed at us As we're seeing in the present moment Despite the laws that are there to ensure our safety and our protection we have to continue to to fight for that To be seen to be heard to be acknowledged to be recognized for our intelligence For our strength And for all that we can bring into all of the roles that we play as women in our communities and deb is going to be Showing us secretary of the interior That we can do it. That women have been doing it all along and that we will continue to be doing it and holding it down for our communities. Well thank you for that. Dr corine sanchez on the line. Executive director of table women united. And even looking into your life. Dr sanchez the things that you have accomplished in the the words that you put forward To talk about what's important in our tribal communities in you know to turn this onto you to put the spotlight on the work. You're doing or the spotlight on dr rosie to world and everything that she's done To bring you know the importance of our culture to the forefront of what it means to hold onto our heritage in. I think it's really exciting as we talk about. These women who have definitely made history are indigenous leaders are indigenous. Mothers are indigenous. Sisters that we also are hearing the voices of other people too who deserve a lot of recognition. And you know just getting some of that going in the circle starting off our week this way. It's really important in. We really appreciate just knowing that these stories exist and knowing that there are many other stories yet to be told people who are doing important amazing inspirational things. And if you'd like to share some thoughts on people in your own circle you can always reach out to us. One eight hundred nine nine natives where we are on twitter even just a photo because sometimes seen them in actions as a lot. Let's take a call. We're going to go ahead and check in real quick with jeff in duluth minnesota tuned in on the radio. Thank you for giving us a ring. Jeff year on here all right. Let's try another one. We got mike in helena. Montana tunin online in mike. Real quick your thoughts and understand that you know there are people that you are recognizing. Hi this is mike jedi here. I think in education in montana. All right on yeah. They just wanted to let folks know. We've got a curriculum about louis cabal on our website and we also have a publication called Resilience stories of montana engine women who have made a huge contribution to our state here. But just google indian education for all Resilience and you can see some really neat stories from indian women powerful stuff and then we're working on lesson plan about talent right now share with people so we should be out pretty soon and i'll tell you one thirty second story this Woman from crow was driving the billing so she'd been at crow fair choose crow and sees this woman hitchhiking and see pulls over and see a northern cheyenne. She's got a big bag their cruel lady says hey. What do you got in the bag. Northern china has oh. I gotta hendro for my husband and the cruel says really good trade. Love the humor needed it this monday. Got a big week ahead. Thank you for that. Mike and thank you for tuning in as well and thank you tour. Guest dr rosetta whirl. Dr corinne sanches turku bell and alex. Pearl if you missed anything. In the our hit rewind on our website native. America calling dot com. It's where we archive our program. You can also find us on. I tunes as well and we hope you'll join us tomorrow for discussion about accountability punishment in correcting bad behavior. In the age of heightened social media consumption. If you would like to add to our conversation tomorrow we hope you will make plans to join us. We hope you'll call in. I'm tara gate what thanks for starting off your week with us. Find out more about what we have planned for the full week at native america calling dot com. Smoking gave me. Copd which makes it harder and are for me to breathe. I have a tip for you. If your doctor gives you five years to live spend it talking with your grandchildren. Explained to him. That your grandpa's not going to be around anymore to share his wisdom and his love. I haven't figured out how to do that yet. I'm running out of time. Copd makes it harder and harder to breathe and can cause death. You can quit for free. Help call one eight hundred quit now. A message from the centers for disease control and prevention health care endeavor endure after see marketplace may fifteen twenty twenty one dr new cocoon see again healthcare provider not high hung rossi tool new healthcare dot gov akilah only will hold on louis one eight hundred three one eight two five nine six when cairo center for medicare and medicaid service. Native america calling is produced in the annenberg national native voice studios in albuquerque new mexico by kwon broadcast corporation. A native nonprofit media organization funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio. Satellite servants music is by brent. Michael davids native voice to native american radio network.

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08:24 min | Last month

Coinbase set to hit the Nasdaq today

"This marketplace podcast is supported by out systems. The application platform that enables every company to innovate through software out. Systems accelerates the development of business critical cloud applications build the difference without systems for more information visit out systems dot com slash action this marketplace podcast is supported by wise. Get the real mid market exchange rate every time you send money to eighty countries join over ten million people and businesses and try wise for free at wise dot com slash marketplace digital currencies. Get a spot at the head table. With a big new stock. Today i'm david brancaccio coin base affirm that helps customers trade digital money. Crypto currencies is set to list on the nasdaq market. Today it'll be the first major crypto business to go public in the us marketplace's. Nancy marshall genzer joins me help us better understand this company that will trade under the perfect ticker symbols n coin that is perfect and david mostly people buy digital currencies like bitcoin on coin base and the company is really positioning itself. To be at the center of the new crypto. Connie choi is the president aucoin base and she says her firm looks at the big picture. We believe that in the same way that email was the digitisation of information as you and i send emails now in use to send each other. Snail mail crypto is the digitisation of value. Our focus is on furthering that mission. It's not about trying to think about what the market were an or anything like that. But then what about the short term here coin basis short-term growth will mostly be dictated by the price of bitcoin. And how much. Bitcoin people by and right now. The price of bitcoin is soaring. It hit a record of over sixty three thousand dollars yesterday and it's more than doubled this year as a huge valuation here yet nasdaq gave coin base a reference price of two hundred fifty dollars a share and that puts queen basis value about sixty five billion dollars but it is expected to open even higher than that. Nancy thank you. Bitcoin is up two percent now. Sixty four thousand one hundred stocks. The stock indicator in amsterdam is up two tenths percent. What happened to the footsie in london. While still there but post brexit amsterdam's now the top place for stocks in europe hear. The dow future is down slightly five. Points the nasdaq. Future is up about a tenth percent. The ever given cargo ship of suez canal fame is stuck again. The ship owned by a japanese company is in egyptian custody with officials saying someone needs to send them nine hundred million dollars. Ship is not going anywhere. The bbc's sally. Now bill has more. Egypt is demanding compensation of nearly a billion dollars to cover the losses that resulted from the blockage of the strategic quarter. Way nearly twelve percent of global trade passes through it a statement from one of the ever givens insurers said the vessel's owners were disappointed that suez canal authorities decided to arrest the ship. They say they have already made a generous offer to saturn the claim but the court order has been issued to hold the mass containership and for now the giant given won't be able to leave egypt until a financial settlement is reached in remarks to local media the canal authority. Chief said that the canal itself is not to blame for all what happened in cairo. I'm the bbc's sally nabil for marketplace this marketplace podcast is supported by key a bank devoted to helping clients shape. The future of healthcare key believes that the way to impact the changing healthcare industry is to shape yourself by sharing relevant insights and solutions rooted in research and expertise. They help clients create a brighter future for all key. Strategic approach plays a role in creating opportunities that make a meaningful difference helpful information about healthcare. Trends impacting your business is available at key dot com slash healthcare trends. Let's check in on education during a time of covid today. Higher education tribal community colleges serve native american students and as the pandemic moved instruction online for the first time. There's been a decline in enrollment montana. Public radio's aaron. Bolton report twenty two year old haley. Lame bowl began her second attempt at college in the fall of twenty nineteen to pursue a degree in business but after her college on the fort belknap reservation in north central montana shifted to online classes last spring. Layne bowl struggled online. It just wasn't working for me. I couldn't focus. And i started getting behind on my homework. Eventually she dropped out of owning nakota college. The american indian college fund says l'aimable is part of a larger trend. President cheryl crazy bull says most of the country's thirty five accredited tribal colleges this fall sign. Enrollment dr-jump the area. That was most alarming. Course is a pretty significant decrease in the number of first year students. First time freshman enrollment at tribal colleges fell in average of eleven percent. In montana. Freshman declines at most schools were closer to thirty percent. Crazy bull says access to affordable aimed fast broadband made it hard for tribal colleges to recruit and enroll high school students last year. She says limited internet ability also led to other students dropping out owning the coda college president. Sean chandler says many students didn't have access to laptops and other devices. I think there was probably more than half of our student. Body didn't have technology at home so we knew if we didn't help them with that we wouldn't have any students so any nakada provided free laptops to students chandler says without that the schools nine percent decline in student enrollment. This fall could have been much worse but now some students like label may be ready to return. Thank you bye-bye next semester. Even if it still online. She says she wants to complete her business degree to pursue her dream of opening a cafe in northwest montana. Aaron bolton for marketplace and in the one point nine trillion dollar stimulus. there's a piece labeled a tax credit which may sound like something that might adjust things when you do your twenty twenty one taxes a year from. Now oh contraire this is up to three thousand six hundred dollars in real money. That will get paid too. Many families with children installments month to month. Through the end of the year single tax filers making less than seventy five thousand with children are eligible one hundred and fifty thousand for couples for starters. The news from the irs. Commissioner yesterday is that those checks should start hitting in july three hundred dollars a month if you have kids under six two hundred fifty dollars a month for older kids. I'm david brancaccio. You're listening to the marketplace morning report. Apm american public media. Hey al i'm mary mcrae's host of the marketplace podcast. This is uncomfortable when amber found out that she would finally receive the disability benefits. She'd been waiting for it. Came with the asterisk And then you know thank you immediately. Say you need to get divers. Because you're gonna be able to get more benefits if you get divorced this week on the show we look at one. Couples fight to stay both married and ensured. New episode of this is uncomfortable. Drops thursday wherever you get your podcasts.

david brancaccio Nancy marshall center of the new crypto Connie choi suez canal amsterdam canal authority sally nabil aucoin montana bitcoin egypt bbc Bitcoin fort belknap reservation
Robert De Corah (Oneida/Assiniboine) Part 1

The Storyteller

14:30 min | 3 months ago

Robert De Corah (Oneida/Assiniboine) Part 1

"So i had a friend and he said he's gonna become an aristocrat. And i thought about it and he says. Would you like to go with me. So i went with him and the accepted us. And i would become a gang. My friends to the storyteller. You'll find first. Nations people from across native north america who are following jesus christ without reservation on today's program we'll hear from an elder who because of the relocation act grew up in the heart of chicago as a young man he got caught up in the gang life and the violence that comes with name is robert de cora which is a ho chunk name. I am registered as an oneida indian having been born on the oneida reservation by green bay wisconsin and my dad was neither and ho chunk. My mother was makuta. Sue or a to from the fort belknap reservation in montana. I am now in elder but early in my life. I'd go through a number of experience whether the reservation where i was born and experiencing in the indian relocation act. Were we would eventually end up in chicago on the nor side where most indians were relocated to the uptown area. Like many native americans. We weren't exactly rich. Six of us would inhabit the same bedroom until later as we grew up and my parents saw that we needed to go ahead and get the another bedroom so the girls would be one room in. The voice could be in another room. Four sisters two brothers well like most indians that relocated to chicago. My life in many ways centered around the american indian center. There we would attend all the children's programs and would receive gifts for christmas. And we would go to indian bowling or i remember my family doing that Every saturday we go to indian swimming indian basketball and native of baseball softball league and these are the things we would do. As well as the tend to powwows well growing up Like most natives our lives centered around going back to the oneida reservation for summertime the be with our grandparents and aunts and uncles rich. In that way haven't experienced family now we would also go alternate at times to go to montana to the cinnabon reservation early on as a child on the cinnamon. Reservation are remember my grandmother. Her name was needed. Tucker born eighteen ninety seven she hired quote unquote the gifts of prophecy amongst natives. And she could tell you future later she would give her heart to the lord jesus and she discovered that the spirits that were given her power. It wasn't the holy spirit. So she submitted her gifts of prophecy to the lord and She lost them and now she trusted that the spirit of god would guide her. I remember my grandmother. Doing native works shoes famous for quilt doll. Shoes famous for her beadwork. I have many of them. She taught me how to be. She taught me to make moccasins. How to create a loom and how to do. My own belt are headband. Make a pouch. She taught me these things we visited. And i would just sit there with her on the reservation but she prayed every morning which amazed me that should be on her knees for fifteen minutes. Thirty minutes praying and now say grandma what are you doing. She says my children shed twelve of them are scattered all across this country. I'm praying for my children. That god would protect them that god would possess them. God will be with them and that impressed me how she prayed and she would end up taking me to a little church. Absorption now if you've ever been dissolved and they've got a little single jail cell the have a massive bar and that's what we grew up with Alcohol all of our life which i began to get into trouble beginning at seventh grade regularly drinking but that church was up on a hill and i imagine as an adult it could not seat more than twenty people. Little thing to solve slow church. I've seen now my mother. Because when they grew up they had grown up catholic. And my dad. When he grew up he grew up a piscopo palin so as a child growing up alternate at times going to the catholic church and mass and would also go to fiscal church. I happen to be an all nighter locally there in chicago. The closest church for us to go to was quote unquote a nondenominational church. Where we basically would go every sunday. We'll be given maybe two three pennies and nicolette and we would stop and get our candy l. The candies were one penny. If you want really make go far too large pretzels two for one sense so you felt like you had eight something and then we go to sunday school and that was growing up well if you live in inner city chicago which we did. It was a rich environment in that we lived in the most diversified neighborhood. In all of chicago we also lived in the most alcoholic may put in all chicago. I grew up in what i call the bar after the bar closed in chicago. So i knew all the native people they'd be at my house. And i wake up in the middle of night and a visit with the different ones and i can remember cubby another's And i'd wake up that. Give me a few pennies or nickel or quarter as us passing through everybody and then go back to bed. I'll wake up and everybody's passed out in the chairs over. They work and so that's how we grew up. And that's and that's what. I began to drink on a regular basis. Rarely on the weekends are witnessed. And so that's what i became. I'm sad and salary to go back in time to say when my brother thought they thought it was dying from gangrene. What did i do. i'm medicating myself. And that's what i think alcohol is medicating yourself from your pain. And so i got drunk and so. I staggered back into my grandmother's home. Where have you been. Where'd you get a hall and so there are go to my grandmother's home. Pass out now. I look at it as an adult shamed seventh grade but an eighth grade in chicago once again being too stupid on a school night. Not knowing what to do with alcohol drank about a chord of wine. I've got a curfew. Nine thirty and i stagger home. Imos says where you been bought the time. She says where you been sunday schoolteacher. Who knew me followed me home. And set your son's been out drinking by our seminary. My mother said you shouldn't be drinking. Whatever in front of her just laid down passed out and then just hanging out doing your thing. That was my growing up. Nineteen sixty seven. Indians won the right to gather in mass. And were you could gather in public. What ended up happening. The first powwows began publicly. Now we're there powell's and secret on some reservations but now i know neider. There are participated in the very first one as a trial during the day. My grandmother said could you be a clown. I said i don't know how to be a clown. She says teach you so. She painted me all up. Dressed me all up and The indian parade went to throwing candy out to the crown and they gave me a prized for being cleaned up. Went to the powwow danced ram. And that's where it was and In chicago we go either indian center the piles so you go to the armory for big one and because i knew director and we lived within a block of each other and a hung out at times of the son he would say. Would you like to ride with us to the powwow say yes and so we would go. Well i became involved with a street gang a young. I didn't hang out too much at that point. And that was with the black saints. But i was considered a peewee black sing and Then they black saints. If i remember correctly become aristocrats. So i had a friend and he said he's gonna become an aristocrat and i thought about it and he says. Would you like to go with me. So i went with him and the accepted us and i would become a gang member now during that time. You experience violence all growing up. I've been attacked with knives a number of times. One time somebody running at me and my friends running from me and had a knife news ready to plunge it in me and i jumped as high as i get in the air i mean high and i kicked with all my might katamon a chest and the knife went flying and he just sat. There cursing me out then doing anything. Well he was golden gloves. A news also a wrestler so a week later he challenged me and there we go again but during the gangs end up being forced into a fight what had happened is we're sitting on church steps all getting drunk and some guy so could you move down as to why. I'm ripen to this girl. I said yeah. I'll move down so the later calls me over says do this. Is i main demands wrapping to scrub. You gonna take that take up. He said ludin step. You don't take that. And i says well i don't bother me. He says you either find him or you find me. Take your pick. We've run out of time but we hope you'll join us for the amazing conclusion to robert story without giving away too much. We can say that. This wasn't his last fight but his biggest battle wasn't with gangsters. It was with himself. The truth is it's the same for all of us until we come to the end of ourselves and walk humbly with our creator there will be no peace no hope and no power to change what really matters in this life. So how do we walk humbly. With god it begins by recognizing that we have dishonored in offended him and that we can only be restored on his terms. And what are his terms. Listen to jesus words for god so loved the world that he gave his one and only son that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life. If you want to know more we have a free resource would like to send you called. What if ask for it when you write to us at the storyteller. Po box one thousand one bemidji minnesota five six six one nine debts the storyteller po box one thousand and one bemidji minnesota five six. Six one nine. You can also request it online at our website without reservation dot com or on facebook at without reservation. Thanks for listening and remember. The greatest story took place at the cross for the wages of sin is death but the gift of eternal life through. Jesus christ our lord. There's more to robert stories so be sure to join us again. Next time as we listen to the storyteller.

chicago robert de cora makuta fort belknap reservation american indian center montana piscopo palin oneida green bay Imos softball north america neider Tucker wisconsin bowling nicolette basketball baseball swimming
01-13-21 Learning loss during the pandemic

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 4 months ago

01-13-21 Learning loss during the pandemic

"Welcome to native america calling from studio eight six nine in a letter pueblo. I'm tara gatewood at the beginning of the covid. Nineteen pandemic educators scrambled to get students connected to on my glasses to keep them safe even day. Educators worried how online only classes would affect students longtime learning a new study by mackenzie company. Now documents the learning gap from almost a full year without in person classes. Many worry that gap is even greater for native students. Coming up after the news. We'll get the details about the drawbacks of online learning. Stay tuned this is national native news. Tony gonzalez oklahoma congressman tom. Cole opposes impeaching president trump as members of the house moved to impeach trump accusing him of inciting violence against the government after last week's deadly riot at the us capitol and a house rules committee meeting tuesday. Kohl condemned the violence and called for justice for those who took part in violent acts. Cole says the president bears some responsibility for what occurred but says he will not support. Impeachment differ with my college in the majority. I do not believe there. Proposed course of action. Impeachment is the appropriate solution. I can think of no action. the can take is more likely to further. Divide the american people and by putting the country through the trauma of another impeachment. As i speak today. We're just eight days from the end of president trump's term of office next week president-elect biden will take the oath of office as the president of the united states at a time like this we should be seeking a path forward Healing a path toward healing the american people but instead majorities rushing to judgment without due process. The house wednesday began debate on an impeachment resolution against the president tribes in montana have vaccinated healthcare workers for covid nineteen and are moving forward on plans for community members. Yellowstone public radio's caitlyn nicholas reports last week the rocky boy health center which serves the chippewa cree in northern montana initiated phase two of the rocky boy covid nineteen vaccination plan misty denny the health centers public information officer says the scheduling team began calling elders age. Sixty five and older on december thirty first to schedule appointments or trying to discourage any kind of elderly patients from this show enough so they've been working diligently to contact the eligible recipients directly by phone danny says the clinic vaccinated healthcare workers from its initial shipment of two hundred doses of moderna vaccine and is using the remainder of its second shipment of two hundred doses for elders prioritizing those over seventy five with medical conditions most montana counties are still in there i roll out of the vaccine to healthcare workers who have direct contact exposure with the virus however other tribes in montana including the crow northern cheyenne black feet fort belknap indian community and the confederated salish and kootenai tribes started vaccinating elderly tribal members. This week. After completing the first phase of vaccinations all tribal members are prioritized to receive the vaccine under montana's vaccination plan native americans and montana have experienced disproportionately high rates of infection and mortality from the corona virus for national native news. I'm caitlyn nicholas. The navajo nation has connected more than seven hundred homes to the electrical grid using covid nineteen relief funds as arizona. Public radio's ryan hinds reports the navajo tribal utility. Authority is using nearly forty million dollars from last year's cares act to improve power lines grid capacity the tribe intended to bring power to about five hundred homes before the end of last year but was able to exceed. The goal is crews worked long hours over several months. It's a continuation of the light up navajo project that began in two thousand nineteen about a quarter of the fifty five thousand households on the navajo nation. Aren't connected to the electrical grid. It prevents access to running water reliable lighting heating and cooling as well as modern refrigeration and internet access the navajo tribal utility authority is also installing. Solar power systems in two hundred homes and several families have received bathroom additions in water. Cisterns using cares act funding. It's all part of a broad plan approved by the tribe in august for electrical water infrastructure and broadband projects in all the federal covid relief package allocated more than seven hundred million dollars to the navajo nation for national native news. I'm ryan hunches in flagstaff and demand. Tony gonzales natural native news is produced by colonic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by the sonam ski chambers law firm championing tribal sovereignty and defending native american rights since one thousand nine hundred. Seventy six with offices in washington. Dc new mexico. California and alaska support by the association of american indian physicians and the samsa sponsored opioid response networking the nation to address the opioid crisis in tribal communities information and support at a p dot org native voice one the native american radio network. This is native america calling. I'm tara gatewood joining you live from my homeland of sheer would be skype. The achievement gap for native. American students is well documented through the years native k. Through twelve students have some of the lowest test scores graduation rates on top of that the federal communications commission points out native households have among the lowest rate of access to broadband internet service and now a new study finds native students are among those who are disproportionately affected by the shutdown of in person classes because of the cove nineteen pandemic the report by mckinsey and company looked at last year's test scores and found that students of color including native american students were further behind in math and reading coming up. We'll speak with educators about how their students are faring. And we'd like to hear from you too as a teacher or a parent. Are you concerned about your students education. What challenges do you face getting. Your native students connected to the internet and keeping track of their schoolwork in tests. Give us a call at one. Eight hundred nine six two eight four eight also. One eight hundred nine nine native and joining us today from tucson. Arizona is kimberly danka ba- gay and she is the president of the arizona indian education association and program coordinator for the amphitheater public schools native american education program and she has kiowa caddo and pony. My pleasure ever hear kimberly. Welcome to native america calling. Good morning Tear this is Thank you for allowing me. This opportunity to be a part of the program and just for purposes of how i introduced myself. I just introduced myself mykhailo language now. am toyota. I'm going to Going good chali mossy not oklahoma aimed. Kimberly thank hoppy. Gate alcon My name as much in is kimberly delegate. And i'm coming to you from tucson arizona. I've been here working for the theater. Public schools twelve years I'm sorry for nine years. And i've been with the arizona indian education association for the past five to six years very nice and just hearing that i can see your view into this issue is really critical. And talk to me a little bit. Kimberly about what you have witnessed in of course your concerns with how things have progressed over the last year with the pandemic go ahead. Sure what i've seen and witnessed coming from an overall statewide look on how the pandemic has affected. Our native. students is very alarming We it's no surprise that our students have already been lagged behind left behind in the area of faculty just in general Just due to of course one of my main passion concerned as a curriculum that's being utilized out the at the public school systems And just the funding. That's not being provided to assist our schools to help our students to become academically successful But with the onset of the pandemic and through the course of this seen what has happened over the past year a lot of our students have felt fallen further behind and mainly in the areas of math reading those are science classes and areas of You know something that they already had a hard time keeping up with. And with the onset of the pandemic is just enhanced that detriment- detrimental effect on her students and so that mainly causes d to going to online virtual learning remote learning Not having to adjust to that transition but also not being able to have access to that To the internet a lot of our rule schools. have problems with connecting to the internet or not even having that broadband service provided to them. And of course we Those who are in education. Know that n- you know. The funding really isn't there to provide that for the broadcast in rural areas. And so it's been a really detrimental effect on a banner native students in those areas. Not only that. But even with the public school districts such as the one that i work for here in tucson area Our parents still have that problem. Even though we're right here in the big city Connecting to the internet isn't something that maybe they don't have access to for whatever reasons whether it's personal or just you know not able to have that service provided in their homes So we provide packets to go out to students but It's still there's a transportation issue with a lot of our families that excuse me that we serve as here As well as you know across the state and so a lot of our students are lagging behind. The students that are currently work with Those are the areas in the math of reading that really Highlight what they're having problems with A lot of our native students are visual learners. So it's it was easier for them to see in person of you know the problem that was being done. They cut right on the board or You know talk to the teacher. Transitioning over into a virtual round a little takes assessment especially for those who aren't used to being on the computer or talking to somebody over a machine and so it's a lot of adjusting for students. But i do see that that is having a detrimental effect upon all of our native students. Just trying to adjust and to catch up to With their studies in this also involves parents in right now on parents or teachers Or the ones who are helping their students. You know understand this technology. What about that part of it. Maybe that's where you come into this conversation. We want to hear from you. Some of the challenges maybe even some celebrations in the way you come over some of them. Give us a call. One eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is the number kimberly anything you want to share about thinking parents. Feeling some of these gaps absolutely Our parents are now. We have parents who maybe have our teleworking from home. So they're not only trying to do their job that they normally do but they're also having to become a teacher and in that capacity it's balancing you know making that time for their students for their child to Understand their schoolwork Even for me as a mom. I had two children that went through the public. School system. The way they learn today was a lot different than i learned in my day and so trying to help even my own children through that process. I can only feel and understand where parents are now coming from even more so with having to deal with having their children at home all the time and trying to balance that work and taking time to help their students and even more if they don't understand the work or know how to do a math problem you know i. It's a lot different than maybe what they were taught. And so you know. Our hearts always go out to our parents More so just because of that Specific y- issue that they have to deal with and so we try to provide those resources for our parents. We try to provide encouragement especially for parents and to also Help our Remind our parents to provide continue providing those teaching home. You know within our program. We always tell our parents that education begins at home. You know especially for our native families. You begin learning from the day you were born and through those teachings those values those customs and so that helps you know our students to remember where they are and where they come from and to know that what they're doing and what they're accomplishing. What they're going to accomplish will one day come help our people and so just trying to encourage parents to remind their children that and also that we are here to help them if they need assistance. parents were you. Give us a ring. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight also here to washington. Dc is diana lawyer and she is the executive director of the national indian education association. And she is from the oglala sioux tribe our pleasure to have her here diana thank you for being with us for another native america calling thank you and afternoon. Good morning. Everybody listening in the communities. Thank you for the indiana just any initial comments. You wanna make go ahead. you know. it's hard to make. Any kind of comment is already set or thoughts. That i think what we need to do collectively not it's not just native nations but even the public school system and education advocates organizations influencers. We need to start reassessing and thinking of How this american education system looks we as educators From the ground all the way up to the top to the federal level were shocked in march and april of last year than education system. That was not functional not Effective as well as we thought it would be across all of our community. Yes it's disparities equities but what kogas and the pandemic pot shown up. Was that this. American education system doesn't work for all of our students doesn't work for all Thoughts and philosophy that doesn't work for all belief systems. And and i know and i a and a lot of our tribal communities and agencies and organizations have been saying this for a very long time and it took a pandemic to To slap reality and a lot of people's faces to show what we've been arguing advocating for. This is not work. And i'm not saying that. This organization on myself individually has the answers but collectively. We have had the answers. We'd been advocating for change. This can't be focused on standards anymore. We've got to start looking at communities in school Personally we have to look at the different staunton philosophies our culture language and how does that in You pray into our daily life. Kim said we've been learning since we were born. Why can't that learning dot philosophy extent into the classroom from now is the time to make that. Concept has a lot of power in it in just thinking about you know extending this beyond your parameters that fit on paper and when we think of the opportunity that is being missed for our students i know that talks about you. Know our our future leaders in our communities of the potential and things that our students can do. There's a lot that needs to be said. I know you'd like to say some to go ahead and join us at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number two also one eight hundred nine native on the next native america calling native in the spotlight worked on joe biden's presidential campaign and built a consultant business helping drives with complex issues. Clara pratt recently won a prestigious environmental award. When we sign on air again won't find out what drives her success and what her hopes are for twenty twenty one support by roswell park who know tribal communities face persistent challenges in health equity such as cancer and higher death rates the centre for indigenous cancer research at roswell park. Comprehensive cancer center is dedicated to advancing cancer research that will lead to translatable science medicine and cancer care for indigenous populations worldwide. Are you at high risk for cancer. A no charge online assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash assess me. You're listening to native america calling interrogate would misled pueblo. And we are talking about learning moss as a result of the covid nineteen pandemic today. Are you a teacher or pairing. Who is struggling to keep your students. On-track tell us about it. Join our conversation by calling one. Eight hundred nine nine six to eight for eight. That's also one eight hundred nine native with us today out of washington. Dc is danoy. Here she is the executive director of the national indian education association. Here too out of tucson. Arizona is kimberly dang klopp gay and she is the president of the arizona indian education association. My pleasure have both of them here. And diana the future of our children you know having this time in their life and their education story. What are your thoughts water. We really talking about of why if adequate adequate education isn't happening now to them what this will mean them. Five years from now. Twenty years from now any thoughts diana yeah i think it will influence their opportunities shrink opportunities from five opportunities to one opportunity and i'm thinking about our students that live in rural areas where they go to public school tribal bureau school private charter Or school it's little. Areas are isolated. Herring the students. That don't that already came in It's like came to the playground behind. They came to the playground. And all in an area of an could begin with the pandemic has pulled the onion back those layers and just shown more What's frustrating as an as a parent. This is something that out of their control. The system that they go to school in is out of their control. The system is out of a parents control out of a communities control out of our tribal leaders control these systems that we go to school in entrust upon our systems that are placed upon us and we have zero control other through other than who advocacy advocate to your local your school board your local leaders or state leaders now your federal eaters because change has to happen for these opportunities to multiply for our students and i'm not just talking about natives. I'm talking about all. Students who work negatively affected by this pandemic and those numbers are pretty high when we think about our own tribal communities and diana when we heard from kimberly and what is going on there in arizona. Use a national view. What are some of the things you're hearing from some of the different areas and maybe even ways people are figuring out how to navigate or pushing back against This gap this learning loss. Nationally user conversation around broadband and axa and i think we Collectively as national advocates. A fair job and advocating to get more money out into our communities. I believe one of the stories. We heard this coming into. Our intro was internet and electricity to navajo nation home. This is a story that i'm hearing across a lot of our tribal communities and a lot of our rural areas and that's the coburg funding so i think that's a positive space as far as At the federal level goes the big conversation to hearing in education associations and organizations. We can't keep pushing. Standardized testing. can't keep pushing assessment until we fix a broken system so it's going to have to come from a federal or national organization conversation to start making those changes of these conversations are happening and are The equities are a part of the conversation grants and pushing folks to influence what happens at the state level. What's really frustrating. As you come across and that across all states you have potentially fifty different ways of looking at assessing on addressing musicians. And it's a challenge when you get to the federal level per chrishell funding to support fifty different solutions. I think there need not saying. I wanna bashful education system national education philosophy but i think collaboration and partnerships communication is key. When we're making solutions where advocating to push more money into a system for a fixed. We need to ensure that the is solid. We need to ensure that its effective. And if it's happening in once maybe could have potentially support in another community in critical questions. Were also asking you today. What are your thoughts one. Eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is the number. Thank you for that. Diana and want to add another voice. We're going to go to mesa. Arizona to say hello to esther nice nystrom who is a program specialist for mesa public schools native american education program. She is navajo in our pleasure to have her here. Esther welcome thank you very much for having me I'm going to introduce myself. That asia kato it shouldn't it shouldn't twitchy nicolas to she. Does she taper that kind of knows. Ah estrin nostrum Yeah my name. Is esther nice jeremiah. Some mesa public schools native american education program Thank you for having me this morning. I welcome At out in our community. Thank you for that and esther thinking about going into all of this were educators prepared for what came in what you're witnessing now. And how have they made adjustments. If not okay come Myself i am a certified teacher coming from the classroom and then moving into Different administrative positions There was definitely a moment where teachers had to take a deep breath and realize that things are changing we were not ready Prepared for this pandemic You know in our education careers when we're born this. A pandemic hasn't happened for quite some time. So the online systems outward definitely really ready because they were already in that mode of remote learning. How ever are in person classes which wasn't even talked about you know in person remote Partial was not even prepared for so back in march when this happened and he had to make that transition into An emergency mode of everyone's stay home. We have to figure this out we've learned not ready However within the past couple of months it has been up to the school district to decide that best outcome for their students. And what's that burning with. Looks like so Boosting up -education for our teachers who were not Trained to be online a remote teachers there were increasing teachers. They district had to stop That education on how that puts and changing and increasing the modalities of instructions and integrated best practices. Still in the remote setting. And what about the students. What are you hearing from. Students will kind of stories are coming out in being the people who are in this gap so at the very beginning There were a lot of gripe and complaints Saying this is not gonna happen This is not the work that came from our parents as well. So i received phone calls almost every day saying What do i do here. Doesn't teachers have lesson plans and also Styles of learning and. I'm you know taking some time to transition into a remote learning best practices for our teachers in pants to get involved right now. there are less phone calls Let's great he didn't. I'm moving forward with their online classes. However there's some they'll disconnect this well I believe disconnect of Not being personally interacting with their friends and also live you. That personal interaction is really important. Has affected the social emotional learning of our students. In you know that. That's a big part of this in. Sometimes you know we we get the numbers of where students are Who's attending classes. But that other side of the story isn't always heard Maybe you have incorporated native america calling into your students day or you. The student wanted to put it in there. And you're listening today. We wanna hear from you. Two one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is the number. Let's go ahead and take a call we're going to say. Hi to melvin. Who is in santana. Brassica tuned in on casey white-cain melvin. Thank you for reaching out go ahead. You're in the mix During the pandemic here was at the clinic to get checked. And i noticed i mean really noticed. All our professionals were white. Doctors nurses and techs all their most. Where's your in people you know. And i went over and i talked to the chairman and roger trudell i should oh our education public education your disaster plus. Our college actually declare a disaster. Start all over because during this pandemic time we're trying to figure out how to do home education and all that ramaz just redo the whole education. Because i sent my daughter to a private school public school and i was able to see the difference in the academic. The academic is too key. Kids aren't getting quality at today's really See it work force. We better quality education that nelson appreciate your comments redo the whole system in this is a moment where some of that seems like a potential seeing all of the things that are happening now and maybe it's time to redesign all of this. What do you think one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. Thank you for that. Melvin also here to decay into arizona. is dr victoria. Uc she is a secretary of the navajo nation. Board of education and the secretary for the national johnson o'malley association. She is dna our pleasure to have her here with us today. Dr gyasi welcome to native america calling. Oh got akshay donna. antony But on the airbus's chain ashamed that should change tore had leaning dash another look. How great in our show putting the patient on ish not audit dice. I the quite do jensen. This'll her late. Unfortunate cut on metal doors yet and any gi highlight La in boston it. The whole pa button kin no poodle you hit you. Hadid shit didn't know ecuadoran juhasz seat on the auto. She could always been gonig. Hana steeple thank you for giving me this time to speak on behalf of the national johnson molly association also in also including the navajo nation. My name is dr gyasi. And i just introduce myself in my own. Native tongue. appreciating time opportunity to speak this smarting or does afternoon to you all. Thank you for that in dr gyasi. Let's move into as the semester that we just jumped into in. We've heard you know some of the disparities going on but as we get into another semester in many of which is going to be online classes Distance learning what is your thought. Kind of support is being given to students like just like to say here on navajo nation First of all we have a public house order navajo department of health in regards. You know office of environmental health and protection program. A lot of Our decisions are Made in regards to the navajo nation. President and vice president's office in regards to continue to stay at home shelter in place walked on orders Additional usually the addition of two weeks including fifty seven. Our weekend lockdown are happening here on the navajo nation with that sad That goes to with that order in place now who nation. Ob office we have to resort to online distance. Learning and a lot of our staff In regards to Are where we're at as a hotspot area so a lot of the work that we are doing is working from home and working remotely from home and at this time. That's what is happening. And yes there are This coming semester there are talks in regards on the navajo nation. Board of education level of Really having students still be Throughout this entire semester distant. Learning where i know with public schools. A lot of their focus is to have onsite learning available to their students just because on their their thought process is The information that is given to students in guards of education is not in place well enough in regards to a lot of Others have mentioned not having to wi wifi access or devices available to to them because they live in rural areas and a lot of information. Education lesson objectives are being given are on in terms of educational packets in. About how many students are we talking about on the navajo nation. On the nation. The two hundred two hundred and fifty thousand. I can double check right now but as the quiet quiet. Larger numbers enema skin. Just to kind of get a ballpark. When we talk about our native students in again they are the people who will be heading up. Her native nations Keeping him safe keeping them healthy in when we have this kind of gap. What does it lead to your thoughts. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is a number and we are hearing from people who are in the circle of education. And what have you witnessed in your own family. You can share your thoughts with us today. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. Maybe you are that teacher who is facing all of this and understand what it means to go fully online. What would you like to add to this conversation. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is a number and we know we also have tribal leaders in our listening audience. What are some of your thoughts. When things started to happen a scene more closures seeing things going on with the pandemic. What was your thought about the education of our students. If you put anything into place council members of your online if you're listening to some of your thoughts was education the first thing you said we gotta make sure this is a being taken care of to want to hear from you. All thoughts are welcome. Where heading into another semester. Were in another semester. What other kinds of challenges come with the spring semester and you want to share some thoughts or ready to hear anything you'd like to share dialing now one eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is number. Go and give us a ring. Keep the phone lines open support. By the association of american indian physicians and the samsa sponsored opioid response network working with tribal communities across the nation to address the opioid crisis. Breaking the cycle starts with preventing opioid misuse treating opioid use disorder with medications and counseling and recovery support during all phases of recovery. If you or loved one is challenged by opioid use disorder. You can find additional information at a p dot org. Thanks for tuning. Into native. America calling interrogate would and we're focusing on learning loss for students as a result the pandemic. If you're an educator. Is this something. You're witnessing in your school. There is still time to join our conversation. Were at one eight hundred nine six. Two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native right right before the break. Introduce you to dr victoria. Who joins us today. Out of k into arizona and she is a secretary of the navajo nation board of education and doctor gyasi when we think of this gap I'm also wondering about graduation and dropout rates Any thoughts on this of you know how this will affect our graduation rates or if there is anything you can report on students being absent dropping out any thoughts. Thank you question man Due to lack of internet access and they see his cannot access online lessons. They need to be given paper packets or make arrangements for them to access to internet edition. They also need support for dealing with stress and other emotional needs especi- e when they are experience when they experience family members dying from kobe. Teachers they also need continuous support for online teaching many have adapted to on my teaching but there are still other struggling with using technology as a tool that this time for not only our students but also our staff and also our parents and grandparents and a lot of in our home. Our our grandparents our teachers of our students to graduate And the community itself and each of the community here onto novel nation in surrounding areas. Are you know doing their best to provide Curriculum curriculum development or social emotional learning or understanding trauma reaching out teaching children who have the trauma or experience Fan loss of covid nineteen. We've been trained to provide Building resiliency Working on connecting. I think what put all brings us back Navajo people as the net is the knowing of having the clan system that kinship system in navajo they call like having that Family values and family respecting an having those traditional values within their home within their whole gone within their foundation brings stability to what is happening with this pandemic dynamic and the student who have those teachings from their family Those great teams from their families are really. I think are laying down the the role for other students who are meeting that support and help in the online distance learning. So they've been in these times in a lot of people are definitely taking the opportunity to infuse more of our teachings our understandings and even this system into other students education. And i know a lotta people are saying this has been a silver lining in some of this and parents are even able to bring in some of the language into a student's school day and so there are some things that you know. We are seeing because of this too and so there is stuff still to be celebrated and as we get a clearer picture as to what educators as well as students are facing this year. If there's any thoughts you have go ahead and dial in one eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight duck gyasi. Thank you for that also here to from an. it is diana konare and she joins today out of washington. Dc and. dan also wanted to toss that question to you about dropout rates and graduation rates. Is there anything you can report on that. I don't have hard numbers hunting. Like most people. We just have Projections we know. Dropout rates are high I echo what The call the parent called in and said a lot of our parents are choosing to move their students from a public. School system Maybe even a charter system a charter system. That could be online. And i'm just going to say epic because that is an online successful charter system. I'm not promoting them specifically but that is an example of what i'm hearing in urban areas writer urban suburban areas. They do have more opportunities for school choice and they're able to move their student from a public system to a school. That might have a better track record for being online and supporting students I have heard and this is just again in our community talking and sharing frustrations and information a lot of our juniors and seniors. What are they want to drop out or or having to drop out because they have younger siblings or Nieces and nephews that they need to take care of teach so making a choice as our community members. Do not take care of themselves but take care of others so we do have a lot of Juniors and seniors that are choosing to You know opt out this year to help the collective help their younger siblings and relatives be Be successful thank you for that. And what are you experiencing as. Well one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight also here to albuquerque. New mexico is uh sheen dana ba- gay and she is a trained specialists with epochs that stands for education for parents of indian children with special needs. She is dna. And it's our pleasure to have her here with us session. Dana welcome good afternoon Yacht ask those should the Like but she in honest edgier adopted guy cutini. Mistletoe auditing buses team cobra. Does it change though. that's mela. Hello everyone my name. Is shane dana. Be gay and i am. Benny white corn clan adopted by the red running into the water clan born for bitter water my maternal grandfather is the edgewater clan and my paternal grandfather's clan is the two met at the water. Hello everyone thank you for having me our pleasure and thank you for introducing yourself in that way and understanding the relations that you come from is really important in all of this and you connect to a lot of students through epix and of course you know we definitely want to hear about how all this is unfolding for special needs students. So give us a view. What are you hearing. What are some of the adjustments that are having to be made. Go ahead okay. well Some of the families that i've been working with are having a hard time with their their children being one on one with their children who have special education needs And just kind of balancing their life around The school making sure that their children are are attending each and every one of thirty classes and online Zoo mean and just everything that intel's with them occupational therapy speech therapy and just juggling all the appointments online. It is very overwhelming for my parents. That i helping through do this time and also Just kind of the connection and the rural area is another Part that's really really I need So with some of my Parents that i've been doing. I have a parent ambassadors training. That i help parents band. You know the iep Portion of their special education and i also Help them understand their the parents rights and the students right as well and with this. This is very difficult because some of the parents you know that they've never really had to go online so i would help them Step by step and also another thing. That's pretty alarming is Getting the parents to advocate for their child children So i just Help them in any way. I can and some of the questions that they have. We go by step whether it may be writing a complaint letters to the school or Looking for more resources throughout the state in so just seeing dana. When you talk about you know helping parents understand their rights. What are some of the things that you were having discussions about or things. You'd like to inform especially parents with students with special needs about things that they should be speaking up on. Are there any things that you'd like to share Yes like the understanding the individualized program The iep Which entails bullied children and then early education as well The ifs's individualized family service program and just addressing the to Documents that helped Get services or their children through the school and to get everyone on the same page to understand that the services needs to be met by the school and with the and also just The parents rights then to see jewel safeguards in special education is another thing that i would like to Let parents know that you know they. They do have that right to advocate for their child. And and a lot of the parents that i do work with. Don't know how to go about that. So i show them a different way to collaborate and to network with different Professional to help get that taking care of in wind. Some of this is going on it. You know we. You know. want to hear how students are faring in. We're talking about a lot of screen time all day in this is something we can hear from our guests on but for you session. Dana anything to share about what this means for students to be onscreen all day. oh yes. It's pretty overwhelming for the students of the families that i've helped work with. They just have so much homework to be turned in. And i think the the parents the parents and the teachers are giving a lot of homework to the children and the children are kind of add a standpoint where they don't know what to do so the parents kind of end up helping them turn in their homework but when the test come in that's when they figure out you know like that the Where they need more help on how to implement the the lessons and to what they learned instead of just doing the work for them you know the end to be counted as a attended attendant for that day there on the screen most of the day and they get very frustrating especially for the kids who have so much energy and a. They need to go play. They need to do different things. Walk around and being fed up a screen and you'd like to highlight when we talk about this time in everything that is brought forward in you know especially for students anything more. You want to share such dana. Yeah Well i would just like to encourage each and every family's To know that you know there's there's parent resources centers out there and each state and ethics is one of the resources here in new mexico to help parents understand their child rights and we also Have a training for parents and if their parents out there are interested. In our paired cheney's i can Give them more information Our website is epics. Am dot work and we have a conference coming up a virtual conference coming up so everyone can take take a look at that on our website for more information and again The parent training is for parents. Who wants to understand. More about the Special education System in their schools. And i eat and we can. Yeah i can before all right. Thank you for that player to have you on the line today and as we get ready to wrap things up we are looking at it. Inauguration coming up new administration What are your thoughts on. How this will shift thinks if any diana From by diana lawyers. Here in indiana. I wanna get your take on that. Thanks yes We hope it will shift and we hope it will shift the conversation. We hope it will shift attention but more important. We hope we're at the table This past administrations. We saw a lot of cuts at the department of education in various departments and hold apartments being absolved to save federal funding. But we wanna make sure moving forward to To address these inequities in native communities tribal communities and for native students in urban and rural schools. We've got gotta be at the table and part of the solution and this administration so far in our conversations with biden harris transition team. They are asking for solutions from our communities from our perspective and points of view. And that's a huge change of the last four years. So i have hope and i want everyone else to begin having hope but the voice comes from us we have to empower ourselves. This administration is gonna do What administrations have done in the past. It's running government running a system that he's existed for hundreds of years and that we have been left out of so moving forward the hope. Is there the support. Should be there but we can't stand aside. We have to begin. Advocating aggressively advocating Through education and through. And i know he'd done that i've seen it before our protests. I've seen changes happen when we collectively come together to advocate on on one issue or multiple issues That those are my partying wirtz. I just want everybody to know that. Their We have to have hope in order to move forward congressional in diana any context you'd like to share people want to connect yes my Email the o. You are in a y. e. r. and i a. dot org. Our website has a ton of resources and information. www dot n. i. e. dot org and my contact information on the website as well all right. Thank you for that. And that's going to wrap up our program today. But what is your students story if you would like to reach out. Tell us a little bit about it. You can always email us comments. At native america calling dot com or on social media. Facebook twitter and instagram. And thank you to everybody that we heard from inner program today. Esther nystroem kimberly dank lobby. Gay doctor victoria gyasi. They in ignore and session dina began. Thank you all for being with us and tomorrow. We hope you'll join us for discussion with our january. Need in the spotlight claire pratt. I'm tara gatewood. More information about native america calling can be found on her website. We'll meet you here tomorrow. Support by ameri indian countries. One hundred percent tribally owned insurance partner. Emory works with tribal governments and their business enterprises to provide effective commercial insurance coverage strengthened. Native american communities protect tribal sovereignty and help keep dollars in indian country. More information on property liability worker's compensation and commercial auto solutions at amazon dot com. That's a. m. e. r. n. d. dot com new. Sir would over tourney tourney. One captain muna yamanashi without nick. Excellent cooler nick concacaf. Louis incan healthcare provider cars to hung on healthcare dot. Gov knock key now. New one eight hundred three one eight two five nine six kind looney center for medicare and medicaid service. Me native america calling is produced in the national native voice studios in albuquerque. New mexico by chronic broadcast corporation and native nonprofit media organization funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio satellite service. Music is by brands michael. David's native voice the native american radio network.

arizona indian education assoc montana america roswell park tara gatewood caitlyn nicholas diana kimberly national indian education asso tucson association of american indian arizona mackenzie company congressman tom president trump elect biden Yellowstone public radio rocky boy health center misty denny cheyenne black feet fort belkn
Health Officials Fear COVID-19 Pandemic-Related Suicide Spike Among Indigenous Youth

TIME's Top Stories

09:51 min | 5 months ago

Health Officials Fear COVID-19 Pandemic-Related Suicide Spike Among Indigenous Youth

"Presented by raytheon technologies our nearly two hundred thousand engineers researchers and people with purpose are building the future today. We're pushing the limits of known science to go deeper into space advance aviation and build smarter defense systems that protect all of us here at home. That's the future of aerospace and defense learn more at rtx dot com health officials fear covid nineteen pandemic related suicide spike among indigenous youth by sarah reirden fallen pine cones covered. Sixteen year. old leslie kaiser. Fresh grave at the edge of wolf point a small community on the fort. Peck indian reservation on the eastern montana plains. Leslie whose father is a member of the ford pekka cinnabon and sioux tribes is one of at least two teenagers on the reservation. Who died by suicide the summer a third teens death is under investigation. Authorities say leslie's mother natalie. Kaiser was standing beside the grave. Recently when she received a text with a photo of the headstone she ordered. She looked at her phone and then back at the grave of the girl who took her own life in september i wish she would have reached out and let us know what was wrong. She said youth suicide rates have been increasing in the us over the past decade. Between two thousand seven and twenty seventeen the rate nearly tripled for children aged ten to fourteen and rose seventy six percent among the nineteen year olds according to the us centers for disease control and prevention mental health experts fear. The pandemic could make things worse particularly for kids who live on rural native american reservations. Like ford pack. In a typical native american youth die by suicide at nearly twice the rate of their white peers in the us among those are vulnerable children on remote reservations who are cut off from their larger families and communities by covid nineteen calls restrictions. It has put a really heavy spirit on them. Being isolated and depressed and at home with nothing to do says kerry manning a project coordinator at the fort peck tribes spotted bull recovery resource center. Other native american leaders are also sounding alarm on south. Dakota's pine ridge reservation iguala sioux tribe. President julian bear runner declared a state of emergency in august and his declaration. Bear runner wrote that the measures imposed to prevent the viruses. Spread has added to the strain on a population already struggling with poverty addiction high crime and the trauma of generations of being the target of racism. These necessary measures and the threat of the virus are taking a toll on the mental health needs of our population requiring a response that we are inadequately prepared for due to lack of resources. Bear runner road. It's not clear what connection the pandemic has to the youth suicides on the fort peck reservation. Leslie had attempted suicide once before several years ago but she had been in counseling and seem to be feeling better. Her mother says though she also notes that leslie's therapists cancelled her counselling sessions. Before the pandemic hit probably with the virus it would been discontinued anyway. Kaiser says it seems like things that were important were kind of set to the wayside. Tribal members typically lean on one another in times of crisis. But this time is different. The reservation is a covert nineteen hotspot and remote roosevelt county which encompasses most of the reservation more than ten percent of the population has been infected with a corona virus. The resulting social distancing has led tribal officials to worry. The community will fail to see mental warning signs among at risk youth so officials are focusing suicide prevention efforts on finding ways to help those kids remotely. Our people have been hardships. And they're still here and they'll still be here after this one as well says don wetzel tribal liaison for the montana office of public instruction and a member of the black feet nation. I think if you wanna look at resiliency in this country you look at our native americans. Poverty high rates of substance abuse limited healthcare in crowded households elevate both physical and mental health risks for residents of reservations. It's those conditions where things like suicide and pandemics like covid are able to just decimate tribal people says theresa brockie a public health researcher at johns hopkins university and a member of the whiteclay nation from fort belknap montana. Montana has seen two hundred thirty one suicides. This year with the highest rates occurring in rural counties. Those numbers aren't much different from a typical year. Says karl royston suicide prevention coordinator for the state's department of public health and human services. The status had one of the highest suicide rates in the country each year. For decades as social distancing drags on fatality numbers climb the economic impacts of the pandemic start to take hold of families rushton says and he expects to see more suicide attempts in december and january. We're hoping we're wrong in this. Of course he said for rural teenagers in particular the isolation caused by school closures and prevailed or cancelled sports seasons can tax. Their mental health. Peers are a huge factor for kids. If they're cut off they're more at risk ralston says furthermore teen suicides tend to cluster especially in rural areas every suicide triples the risk that a surviving loved one will follow suit. Ralston says on average. Every person who died by suicide has six survivors who are affected deeply by the laws when talking about small tribal communities that jumps to twenty five to thirty. He says maria vega twenty two year old member of the fort peck tribes knows this kind of contagious grief. In two thousand fifteen after finding the body of close friend who had died by suicide vega attempted suicide as well. She is now a youth representative for a state run. Suicide prevention committee that organizes conferences and other events for young people vega is a nursing student who lives six hours away from her family making it difficult to travel home acted cove nineteen october and was forced to isolate increasing her sense of removal from family. While isolated vega was able to attend therapy sessions through a telehealth system set up by her university. I really do think therapy is something that would help people while they're alone. She says but vega points out that. This is not an option for many people on rural reservations. Who don't have computers or reliable internet access. The therapists who do offer telehealth services have long wait. Lists other. Prevention programs are having difficulties operating during the pandemic brockie who studies health. Delivery and disadvantaged populations has twice had to delay the launch of an experimental training program for native parents. And this project. Local workers will meet individually with one hundred twenty parents with young children and teach resiliency cultural knowledge and parenting skills. Brockie hopes that by strengthening family and community connections through this novel method. The program will lower these children's risk of substance abuse and suicide later in life at fort. Pack the reservations mental health center had to scale down its youth events that teach leadership skills and traditional practices like horseback spac riding and archery as well as workshops on topics like with grief the cultural events which manning says usually draw two hundred people or more are intended to take teenagers minds away from depression and allow them to have conversations about suicide a taboo topic and many native cultures the few events such as coping skills that can go forward are limited now to a handful of people at a time tribes rural states and other organizations running youth. Suicide intervention and prevention initiatives are struggling to sustain the same level of services using money from the federal cares act and other sources. Montana's office of public instruction ramped up online suicide prevention training for teachers. While ralston's office has beefed up counseling resources people can access via the phone on the national level the center for a native american youth in washington. Dc hosts by weekly webinars for young people to talk about their hopes and concerns executive director. Nikki petra says that on average around ten thousand young people log in each week and the cares act. The federal government allocated four hundred twenty five million dollars for mental health programs. Fifteen million dollars of which was set aside for native health organizations. Peter hopes the pandemic will bring attention to the historical inequities that led to the lack of healthcare and resources own reservations and how they enable the twin epidemics of covid nineteen and suicide. This pandemic has really opened up those wounds. She says we're clinging even more to the resiliency of culture. In wolf point natalie. Kaiser experienced that resiliency and support firsthand. the fort peck community has come together to pay for leslie funeral. That's a miracle in itself. She says if you or someone you know may be contemplating suicide. call the national suicide prevention lifeline. At one eight hundred two seven three eight two five five or text home to seven four one seven four one to reach the crisis. Text line in emergencies. Call nine one one or seek care from a local hospital or mental health provider.

raytheon technologies sarah reirden leslie kaiser eastern montana plains us centers for disease control kerry manning fort peck tribes spotted bull pine ridge reservation iguala President julian bear office of public instruction Kaiser leslie Leslie vega ford don wetzel theresa brockie fort belknap karl royston
02-18-21 Medical experts: dont lower guard on COVID-19

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 3 months ago

02-18-21 Medical experts: dont lower guard on COVID-19

"Welcome to native america calling from studio eight six nine minutes but a pueblo. Unterrogation would new variants of the virus that causes covid. Nineteen have been found in the united states. Little talk with an expert from the centers for disease control and prevention about what we need to know about these virus mutations. Vaccinations continue but are going better in some places compared to others we'll find out why we'll also get updates on what's working and what isn't in native communities when it comes to fighting the pandemic we go live it after national native news. This is national native news. I an tonio gonzalez. The montana missing indigenous persons task force announced the fort. Belknap indian community became the last tribal police force. In the state to join a national network of criminal justice databases yellowstone public radio. Caitlyn nicholas reports. The police of the nakota in nations are the newest law enforcement team in montana to join the criminal justice information network also known as sejin. Brian frost missing. Persons specialist for the task. Force says season is basically a law enforcement pipeline connecting criminal justice databases from the state the federal bureau of investigation and other federal and state agencies. So when they want sensitive criminal justice law enforcement information or when we have an active missing person's case they used to call blaine county and lane county to perform those transactions for them. Now fort belknap will be able to do that on their own. They won't have a third party. So that's fantastic. Means the task force also reports missing persons cases are down nearly ten percent since january after many people were found alive and well there are one hundred sixty seven active missing persons cases in montana. Nearly thirty two percent of those missing are indigenous. Only about seven percent of montana's of american for national aid of news report for america. I'm caitlyn nicholas. Us lawmakers wednesday speaking to members of the native american contractors association during the group's annual two day conference held virtually pledged to work with indian country on economic prosperity cove nineteen relief and business development. Senator bryan shots of hawaii says he looks forward to working with tribes in his new role as chair of the senate committee on indian affairs. He says the next cove nineteen relief package has big investments tribes and says. There's likely bipartisan support and areas of tribal business and contracting. I'm hoping that this can be a relaunch of our partnership over the long run. And and i'm very much looking forward to what is to come. Congressman don young of alaska discussed his role as a ranking member on the house subcommittee for indigenous peoples. And we're going to do to work together to try to make sure that my alaskan native primarily to be frank with you and american indians or forty eight a can continue to go forward and be successful congresswoman depp holland whose biden's nominee for secretary of the interior. And a three minute prerecorded. Message spoke about tribal economic and business initiatives government government relationships and trust responsibilities. Thursday's agenda includes remarks from us. Lawmakers from montana nevada maine and illinois as the native organization sets priorities for the year and develops plans to work with the biden administration. A federal judge temporarily stopped the sale of a national archives building in seattle washington. Be as trip. Crouse has more at a written order filed tuesday morning. Us district court. Judge john kuhn our or to the eminent sales the national archives building and removal of immense archival collection in a news release washington. State's attorney general. Bob ferguson said quote. Today's legal victory blocks the federal government's unlawful plan to sell the archives and scattered the dna of our region thousands of miles away in quote in january. Two thousand twenty. A five person panel identified the archives building in seattle and eleven other facilities as excess properties in opportunities for the federal government to cut costs. The archives building houses a collection that includes historical documents and records for two hundred. Seventy two federally recognized tribes in alaska idaho oregon and washington. A sale of the building could move the archives records as far away as kansas city missouri and riverside california in january two thousand and twenty one washington state's attorney general and forty tribes states and community organizations filed a motion to block the sale of the building in anchorage trip. Krause and antonio gonzalez national native news is produced by cohen broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by aarp aarp creates connects. People to unique tools and programmes helps conserve personal resources and tackles issues that matter most to individuals families and communities more at aarp dot org support by the american indian college fund providing scholarships to native students of every age for over thirty years applications for the upcoming school year accepted through may thirty first at college fund dot org native voice. One the native american radio network. This is made america calling. I'm tara gatewood. Joining me live from my homeland doing via skype. The biden administration announced two hundred million dollars in funding to track the new coronavirus variants. That are currently in forty two states in the us. These mutations of the covid nineteen virus appear to be spreading more easily through easily although the centers for disease control and prevention says public health officials still need to study the problem. More to get the full picture. Today will year from an expert at the cdc about any additional threat threats that come with the coronavirus mutations also the rates the covid nineteen pandemic continue to go down and tribes are working to distribute vaccines today. We'll also hear from the athletic pueblo. About how their nation is faring during the pandemic and we'd like to hear from you give us an update on your tribe and community. How are you doing call. In and share the number to join us is one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine native in joining us today out of atlanta georgia is dr john brooks. He is the chief medical officer for the centers for disease control and prevention covid nineteen emergency response. It's my pleasure to welcome in. Dr brookes dr brookes welcome to native america calling. We'll thank you very mattress by player. Be here today. And dr brooks i know. A lot of people are very curious about the different Variants covid nineteen strands in. So let's go ahead and start there. What can you tell us about these strands. In what's known sure. Let me just for everyone's background explain. What a variant is so these viruses have a genetic code. That's like computer code. That are instructions on how to make a copy of the virus and sometimes errors get introduced into that code and that ends up doing something to the virus. Sometimes it gives the virus in advantage and when those kinds of changes occur that creates and do variant of the parent virus. So this is a natural part of evolution. We not viruses do this. It's not unexpected And now we're beginning to see the emergence of some of these variants that have it develop advantages that make them either more easily to transmit to other people so they're more infectious or in some cases may make them Less resistant or rather warm resistant to our community or to potentially drugs or even a vaccine. Here's what we know right now. The variant that's most there three variants that have been identified in other parts of the world One i in the uk. united kingdom. Another i in the south africa in the third in brazil. And all of these have been detected here and that's not unexpected But we're keeping a very close eye on them. Nothing important point just to save from the start that cdc Working closely with many groups across the country. I have systems place to monitor. How common these are where they are into dance so how they behave so talk about one of the variance the one. That's most common here right now and it does by a funny name. It's the letter b. Dot one dot one dot seven Basically everybody calls it. Be one one seven. And this was a variant that was first observed in the united kingdom in england. Mostly in the southeast part of england Between london and kent and over the course of a few months since last october it suddenly became the dominant strain of the virus. About with their. You know maybe five percent of viruses that they had sequenced before that had been this variant in some way by christmas all of them were just dairy and and what was going on this daring. This more transmissible. It got the upper hand so it could infect people faster and takeover compared to the others. Now it at the time it didn't appear to be any more dangerous or make you sick or have a greater risk of death but it does pose a very serious problem because it's more transmissible. If it's more trends and missile more people can get infected more rapidly so can move more quickly to a population of people and the more people that get sick. Then more people who are going to need hospitalization it could potentially die so even though the virus itself has not been well established to be more dangerous in terms of making sicker. We're really concerned about it. Because it spreads quickly and rapidly. It could overwhelm already strange. Healthcare system in we definitely know a little bit about that in our native nations and folks do wanna let you know a doctor brooks is with us for the first part of our our so if you'd like to talk directly with him as any questions you can give us a ring. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number and dr brookes a lot of concerns are with this variant of how it will react to the vaccines that are being administered. What can you tell us well. Let's actually some pretty good news. The current vaccines for us in the united states appear to provide protection against dis- disappearing that i just described and vaccination is obviously important not just for over in general but also for this marian other things that we can do to protect ourselves from the infection to begin with you know before the vaccines were available. I'm sure all of you. I've heard repeatedly there things that we can do to keep ourselves safe from the virus and the two that. I really want to emphasize because we know they work really. Well are wearing a mask when you're among people that you don't know and trying to maintain a physical distance to the extent you can from other people that you don't know and sixteen Also of waiting crowded indoor spaces that are poorly ventilated and maintaining good hand hygiene and i know that for some people. Access to soap and water isn't necessarily immediately available but hand gels Can help those are made available And some people you can reuse soapy water As long as it's Not visibly dirty. And these are some of the things we've heard Since the beginning of the pandemic and there you go another reminder. Dr brookes was curious of how it is known that the vaccine his helping protect against the new variants is this through lab work. Is this through testing. people's exposure. Can you tell me more about that. Yeah sure i'd be happy to Right now is paul. I i do lab work. What we do is the take people who've been vaccinated and we can take a sample of their blood in that blood or the antibodies that they've developed in response to the vaccine. The vaccine wants to make antibodies against this virus. 'cause they'll protect you and we can take samples of the buyers in a petri dish and expose them to the antibodies. We got in the person who's been vaccinated. And if those antibodies neutralize or stop at virus from replicating them we know that they working against the virus. So we go ahead and step foot both medina and the visor. Beyond tech vaccine that the immune response that's caused by getting a vaccination is protected in so you know we've learned a lot in a year dealing with this and just understanding in the beginning There were a lot there was a lot of confusion. There are a lot of questions are still questions but we have lived a full year in a lot. More has been discovered about covid. Nineteen and dr brooks. Is there anything you can. Update us about The threat of it being passed on surfaces. Is there any update from what we knew last year. Yeah i'm glad you ask that. I think that's something that concerns a lot of people. And i think as you point out we learned a lot in your feels like this year is almost a decade. I think in some ways you know by the all the things that have happened. One of the things we've learned. Is that our early concerned that this virus might be easily spread by contact with surfaces may not be quite as a concerning his now as it was then when just virus first appeared. We didn't know much about it. But we know that the kinds of viruses that it's part of these respiratory viruses can spread through contact with contaminated or dirty surfaces places where a person coughed on or they touch their face and they touched the surface influenza and and some forms of the common cold are transmitted pretty readily. This good news is that we're just not seeing a lot of cases where the person only exposure was touching a surface and then can confirm touching their face and becoming infected I just wanna remind people that takes has to be kind of a special circumstance to get that to work. You know those a certain amount of virus that you're has to get into your body. A certain dose of the virus has to get into your body to make you sick. It isn't just usually one virus particle but it's all on the order to hundreds or thousands at a time so to get an infection from a surface. You touch you. I have to touch surface where there has to be enough living buyers to then transferred to your fingertips than. It's long enough on your fingertip that it gets into your the edgier knows you might rub your face or something The only thing. I just want to point out is no. We are still still advocate for You know keeping service is clean and Sterilizing them but maybe not quite to extent that we had said before. The one thing you can do. That's completely in. Your control is hand hygiene. You know if you're worried that you've got a package in the mail saying i've heard this a couple of times. I'm worried that the mailman contaminated by mail. Well let's go outside. Bring your mail in take out the mail open it and shakeout the content. So you don't touch those then put all the Envelopes the trash. Then wash your hands and don't touch your face. I think you're good to go in. So i know you have questions in are wondering about some of these updates at your hearing today directly from the cdc with us today is chief medical officer for the cdc Covid nineteen emergency response team. And if you'd like to hear a little bit more ask some questions. Now's the time. Dial in one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight dr brooks will be with us for a little while here but we are also wanting to hear how all of this how you're doing how your community is doing. What are the lessons learned. What more needs to happen. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is a number of course if you have any thoughts on the vaccine helpings are being administered. Go ahead and dial into one. Eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. go ahead. dial in now. This year's sundance film festival featured indigenous documentaries short films and dramatic features from around the world. Join us for the next native america calling as we talk with some of the filmmakers about their work and what sundance means for indigenous artists. We'll also hear about efforts to encourage the next generation of indigenous filmmakers. If you're hurting in your relationship or have been affected by sexual violence. Strong hearts native. Helpline is a no charge. Twenty four seven confidential and anonymous domestic dating and sexual violence helpline for native americans. Help is available by calling one eight. Four four seven six to eighty four eighty three or by clicking on the chat now icon on strong hearts helpline dot org. This program is supported by the national indigenous women's resource center. Thanks for tuning in today. Here on native america calling interrogate would from pueblo and we are getting updates and the covid nineteen pandemic today. If something you'd like to share about how your community is doing. Go ahead and give us a call. The number to join us is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is the number. We look forward to your calls here on the line today out of atlanta georgia is dr john brooks. He is the chief medical officer for the cdc's cova nineteen emergency response. Dr brookes thank you for being here and you know what i do. Have a caller would like to chat with you. We're going to go in and say hello to jordan. Who is here in albuquerque. New mexico tuned in on k. Unm jordan thanks giving us a ring go ahead. You're on air. Good afternoon dr. Brookes thank you for your time I had a question in terms of inpatient care and in different facilities and different doctors. That might have different. Approaches to therapies and whatnot are they're not to discredit or discount any type of from any type of medical professional but are there standardized questions or concerns or something that family members or loved ones could ask if they think that certain therapies or approaches aren't being addressed like if we worried about why certain tests are being ordered or people's aren't being addressed. There's something standardized. Cdc recommends could be useful for families to not obviously promote their own medical advice. Which questions to ask for. Probing for different different therapies. All right thank you for that jordan. Hang tight dr. brookes go hit thanks jordan and that's a good question and it's very hard time whereas when you have a family member in the hospital and i think you you know people who aren't familiar with medicine what's happening can be a little concerning because you don't know exactly what's going on. I wanna make sure that folks node the federal government does publish standardized guidelines on how to diagnose and treat people who have covid nineteen these are published by the national institutes of health. Our sister agency. Cdc or the nih and you can find them by going online to www covid nineteen treatment guidelines. That's one word kobe. Nineteen treatment guidelines dot nih dot gov and area find information about how the recommended wage to evaluate someone. What tests ought to be done shouldn't necessarily be done. Also over a review of the dateable therapies and medications that are available including those that are experimental also recommendations on how to manage other aspects of care such as if a person has to be under breathing machine how to manage that. Or they're having trouble with blood. Clotting which is a not uncommon problem with coded how to manage that. And then lastly you might want to also look up. A website called clinical trials dot gov. That's two words. Clinical trials dot gov which is a place where any person in america can log on and search for drug or treatment trials around to condition that Is affecting them or a loved one this way that if you wanted to see if there's something out there that might be available to me. That people are talking about. I wanna willing to consider enrolling in an experimental trial drug. It's an excellent place to find it all right jordan. Thanks for giving us a ring. We now go to mark. Who's in cheryl. New mexico do need on k. Unm thanks for calling mark year on air. Hey doc i. I was curious if you guys have gotten any inputs from native. American healers 'bout cova guidelines prevention and treatment. Okay go ahead. Dr brookes market. That's a great question. i think sometimes too many people discount forms of treatment. That aren't so called western medicine But there's a lot of human history has a lot of examples of ways that we should take care of each other Away that aren't necessarily what you might get Downtown city hospital that being said. I don't know that there's been a formal evaluation of some of the Tradition that may be part of some of the communities of people listening to this hall. But i think we'd welcome hearing about those. I mean i think is important to just keep an open mind. the Sometimes it's not necessarily just treating disease but treating the whole person And in in in in addition to the physical problem their mental health their perspective to help them get through a condition like this. So we haven't. I'm not aware of having Daughter formal evaluation or had blown discussion. One wouldn't originally. It was that to the extent people interested in this topic area. Who had something to share can get in touch with local Physicians healthcare personnel on their area and share that. I didn't cover his that. So either through the indian health service or through You know local hospitals. It's always worthwhile to hear other perspectives. I think we would welcome back all right. Thank you for that again. If you've got questions go ahead give us a ring. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight in dr brookes spent some time not too long ago talking about heart health in talking about the impact. Cove in nineteen has We know what we're discovering about the impact. It has on the heart. Is there anything that you can share about what we understand about. How much covid. Nineteen is taking a toll on the body in ways that maybe we didn't know about or just trends that we're seeing an how much of a toll it's taking on the body. Yeah thanks. That's interesting question so i think early on. There was some evidence that in very surprising evidence. You just alluded to tear but you know. Wow some people seem to be getting some real heart problems. Particular inflammation of the heart muscle that led it to be kind of weak and upbeat properly. The good news is that people seem to many people seem to be getting through that with supportive care and they don't have a lot of residual heart problems but there is a bigger problem That we're seeing and it's this long term cluster of conditions that are sometimes called long covid And is more formerly called post acute coded syndrome or p. a. c. s. packs and this is a cluster of symptoms that seem to orbit around extreme fatigue. Muscle aches and pains and joint pain. Something called a brain fog or you know you just don't feel clear-headed bad headaches And numerous other Conditions that many people don't experience but some do you know most people who get covid while the half of them are going to have any symptoms. The remainder who get symptoms will probably do just fine a small number. We'll get very sick and some will unfortunately die. And then there's this these people among the survivors. There is a fraction who go on to experience this long curved syndrome We worry about this. Because of course he millions of people in the united states and worldwide infected with this. Even if it's a very small fraction that developed this syndrome. Best a lot of people. And so the nih and the centers for disease control together with our Collaborators other countries including the world health organization are spending a lot of time and effort to better understand what this condition is and how we can help people suffer from it. Well thank you for that Dr brookes got another question coming in out of tells new mexico I believe it's gio vein. Vena von Joining us today on a u. and m. go ahead you're on air in. How do you say your name. I'm sorry giovanna giovanna thank you giovanna go ahead you're on air. Thank you very much Dr brooks i really appreciate You giving this talk today This is a lot of things. I've been very concerned about. I'm sorry i just recently turned in about five minutes ago. My question to you is. When is it safe to be around. Someone who has had the cova nineteen viral. Okay dr brookes. Hi joanna thanks. that's great. that's a great question. So just let me tell you a little bit about how people get through the infection own form. How when it's kind of around the began so when a person gets infected they the the highest amount of virus that's going to be in their blood is within a few days after the infection took hold and it's usually right around the time people develop symptoms maybe the day before at we know that pastor about ten days from that time point most people. The vast majority of people are no longer shedding any infectious virus. Now there are a few exceptions that don't apply to to to most people for instance people who have a very severe in the deficiency. You know people with a bad warm of them. Folha undergoing a bone marrow transplant or something. So they're immune system can't control the virus they're going to have an extended period but ninety nine point. Five percent of people is going to be about ten days. I just want to remind folks something very odd that we've noticed in be aware of if after a person's recovered and they get a pcr test that test that's used for diagnosis. Sometimes even after ten days. It'll come back positive. Why is that. it doesn't mean we don't think it means that they're infected. We think what's going on and we have good evidence for this. Is it this very unusual brand. New infection is doing something that we haven't seen very often which is continues to shed the Viral material with that test. Picks up but there is no live virus present so just say that in case people ask what if i go to get one of his diagnostic test. It'll show me. But i don't have it anymore and we asked people did that very early on and that's how he learned. Oh gosh that test really isn't necessarily telling us the truth. They're still infected. It's good diagnosis. But not very good thing when you're no longer infectious but i think after about ten days when we feel most people are safe so at that point. It's safe to begin. Getting this is the person who's part of your bubble. I if you will the person during your household it's your child at the kinds of people who are spending close time with with masking inside your household at around ten days is when they get back together with them just one last thing. We not only want them to get to ten days but we also want to see them without a fever for twenty four hours and that means also without a fever because not because they're taking a fever medications and sat there. Other symptoms are improving right. Well thank you for giving us a ring. They're out of house and dr brooks. No you gotta get going here Any additional resources or or websites where people can get more yea our At the cdc. Our website has a lot of information for People who have any kind of question around the how people get covid diagnose it and what to do to prevent getting it you can just go to. Cdc dot gov backslash coded that should bring you there. or if you're like me. And i can never remember any of these websites. Just go to go your favorite search engine and type feed ec covid and. It'll take you right there. I think you for that. Dr john brooks of the centers for disease control and prevention cove nineteen emergency response and so now we turn to find out just what is happening in our tribal communities to give us more insight. We're going to go to el paso. Texas to sail to chris gomez. He is the media coordinator for the little. They'll serve pueblo where he is also a member. Chris my pleasure to have you here. Welcome to native america calling. Fb so much era fellow putnam member as well. Yeah you know. We have a great stories in our nation's of You know sister communities in time in history Has put us miles apart but we all understand histories that connect us and so thanks for making those connections. And so chris Tell us a little bit about what The current state is there in your nation in terms of fighting the pandemic fighting the coronavirus. Tell me more. What's the focus. I it's really Gone from s ezzedine and preventative measures. I mean that's still going on of course but the focus has moved to getting people. Vaccinated as a tribe receives a A lot of vaccinations from the indian health services. Right now Just to give you an idea where we're on phase what we call one. D one was on first responders and emergency medical personnel people fighting on the frontlines cove in nineteen one be extended that to include educators for the now opening schools. Also people with health conditions and tribal elder so As of Pepperoni the ninth. We've had nine. Vaccinations administered here on the five. No i'm that's six hundred twenty. Six of those are persons with the first dose and we have three hundred thirty six people fully at the with full Back in the nation and and to give you a comparison New shots rolled back in october and Three hundred fifty. Three of our tribal citizens took advantage of that. So you could see. People are flooding more to covid nineteen vaccination so the infrastructure is kind of transition from testing and and response to more to back. Maybe and more outreach. In prevention we know is a huge key in a lot of why we're even seeing Changes in terms of our understanding and also safety and security in our nation's tell me about all the different kinds of things try and is done to prevent the spread of covid nineteen. I mean we were blindsided by this Back in march. It's almost a year now and My my tribe. Immediate the Wenski remote working at as far as our worth those and right after that shortly after that we implemented checkpoint one of the challenges that our reservation the houses. That were a checkerboard reservation. We haven't And you could do village and the village and One further east that they're separated by about five miles of distance so there were two checkpoints set up at that point and It was just mainly to control traffic. Coming in and out. Public parks were closed and we went for a couple of weeks before we even saw her. First case of covid nineteen and Then of course after that first case It it really tight end up here With the with the checkpoints on the tribal government was recommended. Only one adult be reservation for essential items. Unfortunately we rely a lot on rounding community or things like our groceries and all of our other essential need I'm healthcare That can't be provided on the reservation and things of that matter so They were Really educating the community about the importance of only sending one on tribal members you had Just regular everyday tribal members making mask at this point. You know people that with so for these days and and things of that matter. They were transitioned into helping. Mcmaster first responders so it was just an amazing response from first responders to community members alike. And it's still an ongoing challenge. It's still a fluid situation. like Now we have these variants that we have to worry about the doctor. Preferred was Educating us on and i'm so it just seems like there's something new but As gets better at one thing the next challenge comes up so it it's really been Just something you never expected for years arm urgency management. We've conducted these extra exercises on And and Having a massive vaccination side or mass medical dispensaries site. And you never think that it's gonna actually happen. We have all our annexes Who are emergency management. And you know something to deal with health and donations and and other areas of expertise and on to actually see them get implemented. I guess it really speaks to the the amount of banning department of public safety Did how well it was executed from the time dependent the president in that kind of information what we've learned especially intertribal nations. I think is really important to open our ears too because sometimes what we hear what one tribe is doing It can inform what is going on in another nation and think that's the beauty of how we're all able to meet here on these Native airwaves today. meet us to share some thoughts. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight to join us support for journalism that raises the awareness of child wellbeing to citizens and to policymakers provided by the annie e. casey foundation building a brighter future for children families and communities information at eighty. Cf dot org support by ramona farms offering wholesome and delicious foods from our heirloom crops as our contribution to a better diet for the benefit of all people. We're honored to share our centuries old farming and culinary traditions online at ramona farms dot com. Thanks for joining us. Here on native america calling tara gatewood and if you would like to share some thoughts in this conversation today you can dial in one eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is the number. How are things going in your own tribal nation. Do you have the resources you need a to face the pandemic and when it comes to vaccines what is the current state. Go ahead and give us a ring. Share your thoughts. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number and we definitely look forward to hearing how this is going in your own tribal community again. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight his how you join us and here on the line today. Out of el paso texas is. Chris gomez he is the media coordinator for the u. sleep do serve pueblo. Our pleasure to have him here and chris you talked a little bit about the vaccine and is there anything more. You'd like to share about How the vaccine rollout is going in your community. What we've done leading up to that when everybody was waiting for the emergency I guess approval by the fda a tribal health clinic was getting ready to roll that out. And what they did is they got like our public health nurse. Mitch close to come onto our podcast that we have here. And and that's why cast also the arizona station to talk about the technology that was going into the vaccination. 'cause i think more than ever right now we have a lot of conspiracy theories out there and and you know people just spread with false information. So he did about four part series on on the vaccination and development and how the trials were going at the information provided by both of the manufacturers and everything. So i think that's what a lot of people at us we did Some transcripts in and out through the who are tribal list-serve and on our social media pages that way What we were trying to do is just kind of funnel in all the information to our social media outlets and our email server and all that and because we're a very social Group of people so we talk a lot and You know you want them to get the right source and the right information and not be so Earful of getting that vaccination right now and i think with the first wave of people getting vaccinated people are seeing them Recover have mild side effects really and That's taking away a lot of maybe the the ear apprehension towards that vaccination that existed. I think at the very beginning so We still have a large demand. You know we're looking forward to being able to move into the next phase and back to the more people but For for the most part we're minister in them as they're coming in You know within twenty four hours in chris if people do check out your podcast. Where did they find it You can search the daily cornmeal wherever you get your your podcast either Whether that's the the apple podcasts spotify catas- were in about eight different platforms. So i'm that and if you wanna listen to our radio station you can find that We have a listen live link on the website at www dot org. It's on the bottom of that streams twenty four hours a day. All right thank you for that and another aspect that I know has really taken. An impact is how business is conducted especially or tribal nations and the different types of enterprises that are making revenue for the tribe. What can you tell us about how that side of things are going or or a little bit about what you know tribal business what it looks like either individuals in your community or even just the tribe itself it's so there's two areas Like to discuss with with regards to the travel economy And we'll start with a small business owners. Of course they were negatively impacted by the covid nineteen just like nation- nationwide and i'm not just talking about the mainstream one. I'm talking about the informal economy people to your your artisans Just people who make their living and I mentioned the tribal seamstresses them. So they were negatively impacted and our We have a community development Foundation that gives small business loans and they took over the first phase of that was To get people qualify for the Arrow protection act Fun and Had some workshops that they did online so they have a good business directory. They were reaching out to those individuals and then tribe was able to allocate Supplemented fund aside from the ep to help them with that. And the great thing about that is people from the informal economy. All if i heard that so. That's helping people get back on their feet and we'll forward from there Now getting into the tribal enterprises the entertainment center. It's a big employer. Dr so it did have to shut down. During the height of the pandemic we did shut down for a number of weeks and unfortunately You know there were you lay off but for the most part When he cares act funds enrolled in a lot of people who were laid off they got transition and the things like Temperature screeners More of that. That covid response Emperor released so we were but they were able to work checkpoints and things like that Our entertainment center had to Really put parameters up as far as social distancing the usa face coverings. They started their own testing protocols for employees. I believe they're testing their employees mondays and fridays. And it's been really successful in catching Cove nineteen cases There at the entertainment centre because it is a major worry. You have a lot of young people that work there at the entertainment centre and they go home to elders and You run the risk of them and making them so They are fully reopen. And it is Looking back it's going really successful Right now since the pandemic began. We're we're a really small drive. We have about four thousand members and only about maybe sixty percent of that is local like on the reservation. And then he'll paso region so We had a one hundred and sixty six positive closet nineteen cases and so Just that it really was no earthen. What the communities have and i. That was the response of our tribal government. There but i i. It really is balancing excellent. We had that huge bike. El paso became ground zero in the fall or winter or covid nineteen just nationwide and You know we had to aol back. A lot of the reopenings that we were doing and really Back to remove Giving remote services so That was something that we had to act as part of the cares act. Yes people who are needing mental health services so we were able to provide them. I've had their continue their their their treatment. virtually and you had a lot of examples like that where where are social workers for example they had to to step in and increase their outreach and in order to keep providing those services that are vital here in the community in chris in terms of aid to the community we know a lot of tribes used cares. Act money for different resources. But what kind of support is still needed in terms of funding in a you know anything you wanna share on that side. I think the major thing that you'll need it is obviously Just more Vaccination capacity just right. Now we're not meeting demand of our tribal Governor wants everybody vaccinated every adult You know and i think if we have the actual number of vaccinations that we needed we wherever he got they're. They're very efficient at at giving us information so We we had already previous to this virus outgrown our house facility so we had interested joint venture program with indian health services and we a new facility under construction right now of course on that. Construction was innate a little bit due to the covid. Nineteen pandemic and everything so That that the that that we Our community has grown Exponentially and i think That just a larger healthcare is Something that it's being addressed right now. but I think if we could expedite getting that done we've been able to work miracles with what we have here in the community I mean they've outstretched parking lots and roads and everything to be able to serve as mobile unit both testing and administering. Vaccinations that I i think the actual physical facilities just going forward or something like this all. Help them in with well. Thank you for that. You know what. I got another caller on the line. We're going to say hi to eric. Who's in little diomede. Alaska tuned in today. Eric thanks for giving us a little giving us a ring year on year. Yes thank you for this program. You share on the radio. I've been listening to this. And i just mentioned i just come back much trip month. A month ago i went to nome alaska damien island i took eight tess eight covert tests while i was there every single one. I passed in a couple of incidents. Where are we supposed to people that. Were super supposed to have the covert but i wouldn't quarantine by always tested. Come up negative place. And i was mentioning that when the doctor mentioned the material phone is he talking about the didn't retail wish by the virus itself or the virus so dying off because they'll have a host anymore but that was my question not sure if he's on on there anymore but my if they i mean it'd be funding for more vaccines test. Part of that money should go to men's midstretch because distress itself from covert is having more impact on rule villagers than in the city. Because we're wearing the both living in smoke. Small these stashing our bodies over this and by time we were wonder if cheer our bodies already weakened from stoke from you know all this besides life giving you stretch. No it's coach fresh Yeah in eric. I i hear you i hear you. I hear you the amount of stress that has been placed. You know around the globe and people in the way that it puts on your body. We've had conversations here on this program where we talk about. What stress does To your physical health and it does it. Wears you down and You know i'm sorry. The doctor isn't on the line with us anymore. But chris i'm sure you can truly relate to what eric is talking about. And then that comes into the discussion of you know helping our community members in terms of you know we understand. We're all stressed. What can we do more to relieve some of that to support each other or just even acknowledge you understand. Somebody's going through this. I think there's a lot that happens when we think about the health of our communities annot and i'm sure this is a concern for you and your community Anything specific you. Wanna tell eric and then of course just thinking about. This is a big topic in how we cope together. It really is stressful. And it's probably the most depressing thing that i've ever gone through in in my lifetime for sure to tribal ceremonies cancelled. I mean just That's where you that absolutely like race you. You don't really appreciate something So sacred until it drifts away from you and of course our tribal government has to do that. Just in in Of caution and everything. So i i think that's the one thing that really brought me down of personally just those being able to Celebrate those of you just kinda celebrating your heart but When we say social distancing Are licensed therapist who was Kind enough to do about a forty five minute. of podcast with us on the day. Cornmeal about Dealing with the stress of covert nineteen talks about how There's a misconception that Physical distancing is what we do and and not social distancing so You know we can still be social on you. Were technology you know. They might not have that kind of technology like in rural really rules but Making phone calls to those. No one's and and just assuring them that What they're going through. Everybody is feeling that way. And there's nothing wrong with billion that way. And i'm really taking a media break is another thing that that She she talked about was just disconnecting from all of this Doom and gloom that you hear in the media for and a working on things like your breathing and Your physical and mental well-being Not focusing too much on what you can do but focus on what you can do and what you are able to do within your your Own home while your social distancing. Like oh i know. Many of our tribal members started gardening during this time. And just kinda returning to those those on route That that we have behind for so many years though You you you have to really do your best to make positive out of this have situation because We're all in the dark hair. We don't know when we're going to return In normal and and Like eric your your immune system can really get weekend who stressed so Those are just some random awesome in my head When thinking about the whole stress of this whole whole situation indeed in chris's more you would just like to share about how you tribe is facing this lessons. Learned a year later since we all started learning about this anything more. I guess What we've learned is just to expect the unexpected and and Not really Ready for anything at all. Those -mergency exercises that you might not have taken seriously before There they all prove to be vital in the end. Didn't just better to be prepared for the worst and You know because basically is when you know the worst is in as bad as you prepare for so I think that that's one of the things right. Now we've been a year into response so There's gonna be a lot of lessons. Learned going forward and how to apply those and make sure that you know you are better prepared for the next is and whatever that is whether it's a nice natural disaster or if it's something viral like this but just the I think one of the best things that could have happened having having this. You like infrastructure Where we we have inclement weather the other day and we're able to do Pool from home just because the were whereas before it would have been Just accountable day We already have the infrastructure to be able to just give it and transition to online learning And a so. There are things that that did it. I think As a benefit. For this but i think just like dr brooks dead. I'm continuing that practicing good hygiene. Continue the where those face coverings even after you're vaccinated I think go a long way. ovid nineteen is trending in the right direction here in With texas europe pueblos cases are are declining. Now and hospitalizations are going down but Don't let your guard until we're completely out of wood and where those face coverings is recommended by center for disease control over your mouth as laws are knows practice. That's social scene and Your best to keep your up all right. Thank you for that. Chris gomez with the u. Sled a serb pueblo. Thank you for joining us today. Also thank you to dr. John brooks with the center for disease control and prevention. And that's going to wrap it up for our. We will continue to check in with you or tribal nations and how you are facing the pandemic and We're going to do it again next week to where we take a look specifically at what we're all facing in our own household to bring harmony within the family got any thoughts got questions got stories. We'll be ready for you next week. And if you'd like the full lineup you can always go to our website. Native america calling dot com and sign our newsletter. If you haven't already then all this info get sent to you the end of the week in your email box. That's going to do it for our program today. We sure hope you'll make plans to join us tomorrow when we signed back on air where we'll be taking a look at this year's sundance film festival. I'm tara gatewood things for tuning in. We'll meet you here tomorrow. did you know. Covert financial relief. In the form of forgivable. Ppp loans is available to small business owners and independent contractors including artist's dream. Spring has worked with new mexicans looking to open or expand their business for over twenty five years and now they're helping provide. Ppp loans information including how to qualify at dream spring dot org that's dream spring dot org dream. Spring supports this program. Be your own dark this year. Make sure your heart is healthy enough to all your love. Contact your local health care provider for more information visit. 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04-23-21 Cultural traditions of spear fishing

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 3 weeks ago

04-23-21 Cultural traditions of spear fishing

"Welcome to native america calling from studio eight six nine in pueblo. Interrogate it spearfishing. Season in wisconsin. Right now it's time when nobby fishermen nights harvesting walleye and other fish uses barbed spears. It's a traditional practice and a treaty. Right for tribes. Need a fisherman face much resistance in the eighties and nineties. Much of the confrontations have died down now but there are still occasional clashes coming up. We'll learn how it's done. And the importance of the practice to help. Sustain made of people will learn more right after national native news. Stick with us. This is national native news. I'm antonio gonzalez tribal leaders and conservation. Group sent a letter to montana's governor this week urging him to veto to bison management bills yellowstone public. Radio's caitlyn nicholas. Reports the leaders of the fort pakistan boy ensue tribes the fort belknap indian community and black feet nation along with the intertribal buffalo council defenders of wildlife and other conservation groups say the two bison bills threaten tribal efforts to restore bison through quote the unlawful delegation of state powers and the restrictive definition of wild bison. An quote house. Bill three zero two. Which would give county commissioners authority to approve or deny bison transfers is opposed by tribal nation leaders who say the bill contradicts montana statutes and sets a dangerous precedent for fish and wildlife management and quote. It's tackle in trouble sovereignty. That's urban carlson from black feet. Nation president of the intertribal buffalo council while supporters in the bills hearings said it gives locals impacted by bison transfers more authority tribal members and leaders said it would ultimately make acquiring bison or even impossible for tribes cone commissioners have any expertise in wildlife management to are the have any biologists on a commission while life managers. Who can actually give a real reason why they shouldn't come in. We don't think so. Let's just more of a political decision. That's going to be made. the letter. Also asked governor g forte to veto house. Bill three eighteen which would define domestic bison as animals that have ever been subject to a per capita livestock fee opponents say the new definition ensures very few bison in montana will qualify as wild bison which they say would constrain tribal state and federal efforts to supplement conservation herds. Earlier this week jian forte announced the cancellation of advice. In management plan that would have allowed more bison to be restored across the state in montana for national league news. I'm caitlyn nicholas. The first lady of the united states says the biden administration is committed to respecting tribal sovereignty and working to strengthen relationships with tribes. The remarks were made during outdoor speech at the navajo nation capital and arizona. Thursday first lady. Jill biden says tribes will always have a voice in the administration. Today as your first lady in our first one hundred days. I am here to let you know that we are keeping that promise we stand with you. The navajo nation as you govern our administration will work in partnership with you honoring the solemn trust responsibility to tribal nations some initiatives. She touted for indian country during president. Biden's first one hundred days in office. Include the reestablishment of the white house counsel on native american affairs covid nineteen relief and key native american members including secretary of the interior deb holland and the nomination bryan new lend for assistant secretary of indian affairs. The first lady says the administration is just getting started adding their proposed plans in the works which seek job creation and to address broadband. An infrastructure needs her visit on navajo. Land continues friday to a school and vaccination clinic. This is her third trip to the navajo nation. According to the tribe but the first as first lady tribal groups are calling for the swift. Confirmation and brian newland persistent secretary of indian affairs after his nomination was announced. Thursday new lint is a citizen of the bay mills indian community and served as chairman and chief judge he also served in the obama administration the national congress of american indians and the united southeastern tribes applauded the announcement and are calling on the senate to act quickly. I'm antonio gonzalez. National native news is produced by colonic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by the center for indigenous cancer research at roswell park comprehensive cancer center dedicated to cancer research medicine and cancer care for indigenous population. The no charge online risk assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash assess me this reminder to get your covid. Nineteen vaccination is provided by the association of american indian physicians and the centers for disease control and prevention. Who support this show info at aarp dot org or cdc dot gov slash corona virus native voice one the native american radio network. This is native america calling. I'm tara gatewood joining you live from my homeland of duty. The wisconsin is in wisconsin. There's a lot going on. And it is spearfishing season for the tribal nations in that state. And it's a right guaranteed by treaty and a practice that has gone on for many generations. Spearfishing starts at nighttime involves a boat lights and a spear in wisconsin. Tribal fishermen are harvesting walleye. A shiny looking green fish. That has distinct is and spearfishing is heavily regulated by tribes in cooperation with the state and each catches measured weighed and recorded with officials at the end of the fishing trip. But spearfishing has a history of controversy in the eighties and nineties. Some protests against tribal spearfishing became violent signs stating save a while. Save a walleye. Speier in indian showed up. Sadly behavior still continues. The wisconsin department of natural resources put out a public service announcement ordering people not to arrest. Tribal fishermen will hear more about all of this steering today's program and as we learn more about spearfishing on the traditional side. We'd like to hear from you to give us a call. The number to join us is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and joining us now from the likud array reservation. Northern wisconsin is mick igam and he is executive administrator for the great lakes indian fish and wildlife commission and a former chairman of the likud. Ojibway tribe our pleasure to have him here with us. Welcome to native america calling mic or thank you well. We definitely enjoy having you here with us. And let's just tell our listeners. A little bit about spearfishing and maybe it starts with you and when you started to spearfish. Tell me a little bit about them. Well i started to spearfish. I was Much much younger We generally didn't call it spearfish. We'd just call it fishing or going out harvesting And apparently Non-indians don't use a spear generally so they look at the tribes as your fishers and so Again we just look at it as our harvest spring harvest and It's been going on here for about a month off that we tend to spring. But i i'm thinking we might need a new season because i'm not sure if this is spring or if it's still winter sixty one day and then thirty the next i hear you and so when you do go spearfishing. What is entailed. Describe what happens. Well the family gathers my father my son myself we gather and we make sure. Everything's ready Both the spear or if you're if we're going off of the reservation we gotta make sure we ever. Id's and our permits are boats registered. And make sure that the the many many requirements that are put on us when we go off the reservation. You gotta make sure we're all hunky dory because otherwise we will be getting tickets and then We gather about an hour before dark and we had to whichever lake that we choose We kind of have our own family lake that we go to and then we spend we always put tobacco down and and we talk a little bit before we go out because you know spearfishing quote unquote or harvest. It's more it's more of an active just taking the fish. There's you know in some communities and some families they're singing and there's dancing there's praying there's getting the fish then there's cleaning the fish and and packaging em and then distributing them among the family and so there's so much more that go into it than just the fishing and i know that's a big part of culture to end so maybe that's where you spend a lot of time prepping your family before this season comes around and the true meaning of all of it what it means to bring the fish back home. There's anything you'd like to share. We are ready for you. We know this program is carried in many places in the great lakes area. And we know this know that you know a lot about what we're talking about today so share some knowledge share some stories. Dial in one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight and mick tell us a little bit about the circumstances For natives in wisconsin with regards to spearfishing are the only ones allowed to do this. Well you know. It's up to each sovereign government to decide how one can harvest and the state of wisconsin. Their government basically is decided that the only fish that they can spare room seasons they have they spear Sturge in on a couple of central eastern wisconsin lakes. And i believe they also spear carp or rough fish as well But other than that. I don't believe wisconsin does do any spear fishing but again it's a sovereign prerogative and the tribes Throughout all of our history of have used spears nets to harvest fish. And that's the we choose. And then and when when wisconsin became a state and imposing their fish game lot of us look at kind of as a high intense to be fat and eventually the court did rule that and saw you know they look tribes as as Taking you know visually too many fish when you look at the numbers it's basically one percent or less. I think john gilbert whose Later can talk more to that but you know we were used to getting yelled at while we're on the lakes you know we get yelled at all the time. It's not like it was in the eighties at least for us around here. And we kinda gotten used to it. And i would say that Misinformation is the root. Cause of most of it. You know the the racist the racism and and things like that. they'll love to fan the misinformation. But in general my opinion is that when people resort owners landowners tourist when they understand the information usually the no issue into education. I'm sure is a big part of all of this. And especially when you share the cultural side to it in mic when you do bring that side or open that up even more do you feel it creates more understanding all no doubt it creates more understanding and and generally the non-indian public they their knowledge of the tribes comes from hollywood seeing hollywood movies and things like that not necessarily taught him schools so That's where the misinformation starts with hollywood that type of thing And and one example. I have here just that just happened. Just a couple of days ago when i was playing basketball with some not indians from the community and the topic of spearing came up and the person told me and it was awful. Sluggish comments straight out of the nineteen eighties. When the anti treaty groups were fanning flames to make people show up at boat landings and protests throughout the person. Said you know. I wish you Passing along your tradition in your culture but you know what you should do that in a birchbark canoe and use a wooden spear because that's your culture and of course my replies. Well you know there's two parties to the treaties here the tribes but also the united states. And if we have to stop in time. One party of the treaty. Well then you have to stop in time as well and then you should be writing to this basketball game in a stage coach. One party of the treaty. Stop in time. We're a highly adaptable people. Of course we use metal bullets and and spears and cell phones and computers. We are highly adaptable people. But that just goes to show in all these years. Since the boat-landing protests not a lot of education has gone on in in the schools addressing those types of comments. And what does that do to the youth. Think make well. This particular person who made the comment was only twenty. Years old is a youth and so on and my sons and relatives are there as well and so what happens with the youth is they tend to go in their corners. Like you're in a boxing ring and then you start to spar and really i in the long run. Though what happened on the basketball court was we had a good conversation and so we did more education there than the school system did so having the conversation is good and even sometimes if it starts with a bad comment or starts with an incident in the long run i think having the conversations really good my thank you for having this program today. Well thank you for that With us today is mick igam. He is the executive administrator for the great lakes indian fish and wildlife commission. You might know it. It's cliff wick is also the former chairman of the likud jeb way ben and if you would like to chat with him you can give us a ring one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number and maybe you have questions you can call in with those two. I wanna learn more about what this is what it means to tribes. You can call in one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is a number and maybe you also take to the waters of your own tribal waters for different types of fish and this all of this is resonating something with you. You wanna share compared tribal notes call in full nine open one eight hundred nine six two eight four is a number and if this is something. Your family participates in Maybe somebody told you a story of why it's important to keep this going. You want to share it with us. We are more than happy to have you share on these airwaves. Today they are yours. Call in and share one eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number and What is it mean to have the fish. Come home after somebody. Who's been out on the water spearfishing. You can tell that side of the story to by dialing in gold and give us a ring. We're going to pause here for a moment but we're still ready for your call so go ahead. Pick up the phone. Dial in the number one more time to reach us is one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. We look forward to hearing your voice today with the navajo creator. A lakota star in five native writers. The new tv show. Rutherford falls is breaking barriers. The comedy is on the news. Streaming service peacock from nbc. We'll get a preview. Talk with those involved on the next native america calling if you're hurting in your relationship or have been affected by sexual violence. Strong hearts native. Helpline is a no charge. Twenty four seven confidential and anonymous domestic dating and sexual violence helpline for native americans. Help is available by calling one eight. Four four seven six to eighty four eighty three or by clicking on the chat now icon on strong hearts helpline dot org. This program is supported by the national indigenous women's resource center. You're listening to native calling. I'm tara gatewood from a subtle pueblo and we are talking about steer spearfishing today. And if you spearfish give us a call. We'd like to hear from you. The number to join the conversation is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight and here with us today from the great lakes indian fish and wildlife commission. Is mick igam. Thanks for being with us mic. Also here to from dana wisconsin on the bad river reservation. Is john gilbert. He is director of biological service at cliff wick. Pleasure to have him here with us to john. Welcome to into native america calling. Thanks very much for having me for sure. John you take a close look at all of this and just knowing the animal the best More fish the. And i know you've got a lot of great knowledge to share. And sometimes the controversy comes about win fisher being spearfish. Why don't you tell us a little bit about You know when it's time to take the fish and and really The time that it happens in you know tell me more during the spawning season sure. Some information drops knowledge. Go ahead john. Well sure i can. I can Help out a little bit there Some of your other guests. They probably know as much about walleye as i do. Maybe even more So well we'll hear their stories to but spearfishing takes place in the spring when walleye are coming into shallow rocky shores responding and makes them vulnerable to harvest People have been Taken advantage of that phenomenon for you know since time immemorial and Using that opportunity to harvest is walleye for food. And so it's an extremely efficient way to harvest walleye Just as example if you're using hook and line. Shane might take four or five hours to catch a fish And where a spearing observes charles spear fishermen harvest and you know one minute so sixty an hour extremely efficient way to harvest Walleye of course. This is what the tribes to want is an efficient method of others in their food makes no sense to spend four or five hours to catch one walleye when You can fill up a bucketful in an hour or so and so when they're catching news for food that's the way to do it But of course that high efficiency. I think nick was talking about that a minute ago. That high efficiency means that needs to be you know. Strict regulations put on the exercise of this right. And so we want to make sure that it's all done correctly and that the correct number of fish are harvested and that there's no harm to the resource and so we've been monitoring this harvest for many many years decades thirty plus years. I'm a couple of things that we've seen. One is that tribal harvest about thirty thousand fish a year or so. It depends on the year but about that. A state harvest is about ten times that amount and so the l. c. o. Decision when the judge ruled that the tribes in the states with the source fifty fifty. You can see that. The trump john even coming close to their half of the harvest So yeah You should have lost my thought. So highly regulated and Every fish is counted every fish shacks and so we know that in at the end of tribal harvest is comprised of about ninety percent males so those females that are so important for laying eggs. We producing the lake. They are protected and so highly skewed towards male harvest and a very small number of fish. Compared to the total number of fish are harvested. You know in the territories by the state and so we're quite confident that tribe addition is providing for food for the tribes. But as doing so in a way. That's biologically sound. We're not harming any lakes population by harvesting fish. In this time john. Thanks for sharing that in something else you know. Yesterday was day. People are thinking about their environments. In is there anything can share about how the environment for the fish are changing your anything. That kind of also affects spearfishing. Anything like that going on. Oh my gosh yes so Walleye are cool water species. They rely on cold water. They don't like really warm waters and so as temperatures are rising we see lake temperatures also rising and this reduces the amount of cool water habitat available for these walleyes and so over long term. We've been monitoring populations. Like i said for many many years. We see a decline de decline in walleye populations over time and Largely due to some of these conditions changing weather conditions is one for sure The other is introduction of invasive species such as zebra mussels for example or spiny water fleas that further reduce availability of food for these fish and so combination Warm temperatures and reduction in food because of invasive species as and really hurt some walleye populations while you know. There's a lot to be learned today. We'd like you to teach us to got anything to add. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight Also here to from glick. Mike and mike you know. It's really great to get that kind of information. Because a lot of times that's what leads into the misinformation And which also leads to you know misinformation about treaties. And is there anything you want to share about The treaties how maybe some of that sparked what was known as the walleye wars or even black backlash of spearfishing today You know hearing things like there's two sides to those treaties. Let's enforce the entirety of treaty and stop cherry picking things out to benefit one party. That was a comment. Coming from the wisconsin department of natural resources facebook by gentleman who posted that and there's also also things like spear while is out of a canoe you made from birch tree which we heard You know any thoughts any comments and we know treaties are big into all this anything you want to share mic. Well you know when people think of treaties There's there's different types of treaties and and so You know you have your military alliance treaties and things like that. Your nuclear proliferation type treaties and the bottom line is their sovereign government to sovereign government. And i think that's the most important Take away that people need to know that. When when the united states was forming the first treaties we had were military treaties. You know our enemies are your enemies type of thing men. It went to selling things like we sold timber we sold minerals and then ultimately we ended up selling land but every single time as a sovereign government. We did not sell the right to use the land. Or what are the lawyers call at yousef. Rectory rights the right to use the land property right so just like former president. Donald trump can own mineral rights under the land or or air rights for an airport above it. it's the same type of thing and that's where people when they say we want equal rights that's the equal rights under the law under the constitution treaties are the supreme law the land we never sold those rights and we retain them. It's not something. The united states government gave us like some people sale. They gave them the right to fish or or this or that bottom line when the treaties were reaffirmed by the united states court. What they're affirming is sovereignty to decide our own harvest methods under our own seasons and things like that to me. That's one of the most important takes when it comes to understanding treaties. Thank you for that. And got another voice to add. We wanna address to their space one. Eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is the number. Let's go to a full nine. Go to the phone lines. I'd that a caller from fort hall. I'd aho tune in on kiss you. We have lytle lytle. Thank you for giving us a ring year on here Just go for it just wanted to call in and Thirty as we're talking about spear fishing spear fishing for the show and banning nature here is very important. It's a traditional technique. We still use today. But it's being threatened by the way Modern and The spear phishing technique. We employ is is hunting. You know salmon and steelhead in our actual streams in idaho and unfortunately many of our stocks are are already listed threat and They're potentially going to be moved towards endangered and if they're move towards endangered there's not an exemption under the dangerous species that act to Permit that tried fishery. And so you know we're really starting to look at a way of life you know teaching ending and so i just wanted to bring people's awareness to that and that also to let people know that the major cause of this issue salmon is that these dams are killing off all of our juveniles and you know the tribes. Don't have a seat at the table to to protect our interests and protect our ways of life and that'd be horrible to see that spear spearfishing technique go away but it's it's getting threatened as we speak and it's been getting threatened for a long time. I just wanted to add that to this discussion today to make people aware that thank you sure. That is a huge very important concept when it comes to all of this in the threat of something like this going away. It's it's more them. What what the act is what. I'm hearing and i'm gonna turn to another gentleman. Who's here with us today to get his. Take on it Joining us from his nation in wisconsin. Ajay is jackson bissett. He is a k. Through twelve dina students at the likud. Oreo job wise school and he also does spearfishing and jason is likud array our pleasure to have him here with us. Jason welcome thank you. Thank you so much good to have you here. And so jason when these things are threatened the threat of this going away. That's a big one and especially even if our young people don't care about it or don't understand her aren't introduced to it. That's another type of threat in so wanna your comments about while this is important. Well i think for me. I you know and i agree. Let me say first of all. Let me agree with a lot of things that was saying. You know i think the For me it goes back to like the very essence of you know those initial treaty agreements. You know so some of the things that we try to get students understand here at the school is just How vitally important. Those treaties are You know so for for us is understanding like how those what was a frame of mind that Those old people were into sign those treaties. You know so. I think why it's important is not only for the sake of being able to feed your people but it's also the essence of of our ceremonies. the fact that those those folks who signed those treaties were were smart enough and forward thinking enough to make sure that that those provisions were were written in there. You know the the right to hunt fish and gather all of those things are are vitally important to all of our ceremonies You know those feast foods are at every one of our ceremonies. So the fact that they're able to Like i said not only worry about like you know a world pandemic where people don't have money so they can go out and eat but also like the very essence of of those Ceremonies right so so essentially for me is when we go out fishing And i have three boys And when we go fishing. I is that is that very connection to those old people that that were smart enough back then to to make sure. This was all written down and You know so. Part of it is actually taking the fish and being able to share the fission and all of those great things that that make what saying. But it's it's i think for us. It's really that Connection to all of those old people that came before us right so Mr gilbert mentioned that you know the have been coming in since time immemorial and you know i imagine You know there have been initiative avi there since the very beginning you know and being connected to that the biological rhythm of the things have happen every year at home so In you know when you share this story with young people what happens. Maybe even their sent a pride in who they are and their indigenous nation you know their thoughts and connections to that if you wanna share something on that dial in one eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. Let's take another call. We got paul in likud Wisconsin tuned in on w. o. j. p. paul. Thanks giving a ring. Go ahead your thoughts. Thank you much appreciate that Comments from the last caller and from mike From mic him Today Just wanted to remind listeners. That why those ceremonies are intricate to the culture and heritage and history of the ojibway people. All these foods are on the dinner table on a regular basis epidemic. Pandemic was a good time to see how much food could be shared because people had time to harvest. It's so there's wild onions and wild rice maple and birch Syrups and teas and things going on. So it's not just you know the right to be able to harvest but the right to exist in have good health nutritional value at the table But the point. I wanted to make about what northern wisconsin and its citizens of wisconsin benefit michigan minnesota as well is the business contract portion of the treaty of eighteen fifty four and previous to that United states and citizens up here game billions of dollars in my hand. They gained billions of dollars in forest products. They gained billions of dollars in copper and iron or and they benefited from that with the ojibway. Bright or these food resources in the woods to be able to feed their families and everyday there's a transaction sawyer county or some other county. The people citizens of northern wisconsin benefit from the taxes on those real estate transactions on lakes that surround this reservation and on lands that were not only seated in the treaties but one's own even within the reservation boundaries. That was swindled away from ojibway people. Millions of dollars in real estate transactions last year benefited the citizens in which those revenue should have gone back into supporting and upholding obligations for education and healthcare. And the reservation. So it's not like citizens aren't benefiting. Today is a take a pause in in. Think about everything that is connected to this in You know with that. Put on the table in thinking about you know the the relationship to the entire state in hearing that a lot of this still needs to be shared because education is important. Hang tight. there's morehead hang tight. Smoking gave me. Copd which makes it harder and are for me to breathe. I have a tip for you. If your doctor gives you five years to live spend it talking with your grandchildren explained to him. That your grandpa not can be around anymore to share his wisdom teeth. I am figured out how to do that yet. I'm running out of time. Copd makes it harder and harder to breathe and can cause death. You can quit for free. Help call one eight hundred quit now. A message from the centers for disease control and prevention. Thanks for wrapping up your week with us here on native america calling. I'm tara gatewood and we are checking in with the great lakes area to learn more about spearfishing. We're learning a lot. Even its connection to treaty rights. If there's anything you'd like to share give us a ring. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is the number and thank you to our caller paul that we heard from before the break. I want to go to jason bissonnette. Who is here with us today. Who is the dean of students at the likud. Ojibway school and jason is there. You wanna share after hearing paul in talking about treaty rights and everything else that comes with it and you know how the state is in connection with what goes on in who the native people are anything you want to share. Well i don't know. I certainly don't want to speak on the state's behalf. I i guess i have opinions about the states relationship and their management of of of things. I mean we again. I could go on a complete tangent as as could everyone around here i think about like the wolf hunt and mismanagement of things but I i think the one thing. If i could just mention you know i think one of the we're talking about education and and for me Likud race school. I think what we have control over is like the amount of information that we prepare our students with you know And that way we can come back and we can challenge and we can We can help foster those relationships but have those have our kids like completely understand where they're they're not only their treaty rights but like there's auburn their sovereign rights so jeb. Loy people You know of course you know. There's evan flow of of state and federal relationships. But i think the stronger we can make our children Better off we'll be you know today we when one of our One of our teachers was was doing a musky flaying demonstration and they were frying walleye in our in our home macrumors While i fish eggs being incubated in our high school biology room You know so you know so. We really try to build this entire curriculum around Not only fishing. But we build you know trying to incorporate that which way knowledge and every one of our classrooms just to prepare our kids For the future. Because they're gonna be the future ones who are going to have to either build relationships with the state or regular citizens with the state. But you know first and foremost they need to know who they are and why it's important They need to be able to feel ojibway. And share that knowledge with everyone else and jason Preparing to go out there on beyond the water into take the fish. That also is important with this too many times. We've talked about Hunting in the type of preparation. That person needs to take to do this. I'm wondering share a little bit about that of you. Know it's also everything leading up to being able to spearfish anything you wanna share. Go ahead jason Yeah absolutely and i. Unfortunately i don't think i could. I can't disagree with with mick. You know and i This is going to be talking here pretty soon. I hope and i'm sure. His story is going to be the very similar like as soon as the snow starts to melt. Everyone kind of gets ramped up and and getting their gear ready and You know that transition from wintertime. We had gill nets under the ice all winter. And so you're you're you're transitioning from from winter to you know the sugar camp than you're transitioning into The spring fishery. And you know so like mix You know just in your family together and getting your plan and getting your gear and your boat your Making sure last minute all your holes and everything is ready to go. So you know our efficiencies in his actually are open waters fearing season is actually pretty short. So you wanna you wanna be ready to go when it happens. So gotta be ready. Well thank you for that and you know what let's check in with our phone lines again. We're going to say hi to gordon. Who's in red lake. Minnesota tuned in on o. J. b. gordon. Thanks for giving us a ring. Go ahead you're on air. All right yeah. I just wanted to Della story about when we were younger when appeared readily quake is a very large lake. And we got over fifteen tributaries that come into it and only one that lead that leaves it so when we would go spearing particularly for northern pike We walk up the creeks till we got to the first obstruction where to paper. Kind of all stuck trying to get up and over and we could take our pick of which ones we wanted because when you get a we eat the eggs also so it's a delicacy so we would take one of the Fish With the eggs at and the eggs and eggs in the in the creek. Great there because all the male fish already fertilizing the water all around them. Because there's lots of miniature. You just take what you need but we always take some louis. 'cause he would eat them. It was a real delicacy. You have them with the morell mushrooms which are coming out here pretty soon also so that was the one or two stories. I wanted to tell you that. I learned growing up in red lake. That know how we would replenish the fish and keep the eggs going but we still got the enjoys them at the table jer. Thanks for sharing gordon. There in red lake. We now go to round lake in wisconsin to say hello to allan tuned in on w. o. j. p. allen. Thanks for giving us a ring. Go ahead you're on air. And thank you and i'm like make a comment about people who have the misunderstanding that the spear is depleting resources. That is not true. They only real cliche should the pleading of the resources. Probably by the mismanagement of the wisconsin in our the tribes restock. These lakes way way over. What any effort to. Dnr's ever made. I don't I don't think that people truly understand the The nature of these treaties got put in power and and what the actual series of events took place. This was more of a a real estate transfer action than anything else and the people that don't think it's a good thing or post to it Maybe don't appreciate the fact that the houses they live on these lakes well part of that decision to allow the resources to be harvested as part of this what i would call a real estate transaction right. Well thanks for sharing that a lot to think about. Thanks for your call there in round lake We now go to nick. Who is in mellon. Wisconsin tuned in on w. o. J. b. nick. Thanks for reaching out. Go ahead what are you thinking today. As a fishing guide and eagle river in northern wisconsin in the eighties and every the violence landings there were signs spirit. Pregnant squad stable. All i Travel people were pelted with risked rockets. Slingshots we still have friends that have been shot at every year fishing. The land What can be done about that. All right thank you for that. You know what. Now's the time to bring in another one of our guests Joining us from the lack. The flambeau nation there in wisconsin is bisco. Nate greg johnson and he is language in art teacher for the coterie or elective flambeau tribe. And he is lactose lamble. Ojibway a pleasure to have him here. Gregg welcome and. I'm gonna let you respond to our last caller nick any thoughts. Hey thanks are having these Can you hear me pillow. Okay all right last year Me and Elder friend of mine and a veteran. We all We got lucky when we got a really good lake while lake. And so we went to this lake and We got our permits from the creole team. And there was some young men that were going off in another direction the same lake and so As we were traveling across the first base to the left of the landing the young men went right. Go from heady visiting educator from the oneida tribe in the boat with us She on there that she works for. The united tribes. Anyway we were heading across the bay and you know The previous year. I was i had a death threat on that Right side of the lake. And that's sort. Those young men were going so i yelled to be careful down there spacey. People down there. We're gonna go last though we don't Run into any of that and so as we go left in the following bay There was this Party up on this host up on the lakeshore and so As we're as we're approaching that you know. I just had a real uneasy feeling. So i told him motorman You know go go right a little bit and just try to avoid the stock analysis. And you know we're we're kind of used to that up here. We have people that still rocks at us and say things but we saw some lay schools wrote and you know the guy ran inside. All of a sudden there was gunfire and we kinda ducked down and we hit the bottom know. We have a combat veteran. He was running the motors that evening. And that really shook him up He was in beirut during the beirut bombings in their early eighty and so We had one of our veterans of the spearfishing with us. He's i also work with leeann valley or boise he He was shook up. Shook up and you know just directly across the bay and You know we kind of assess what happened. What went on and you know this is a this happens. That was fourth time Last year that. I got shot at and so we did. Is we We call the authorities. And you know we've got this guy handed and They went in any as gun ended. All this stuff you know when they played their parts but You know court happened about half a year later and the guy. I got away with it. He had to pay three hundred dollars. Fishermen harassment fine. And you know he got away with it. Essentially and some of these types of incidences that happened to tribal fishermen every once in a while listening to see the territory. And unfortunately you know it goes back to educating the public. You know i'm a. I'm a teacher. I teach here at the public school. I teach language culture art and also teaches high school but One of the thing that's lacking in the education system is We do a pretty good job. At educating people are ways and their ways well coming from the state of wisconsin you know they. They really need to step it up when it comes to education for their people for their for their citizens It's not my job to go out there and blow horn and tell everybody you know that this is how we do it and you. You guys have to respect their job. It's there it's on them. This is their thing you know. And it's to the point. Now where wisconsin has to face the fire they have to realize you know what their lack of compassion for the tribe. Tribes are creating creating this massive animosity. And you know what happened in. The eighties doesn't need to continue to happen anymore. But it is happening today so i believe that you know education is key. Yeah so it's within the state's power you know. And there was a lot of suggestions to the state representative and even the governor himself. You know the The not natives have this Computer system they can go online and you can buy their license and they have all this stuff you know and a lot of these guys are unaware of treaty rights are unaware of what a cd territory or even what sovereignty means and. So one of my suggestions was you know Make it part of the buying your license if you buy your license. You know you have to read this. Page and click agree the understand treaty. Right something like that and so we're always coming up with ideas to help the the non native people trying to comprehend and understand what the previous zone mississippi show has already reiterated. You know that we might be left alone. We wanted to continue with our culture and we want to feed our families. You know. i'm not out there to trophy hunt. But what i do is provide for my family and give them the food that our ancestors because that is where our health and our life comes from the life of those fish and so i think it's important. Education is definitely key. turn in Great you also know the language in our planet to all of this any words in would you leave us with. We got about a minute before we wrap things up sir. Yeah the word. For our most coveted fishes Walleye in our language olga. And when we're done harvesting these fish we always give a talk and we always say the word megan which which is the worst thing. And i'd like to say thank you to you and your show as well and to the four or your gentlemen that were on for me. I appreciate all your words. Well thank you for that and we do to wrap things up here But we know that there's a lot that goes on with the great lakes indian fish and wildlife commission on all this and of course if anybody does want to reach out him at turn to mike igam and places where people can reach out and learn more sure glitz. Rg oil and you know what you're kind of cutting down on my end so going give it out again. Make sure our it would be lift wick dot org all lower case lower case. Okay good deal and Any final comments. While i have you go ahead mick. Well i wanna thank you as well. I had so many other comments while people were talking and wanted. Didn't but i realize you only have one hour for the call but i think every single person that called into one caller al from round lake. He's a resort owner. And so in the beginning you know when the court case happened there's a lot of fear and these Resort owners were legitimately afraid for their business. But once they got the information of the true harvest than al and fellow. Resort owners started working with the tribe to do projects on their lake in collaboration. It's a lot better spending money on the lake. Been on lawyers fighting each other. Hey now are right there. You go Thank you would way to wrap up the week checking in with all this. There's more we know. Feel free to carry on the conversation. Send us an email comments. At native america. Calling dot com. Thank you to everybody that we heard from bisco. A greg. Johnson is well as jason bissonnette john gilbert also mic issue. Thank you for joining us today. Here on the program and we're back next week with five more shows on monday. We're talking with the creator and some actors from the new peacock. tv show rutherford falls which is now streaming. Our executive producer is hugh senior producer. Is monica breen. Associate producer is murphy berina. Spencer is our engineer. Nolan days moses the distribution director in. Bob peterson is a network manager for a voice. One clifton chadwick is a resource development specialists and twenty. Gonzales is the anchor and producer four national native news. Charles say there is our chief of operations in present president and ceo of broadcast corporation. Is jacqueline salih. I'm your host and producer terri. Gatewood will meet you here on monday. Support by the suit. Trading post who's special selection of dried herbs or chosen for superior quality meant many sage sweetgrass braids and red willow and cedar or wild crafted all available etsu trading dot com support by the applied indigenous studies department at northern arizona university giving native american students knowledge and tools to become change agents in their communities where indigenous knowledge is applied in a u dot. Edu slash native buju zona. God enough win an Nonleague godwin gimnasia kailua kenosha keyed in a shanavie. 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01-21-21 Oak Flat at a crossroads

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 4 months ago

01-21-21 Oak Flat at a crossroads

"Welcome to native america calling from albuquerque. Monica brain defenders of land sacred to apaches and other tribes are hoping the courts can halt land transfer to a mining company apache stronghold filed suit to try and protect land known as a flat. They're hoping the only treaty between the us government and apaches concerning land can keep the transfer from going through. It's the latest development in a decades long fight over flat. We'll get an update on the land coming up after national native news. The national native news antonio gonzales tribes in montana and north and south dakota are welcoming president biden's order to revoke the keystone xl pipeline. Permit chairman herald frazier of the cheyenne river. Sioux tribe in a statement thanked biden and expressed gratitude for honoring treaties and keeping his campaign. Promise meanwhile tc energy announced it will stop construction in a statement issued. Just before the inauguration wednesday tc said it's disappointed the new president is rescinding the permit issued by the trump administration. Victoria wicks has more energy. Says the company has a successful business base and aside from the keystone xl pipeline. It will go forward with other funded projects as well. As those under development that tci will stop the keystone xl. Construction had already started which includes a small segment of pipe. That crosses the canada border west. Furlong as an attorney with the native american rights fund which represents the rosebud sioux tribe and. Fort belknap indian community in montana. Federal court for long says the judge warranty see that construction before lawsuits settled could result in a loss for the company pram canada's forging ahead with building the pipeline with this sort of cloud of litigation hanging over their head from the tribes perspective from our perspective. They've really assumed a lot of the risk of doing that pipeline. Proponents say an into to the project would result in a loss of thousands of jobs during construction but west. Furlong says those construction jobs can be replaced. My personal hope is there's a real opportunity for infrastructure reinvestment and then new investment in different an alternative sources of energy that frankly are better paying and safer jobs. Several tribes and environmental groups filed lawsuits starting in two thousand seventeen against us government agencies for permitting. The pipeline without adequate environmental studies and for violations of treaty rights the pipeline was tied up in litigation throughout the previous presidential administration for national native news. I'm victoria wicks in rapid city. South dakota president s executive order on protecting public health and the environment and restoring science to tackle climate change also directs or review on restoring bears ears national monument in utah to consult with tribes and report back to the president insects. Dj's bears was modified in two thousand seventeen by president trump since then a number of tribes have been fighting to get protections back the executive order also puts a temporary moratorium on oil and gas leasing in the arctic national wildlife refuge it directs the interior department to review the program and study potential environmental impacts. The steering committee and environmental groups are among those fighting for permanent protection of the arctic refuge indigenous organizations illuminated. Teepee in billings montana this week to honor lives lost to covid nineteen and recognize the new presidential administration yellowstone. Public radio's caitlyn. Nicholas has more as the sunset. Tuesday evening bill snell executive director of the rocky mountain tribal leaders council explained. The teepee serves as a memorial for those who've died from covid nineteen it as a symbol of hope as the united states transitions to a new chapter under the biden administration. I think it's really important that we as ended people take the lead a lotta times. In this and be able to demonstrate our way of trying to give some hope to the world the teepee was lit with amber lights to symbolize the dawn of the new day indigenous nations. The united states are moving toward amber was also chosen because the washington monument and other sites illuminated at the same time across the country. As part of a national covid nineteen memorial snell said he hopes this display like the installment of teepees erected in billings last month to symbolize tribal members who've died from covid nineteen will stir the biden administration to put even more resources towards fighting the pandemic which has disproportionately impacted native americans. I'm caitlyn nicholas and damien tony gonzales. National native news is produced by colonic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by the center for indigenous cancer research at roswell park comprehensive cancer center dedicated to cancer research medicine and care for indigenous population. The no charge online risk assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash assess me for law and justice related programming provided by hobbs strauss dean and walker l. l. p. a national law firm dedicated to promoting and defending tribal rights for more than thirty years. More information available at hawks strauss dot com native voice. One the native american radio network. This is need of mira calling. I'm monica brain sitting in for tara. Gatewood joining you today through skype. A group representing san carlos apaches and other tribes is hoping a court injunction can stock the clock on an imminent land exchange in arizona apache stronghold sued to stop the transfer of land that clears the way for a copper mining company to take place over development of land known as oak flat apaches and others say the land is sacred and have been in a high stakes tug of war for its fate for decades. Now last minute trump administration move means the land transfer is closer than ever before resolution. Copper is the company proposing a mine on the land. They declined to be on the show today but did send a written statement resolution. Copper project director. Andrew lie said the company is quote committed to ongoing engagement with native american tribes and working to seek consent before any decision on the development of the project. What do you think about the controversy over. The area known as oak flat for lines are open. The number to get you into the conversation is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four. That's one eight hundred nine nine native joining us. Now from san carlos arizona is went slur no senior. He's the leader of the apache stronghold and he is ancarlo patchy welcome wetzlar and please feel free to further. Introduce yourself In yeah are biko. Vizor list is wanted to say Greetings to all my brothers and sisters lifting In indian country and I thank you for having me on today. That's great to hear you again and get an update on what's going on There in arizona so where things stand right now with with the land transfer and and with oak flat. Well as you said to the listeners. You know we. We have filed lawsuits. And really when. I'm asked two questions. You know the question is i tell them that. First of all as i've said it's a sacred site in a holy place you know no different than the biblical when we talk about cyanide and it's always been a religious battle for me because What what we see that will forever be destroyed as is one the identity of both Of the amount that holes our language or songs where it originated and then the future of our children of those that are babies and yet to be born and the consequences. That comes with that you know and again you go back to the constitution of the united states of how they founded this country based on religion. But you know it it does not extend to the rest of us and you know and one of the things. That's really important that we need to understand when the united states does this kind of exemption. What does it mean. What does it do When the laws don't govern you know justice as far as the reality of what's going to occur so you know it's it's really has been a religious battling to stay focused in the religious sense so that we don't lose our focus. Because i as i tell the people here you know we're fighting something great That is evil That has come to this part of the country. And i tell people it's not it's not the white people is the way of life is just capitalism that is destroying so many different things and so you know oak flats has really now you know politically from the time. We started to where we are was educated as much as we could to to the world and to this country pacific this country about what political does to a place a human race. And then you have the long that you know. Now we're at that point where we have to submit what we have to the justice and see where see what's going to be ruled from that and so in so many ways you know it's kind of like we're at that door now you know Which is really unfair. Because we're our religion is going to be tried and our our our right to be is also going to be tried based on eighteen fifty two treaty that we also have included. So it's a frightening time for us. You know because of how the laws were exempt. Not giving us no fairness in the zone of people as well. Not knowing the pros and cons that we're gonna take place on this mining activity that's going to occur. We're talking with ensler nosy senior He is leader of the apache stronghold and We're talking about flat. There is a controversial land exchange. The clock is ticking. On the land exchange in arizona the company resolution copper will exchange a privately owned plant and for land in the tahoe national forest And they hope to have a copper pit mine in the area once. Are you know Whatever you feel comfortable sharing tell us about the cultural significance of this area oak flats And the challenges of explaining this to people who aren't native. Well i think the biggest thing that it comes right down to is that there are wrong. Definition that were used for religious ways and like for instance you know when are gun people on gun means like i guess the closest in the english language would be angels saints and so when they classified they classified it as dancers are devil dancers based on what they see in. I guess when they came into this area and so that's just an example of what we're going what we're coming across with what had happened in the past and what we're facing today because it really dilutes in english name which really definitions that were given really dilutes really what this is you know and it goes back to the and i tell me that people it goes back to the beginning of time and even in europe about before they were colonize into this coppola's world that you know and i'm glad that i can speak with reference because going back to to europe you know for the fight from my grandma and oak flats and meeting with so many of the people that you know even white people had a customer a cultural way a religious way before the dominant of came to them as well so you know and then there's also pitcher gloves. There's there's a pitcher glib here and i'll on oak flats and also at one on my graham. That isn't the help that the people were able to take me to the alps to see and those those those pitcher gloves identify the angels the overall gender religion. And so you know. I try to tell people that you know we still hang onto time immemorial Of what it was and so when you come to oak flats. That's one of the areas that give us that recording that that way of life that reminder as indian people and then it translates into our children for for those years yet to come and so you know in destroying all of this then it would raise questions in our in those yet to be born. You know you're singing songs. You you know you pray this way. where's it at. And then and then you go there and it's a big copper pit mine and and then you know what they're going to be given out as jobs money you know the the the the economic development you know. They're going to be forced to learn those things which really really takes us as people in this country in a direction that we shouldn't go because we're killing all the environments and we're killing all the religious ways and you know when the water goes everything goes you know and and that's one of the things that we see that that i that i've witnessed and i've seen in tried to educate across country. Not not. just you know indian people but the everybody that you know. A lot of things are at stake and an phone from the environment to political laws and to our congressional people and how they make decisions you know. All that are is intertwined in this an an oak flats and and and again you know it's it's holy and sacred and i it just like all these other places but we're we're killing these places and wants their all gone you know. It's like my mother used to tell me where people who are just like them. We've turned off the value volume and we don't hear life no more and at the time that we say that mothers. We'll do what it has to do. Cleanup while this reminds me of so many other shows that we've done on on native america calling about sacred places that are that folks are genuinely concerned about when it comes to mining at. We did a show about a place in montana. Call badger two medicine. And i remember the folks Mentioned when they were working with the federal government and working with you know with the people who had leased land for mining. They just said to them. Just show us. Which rocks are sacred. Just point out the sacred rocks and will avoid them In order to you know when we put our oil wells in or things like that well sorry. Have you ever encountered a conversation like that. Where and and then. What are the challenges of explaining. You know it's not about one sacred rock or one spot no it has been challenged challenged the challenging of it because they they don't realize that everything is well you know it's probably the way they were brought up are taught but they don't realize everything interacts together and if you if you heard one part it's just like a body we try to explain them to body if if an arm is taken away what happens to that body if even if a finger is taken away what happens to the body if a toll is taken away what happens to the bali trades an imbalance and so there's only certain places that you can do things and so it's been really hard and one of the things that i had to bring up to people is the fact that there's places that are male and female and when we talk about oakland's is female because it provides water provide life environment is there you can be born there and you can die there from old age but you go from a radio where other places can you find that you know and so these are these very unique places than i tell them that you know you can't you know there has to be a point where you need to understand enough is enough you know we can't and then when you look at it from the from the perspective of people in power is about greed and power you know it's about no end and like when i'm in dc. I'm talking to all these people you know. They're worried about their children and nurturing to be born of how their stocks and bonds are going to be like when talking with some of the the mining people you know it's not not only about mining if about buying up the water because are the ceo's have assured stockholders that we got to buy these land bases and bite us water. Because you know the next thing for your grandkids and ones yet to be born will be who controls water and so you know they have these things all set up down the road As far as when you look at corporate life and so you know we we have to tell them what they're living into magnum understand what we're trying to say but it it we're not saying it and we're not telling them are you know they're not listening than they're going down this road but is is it's been really you know apart that you have to educate i guess along the way ensler. Thank you for sharing that. We're gonna go short break and after the break we're gonna talk more about Oak flat and apache strongholds efforts to save the area from a large copper. Pit mine if you want to weigh in on this particularly if you support the mine or you don't support it call us at one. Eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. We'll be right back. Despite the convenience and popularity of online shopping indigenous bookstores continue to thrice a new one the birdcage open in rapid city. Recently despite the pandemic and others are continuing to create space for indigenous literature and community in urban areas. We'll talk with some native bookstore owners on the next native america calling support by roswell park who know tribal communities face persistent challenges in health equity such as cancer and higher death rates the centre for indigenous cancer research at roswell park. Comprehensive cancer center is dedicated to advancing cancer research that will lead to translatable science medicine and cancer care for indigenous populations worldwide. Are you at high risk for cancer. A no charge online assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash assess me. You're listening to native america. Calling i monica brain sitting in for tear gatewood johnny. Today through skype. We're talking about oak flat today. It's an area in arizona that sacred to the san carlos apache and other tribes and it's also the site of a proposed copper. Mine if you want to weigh in on the conversation the number to join is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and before the raker talking with wessler nosy senior. He's the leader of the patchy stronghold and Once i want to give you an opportunity anything else you want to Share about the challenges of explaining The spiritual significance of land to Mining company or to the federal government. Well i i think i just go back to what you said earlier about resolution copper and their statement when it comes to the holy circuit plays. There's no way you can mitigate anything. There's no there's no price they can ever you know supplement what's going to be lost and and You know you don't give up who you are. You don't give up your sovereignty as a as a person that has a way a belief in life and in the same thing you know from the purpose of why we were put on this. Earth is to take care of those precious gift that gives us life. And as i said before you know these places go then everything else follows and i just pray that these people are people would realize that you know the environment the way they call it. I is really really crucial for what tomorrow and the future is going to be and for you know for us. It's it's our mother you know. The mother provides everything it gives us everything that we need to survive. And if we go too far away from it you know. There's no way of coming back. But that's where That's your belief in religion is important and you know and bringing up our children and making a realize that you know it's not about us it's about everything and you teach them that in the very beginning then it get older they they understand it. And so you know spirituality is really inside of a person that you bill. You help bill. But you know. I it's to make them understand but And also understand corporate life that we all live in you know and i tell people that. We live on reservations Where suppress going across the country. I've seen cities and towns. That i met a lot of non-indians that they're living in suppress stage as well especially with this pandemic has shown how people are living in corporate world and suppress. And how many you know are in need so it- it's important that you know we. We saved we saved these things. Like last example give is like for instance I believe there's an copper is like three something dollars a pound and then with the acorn itself. You know people have sold that for one pound sixty dollars because One can one coffee. Can one pound can't feet up to four to five hundred people and then if it's just a family it can lascaux half a year so all this is right in front of us but we ignore it. You know like it doesn't mean anything. And so you know spirituality is really the upbringing of who we are and all we're trying to do is not be into this corporate world and we're just trying to ropes to everybody else to make them realize that you know we don't wanna go there you know and we're trying to help pull them back out and and i guess that goes back to sustainability also taking care of the earth for what it provides so i think that's really really important for all of us and i see that more so now 'cause you gotta teach those younger people that And in as older people we have to admit that we're caught up in this corporate world that you know it really. It really needs to devastation. Like we're witnessing right now. You wanna talk more about that particularly you reaching out to to younger people to explain this issue of oak flat to them but I want my outside your voice to the conversation if you want to get in and talk about oak flat in arizona or maybe there's another environmental fight that for sacred land that you are working on calls at one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight Let's take a quick call. We've got michael in his pueblo to nunan k. u. m. Hey there michael What do you want to share. But yeah i. we're taking my call. Yeah i was wondering if the triumph had reached out to debra holland because her new position she may have. She may intervene and also she understands a religious sacred significance of of indigenous America and the indigenous indigenous tribes around the world because of our essence our beliefs. and also. You know you administration just took over their stated agenda. I think Then we'll see whether the corporations and lobbyists have one. How strangle this administration but I i think time. I think the time now three talks ever and then also you know and just let time time while we're here it was just you administration all right michael and have you reached out. Have you spoken with congresswoman holland about this issue. Yeah we've already been in dc and met with her already we. She's aware of this issue and I believe with the try the same thing and also with an fe. I you know information has already been submitted to her But we've met her directly and we. We talked to her as well. Let's add another voice to the conversation. Joining now is clark makamba. He is the vice chairman of the hopi tribe. Welcome back to native. America calling vice-chairman ten conga are. Y'all doing. Thank you for allowing me to be part of the conversation. Today gets great to hear your voice. So i just talked to us a little bit about the significance of the oak flat area to the hopi. Well hope he has long lane. You're just to Not just the current Villages that we have here twelve of us have our clan. History of what i just Basically testified again this morning in reference to another sacred site which is very important to a lot of tribes north of where the current San carlos is in I know for a fact that To clamps in particular the grease would and roadrunner or are affiliated with the area and we have long been engaged in discussion What since the The the project started developing their maybe even longer than some of the other tribes that got engaged in there and we always say it that Ancestrally culturally this are the footprints of hopi that have traveled through there so we know of sites that we have Named in that particular size we have address more than once along with not just oak flats. We've always only or. I've been engaged since i've been in office since two thousand sixteen Which is a new enlightenment to hear that. They stop the construction of the wall. Just same thing as devastating as what it is. As far as what's happening there know flats but hope. He has long been engaged in a lot of the areas here in the south west particularly in at the request of other tribes. Because we know ancestrally it. It has a lot of bearing on how and how what hope he is today. A lot of the other tribes have our stories of why it's significant us. Yes the current day brothers and sisters paget tribes that reside in that area. They have the The significance of the cultural value of it. What they do they're ceremonially but our history goes into the point of how hope he became who we are and any destruction of any land throughout the united states is really a Basically another imposition on any native tribe without any consultation. That has always been the american government. And like you mentioned today. the Mentioning of congressman. You know until that day arrives. Then yes we really start hammering at her door and others to trying to resolve some of this issue or give bring a bigger attention to it. Opened the doors so that there is actually a discussion. Yes you know. i i heard today. Also you know the keystone pipeline has been put a halt to but yet in our back doors in every area. And it's not just about your neighborhood. They're in albuquerque near the area. Who was here i. It's always been the native americans so our sites our history is scattered through on every space of this landscape that today finally we have some laws and some legislation in place that the government's state both lake local federal and that at the national level. They have to comply with that recognition. So with this you know. That's my my part of it. That i would like to add onto the discussion today that regardless of where we are at and situated at this today need to continue to support one another if one tribe or an armed to another brother sister. We need to be there. Actively engaged in those kind of issues so that we bring attention at a national level not just local level so vice-chairman tana. Kamba does the the hopi tribes visit officially on the record is not supporting the coppermine at Not not in not Not on record but we have been as far as you know from the get-go of what was happening there It wasn't until later. On when i got involved that he was always something that had come to the floor of the council. So of course. A lot of the Issues that come there sometimes. It's already acted on before. I have arrived here but at this point the cultural side of it is that we are still concerned. We'll support Ns new legislation debt is of major concern. That you know. We need to be apprised. Of as far as our cultural sites that are scattered throughout that region. All right. thank you. Vice-chairman tana convoy. We appreciate it and before you go. I know you've you've got to get going Can you just give us an update on Where it stands with bears ears The the the issue s that. We're waiting for the new administration to actually. It was heard that they were gonna resent the The current executive order. That's unplaced your and if they do that that would be great news and then it will be up to the parties to five tries that are engaged currently in litigation on the issue with the trump administration. The former trump administration is that. I hope that it is again. Overturned in the dc courts. And once that happens. I think the push is to go forward with A better concrete Legislation from congress. Making it a permanent. A permanent place of A national monument so that no other administration in the future or no coming in future. That will intern. What we have worked. really hard for it to get this legislation in but that's where we're at currently of course we've got an uphill battle against the state of utah but I'm not gonna stop there. I'm gonna continue to talk with the representative of of romney and other stuff Representative state of utah. All right. thank you so much for joining us today. Vice chairman of the hopi tribe. clark makamba. thank you Thank you for giving me the opportunity. I wish you all well. I wanna thank you for allowing me to be on air. But i want to thank everybody. Who's listening. I wish you all well. Let's try to pursue and and be safe. Take the cdc recommendation mask up. Wash your hands. You know sanitize make sure you social distance because we wanna get back on a normal life of what. Our culture is about native americans and i care about all of you. That are listening in. I love y'all and i hope to see all of you down the trail again. in in our lifeline. Thank you thank you clark appreciate it and if you want to join our conversation give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. We're talking about the apache strong old It's a proposed copper mine. There's a proposed compromise on the land in arizona and the trump administration's one of the last acts of the trump administration was to set the clock. Ticking on a land exchange that would put the land in private property with the mining company. What do you think about this. Give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight a stuck to julius in jacksonville. Florida tuned in online. Julius do you want to share. Hello i just want to basically give a shoutout to mr nosy. And i'm totally against what the trump administration is doing is wrong number one that main sacred to the apaches and they thought for it and it was a part of the reservation back in the nineteen fifties so i support the people vote. Flat one hundred ten percent feel different than a group of these guys. Going into a church is wrong. They have a right to have their sacred place you know. And that's just the way. I feel about it all right thanks. Julius great. great to hear from florida. We don't usually a lot of calls from florida. Appreciate it and. I want to add another voice to the conversation joining us. Now from tucson. Arizona is roger. Federer shown he's the director of the arizona mine reform coalition roger. We're gonna go to a break in just a bit. But i want to welcome you and ask you. You know what you want to contribute. Add to this conversation about oak flat. Good morning Monica good morning to everybody. They're out in radio land I guess the the overriding thing here is is. This is a failed experiment This whole mine idea. It's just not gonna work. There's not enough water to go around for this mine and obviously it's it's it sacred and has a much higher Calling than than to be destroyed Is a failed experiment. So it it. it's just It's clearly a situation that that Is is intolerable. It in and we need to make sure we we. We stopped this from happening And i think we still have the tools to do that. We haven't even really talked about The mechanics of the mind and how it works. I read an article in the arizona republic that said that the type of mining that it is would create a thousand feet. Deep pit I wanna talk more about that. Roger After the break as well and I want to hear from you. What do you think about. The mine proposed mine in oak flat in arizona and It seems like we have different reasons that our guest today are saying that the mind should not happen. One first and foremost of mr no senior has mentioned is that the land is sacred. The land is sacred to the apache and we heard from The vice chairman of the hopi tribe that it's sacred to the hopi as well they have Ancestral connections to that land. There's a few other tribes that also say that the land that in that area significant to them as well but the other issue is one of the environmental groups saying that a large open pit copper mine would actually be very detrimental to the area. There's issues of water. There's issues of Chemicals going into the ground and just the fact that it would be a large pit. From from what i understand roger from the arizona mine. Reform coalition is with us. He's going to explain sort of the mechanics of how this proposed mine would work after the break but we also want to hear from you there still time to get in on the conversation give us a call at one eight nine nine six two eight four eight one eight hundred nine nine native you can tweet at one eight hundred nine nine need of as well and if you have a lot more you want to say you can send us an email to comments. At native america calling dot com support for journalism that raises the awareness of child wellbeing to citizens. And to policymakers provided by the annie e. casey foundation building a brighter future for children families and communities information at a e. Cf dot org support by navajo language renaissance presenting rosetta stone navajo for ipads iphones chromebooks and android devices with to learning levels and a self self-correcting pronunciation feature info at navajo renaissance dot org. You're you're tuned into native america calling. I'm a brain and today we're talking about oak flat in arizona before the break. We're talking with roger featherstone. He's the director of the arizona. Mine reform coalition so Explained to us. This proposed copper mine that would be in the oak flat area. What exactly Would it look like what kind of mining will happen there. Well first of all i i. I'm competent although it'll be it's an uphill battle always has been. I'm confident that this will never happen. And and and so. We're talking theory here. what what. The company is proposing. Not what what. I'm i'm i. I think that will be able to do. But the project itself is is a is proposed as massive it. Would it would be basically a forty three mile footprint that would destroy sixteen thousand acres from from one side to the other. This would be a it. Wouldn't be an open pit mining what what's called the cave mine which is essentially an upside down Open pit So what the company would do at oak flat is they. Would they would Drill down to seven thousand feet below the surface and they would create a an infrastructure at the bottom of the Or body and then they would blast to collapse the your body down into their workings in the bottom and in doing so it would create a crater basically on the on the surface that would be two miles wide and and thousand foot deep And then they would take the order processing facility in and because the body is about a cubic mile in diameter it would create That much waste toxic waste and that would be pumped twenty miles to the east into another valley And and then just dumped on the ground to to have all that toxic waste percolate in into the ground So that would be the basic proposal. The mind would use As much water is the city of of beers on and of course in arizona. We just don't have that much water to go around so so that's kind of the mechanics of of what they're planning. This has never been done at that depth anywhere in the world The only similar mind is in mongolia Which has a devastating impact on indigenous herders on that mine site and the bottom line is They're in construction of a similar operation. And it's just not working out for them they're just not able to do it So so that's you know. As i said before it it's one thing to uh it would be much more tragic to to take low flat and destroyed for for a failed experiment. Interesting roger And i should note that we did invite resolution copper to be on the show today and they did decline but they said that they are committed to working with tribes on this issue. let's Let's go the phone lines. We've got russ in mescalero. Apache tuned in on k. Unm hey there russ. What do you want to share today. Well it looks like we lost him Sorry about that at. Let's go to melvin in nebraska tuned in on casey y que he. They're melvin us. Good morning roger. Featherstone worth year affects On the tribes on the water issues because as he knows all tribes are having water issues. And how bad this be or the apache and surrounding tribes thing is roger. We did work together about forty years ago. In minnesota on those big power lines slow. Yes good good. Good morning melvin. Good to hear the The other thing that that i did mention is is Because the workings would be seven thousand foot. Deep the the mining company would have to pump the water out of the entire area there to to make sure their mind workings were were dry. So so that would have a completely d water Not only oak flat area around it and and with the saint carlos reservation being a fairly close to the east now of of the proposal There's there's certainly reason to believe that. Would impact the the the water supply for the for the tribe itself and it would certainly impact the the water for the towns of superior and top of the world that are better close by. Didn't the forest service. Release a final environmental impact statement. There was nothing in the impact statement about the amount of water that would be used or how it would be affecting the towns in the area. Russ roger yes. They they did. And that's what kind of started this. This clock ticking as far as the exchange And that's what they really rushed through. So so the the final environmental impact statement is is is is very poorly written an incomplete It did talk about the water. But but the the the estimate for the water are low balled and In in our comments on the previous version we we hit them hard on that and and and the response really isn't any better So yes there's a lot of things in in that statement that are talked about There's there's still a lot of unanswered questions in. And and and and i think that's something that the courts will decide is whether that Impact statement is is sufficient enough to to even trigger this this sixty day clock the tech. So is there a possibility if the courts can't get To for example the apache stronghold litigation. In time that the the transfer will go through in the next two months. Roger the Yes basically the the way the law is written at least in in in the stronghold strong Lawsuits out there. They saint carlos patchy tribe filed a lawsuit and our attorneys are also Investigating what what. The options are for for our coalition So yes we believe certainly that if the if the final environmental impact statement is is deficient it would need to be withdrawn and and and and if it was no longer sufficient that should stop sixty day clock from from kicking So so that's yes there's there's that possibility There's other possibilities for fixing this. You know by the biden administration And then i should point out from from the from the companies behind this rio tinto an nba hp the tool world's largest mining companies After rio tinto blew up sacred rock shelters in western australia In in may of twenty twenty the company has promised never to do that again anywhere in the world and of course if rio tinto's words mean anything they would have no choice but to abandon this project So so i guess that would be the other possibility is is these mining companies would actually come to their senses and and and and and walk away before they before they. You know Do any more damage than they've already done. Obviously we're not really you know that's that's a low probability but but you know they you know there's it's still out there. They still might do the right thing. It's really interesting when slur You know what roger is talking about. Is there a sense of urgency. That you're feeling right now. As a result of this things i've read as that mine's like this will take twenty to thirty years to even get started that You know this new administration is definitely More on the environmental side. But do you feel that You know there's that you should be worried that you know the future is is coming up quick when it comes to this mind you know i i go back to day one In one thousand nine hundred eighty nine two thousand The sense of urgency has always been there. And you know like i told one reporter that democrats republicans on this issue prior and then you had other people that time. Everybody seemed to have kind of walked away from the shoes. Especially when they got exemption from john mccain and so and then and then it goes back to the federal government trust responsibility with the try i mean. They know that they have the advantage when they're not helping to try financially to really determine through these studies what the major effects are going to be and being on trump council being a chairman before we had to initiate that all ourselves and try to find allies to help us to kind of look at and and get a good reading was gonna take place and get you know really getting no help and then i remember not going under first doors and my trip to dc. Nobody wanted to open the door. You know and and i was getting slammed by john mccain and kyle on you know what they've been doing for indian people all these years and you know we. Should you know allow this to happen. Is going to be jobs. And your your people are living and devastation. And i reminded them high unemployment comes from them putting as a prisoner of war. And that anything that we've done economically to bring down to unemployment rate has been from the tribe itself so there's been all these back and forth and again i i met with president obama When he was president. And you know brought that to him as well with the issue that we're facing an especially but the law but being exempt from all these environmental laws that what we're talking about right now with what could have been provided to everyone about the pros and cons and so you know then then then. There's a fallen back about us people who we are. Because that's not our manifest destiny and that's not who we are so as people you know especially those who practice their religion. You know you know we still. We still take a step back. What's happening on the corporate way of life. And and they're all trying to come up with you know Is is good for your people. Take take it and then what really frightens me. Right now is the. This is given the time for the resolution. Copper to once again mitigate with the tribes of arizona to try to have them by in. Because you know there's dances that is going to happen and you know you guys need to take this. You know this financial support they were going to give you. You know send us your wishlist. And you know there's a lotta underneath games that are being played to give the wrong story to the public. And so you know that's where it's important for to really stand their ground to not take anything from them at this point But it's a worry. You know what i mean because you're talking about who we are and and what our children are to be and and you know we're coming out of a being victims of to pass and there's a healing going on and i just hope that you know this country looks at that and the people who are providing assistance and help realize that you know is really to a better future for this country so but every day you know. I'm not. I've not slept. Well you know i. I haven't been who. I am living a life that you know there really is protecting what we can and then living at oak flats being intimidated by the miners. And you know you know people say things but it's part of the process but we're getting there and i just think that we can't we can't you know put our Bring our foot off the gas pedal we. We need to keep moving. And and hopefully you know those. Those helps will come where shit when so. You've been working on this for a long time. What a what else would you have been doing with your time. If you didn't have to protect oakland well. I still trying to be trying to protect our people and and trying to make us realize you know what a reservation life as in where you know where it suppresses and then the trust responsibility that the united states have and then you know really telling people the real history what happened and why it happened. I mean those things. I think we i really believe we need to be open doors with our our children because my mother was and this is what made me who i am to defend. What's left and and get other people to defend what is important in life and so i probably if it wasn't fighting for this here it still be fighting for the justice for all the right and then for the newcomers to understand. It's not just all about a corporate world but it's about sustainability about the environment. Because i'm pretty sure they're not going anywhere so those are really important teaching And before we put our children out there and getting their degrees and then they go and work for corporate company. And then you know those things are embedded in them and forget the integrity of a of a culture of people and the blessed gift that was given to all of us. So it's really important that those things are integrated before any of our students are educated in in out there and being grabbed by these corporate companies. You know so. I think i would really be working on that. You know to to really save the future so that we're all in the same page. We're right at the end of the hour. Wessler what do you want to tell. A young people are listening today about Protecting flat why you don't like to say to all people you know we're all we're all in this together and sometimes as older people we make the wrong choices because we were we were not given the right information and just like here at oak flats you know. A lot of the people. Were not giving the right information. But it's really to seek those information to make the right decision but you gotta follow your conscience. You know inside it also it all. It all always tells you when it's right and then when when it's wrong so i just asked young people you know to really go by that feeling is not right and really search into it so that you can make the right decision and not and not to follow. 'cause the the only thing that you know we have and that we should be loyal to is the fact that the giver of life you know what was given to us. And how that's all intertwined. We all have to protect that as it protects us but once we leave it and we don't protect that then we're jeopardy like the way we are today and then we we we become people that were not to try to make something that was wrong. A right and it'll never you know. Never it will never satisfy that human soul so i tell the young people. Listen listen to your instincts in. And that's what has guided me to where. I'm at today and wednesday before you go. Can you say the traditional name of flat for us to say goes tech and Dombi one that's the home of the holy spirit and the amri the old embryo trees. 'cause they history and a story. Thank you so much to wessler nosy. Senior clark makamba and roger featherstone. We're back tomorrow with a look at native bookstores. i'm monica brain. We'll see you tomorrow doc. Support by utah. Dean advocate working to fully restore bears national monument by asking the biden administration to fulfil the original vision of protection for one point nine million acres with meaningful co-management by tribes. It's time we respect ancestral lands and our collective american heritage by listening to and learning from tribes on stewardships of these cultural landscapes info and supporting this effort at utah. Dna dot org. That's ut a. h. d. i n. e. dot org skirts. Fact snuffed on the dos offered. Put that some way or even golf That the I montgomery looking upward got. I'm what she has a abide his my gym ammonia gopher democracy momma sign on hog new healthcare dot gov. I'll go on eight hundred. Eighty three one eight two five nine six year. Must centers for medicare medicate. I native america calling is produced in the national native voice studios in albuquerque new mexico by kwon broadcast corporation and native nonprofit media organization funding provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio satellite. Service music is by brent. Michael davids native voice. One native american radio network.

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01-27-21 Is the Keystone XL Pipeline dead?

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 3 months ago

01-27-21 Is the Keystone XL Pipeline dead?

"Welcome to native america calling from albuquerque. I monica brain the keystone excel pipeline. Project is dead at least for the time being tribes in the path and the proposed project are cheering but already some elected leaders are working to undo the decision by president. Joe biden to cancel the pipeline permit. It's the latest effort over the last decade to build the conduit to transport millions of gallons of oil through the middle of the country. we'll get perspectives on the latest development. And here where and when the pipeline could resurface. That's coming up right after national need of us. This is national native news. Antonio gonzales whether the dakota access pipeline continues to operate is now a question for president. Joe biden as well as federal courts. The dc court of appeals has ruled that the pipeline is operating illegally without a full environmental impact. Study the standing rock. Sioux tribe has asked to dc circuit judge to issue a permanent injunction. Victoria wicks has more a dc circuit. Judge ordered last summer that the dakota access pipeline had to be shut down and drained by august fifth dapple voters in the army corps of engineers immediately appealed and successfully asked for the shutdown to be reversed while the appeals court reviewed. The case that court has now confirmed that the core illegally permitted the pipeline in two thousand seventeen under former president. Donald trump who put a halt to environmental studies ordered by the obama administration. John houseman of earthjustice represents the standing rock sioux tribe. He says the tribe has already started the process of getting a court ordered injunction in the dc circuit but he says the change in presidential administrations opens another avenue. We're calling on the biden administration to set this pipeline down until these legal problems can be resolved hasn't been says the appellate court confirms that the pipeline should not have been built. It never went through the stringent review required by the national environmental policy act or nepean and as a result it is now operating without a permit should pipeline be allowed to operate wall. The environmental review is going on and the only answer to that question. The only possible answer is no. That's not the way the law works. You're not supposed to build. I in study later. Dc courts say the army corps failed to consider the hazards of running a pipeline through the waters of the awadhi reservoir which tribes rely on for drinking hunting fishing industry agriculture and cultural practices. I'm victoria wicks in rapid city. South dakota the fairbanks. Alaska native community recently gathered for vigil to increase awareness about missing people. Family shared stories. Thank those who are helping. Search for answers and called for new action sees dan bras reports eight individuals including five alaskan native people have been missing in the fairbanks area since last may in the latest case. Fifty four year old. Stephen jehlum of stevens village was last seen leaving his sister. Lorries apartment in fairbanks january ninth. Laurie jehlum spoke at the vigil. We know all you're hurting for your family and so are we. I just wanted to thank everybody verbiage. Us there's talk on social media that the missing may be victims of a serial killer former tannin chiefs conference village public safety officer program coordinator. Jody potts who helped organize. The vigil said. The number of missing is unusually high. We don't want to make any assumptions. Said any of these missing person. Cases are connected somehow but we also don't want to make any assumptions that they're not connected and so with that that's why we are asking to create a fairbanks missing persons task force. There were also calls for the fbi to be brought in and for more public transparency about the status of investigations police city officials and native leaders plan to meet to discuss the situation meantime. Pots urged people to look out for one another vulnerable position check on them. Don't just keep going stay aware watch over each other. Must see be safe for national news. Dan broths in fairbanks alaska and damian. Tony gonzalez national native news is produced by cohen broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by the center for indigenous cancer research at roswell park comprehensive cancer center dedicated to cancer research medicine and cancer care for indigenous population. The no charge online risk assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash assess me support. By the association of american indian physicians and the samsa sponsored opioid response networking across the nation to address the opioid crisis in tribal communities information and support at a p dot org native voice one the native american radio network. This is native america calling. I'm monica brain. Joining us through skype tribes in the path of the proposed keystone excel oil pipeline cheered when president. Joe biden cancelled the permit for the project. Managers of the four-pack cinnabon boyne ensued tribes in montana applaud the decision because the pipeline was set to cross the missouri river upstream from the reservations water intake like many tribes. The oglala sioux tribe opposes the plo pipeline opposes the pipelines environmental threat to original treaty. Land in south dakota biden's action is the latest in a start and stop progress process progress for the controversial project intended to pump millions of gallons of oil from canada to the gulf coast. President barack obama denied the original permit president. Donald trump then revived the project. Some members of congress are currently working on legislative action to counter biden's decision today. We'll get perspective on what biden's decision means and whether it is a major blow or just a minor speed bump in the plans by pipeline backers and we want to hear from you give us a call two one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and joining us now. Is faith spotted eagle. She is an elder grandmother coordinator for the braveheart society and chair of the honked to wing. He honked treaty committee and she is a to co welcome back to native america calling faith. Good morning good morning. Thank you monica you were i remember. You are on the show about six or seven years ago. Talking about the pipeline. And you've been working on it on this issue for longer than that. So let's talk about. What compelled you to take up the struggle. okay i think the original movement that i was involved in was being borne along the missouri river. It was the movement of the river. And i had two years old. I witnessed the killing of my. What white swan community along the missouri. And as you know every including Justin slammed up at fort peck. Every single dam was put on the missouri river main stem on a native community and essentially. We were homeless. I was two years old. And i witnessed the dismantling of old log tough two years old but i remember it. I couldn't talk. I didn't understand. But i feel the sadness and anger and at twelve years old. My dad told me he said my girl. You're going to have to do something about this. And i told him i said i'm twelve. I don't know what to do and he said you'll figure it out so i figured it out. It's been a lifelong for me of protecting and defending the water and it fits into the role of women where we have the first medicine in the one. We use water for cooking. We use water for ceremony. So it just became a natural part of my life of standing up and when the keystone pipeline. I heard about it. Thirteen years ago at a treaty meeting in rapid city. It was hosted by Are relative up there And mario gonzales. Well-known treaty attorney. Who helped with the black hills case that you better watch out. He said the textile pipeline is coming from the north west for montana. He said it's going to be tough. And so. I paid attention. Because couple years prior we had filed suit against the keystone pipeline or the the pipeline in eastern south dakota we failed it went to court. In minnesota and henry clinton was involved and it said that we didn't expound on the treaty. But in retrospect it was good that we didn't pursue that one because the setting was right and there wasn't as much stronger treaty. Language there and so when this other situation came up with mobilized and fighting as i said thirteen years ago and we created a just many many water protectors land protectors People that might be listening. I give my hand to you. I raised my hands up to you for doing this. Good fight together. But we begin By realizing allies really important and me being seventy two years old and going through the sixties battles the seventies battles all the fights that we've been in including the historical. We realized that the most important thing was to ally and to cooperate. And that's easier said than done. But the first major gathering was the international treaty to protect the sacred at the hawk territory and we created a the government said we could no longer do treaties. But we decided we can do our own internal treaties. So there's treaty was to protect the sacred against the excel and the tar sands so we thought of our people north and the people with idle no more with fought back so we created this treaty as an open ended. Invitation to work together and at that time we invited. i remember. It was the first time. I heard about the clip down in nebraska. And i called her up and i said jane we're la. Can you bring your farmers up. And so she brought them up. It was a very emotional gathering. They cried about losing their land. And i remember somebody in the audience. Jokingly said you're the new indians now you know about losing land and so. We taught him how to be teased and they signed the treaty. We had Tom poor bear from the lawless. Who signed as the vice chair. Our chairman and ten first nations in canada Ruben george from the selena to was really fighting kinder- organ Many many other leaders and We had the pony come up. It was actually the revival of the peace treaty that was forced upon us between the pony nation. And the one two. We had the Walter alcohol came up very esteemed lawyer and he helped our lawyers and the grassroots craft this treaty. We signed it. We went forward. Tom forebear said you know what i remember. He used to call me girl he said. Hey girl this is. Only the first step. And i said you. Betcha and he and i and other people testified in snowstorms Permit hearings just over and over again and then. He hosted a meeting in rapid city. He said i'll tag team and take it from here. So clawless will host the rapid city meeting so we went from there from there. We went by then we had revived the kabwe indian alliance which actually was started in the seventy s. I have to not forget that it was not original with us. It was started with Many of our people in the black hills who were fighting the uranium and some of those have passed on now rowsley little under was part of this movement. she's passed on many other pipeline fighters have passed on now. What from there. We'd begin to talk about. What are we going to do on the national level. So we organized the Reject and protect and we decided that we were going to go to washington. We worked with Arvo our pipe peoper looking. He kept the prayers going at home. He chose to keep the land strong and stay at home during our action. And we had Many people mobilized and take courses washington. Dc and we wrote across the washington mall around it and to the capitol and we requested a meeting with obama. He sent his His employees to meet with us in one of the executive buildings win in there We had several chairman. The chairman the rose but chairman and all of us grassroots societies and grandmothers and. We told him we said. Thank you for the invite but We need to talk to you. We don't want to talk to your underlings. And so we left the meeting and we walked out and we said if this is nation to nation we need to see Are relative obama and so that really propelled us into the national international arena of what this fight was about an after that many many actions came about we just constantly and then we created a national promised to protect with three fifty dot. Org we have forty thousand people who have signed on to if necessary. Come to south dakota and we said we can't handle that. That's too much but we appreciate you in mind and spirit because this was you know after remember kicks. Al started way before standing rock. Okay excel was able to and we made a vow that were into getting arrested. We're getting into us a very finite weapons of war to protect our lambs and so we did. There were a few people that got arrested in the very beginning and That was to bring attention to it. And i have to give my hands up to her. Deb white mush deb. White plum and tom forebear my Pat spears some of them went to a mardi. Kobe went to washington to the capitol building early on and that was maybe twelve years ago out of that we created direct action training teams. All across checchi shuck going. We traveled from community to community training people in telling them it was really important that we stay united and that we not engage in some of the lessons that we've learned that not more everybody in that sacred circle of life and organizing is not more important it in the sacred circle. You're not above or below anybody because sometimes because of our trauma we get involved in founder's syndrome and for status and we say oh we're the ones that started at the no one else can come in but we needed everyone else. We absolute and we don't need to out indian each other. That was some of the principles that we i. I don't know why that makes me chuckle so much. I love the word first. Itis and founder's syndrome. It's i it's definitely. It's probably like a western concept that That we've adopted through the time right right. Yeah because you're when you're out on the battlefield printing you'll get shot and so That's what as an elder. I've been shot. I literally have been beat physically by end during the aim era. I was in a dangerous place because people like you know how with the January six action with wounded knee number two going on. We were very much targets in south dakota and i was attacked by five young white men and i got my leg broken and after that happened i thought okay. I got my leg broken. You can't hurt me anymore. You know are already hurt so Forward so learned a lot of that. And i know that we had to indigenous and return to old New teachings about how we work together as allies and of course when we went to standing rock we tried out some of those. Some works failed. But we just keep on learning but the ultimate thing is in the organizing against the excel is. It was a spiritual activism. Every single gathering netflix partook in was preceded by ceremony and asking for direction and phase. I wanna hear. I wanna talk to you more about that. I just thank you so much for giving us this very brief History of the fight against the keystone excel pipeline We're gonna go to a short break and after the break. We're and talk more with faith. Spotted eagle about the efforts to shut down the pipeline and What president biden's order Executive order means for the future of the pipeline. But we want to include your voice into the conversation as well give us a call at one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. What do you think about. the pipeline. Writing whisk grew up on the power trail now. The canadian dancer and musician is blending traditional pow beats with hip pop and other contemporary rhythms. Making a sound all his own. He's gino and indigenous music award nominee and is january music maker tune in to hear bryden chris on the next native america calling how murdoch picky twenty twenty one. We'll watch to that whole one. Omar cock washed ashore now. We're chose on the talk. Show gig la loco. Which was on the ot yoy sola niece lilia or healthcare dot gov nashville must uphill one eight hundred. Three one two five nine. Six conic medicare to medicaid or pillow ho headshot. You're listening to native america. Calling i monica brain sitting in for tara gatewood. We're getting perspective on president biden's decision to cancel the keystone excel pipeline permit. Is it a fatal blow or are organizers. Waiting until the political winds are in their favor again. Join our conversation. The number to get into it is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight one eight hundred nine nine native for the record talking with faith spotted eagle and she gives us great History of the organizing of all of the people involved in fighting the keystone pipeline. Faith i to give you a moment Anything else you wanna share about. You know how we arrived. At this moment. I think the important thing could acknowledges amount of grassroots people the young people and the players who came into these types of movements in a different era because old folks we had our times we had our movements and this provided the space like scanning rock did for them to give voice to all of the things that they've been told in growing up that you have to take back the land you have to defend the people and so this has been a skirmish and it was a major victory was a little bit different than the battles that we've had historically because this time we had many many allies we learned how to communicate with white people that we fought with all the time and we continue to fight with because the racism is there but we created some bridges where we could cross that stream and say this. We're both drinking out of the stream and it's going to be gone and so i think that the that was a big big part was the grassroots because in the beginning the elected leadership didn't have the opportunity to get on because they have a lot on their plate and they really didn't know what was going on and so the grassroots. The grandma's societies the traditional people treat people came forth and that was a great thing because we're still alive according to the hierarchy of the government. They will only talk to travel chairman and they created that that type of structure. But we're still out here in the borderlands we're still here and our voices loud and clear with this victory and you know face So president biden signed. This orders cancelled the permit. And what does this mean now is it. Can you relax can you. Can you take a nap. You know take a break. I am taking a few days break with my grandchildren and I think it's kind of like being at a rodeo The gate is opened. You know we caught the steer. We tied it up and it's on the ground right now but those ropes tied and so i think what has done is i learned this from standing rock when we came home we begin to focus on the larger picture of bio region development that we have to protect every single tributary. We have to know what is on our land. We have to inventory survey and Exert regulatory power because if we're sovereign we have to have regulatory power otherwise we're going to spend the rest of our lives testifying in permit here. We need to be exerting Presents in every single water permit hearing and that takes infrastructure and so. I am so thankful that i live in a time. Where you as an appa camp. Cryer can give her voice all across turtle island. We didn't have that in the camp. We have to wait for the word to pass. but now we've got opportunities and we we can't blow it. We have to heal from our anger and rage when we haven't been able to cooperate and now we've got an opportunity to really and even better yet. We have a relative in the department of interior. What a grand time to be alive. And i'm so glad at my age. I can be part of this. And so but and then don't forget to continue to mentor and teach that we have to create institutional memory that every time we do something whether it's water testing whether it's Blocking things at the state legislature because after the battle that we have out we speak. The state of south dakota is in exerting. Water plan again. it's a violation of treaty. Right so i have a list of one hundred that i have to go back to just like everybody else has and so. It's but it's exciting. Because we've got something under our belt right. Now well we're talking about the keystone excel pipeline today. And if you want to get in on the conversation give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine six. That's also one eight hundred nine. I needed by did reach out to tc energy the company behind the keystone pipeline and invited them to be on the show today. But i didn't hear back from them As of the start of the show today. And i want to invite you to the conversation. All opinions are welcome here whether you supported the pipeline or you don't support the pipeline. We want to hear from you. Give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine hundred two eight four eight. Let's go to the phones. We've got elizabeth in bridge or south dakota he there elizabeth giving us a call today. Wanna share I wanna say hi to anti faith. Thank you for being voice for us again. and then. I just wanted to say that i really appreciate the fact that biden not just that he rescinded the permit but that he continues to include tribes in the national conversation every time. I've heard them speak. They include us. And that's never happened before. I don't think any presidency. So i'm really grateful for that. And then also the appreciation that you know. I've heard you know people grumbling about the loss of jobs but where we live in bridgier right there on the front line you know that's right where the pipeline was supposed to come through right where we live And so to me. It's like when that pipe was going to break and it was going to break if it ever got into the ground and it was gonna break right by us. We know that we were told that we were showing that and so to me. Recinding that pipeline saved a entire community of life without that river. We would we would was certain death for us. And so i just anybody that supported the pipeline. Wanna ask them you know how many of our lives are worth a few jobs and just you know just so grateful eternally grateful that that pipeline not going into the ground elizabeth. Thanks for giving us a call. Faith you want to say anything to elizabeth. Yeah she's right on about being in the national conversation. And i just saw the order that came out with a consultation Direction that it has to be beyond meaningful and but the thing to keep in mind when you say consultation. That's the domination word consultation. Being set the decision has already been made for what we need to seek is free prior and informed consent. We have to get consent. It's almost like a rape board you. I didn't get consent to get raped at our rivers or land and so we have to remain vigilant. Thank you elizabeth for mentioning that and sorry about that. My dog is barking the joys of hosting from home today. Well thank you so much elizabeth for your call. We really appreciate that and and faith for your words. You know faith. I was thinking about What elizabeth was talking about with the river and I know that there's been some efforts up in your territory and in maori Territory to Establish rivers giving rivers person hood. And i've wondered if you thought about this is an action Towards protecting the water. Yes we actually have been working on it for about a year year and a half and we were able to work closely with the cultural conservancy. And we've been doing the research and looking at how the ones that have declared it. Now remember when the mari did it. They did it out of a settlement. So it's a little bit different. Each situation is different. Some of the language is constructed for a legal battle. some is constructed from mother nature. So you have to examine closely and ours with the missouri river which is very very long we would have to build consensus Or only be in. It doesn't make sense to only protect the rights of a short stretch of the river where we live. So we're going to be convening some meetings with it will check to shock away all the way up to four pack and i'm glad justin is on the phone because we need to have conversations but we do want to exert those rights because the river is relative it's also in western linkage traditional cultural property which is a federal tenant that needs protection it is traditional it is cultural and it is our property. I met an. It's a little bit hard though to explain all of that to people particularly you know. Epa officials or folks who just who don't quite really at you know how Natives natives live their lives particularly traditional people. have you ever felt Just outright frustrated in constantly explaining yourself over and over again. I think In my age with non native people. I've become a little bit more blunt. Because i don't need to do their emotional labor because what i'm doing and i quit talking to people on airlines because i have to do a workshop indian one on one and sorry but what so i just get to the point and usually where the point lives is in the heart if you can talk to their spirit and their heart they even though they might be raised racist they could get it and sometime. There are some that you don't you can't waste the time. So that leaves us to do the inner work of developing our regulatory power. The we have to be working on our water codes. We have to being sovereign is having regulatory power over where we reside and so in the meantime rather than convincing them to be good people. We can be doing a lot of things. Swear now that there's a change in thought that they're gonna have to be good people because of law and policy change so it's pretty exciting time but it really is the art of war Native style indian staff and a lot of that between the the elected officials to treat people the grassroots and going beyond misogyny. We have to realize that we've been impacted by when the patriots left. They left some in place. And so that was part of our healing here in excel and standing around but we can do it. Well i want to add some more voices to the conversation joining us now from the cheyenne river. Sioux in south dakota is madonna thunder hawk. She's a tribal liaison with the likud people's law project and community worker with standing strong grandmothers. And she is lakota. Welcome back to native america calling madonna. Thank you good morning. I was thinking Faith was saying about being blunt and You know that's that's that's something you have also done in the past where you say it like it is and so when you think about saying it like it is when it comes to this pipeline. What do you say well. First of all I just want you to know how much of enjoyed this this program so far i mean faith you know talking and then elizabeth to strong women that you know i have a real strong voice for all of us so i really appreciate listening to them talk. Yeah well okay with me. It's the yeah you know when you get to be older elder. I mean you know turned eighty this year. You know so. The fact that i'm still here to witness you know what's going on and and it just it just amazing to me but but yeah you know when you get on you know in years. You just don't have time you know. I'm still in a hurry. You know it gets things done. Can't waste time. You know. China bring people along educate the like like she didn't wanna one you know it's just that you know come on. Let's let's just get on it you know. Let's move ahead. Are you celebrating this victory or you know the Cancellation of the pipeline. Or are you. You know like cautiously excited about it cautiously cautiously but of course was happy you know and just just yeah just to see it you know. And that's good but of course you know it's just like this is america and politics and all of that and So you know cautious. We have to be cautious. You know but at the same time you know It's just another hurdle you know the struggle to build their land land-based we're going to be faced with you know fighting for our water and our land and cheesy rights. You name it rules. Things don't change. That's just ongoing. 'cause we're land-based also that that's what we're going to have to deal with. Yeah absolutely well. I want to add one more voice to the conversation. Joining us now is just in depre- he is a tribal executive board member for the cinnabon tribes of the fort peck reservation and he's also a member of the tribe. Welcome to native america calling councilman depre- monica thank you Good morning to faith in madonna's well so how close would the keystone excel pipeline. Come to the fort peck reservation. So this pipeline would skirted the western boundary of our reservation and the proposed crossing site would have been within a quarter of a mile off reservation and the exact location. This is where the milk river and missouri river meet which is the southwestern border reservation and Four four pack. Our southern border is the missouri river and our western boundary. Is the milk river so it was a pretty significant area For a whole lot of reasons. And so if if there was just you know. I am context for our listeners if there was a pipeline break and and we're talking about a different kind of oil here from like for example the oil. That's going through the dakota access pipeline. This is oil the comes from the tar sands in canada. So what what would a break mean for your water in fort pack. And what did the the pipeline company tell you about how they would sort of mitigates any issues. You know that will happen. Because of the break in terms of the pipeline having communication with the tribes. We honestly haven't had much of direct contact with that company but you know for four tries we have a water treatment plant not too far downstream from the proposed pipeline. Crossing on missouri. River are concerned. Probably one of our biggest concern was when a leak was to happen. How would this take place. Approximately twenty eight thousand people who currently receive water off our water treatment plant received fresh water. You know We take water off the missouri river and we have friends and relatives downstream who also have similar concerns. Whether that's tribal or non tribal but yeah. This is a a one. One of our biggest concerns here at fort peck. So when you heard the news President biden cancelling. The permit are you. Are you excited about this. You know there's there's a little relief. But like i said you know It was mentioned earlier. Faith in madonna talks about Think they're gonna be people. Keep coming up some from different avenues and you know we got to be prepared. Yeah so Esten tell us tell us a little bit more about Some of the efforts to prevent the pipeline from from being you know Built near your reservation you know again. It was mentioned earlier about the grassroots people you know. We used our Our tribe we use a lot of Court and litigation processes but again we've We've opposes project from the beginning of his discussions and again we've been litigation for quite some time I'm glad you're the current decision to stop this project and there are a lot of into there have been a far too many people to Name that has always been at the forefront of this discussion but who those who are listening good job. All right we are talking about the keystone xl pipeline. We're gonna go to a short break after the break. I want to talk a little bit more about Some of the things that would come with the pipeline including man camps as well as Some efforts to work on other pipeline or some other pipelines. That folks have concerns about that. Maybe haven't been canceled. There's still time if you want to get in on the conversation. Give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native. you can tweet us at one. Eight hundred nine nine native is well. We'll be right back support. By the association of american indian physicians and the samsa sponsored opioid response network working with tribal communities across the nation to address the opioid crisis. Breaking the cycle starts with preventing opioid misuse treating opioid use disorder with medications and counseling and recovery support during all phases of recovery. If you or a loved one is challenged by opioid use disorder. You can find additional information at a p dot org. This is native. America calling monica brain sitting in for tara gatewood. There's still time to get in on our conversation. About the future of the keystone excel pipeline. Give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight and let's go to the phone lines. We've got our sela on the shine shine river sioux reservation in south dakota tuned in on kipi. Hey there marcella thanks for holding. What do you wanna share today. hello thank you for having this program. I'm really learning a lot. And it's good to hear madonna and the chairman from four pets. I live on the shining river indian reservation and Have you you've heard. The pipeline is is going to be within a couple miles of our western border. But currently we know that there's too large man camps that are being constructed each within sixty miles boorda so my question is for faith Do you have an updates about the status of of men camps in south dakota one of the things that were involved in at home is we organized. A group called nigel to look at human trafficking because it is happening in and around reservation but also violence against native women. So i just wanted to share that and ask faith that she has an update for us. Yeah so much faith go ahead. Yeah so just second hand. And from the rumblings that i've heard is that number one that tc energy is assessing. its legal. Standing is that they're looking and some of this has been on the news is. They're looking at what alternatives legally they might pursue and that includes on the canadian side. So they're looking at that the second thing that they're looking at is how what can they do. In the meantime with what they have. And i know some feelers have gone out to try and they are exploring other options like in our tribes. Have to be vigilant about this. And i wanna say this word. Send this word out to elected leaders to let people know when those feelers come in because they have made him call about wanting to do Renewables wind energy. So they're putting their feelers out there to try to. It's like a chess game. They've made a move and they're trying to figure out. Where do we move now. The third thing and that is their investors is what is going to happen with their investors. And i think that's where on as a strategy we need to. Hopefully there's an investor listening right now. This is an act of settler colonialism from two countries that came in and literally occupied territory. That was not there a long ago. yesterday and today and never again tomorrow and so i think that we need to the wisdom of somebody in so the answer is in regard to murdered and missing indigenous women. We just got to keep the pressure up because it's happening as we speak. We don't know if some one of our relatives and it's not just men women Young boy might be being held. Some more we have to just keep that on and not rest a few days but keep at it. And i'm mindful of elder from the fort hall reservation that taught me a lesson. I was real frustrated working as a school principal out there and i wanted this initiative and they voted it down and i said why didn't they take it. There was all kinds of money and he looked at me and he was kind of smiling and he chuckled and back then i was young and he said you know you're young and you're gonna learn but you know what it takes us a while to get going but once we get going then we stop and doesn't that sound familiar in indian country sometime we get going and then we stopped so the lesson for today is what we can't stop. There's all kinds of m my w happening that is in small industry and we are targeted. Because we're hated and it's It's happening my son is starting a coffee shop in wagner and the majority of the town has been excited and then two weeks ago you know after all the the honeymoon the excitement. The town support the bank everybody. Somebody shot his window at the coffee shop. So in some ways it has not changed from eighteen hundred. So that's why. We have to be vigilant and marcel. I'm glad that you brought that up because our girls are still hurting out there as we speak and some young men there are a lot of lot more men in our communities that have been raped. That research shows the we have to be vigilant and carry on. But we have young people like you marcella and younger. Even you know the ones that were mentoring so we got work to do. But the difference is is that we're more united and we look forward to zoom calls. We look forward to moving forward so today's a good day. Thank you so much faith. It's it's great to hear those words of encouragement madonna. I wanna give you a moment if there's something you wanted to respond to marcela also if you might you know sort of weigh in on how this fight against The keystone excel pipeline was a little bit different than the fight. Against the dakota access pipeline. If there was some differences go ahead madonna. Well you know. I think the the struggle in both pipelines just a continuation because it started with cac south then span rock and Dappled back to kick. So you know because we're so close to reservations are so close That are struggles. Are you know together and So yeah it's it's just to me. It's just a continuation and the straight the strength of this. Whole struggle of courses are young. We have real young water protectors. They started out when they were teenagers. And now they're in their early twenties and they haven't stopped and You know they're just they continue to push not only on a grassroots level but to the tribal council level. You know in in a good way. You know it's just like it's not confrontation with and i it's you know. Here's here's what we're doing and we're doing it with you. You know that type of thing so it really helps with community workers like myself because what what we can do is provide the support total support to these young people. You know we'll do what we gotta do. Give us you know. Give us a market order here and we'll support you in in you know best way we can't we can't sounds down and so the next one you know. We still have to look at apple apple and then the Line three you know. The struggle doesn't stop. We're we're all together in in this people up north helped us and we gotta help them. Yeah i wanna talk to faith a little bit more about some of the other fights that are going on. We heard the news earlier. that The dakota access pipeline Court ordered oil to stop running through that pipeline and then of course line three in The great lakes region is still an issue. But before we do that let's Let's take a call we've got robert in the navajo nation tuned in on ks. Ut hey the robert what do you want to share today. Yes let me turn my radio. yeah go ahead james. H carleton believe that whole and might be as rich or richer in gold than california therefore he opposed colonel candies. Plants put indian reservations in northwestern new mexico and northeastern arizona because he believes the positive gold and silver should be found. Now we have powerplant make waters their largest our plan on the earth. Which is there's an a. public service Coal fired power plant with tweet supply tonnages to by the day and night with the train and the heavy equipment. Multi-million dollar so in eighteen sixty three to use government escalated the war effort to remove almost all navajos fort. Sumner to open up land anglo especially mining prospectors as part of manifest destiny. They'll much for gas and oil which You know the attitude that anglos can put the lands by england's more productive use and this was in the fall of eighteen sixty three though now we have are highly educated and well trained military vets Who done their apprentice ships and german ships and have their professional license shifts to take care of all the capital to run a coal mines day and night. And you know in mind inc's on indian lands gold silver were not found. But there's oil gas natural resources water and switching land. So we bring you nasty never culture products as well as navajo transitional energy corporation and navajo oil and gas racing though. Yeah being so robert. It sounds like you're in support of Oil and gas development. And you know that there are many tribes out there that use oil and gas development to their economies and two they the support them sustain their livelihoods. And so i wanna throw that back to faith whether you say two tribes that are oil and gas tribes. That might have been able to use either. This pipeline or dakota access or line three as an opportunity for economic development for themselves fate. I think it comes down to the price that is paid with human life. So every whether it's hunting whether it's gathering whether it's well whether it's solar you always way The major life that is either enhanced or taken and the history is a fossil fuels have harmed. Everybody not just indian lights and so i think that's the difficulty desert the second Criteria that comes into play. Is that the shock collars and the gatekeepers of these industries are not us. We're the underlings even if we get employed by them the gatekeepers have a settler colonial hierarchy. Where they're always in charge. We are always secondary even if we get jobs and so. I think that's the the design that we are struggled. This skirmish this Victory that we have against keystone pipeline is really the settler colonial hierarchy. That came in and just ordered us what to do and the feds. The ones that are employees in the federal agencies. They have different boss now And while justin is on the phone You know. I was so excited. When the fort peck came in full bore into the fight because when we testified against the water permit hearings about a month ago. You know what the response was. They said the state of montana said that they got too many comments in the public hearing and they didn't have adequate time to sift through the hearings Comments so they were gonna go ahead. And grant the pipeline. I mean the permit. Does that make any sense. That's a arbitrary decision that oh wait. I only have one employee. I can't go through all your comments. So we're just going to give me plenty of time to read. We're in the middle of a pandemic. We have to stay home. I'm surprised to hear that. It and what i call. That is ectomy decision making the trickster decision making it's like you close your eyes while i eat all your food and so we. We can't close our eyes for a minute. And so i you know. I'm not gonna say anything bad about tribes at ended up doing that. But i know that i do know manifest destiny. I know Settler colonial hierarchy in it's always capitalism does not go well with being a good relative to the earth and water or children's because we have to make these decisions based on our grandchildren's grandchildren's grandchildren and there are a lot of movements. That are pretty excited exciting. Because i know like there's a coalition of native people in the nation that are building back against fuels. There's a lot of young workers in there that are i. Don't like to say the word activists. Because madonna. And i talked about that in the old days. We didn't really have activists. Just did what you did to take care of things for people so we got to come up with a different term. But there's a lot of exciting. There's a group of sacred sites people through native organizer alliance where making some statements and bringing together because we worry about bears ears. We worry about o clock. We worry about all of these sacred sites that are literally being destroyed and where soul inflicted by trump's Trickster Attack i mean he was just like search and destroy and so now. We're recovering enberg where we're going to have to go back to prayers and consolidate and not the last thing that we wanna do is fight each other and so We got some time to think strategize. So i'm excited about these statements that were trying to get into the bike administration and to work together with all levels whether it's elected treaty grassroots. Grandma grandpa and most importantly the young. Thank you. so much for that Faith i really appreciate it justin. We're just right at the end of the hour. Anything else you wanna share any final thoughts. Say thank you for the invite on this. Call take you for facing madonna For the insight. And hope everybody's doing well thank you. Thanks dustin and madonna. What about you. What are you thinking about as we as we wrap up the show today. well i was just. I'm just well of course glad to be here. Be able to be a part of the program but yeah the update process. An ongoing work is always exciting to me. And the the young man from Mexico you know just thinking wow that kind of of a work force and educated people and stuff that are doing that for the boss of fuel in the street. Hey switch switch you know do that for renewable solar you know win come on you know you guys got the brainpower in the the human resources you know go for it and so thank you. Thank you so much. I really enjoyed this program. Thank you so much. Yeah thank you. It's great it's great to have you on the line today and faith We're just at the end of the hour but Where can folks learn more about this like. Let's say this is the first time in thirteen. Years that they've heard about the keystone excel pipeline. Where would you like to direct them to to learn more. I think that the protect or Promised to protect with three fifty dot. Org has some Background information and we consolidate to do press releases so there was a lot of organizations like them on native or alliance environment in Indigenous environmental network Braveheart society. There's a lot of people that are organizing against us And have been for years. So and then bowled nebraska our allies in nebraska. They game club keeps pretty well up on things so and we're all working together. The important thing is working together. Thank you so much to our guest. Today faith spotted eagle madonna thunder hawk and justin depre-. We're back tomorrow with our january music maker. We'll hear from the creative musician. Bryden wis- i'm senior producer. Monica brain have a good one interest. Seems native american calling is supported by oregon state university e campus. The strength that comes from your tribal community can make all the difference in reaching your goals. Oregon state e campus is committed to providing another source of strength with the support of educational community. That respects your culture. Earn your degree online but not on your own visit. E campus dot oregon state dot edu slash native america. Calling his name dante. He a. danta dega dega it's dead. He s not costs. Golly don nash dotty to- heated that away all stats. Yes new. Dan dare e toscano tonio. Your new donatella. An excess de sqi. Noski get stay at healthcare dot gov a one eight hundred three one eight two five nine six. He gets medicare medicaid daca. Native america calling is produced in the national native voice studios in albuquerque new mexico by quantum broadcast corporation and native nonprofit media organization funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio satellite. Service music is by brent. Michael davids native voice. One native american radio network.

south dakota missouri river fairbanks biden monica america elizabeth Joe biden rapid city president biden association of american indian dakota tara gatewood Antonio gonzales dc court of appeals Victoria wicks obama administration biden administration Donald trump national environmental policy
NPR News: 01-23-2020 1AM ET

NPR News Now

04:39 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 01-23-2020 1AM ET

"Live from NPR news in Washington. I'm Shay Stevens impeachment prosecutors are highlighting what they call evidence that president then trump illegally delayed military that was earmarked for Ukraine. New York. Congressman Honking Jeffries told senators and trump's impeachment trial that the president tried to override the will of Congress for his own personal benefit more from. NPR's Claudia Grew Saleh's Jeffries told senators. President trump tried to withhold the millions in assistance at Congress considered critical. That is why this Congress allocated three hundred ninety one million dollars in military and security aide too vulnerable Ukraine gene on a BI partisan basis. Because it is in America because National Security Interests Jeffries also said July twenty fifth call L. Summary shows the president pedal debunked Russian propaganda. That Ukraine interfered in two thousand sixteen elections. US intelligence found it was actually Russia Asia clottey Sally's NPR news. The capitol you in human rights experts are urging the United States to investigate reports that Saudi Arabia hacked into a phone belonging to Amazon founder and chief Jeff bezos is NPR Shannon bond reports a forensic analysis concludes at the Saudi crown. Prince was possibly Sibley involved. Jeff as us. His phone was hacked after he received a WHATSAPP message from the account of Mohammed bin Salman. That's the conclusion of a forensic report commissioned by the Amazon. CEO's security team and shared with the UN's human rights office the UN experts had been investigating the murder of Washington Post columnist. Jamal Kashogi a critic of the Saudi Regime Bays owns the Washington Post the UN experts say quote the information we have received suggest the possible involvement of the Crown Prince in surveillance silence of Mr Bezos in an effort to influence if not silence the Washington Post reporting on Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia denies it was behind the Hacking Shannon in bond. NPR News San Francisco. The World Health Organization's Director General says an emergency committee is holding off declaring global emergency due to the corona virus. Iris outbreak in China. Dr Bedrose on and on Gabrielle assess the panel has to gather more information before making a decision out team is on the ground in in China as we speak working with local experts and officials to investigate the outbreak. And get more information. We will have much much more to say Tomato Gabriella. Speaking after an emergency meeting held Wednesday. Public Transit services are shut down in Wuhan China where Corona virus was recently discovered. The move is meant to prevent spread of the disease. The country is confirmed. Nearly six hundred cases occur virus including seventeen deaths the the disease has also been found in five other countries including one case in the United States. You're listening to NPR news. Police say eight people have been shot in downtown Seattle including one person who died five of the victims were hospitalized in critical condition authority. They say that no suspects have been arrested and that the motive for the attack is unclear. It is the third shooting incident in downtown Seattle in two days the US interior career department is giving. It's okay to use a forty four miles section of land in Montana. As a right of way for the Keystone Excel pipeline as Kayla DEROCHA. The yellowstone public radio reports local native American tribes are suing to block the project. Canada based T. C.. Energy won the right of way to build a portion. It's twelve hundred. Mile pipeline across federally managed land in Montana drives maintain. This changes nothing lawsuit against a broader permit president. Donald Trump issued. You'd last year Natalie. Lander represents the Fort Belknap Indian community in Montana and the Rosebud Sioux tribe in South Dakota for any federal agency issuing any piece of a permit hermit simply does one thing at this point in time. which is it's going to make them a new defendant in this lawsuit? The tribes are suing on the basis. that the proposed oil pipeline violates elites land rights treaties finished in the mid nineteenth century for NPR news. I'm Kayla Dorota in billings Montana. Boeing's new. CEO is suggesting production of the ground at seven. Thirty thirty seven. Max Plane will resume this spring even before regulators recertified aircraft for us again David. Calhoun says the assembly line will be operating in a few months. He says he also believes that passengers will fly on the seven thirty seven Max when federal regulators say. It's safe to do so this is n._p._R.. News in Washington.

NPR president Montana Saudi Arabia Donald Trump Congressman Honking Jeffries NPR Ukraine Congress United States Washington Jeff bezos Washington Post UN Shannon bond CEO Amazon Saudi crown Saudi Regime Bays
NPR News: 08-24-2019 2AM ET

NPR News Now

04:59 min | 1 year ago

NPR News: 08-24-2019 2AM ET

"This message comes from n._p._r. Sponsor xfinity some things are slow like a snail races. Other things are fast like xfinity x. by get get fast speeds even when everyone is online working to make wifi simple easy awesome more at xfinity dot com restrictions apply live from n._p._r. News in washington. I'm nora raum. The president of brazil is authorizing the armed forces to fight the record number of fires. The amazon forest babies daniel guy lasts in rio de janeiro reports in a televised address eatable sonata said his government had a policy of zero tolerance silence towards criminality and that apply to crimes against the environment france and ireland threatened to block a trade deal between south america and the a european union in protest against mr bush stance on the environment but brazil's president said issues in the amazon shouldn't be used as as an excuse for other countries to boycott brazil the b._b._c.'s daniel dallas federal reserve chairman jerome powell says the fed is prepared to act if the global economic slowdown hurts the economy n._p._r.'s shannon van sant reports on his speech in jackson hole wyoming powell's speech indicated the fed is considering further further cuts to interest rates but he did not see when those cuts would come president trump has been calling for kites and tweeted in response to palo speech quote as usual the fed did nothing who was our bigger enemy jay powell or president. She trump was referencing chinese. President xi jinping in his speech powell said the u._s. Economy economy is in a favourable place but faces significant risk. He said geopolitical events such as the u. S. china trade war hong kong protests and brexit creating a complex situation and that there are no recent precedents to guide policy in the current climate shannon van sant n._p._r. News the president resident had more criticism of powell before leaving for the g. seven summit in france friday night. He said he doesn't think the fed chairman is doing a good job at all and if powell offered to resign nine he wouldn't try to stop him. The president's comments along with an escalation of the trade war with china may have helped spark a sell off on wall street friday the dow jones industrial average which plunged six hundred twenty three points nebraska's highest court approve the keystone excel pipeline's path of the state friday olivia rheingold of yellowstone public public radio reports that makes montana the last place for opponents to try to halt the project. The three remaining lawsuits against the keystone xl pipeline are based in montana tanna all will be heard by the federal judge in great falls. Who's already blocked the pipeline's construction once before two of the suits challenge a permit issued by president trump trump it would allow the pipeline to cross the canadian border into phillips county montana west furlong represents montana's fort belknap indian community and south dakota's rosebud sioux tribe which which say the permit violates treaty rights without this permit. The rest of the pipeline is not going to be built. He says that's because the keystone pipeline is supposed to be a shortcut down to nebraska. They could find another way. He says it wouldn't be the quickest one for n._p._r. News i'm olivia reingold in billings montana. This is n._p._r. News a red flag law goes into effect in new york state saturday it would allow judges to order that guns be taken away from people found to be dangerous for as long as a year the judge must i consider evidence of the danger and the gun owner would have the right to appeal opponents say would interfere with the rights of law abiding citizens seventeen states and the district of columbia have similar laws a southeastern u._s. Grocery chain will have to spend about four million dollars to reduce colin leagues from refrigeration equipment. Emma hurt with member station w. a. b. e. in atlanta reports on the federal settlement released friday the the federal settlement is with southeastern grocers. The company has more than five hundred fifty stores in the region including winn-dixie and bilo e._p._a. And the department of justice have been settling with grocery first restores over this pollution issue since twenty thirteen for the agreement southeastern has to implement new leak monitoring program and pay three hundred thousand dollar fine coolant is is known to deplete the ozone layer and the government alleges. The company violated the clean air act trader. Joe's safeway and costco stores have already agreed to spend millions to fix similar miller refrigeration problems fr- n._p._r. News i'm hurt in atlanta. The supreme court issued a statement friday that justice ruth bader ginsburg has completed three three weeks of radiation therapy for a cancerous tumor on her pancreas. It said there's no evidence of cancer elsewhere in the body and no additional treatment will be needed. Ginsburg is eighty six and the oldest justice on the high court. She's had cancer three times before. I'm nora raum n._p._r. News in washington.

president jerome powell montana fed nora raum brazil President xi jinping washington ruth bader ginsburg shannon van sant n._p._r nebraska government trump chairman shannon van sant amazon atlanta rio de janeiro south america
12-30-20 Making the best of the worst year

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 4 months ago

12-30-20 Making the best of the worst year

"They want to native america calling from studio eight six nine in a sled a pueblo. I'm tara gatewood. The pandemic and the personal and economic toll. It took put a dark cloud over twenty twenty at the same time. There were some silver linings to that cloud barracuda's at turned the unexpected loss into a chance to strengthen their personal and professional pass. Many people use a time that busy schedules do not permit before to learn a new skill. What are some of the positive things that emerged in two thousand and twenty. We'll take your calls right after national native news. This is national native news. Mickan camera and for antonio gonzales officials are calling for an investigation into the tasing of native american man at the petroglyphs national monument in albuquerque. Daryl house told kaby tv that he went off the trail to avoid a large group and maintain social distancing. He says arranger followed him and told him to return to the trail and then asked impre densification house former marine refused he filmed the initial encounter and posted it on instagram which includes his small dog. Geronimo barking don't want i myself train you. That would be refusing. You'll be going to touch her. A second video taken by houses. Sister shows the ranger several times after he fell on the ground convulsing and cried for help has told the tv station. He has often left the trail at the monument to pray and meditate but has never been challenged for doing so executive director of utah. Dna kfi. woody lee said. The incident was a violation of religious cultural and human rights and noted in a press. Release that the petroglyphs. National monument is a sacred site with a history of indigenous peoples fighting for religious freedom democratic lawmakers from new mexico. Us senator martin heinrich in use representative. Ben ray luhan demanded an immediate investigation. The two wrote in a joint press. Release quote this landscape is sacred to tribes and holds a deep meaning for the people of new mexico. Everyone should feel safe and welcome on our public lands. The national park service has released body camera footage from the ranger and said the incident is under review and has been referred to its internal affairs office for investigation in the statement. Nps said before the officer used his taser. He tried to resolve the situation with a warning in by providing information on why going off trail could hurt the site. Nps said both houses and his sister provided fake names and dates of birth to the officer. House was cited for being in a closed area of providing false information and failing to comply with lawful order. His sister received citations for providing false information and being in a closed area off trail in a virtual meeting with tribal leaders this week. Us representative deb. Holland said she's committed to fully honoring the federal government's trust and treaty obligations the hill reports holland said she will work to address the disproportionate harm native americans face from what she says are long-running environmental injustices and climate change holland. As president elect joe biden's nominee to head the us department of interior. She's a member of laguna pueblo and also has hamas pueblo heritage. If confirmed she would be the first native american cabinet. Secretary leaders of a california city are considering renaming. A park after a state recognized tribe. The park is currently named after president. Andrew jackson who oversaw the forced relocation of tribes in the southeastern united states to oklahoma and action now referred to as the trail of tears the east bay times reports the alameda parks and recreation commission unanimously recommends. Renaming it to chechnya park after a lineage of the alone tribe the name was among more than one hundred and fifty names submitted through surveys and public meetings. The name change requires a vote by the city council. Which is not obligated to take the commission's recommendation and this week. Google celebrated alaskan native civil rights champion elizabeth perovic on its doodle. She played a key role in the passage of the first antidiscrimination law in the united states on december thirtieth nineteen forty one. She and her husband both clink at saw a sign on the door of an in that read. No natives allowed. It was just the latest example of blatant discrimination. She and her husband. Roy found when they moved to juneau and were unable to buy a house. The couple helped to draft. Alaska's first anti discrimination bill which finally passed in nineteen forty five in one thousand nine hundred eight the alaska state legislature declared february sixteenth as elizabeth perovic day earlier. This year the us mint released a one dollar gold coin with her likeness for national native news. A megan camera national native news is produced by colonic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by the center for indigenous cancer research at roswell park comprehensive cancer center dedicated to cancer research medicine and cancer care for indigenous population. The no charge online risk assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash. Assess me support. By the association of american indian physicians and the samsa sponsored opioid response network working across the nation to address the opioid crisis in tribal communities information and support at a p dot org native voice one the native american radio network. This is native america calling. I'm tara gatewood joining you from my homeland of share with dewi via skype the global pandemic has been tougher tribal officials trying to keep community members. Safe it's been tougher. Individuals who lost loved ones their jobs or head to adapt to a new working situation. It's been tough. Nearly everyone adjusting to restrictive things like social norms. But there are some positive things that happened. Despite this being what time magazine called the worst year ever in a major ruling the us supreme court decided in favor of treaty obligations for tribes in oklahoma protests for city state and federal leaders to reassess how they recognize historical figures who. Don't stand the test. Time and innovative american woman is nominated for a us cabinet seat at a personal level. People at home started baking bread gardening and also taking up art and passion projects in focused on family and personal. Well being so. There's a lot that has happened this year and we want you to weigh in share some of your thoughts. What are some of the positive things that did. Come out of twenty twenty. You can join us by calling one eight hundred nine nine six two four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native today. We're going to start off in albuquerque new mexico. We have jere anderson with us and he is the founder of guitars tour and he is coach d. pueblo jarrett's our pleasure to have you here for another native america calling. Welcome you tara Just want to say hi everybody this glorious day and i'm excited to talk about you know twenty twenty i guess well we are excited about it too and jerry just thinking about everything that has gone on in two thousand twenty. I know that there have been a lot of obstacles that people have had to come over and you understand the entertainment industry and what it means to be on stage and this year stages were closed down venues that have been open for decades In a lot of things have come to a standstill but a lot of people have found another way to keep the energy going out to audiences and jere talked to us a little bit about some things that you've shifted to make sure people weren't missing the arts the music tell me more. Yeah so you know. We were all impacted by This pandemic with kobe coming on early in march but For me as a a music promoter producer and founder of native guitars tour. You know our primary avenue for entertainment was live performances But you know as soon as stink shutdown we immediately Started thinking virtual so for us. You know we had to really improve on our audio or video visuals for that Virtual platform so you know that's what we did. you know we just. We just took off with a live shows ended and we started doing things online A lot of learning it was a big huge learning curve for us with you know producing audio for the virtual world versus the live world. So that was. That was a bit of a challenge as well as the visual right because where we have live audiences in in Which is our norm Moving onto a virtual audience and cap speed able to capture that visually. You know with with cameras and camera phones and and all that stuff so you know we. We really didn't skip a beat You know there was a few months there that we took to learn some stuff but then we immediately you know started producing programming and Finding different ways to support our our native musicians and artists. So it's been it's been a learning experience for sure but it's been pretty exciting and we we've been having a really good time and so what was it that drove you to this or got you all to this point where you're saying okay. We know this is happening. But we're going to keep going. You know what what was it that made you want to you. Know up your game Online and things like that. What what was it. That brought you to that point where you said you know. I'm gonna make some positive of all of this you know That's just kinda what what i do you know. It's it's it's something that i enjoy doing. I enjoy supporting the community and really have a lot of artists that are looking at native guitars tour and myself to you know for that support and and a lot of responsibility there. I i can't just you know. Say okay we're having trouble times and and that's it you know we. We have to keep moving back to find ways to to move. And i've always been That type of person that is ready to be innovative to to study and look to see where the industry's going where it's headed. And this is you know. Just another A little hiccup but you know definitely something that has been happening slowly In the past but now that you know we're we're kind of tied to it. It's really accelerated our movement in the virtual world and our different platforms that we have. So you know the motivation. I would say what what kept me going is is just really our community you know wanting to to not stop and wanting to keep moving and we have a resilient community out there you know we as natives. We've we've been through a lot you know in our history so this is Not to two different for us right. Because we're we're ready living the lifestyle that the rest of america is starting to live. Now you know having to to live off minimalistic You know just just these things that you know like on the reservations having to get people having to get their own water you know stuff as as i'm not say simple as that but i mean we've been doing that since you know colonization so It we're just resilient and it's really the community at in bets keeping me going in so cheers some of the things that anita guitar tour native guitars tour is doing is putting out three ways to connect with listeners and it seems that a chance to take a look at some of that and it seems that this is actually a chance for musicians to even. Just talk to each other Tell me what that has opened up and of course these three things that you're doing. Yeah so it's really opened up a lot for us With with again with the community right. 'cause we're here to support native artists. Our motto is providing a stage for native america and we were founded in two thousand seven With that you know ideology of supporting the native community giving them a platform So what has what this has done. You know the pandemic and and that the things. You're talking about some of the programming that we have. We have a show on tuesday nights eight pm mountain standard time. it's called njit open mic night. basically you know Bringing that again that live show virtual so we have jacob shehade from santa clara pueblo. He's part of our native guitars tour team. Any hills that show and he'll bring on a featured guest That'll kind of host co host with him and then he'll open it up to musicians and he's had people on from throughout the us canada We even had some people. Some natives that are out in europe that have Joining the open mic night and have performed so it's a really vast opportunity for all musicians out there To have an opportunity to showcase their talents and just connect you know. We're able to connect with those people Live and we do. All these shows live that we can have that interaction and then on on wednesday mornings. We have more laid back. Show it's called. Njit cafe and that's the way it scotti clifford out in The badlands in and south dakota from the pine ridge reservation and he is just basically a morning conversation. You know you get your your cup of coffee and and sit down and you tune into the live on instagram. And he's just having these conversations with different artists And the topics you know. Go all over the place. So it's just more of a casual conversation and then on went on thursday nights Thursday evenings at eight pm mountain standard time. We have a show that i host. It's called behind the mask right. So it's it's it's a play off of The the masks that we have to wear the covert masks so The way i tie it in is these musicians. Are superheroes kind of that type of mask. Right like a superhero mask. And they take these masks off and then we have an interview and we kinda talk about you know what. They're going through with kobe. What they're doing for their self care how they're handled with their music. And then also we do so mike performances as well and for me. It's been an awesome awesome. Great opportunity to reconnect. 'cause a lot of these musicians. I i tore with. I see him on the road. I see him backstage And you know since we're not performing live. This is kind of an opportunity to reconnect and also to meet a lot of artists and again. We've we've had people from barcelona to i mean we have keith. Ciclon we've had we have Stevie solace coming coming up in january so have the whole span of your entry level. Artists are the way to your top touring artists. So it's awesome community out there so it's just yeah it's been looking and you know had a chance to take a look at the performance by mozart. Gabriel who's connecting to all from barcelona in so here's one example of how these folks in the music industry said okay. We're not stopping. We'll just figure out another way to do this. That is so native in so many ways and know applause too many people who have figured out another way to keep going maybe even do things better getting to folks that they never connected with before. Maybe you're that person. Tell us about it. Phone lines are open. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. We want to hear all about it today. The mcgirt supreme court decision the election and offensive mascots. Just a few the big news stories. This year on the next native america calling we'll talk with journalists about the stories they think with the most important for native americans in twenty twenty and which stories reviews more recognition. We hope you can join us. Support by roswell park. Tribal communities face persistent challenges in health equity such as cancer and higher death rates the centre for indigenous cancer research at roswell park comprehensive cancer center is dedicated to advancing cancer research that will lead to translatable science medicine and cancer care for indigenous populations worldwide. Are you at high risk for cancer. A no charge online assessment tool is available at roswell park dot org slash assess me. Thanks for tuning into native. America calling interrogate would from said a pueblo and today we are making space to talk about some of the things that sprung up in twenty twenty for the better despite all the uncertainty ward. Good things happen to you this year. What encouraging things did you see. Come out of your native community. We want to hear about it. Join us by calling one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and with us on the line. Today is the founder of the native guitars tour he is a kushner pueblo. Member my pleasure to have here. Jerry anderson thank you for being with us and some of the things that you described earlier resonated with a lot of folks of all coming obstacles and for you. What are some positive things you've learned from these times and maybe it's even beyond want. You've been doing with native guitars tour. Tell me more. Well i think there's a lot of things that I've taken from twenty twenty. You know i. I think you know from the standpoint of native guitars tour Some of the positive things that have come out is the ability to improve right in the virtual world. Right the radio the whole thing just getting that down. If you were to see my setup. I have you know microphones and billions of light years all over the place and cameras and ipad and this though the whole setup here you know to do the the production that we do So just learning that has been a real positive thing and then also being able to pass that on you know to our our musical artists. You know 'cause they're also learning and so the whole thing that we've been doing since we started is to develop these techniques and see what works right. What sounds good with equipment. That musicians probably already. Have you know with adding just a few things to their Their equipment that they they're able to produce high quality sound high-quality video. You know lighting and stuff like that so it's also been you know an educational experience. We're we're we're passing that on and you do have shows that we We we do talk about how fit. Do sit ups and stuff like that. So that's been one positive thing but on a more personal note you know it's just kind of reconnecting with with family. You know my wife my kids our dogs and our chickens and my wife started a garden in the spring Early twenty twenty and you know just learning that whole darn thing you know for her was was was challenging and then that got me into it right so i became a gardener a little bit and to build a chicken house and all this stuff. So it's been it's been nice to become self sufficient with things like that with a garden with animals and Just connecting again with the family. You know having homes The kids home schools has has been a challenge us just being able to work in our own little ecosystem here you know with our emotions and and you know just being being a family you know so i think that's that's one positive thing that's definitely come out of twenty twenty and You know for the community again. It's just you know reconnect gina and and trying to stay connected. You know making those efforts to reach out to these different musicians and these different people that you know not letting that go. That's been a real positive thing as well. So and then you know providing opportunities for them to showcase music and stuff like that so A lot of positive things. I would say came out of twenty twenty for for me and you know what we're looking for your list to go ahead and dial in one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight and you know what i'm going to have to add to your intro chicken coop maker. That ain't easy you know. We can get into great discussion about a soil in bugs especially was starting gardens. And if you've never done it you learn a lot what about you. Maybe you took this time to learn something new or attend a conference or maybe even break open. Something that has been gathering dust and and now year full swing years so in dance outfits year Maybe you made a chicken coop. Tell us about it. We wanna hear we want to hear the silver linings of twenty twenty one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight also want to bring in another guest that we have joining us today out of san diego california. We have dj vannes and he is a motivational speaker. Bestselling author and owner of meat of discovering corporated. He is from the owed our nation and it's our pleasure to have him here. Dj things for joining us for another native america calling welcome. Thank you tara. Great to be here and happy new year. Everybody thanks for tuning in. Yeah we are. we're right. It's right about to kick off in so dj. You hear how this group needed guitars. Tour is keeping things positive keeping things going. How important is it that we continue to keep things going. Even though there's an obstacle in you know your reflections of doing this and twenty twenty yeah. And i'd love with gerald saying i was smiling and shaking my head the whole time because i can relate to so much of that journey of that experience i think any of can that are trying to do continue our work and we all had to make a big pit. I know that was one of the things that you know. I go out and do live programs keynote. Speaking training you know consulting in communities or have worked with over five hundred tribal nations and all of that came to a screeching halt in march. The last program i did was with chicken saw nation and march and haven't been anywhere sense Except virtually and that was the big pivot a of in the corner and learning completely different skill set. But one of the things that i i was shaking my head about number one is native people. We are creative. we're innovative. We are entrepreneurs at our core. We always have been and still are today. It's our strength. And that's one of the things that i've seen at a really you know been smiling from ear to ear. Hearing all these stories of resiliency of people that are finding a way forward and one of the things that you had asked jair about you know what what did it take to you know. Continue offering you know the beautiful music to inspire people that that he does with artists is. I was writing down. You know just thinking about that for for me. What it comes down to is when you're passionate about sharing something and there is there a necessity to changing the way that that's delivered you'll find a solution and that was one of the things that came up for me because the first you know in this first started it really was hard to to connect and my first set up. I know jerry was talking about his technical setup. Oh boy you should've seen mind. It was an upside down home depot bucket a stack of magazines I had a flashlight a reading light. It's gotten a little bit more sophisticated sense but at the point is you find a way and once you've once you turn that corner i mean i'm still able to work with the groups i serve you know. My my whole mission is to provide for providers across our native communities that are in healthcare that are in education that are needing that kind of boosting Some of those strategies on self care there are so critically important so they can continue the work that they do and So that was a big takeaway and now i'm busier than i've ever been Through this Doing my programs In finding a different way to deliver be like water. I think it is is that the quote is the bruce lee quote You water keep it flowing find a way get through. Keep that life going and dj for you when you seen some of the people either on social media in your own circle or circles you've worked with in the past be like water. Get through this moment. How does that make you feel and maybe some of the things that you have witnessed it's inspiring to me. I mean hands down. It's inspiring because that's what i go back to over and over again when i hear these stories the people that i'm working with whether it's frontline healthcare workers people in communities people that are struggling with having five kids at home because they're not in school. People are finding ways to move forward. And that's what we do. That's what we've always done. And every time. I hear one of those stories. It makes me inspired continue forward as well. I mean this this whole pandemic if basically comes back to it. Yes we got. We have to flow like water. And if one way doesn't work we find another way and if that doesn't work we find another way and and we figured out as we go and we don't have to do it alone. That's the other part of staying connected during this has been so critically important to be able to. You know share best practices. Give each other words of encouragement share. Some prayers of people. Sure some things that are going right but also share some of the struggles you know being able to be vulnerable and say hey you know i'm hurting too. I'm i'm you know struggling with this as well and that for me has been a big part of this process is i mean. This has been humbling. I think for everybody You know to really be able to sit back and and really see how little we do control but also be reminded of what we do. Control the choices we make you know those those small seemingly small actions that can have a big impact But but they all matter. And that's that's what i come back to get inspired. I made me want to get back to Doing the things Because at the beginning of the pandemic a lot of people were kind of in freeze moat. You know pause. How is this gonna look. And then once people started kind of emerging back into the light people started doing stuff. They started baking. They started learning new ways of doing business. You know my daughter's got me to do a tiktok video for crying out loud. I went back to right. I wouldn't say yeah. You should see that one. I went back to to running because my gym clothes. So now i'm out doing old school board outside. You know running an and lost weight because of it. Who knew you know. Look at the benefits of you. Know going back to these ways but Spending a lot more time in prayer and meditation. I've gone back to writing actually developed a product. That's going to be kind of the core of my next new book that i'm working on. I mean there's you know there's ways that we can go through this. We didn't choose this situation. You know and i know it's frustrating. Feels like being part of the suspense movie that nobody wanted to be. A part of you know with this whole pandemic But we didn't choose the situation that we're in now but we do get to choose who we are and how we are as we go through this time period in sometimes it means a new way join us share your thoughts one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. Let's go ahead and go to our call line. we're going to say hi to nick in albuquerque. New mexico tuned in on k. Unm nick thanks for calling go ahead. You're on air high. Erica near me here. You will welcome you me well so i just. This is not really germane. But i wanted to call yesterday. I just wanted to have probably been listening to the show for twenty years or so and I'm so thankful that it's allowed me to gain a much wider perspective of life in indian country and share it with others perhaps don't know or d- and don't listen to the show so i'm so thankful for that and That's really all. I wanted to to share with you and everybody involved with the show is thank you. Well nick. thank you for being there to an expanding your circle. And i think this is something that a lot of people you know what they have been connecting to during this time is also a great story in itself and in its cause more people to learn more about something They didn't know or actually get a chance to get more of what they love in their ears and their hearts and in their minds. And so nick we appreciate you twenty years. That's great thank you for being a dedicated listener and got another dedicated listener on the line. We're going to go to melvin. Who was in seventeen. Nebraska tuned in on casey y que melvin. Thanks for reaching out go ahead. you're on air. yes. I would like to thank as he right k. a. j. k. z. Right cape or carried your station. I listen every day different topics. I just love it. It's a positive thing for my day to learn from you guys in the country but the other positive thing i feel happened. This year was appointment of that new mexico congresswoman to the interior. Where we really need that. You know in a country where we would have some big positive in the government. Someone who's positive listening to your program. And they were telling us about how she practiser tribal customs and spirit throughout the In the country right now we have issues those sacred site issues which goes back to the interior and i think she can have a remedy in no time and i'm feeling positive about it. Everybody listen lean will give this woman a chance. Could she chewed success. Well thank you for that. Melvin yes we are all watching it. Anticipating what will happen With her nomination and just imagining if she does get this seat. What will change. There's a lot what about in your own community Melvin thank you for your call their incenting nebraska and yes big ups k. z. y. k. Thank you for carrying the program and when we think of some of this stuff that has gone on in our own communities. Maybe you have seen a brighter side to people in your community. We just had our tribal elections There's new leadership. There are people who are going to be Handing the hat over in just a few days in different places and what has come out of some of that. What are some of the positive things you have seen. What about language. Has this been a time where your native language was. Spoken the most under your roof or you. The person who brought those words where he the person who picked up those words in share your thoughts we want to hear from you one eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number. We are looking for things that you know happened in twenty twenty that. Actually you're gonna put a smile mix to or even a check Next to that you finally did that one thing. Where providing space for you today to talk about some of that dial in one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight and dj before we go to break definitely want to Give ways people can connect with you and the work you're doing I know you've got the warriors guide coming out. Where do they find you. Thank you tara yes. I'm excited that we finally are able to give this warriors guide out just went live this morning. Believe it or not but it's a. It's a free download if you go to our website which is native discovery dot com. You'll see a window that comes up and you'll get a free copy of the warriors guide. It's eight native american principles to create enduring strength. So it's going back to some of these old school ways on how we use that to stay strong what we're going through right now and once we get beyond two so please go to that and and hope you enjoy it all right when we got. Dj with us the full hour and also share with us to if you have anything to share with both of them go ahead and give us a ring. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is number and remember we want to hear your positives. Go ahead and put some of that positive energy into these air. Waves today Maybe there's something new that happened to you in twenty twenty what about careers own. Hear from people to maybe. This was the time you chose to change directions. And now you're doing something you never imagine and you are happier than you have ever been. I want to hear that story to go ahead and dial in one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is a number go ahead. Give us a ring or ready for you. We'll keep the phone lines open. We connect with more things here on native america calling. If you're a native american entrepreneur looking to expand or start a business you should know about the indian loan guarantee and insurance program a federal program encouraging private lenders to make the business loan. You need the indian loan guarantee and insurance program supports your lenders. So your lender can support you information available by emailing. dc. I at b. i a. dot gov that's dc. I at b. i a. Dot gov the office of indian energy and economic development supports this program. Thanks for tuning in to native america calling tara gate. Wouldn't and we are taking the glass half full view today on twenty twenty We know it's been tough year but we want to hear what are some of the positive things that happen. There's still time to join this conversation. There's space for you. I gotta do is dial in one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight and you know what i got another caller on the line when go ahead and say hello to michael who was in. He missed blow. New mexico tuned in on k. Unm michael thanks for reaching out. Go ahead you're on air all right. Thank you for taking my call. Yeah wgr what was talking about Guitar tours reminded me states. Forty nine you know all the different artists but you know this is. It's like it's going to go on. And on until code is over. And also i really i really like Some of the the traditional native formats Like on youtube and whatnot. We have a group and they must Clarity you go and they. They made some new songs and sang some songs and they explain. Explain the the music they explain. The prayer involve explain you know and you get to know who they are instead of. Just the voice. This and also the lockdown in albuquerque. We have two radio stations and have well. Music did indigenous music for that. And i would the lockdown more and more people are tuning into that and it's a plus they they've gone worldwide and before the covert foreclosure with here and And there's some oklahoma tribes or tribes all over there doing that but it's more you know. Native native music neighbors native song basically to the beirut's of it as prayer. So you know we appreciate that when when it comes to prayer prayer songs. Yeah in that group that you mentioned boy. They are some strong singers and i enjoy listening to him to thanks for mentioning them. And you know. I've got another call. We got andrea. Who's in fort belknap montana tuned in on kgb andrea for giving us a ring. You're on your club i there. What are you thinking today Actually i'm kind kinda nervous on the radio free. Yeah you sound I feel good today. I feel i felt good here. And i feel a lot better today. Been going through some tough times. You know this month and it's not to Wasn't too good. It was five until two felt like giving up and Like domestic survivor. You know that and was just like everything was getting hard and Yeah the music. Music helped me out lot. I mean there'd be in that you know myself but you know there was people here with me. You know 'cause it's going to really tough time. You know trials inch relations and everything you know be poverty. What is the relationships you know and and everybody would just come in thing king. Their songs every one of them had something about me are told my story you know so. Hopefully that can help other people andrea. I think it can in you know when you get to that point where you're feeling good you do you do to celebrate. And i'm glad you called in glad you're here with us and sharing some of that and we know it has been very heavy in many ways and when we get to that point where we feel that good feeling you you got embrace it and and now you're sharing with us. I really appreciate that andrea. Wish you the best as we move. Further into our winter season in you know hearing how much people depend on the music makes me feel good. I know it's a part of our foundations and we are very grateful. It gets passed on or when someone new discoveries it you hear their voice. It's a real good thing andrea. Thank you for your voice. Today there of fort belknap montana. I want to go now to send a domingo pueblo. We have another caller christopher listening in on k. Unm thanks for giving us a ring. Christopher you're on air hello remember me on the phone from his good all the conferences and and places like that. I i got the call today. colbert survivor. I was in the hospital for a week. And i'm recovered doing well. That's the good news way. historical preservation ulcer for about two years now and with dave holland in office. We've got great things coming. I wanted to tell you that. Other tribes have tribal historic preservation. Officers we need to get together and organizing a national tribal health preservation office with a So we can speak our our tribe who issues to deb holland and and the rest is a native american and democrats. You know so we can voice. Our issues cost on the student at unm. I'm getting my masters in native american studies of my master's in american studies and Going to be taking my l. set but that's the good news. Oh my well you got a lot of good news to share christopher and yes i do miss that. Run into you at conferences and being together and just even reflecting on what people were talking about or seen how many people came together to learn and to grow in so yes celebrated things. I'm glad to hear to About your health and our preservation Officers historic preservation officers. They do a lot of work and it will. It will be interesting to see how far things can go. Christopher thanks for your call on. Sd we appreciate it. And i want to introduce you to another guest but you can keep calling in our phone. Lines are open one. Eight hundred nine nine. Six two eight four eight we're going to go to tulsa oklahoma now we got nico albert on the line. She is the founder and executive chef of burning cedar indigenous foods. She's a citizen of the cherokee nation. Our pleasure to have her here. Niko thanks for joining us or another native america calling. It's great to be here great to have you and nico go ahead jump in there. Tell me about some of the things that you remember. Twenty twenty four and say you know what this was. The good part Well it's definitely been a roller coaster of here. That's for sure You know in march when kind of everything You know really really started. I was the executive chef of a restaurant called duet Here in tulsa and you know we shut down like All of the other restaurants in town and Was kinda furloughed for a while. And then when june came around i ended up getting laid off for financial reasons and so that was kind of a huge blow for me. I you know my day to day life for so many years as a chef in the restaurant industry has just been nonstop busy. You know working sixty seventy hour weeks all the time and You know to kind of just have the bottom dropped out of that and be completely you know. All of my time free it was. It was a huge adjustment for me. and so i kind of you know for a while. I did just kind of sit in a holding pattern like we were talking about earlier Just kind of waiting to see what was going to happen to see how things were going to progress. Am i going back to work. Am i going to have to figure out something else to do and But out of a lot of that. Downtime i was able to kind of put some of my resources and my energy and my time into expanding something. That's always been my passion which is studying and sharing traditional indigenous food and So that's kind of how burning cedar indigenous foods came about is It's something that i've always kind of done on the side and my in my very short amount of spare time from running restaurant i would You know just do private catering events or do speaking events or teaching events about traditional foods. And that's something that You know is always really said my soul. It's been really important to me For my identity and from community to be able to share those those teachings that i have learned and you know this pandemic kind of put that in perspective for me that that's something that's really important to me and i would love to be able to make that more of my focus and so that's kind of what came out of this. Time is for me to be able to really expand that into a business that i can put my my efforts into and being able to share. This kind of information is definitely connecting generations and maybe a lot of people Never had access to some of this information and especially as we have seen many different industries change Including the restaurant industry or where we get food in. This seems to be a time to to just kind of refocus reset For youth thinking about how you are introducing people to food. Maybe in a new way that it's in their dna and it's been sleeping itching in those taste. Buds are now waking up and ways. They've been waiting to Tell me more about you know what it means to you. Know really open up. This side of things well definitely. It's something that i think people have. have started thinking more about it's You know with all of the challenges that came with this pandemic as far as being able to access food especially healthy food You know that's been an issue out. This entire time is how do we. How do we feed ourselves in a healthy way you know. Health and wellness has taken a new front seat for all of us. Because we've had to focus on you know on self care so much with with the health crisis that we're in and a lot of that goes back to our traditional food ways you know as we're stuck at home and you know restaurants are not able to you know we're not able to go out and eat those prepared meals anymore. We're kind of having to shift our focus back to our families and beating ourselves. And how do we do that. In a way that That can strengthen our bodies and our minds and traditional foods are are definitely that You know we have seen so many. People turn to gardening and You know taking this this time that we have now it's Something that a lot of people haven't had. I know my myself included. I had time with my busy schedule to really Make the effort to provide food for myself and this spring at my home we were able to create a garden and i was able to for the first time grow my traditional cherokee corn in my front yard and that has been something that's so rewarding to be able to to plant those ancestral feeds and watch them grow and and then be able to make food to feed my family out of that. That's something that Creates a connection to our ancestors and and to our culture. That is just so important. And i think it's been really enriching for for my family and for the community and You know part of what we've seen As part of you know what's come out of this. Pandemic is a lot of tribal communities. Really putting you know. Some of the cares act resources more of their resources into food sovereignty which has been something. That's been happening for a long time. Now it's been you know a campaign. Lots of effort has been put into you know taking back control of our own food systems but especially now that some of the commercial food systems have broken down or or seeing a lot of difficulty getting food on the shelves in our you know The commercials food market in our grocery stores and things. The tribes have stepped up. And i know here. In oklahoma the osage nation and the greek nation both have been able to invest some of that cares. Act money into Meat processing plant that will directly bead their tribal citizens and be able to be a source for food outside of the commercial food sources so some ways to provide food for our communities ourselves instead of having to rely on on commercial sources. It's been a really Positive outcome in nico would about his family's thinking of families are getting into this. What do you think about that. Well you know like dj was saying and And dare to. We've all kind of been able to take this time to reconnect with each other. I know myself. I've always been so busy Spending so many hours away from home at the restaurant and being home for this time has really been a blessing actually to be able to spend so much time with my family and meal together and Sharing meals at home. Instead of you know usually i would just be to restaurant. You know eating any spare moment. That i have just whatever is available. Now were more thoughtful with you. Know how we sit and gather together to eat and you know being able to make meals and provide for you know for other family members Who may not be able to make meals for themselves right now. That's been Something that we've been doing and a quite a few opportunities to share recipes with with my community. You know i've been kind of talking about having to pivot. You know all of the events that i had planned where they would be big dinners or different catering events that i would plant be had been planning to do kind of got You know got derailed because of the pandemic and not being able to gather in person. So i've had to pivot and find ways to share these recipes and share food with the community You know from home. So i've you know my family and i have kind of turned into our own little television crew. Basically we make our own videos. Now we kinda got tested in a little bit of equipment. Nothing fancy or anything but you know we got. We got the You know the lighting and tripod setup and invested in a better camera to be able to you know. Make these cooking videos at home. And i've been able to take my stepdaughter with me to You know make some cooking videos for our indian education program here in tulsa Show some different ways that we make you know healthy food. That families can enjoy together. And you know we've had to kind of learn new skills together to you know a lot of a lot of it has. We've gotten some tips actually from my mind. I know there's a lot in our young people that you really stepping up and teaching us new things not your young ones with the video. Bj and tiktok. And you're i know he's got some stuff that's cooked up because of our young ones celebrating a lot. We're celebrating youtube for also spending this hour with us. Program support from americorps americorps members who serve in vista. Make a difference in the fight against poverty while earning money for college and gaining valuable skills. Rewarding service opportunities are available across america focusing on economic opportunity healthy futures education and more. It will change your life and the lives of others. Information at eight a. m. e. r. c. r. p. s. dot g-o-v v. slash v. I s. t. Mchugh picky loma can you to i. Chose toppy. paseo head-on keith. Aku zannier washed glitch talkie pillow. La college -til yeah. You always somewhere. So that she hunt the liliana. Your healthcare dot gov initial hire one eight hundred three one eight two five nine. Six kind of medicare and medicaid or thing he through a law. Native america calling is produced in the national native voice studios in albuquerque new mexico by quantum broadcast corporation and native nonprofit media organization. Funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the public radio. satellite service. music is by brent. Michael davids native voice. One native american radio network.

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12-27-19 December in the News

Native America Calling

59:00 min | 1 year ago

12-27-19 December in the News

"Welcome up to native America calling from Studio forty-nine in Albuquerque. I'm Monica Brain. The number of federally recognized tribes rose to five hundred seventy four in the past few days. He's after decades of work. Congressional action formerly recognized the little show tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. We'll talk with the tribes chairman. It also young climate activists in Alaska are pushing a climate emergency agenda we'll hear from the reporter who profiled them for high country news and we'll talk with Indian country today editor Martry hint about the year's biggest native news stories. It's our last news. Roundup of the year will be right back This is National Native News Antonio Gonzalez a federal judge has refused to dismiss a lawsuit brought by two tribes against President trump over his permitting of the keystone xl pipeline claiming it violates treaties and the US Constitution the Rosebud Sioux tribe and Fort Belknap Indian community. Unity say federal agencies. Have a duty to consult with tribes in South Dakota during water-management hearings Rosebud official outlined. The lack of tribal consultation Victoria wicks reports. Ben Rod is the Rosebud tribes historic preservation officer during water hearings earlier this month. Rod testified the not energy has not given the tribes adequate opportunity to survey the pipeline route. Here rod is questioned by energy attorney. James Moore was the Rose Foot Sutra. I offered a chance to participate in the development of a programmatic agreement for the Keystone Excel pipeline and the Rosebud. Sioux tribe chose not to participate is at Corona chose not to participate simply because the process had not been satisfied. Get up to that. Point right tells more that the tribe had repeatedly asked for topographical for graphical. GPS MAPS and did not receive them and so the tribe at rods recommendation did not participate. We do not know where this is going. We do not know where it is on the landscape wouldn't what proximity what sites that we hold significant on the day. Rod Testified in South Dakota Federal. Judge Brian Morris Released Easter decision. That Rosebud and Fort Belknap lawsuit could go forward in Montana. Judge Morris denied requests by TC energy and the trump administration to dismiss the tribes arrives claims Morris held tribes own inherent sovereign powers that include the authority to exercise some level of civil jurisdiction over non-indians on their reservations nations fee lands and surface and mineral rights. Morris wrote that Rosebud has sufficiently made its case that TC energy is required to comply with tribal laws for National Native News. I'm Victoria wicks in rapid city. South Dakota thirty three Bison were transferred this week from Yellowstone National Park to the four-pack reservation in Montana and marked the first transfer of female bison to the tribe through current quarantine program to make sure the animals are disease. Free Rachel Kramer with yellowstone public radio reports wildlife managers early Monday morning loaded up fourteen females and their calves along with five balls into a trailer at the Stevens Creek Capture Facility in Yellowstone Rabbi Magnin the fishing game manager for the cinnabon ensue tribes followed the semi truck as it hauled the vice nearly five hundred miles to the Fort Peck. Indian reservation aren't really really great. It's we've always wanted to get female. He called it an exceptional bonus because some of the females are pregnant at the tribes. Get more cavs in the spring Magnan. Inside the new arrivals will spend the next year in the tribes half a million dollar quarantine facility and be tested. Regularly for Bruce Willis a bacterial disease that can cause pregnant bison in cattle and October their fetuses he said the bison will then be sent to a tribe or federal agency trying to boost its conservation. Heard this summer the Fort Peck tribes sent its first graduates. It's of the quarantine program. Five Bison to the eastern Shoshoni of the Wind River reservation in Wyoming nearly five thousand Bison live in Yellowstone National Park and and over half of them test positive for Russillo. Sus there hasn't been a confirmed case of Bison spreading the disease to cattle but wildlife officials. Say this is in large part due to keeping the population -ation from getting too large. The agency Buys Management Team earlier. This month set goals of hunting two hundred to three hundred Bison that migrate out of the park this winter and capturing during another four hundred to six hundred ship to slaughter a park biologist at the quarantine program has space for one hundred ten Bison for National Native News. I'm Rachel creamer in Bozeman Montana and Damian Tonio Gonzales. The national native news is produced by Colonic Broadcast Corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by prairie edge DOT COM. Where you can find a full selection of Pendleton Products Traditional Ledger? Art beadwork and quirk as well as a complete line of native books music and movies in rapid city or online at prairie edge dot com. WON'T BE LA FOR NATIVE Americans affected by domestic violence. The strong hearts native helpline offers peer to peer support and resources. It's safe confidential and toll. Free at eight four four seven native program support by the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center native voice one the native American radio network. This is native America Calling Monica Brain to Alaska the native youth activists help push through a resolution at this year's Alaska Federation of Natives Conference declaring a state of climate emergency. We'll we'll check in with a reporter who profiled them for high country news also Indian country. Today's editor Mark Trae Hint will join us for a look back at some of the big native issues news in two thousand nineteen. We'll talk about major supreme court cases. A major land trust issue for an Eastern tribe and the upcoming twenty twenty election can and will catch up with artist Jeffrey Gibson who has Mississippi Band of Choctaw and Cherokee and the winner of a Macarthur Fellowship Genius Award and we're working on getting The chairman of the little shell tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana on with us today they just got federal recognition. So we're hoping to talk with them about that but first let's head to Alaska and talk with trip. Krause trip is the news and public affairs affairs producer for K.. NBA and trip is welcome back to native America Cali trip yeah. It's great to have you okay. So tell us about this. High Country News apiece so It really started back in October with Alaska Federation of Natives Holding Their Annual Convention And basically what happened is Victor Joseph from Internet Chiefs Conference Spoke up in support of a resolution solution to pass these revolutions written at elders and youth which is a conference that precedes Af en but at this conference the elders and youth then then take turns and write their own resolutions and then they get passed on But Victor had basically asked to pass them and gave the floor to the Nash. Peter who's a fifteen year old question and a woman from fairbanks leave now who who read the resolution and it basically asked the the F. N. delegation to pass it to declare climate of urgency and for FM performance. Own Climate Action Taskforce On paper that doesn't sound like a lot But for state who is you know we have about about two hundred and twenty nine federally recognized tribes. Six thousand plus miles of coastline A lot of interior land with animals. Yes oil development so Alaska's really this place where you see Oil Developed Oil gas development And Land Resources and land rights and this was kind of a big deal I don't think a lot of people Picked up on it. You know if you a few people did thankfully high country news dead But it was really spectacular thing to watch this young woman and later her friend Quanta chasing horse who USA seventeen and Lakota and which in who sort of spoke up and gave us really emotional plea About the way climate change has affected their daily lives. Yeah definitely There are some powerful audio from that that We were able able to play on a past show Have you heard from other folks okay. So there was some pushback though to To through this resolution what what kind of pushback was it. Well when you say push-back that kind of has a negative connotation So gentlemen from the Arctic Leixlip Bridge Corporation asked to amend the resolution to incorporate basically development and well oil and writes his concern. was that the resolution would sort of ask and I think he used to work. Handcuff their ability to develop resources. And so when you're looking at the Arctic slope you see community. I mean. That's a huge community credibly large. You're talking north. Slope of Alaska and oil development and and natural resources are a huge part of what drives the Alaska's because the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation to one of the twelve regional corporations and Alaska And so they're sort of guided by creating developing spend revenue for their shareholders And for them they seed. Natural Resources is a beneficial way for them to benefit their luther. People increased revenue. It's a little different in other parts of the state because other corporations have a different economies and they're able to generate revenue that way but Arctic slip really all this this resolution as a way to one handcuffed them but also so Sort of prevent them from developing those resources and they were worried about outside interests coming into the state and telling them how to Basically run their subsistence and Obviously the the north slope is will hunting is a very big being so they were worried about outside interests coming in preventing. I'm from being so Arctic Slope Regional Corporation was really looking for An amendment to that resolution I think there's been some miscommunication on whether or not that is quote unquote opposing that resolution But it did lead to some debate on the floor which is was was pretty powerful In the end Kamanda was turns down. it was voted down and the original resolution was passed Well I mean the thing. News is that Aren't those sort of competing ideas Declaring a climate emergency but then also supporting Oil and gas development. It is but really gets to the crux That's kind of divisive and we could. We could go into you know the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act can nineteen seventy-one And how the sort of credit these these different regions you really have Within the toll regions you have remarkably different rent ideas on how to generate the income and what it means for them to be able to progress as a region and like a lot of federally recognized tribes The native corporations are driven by self determination as well so yeah they get to make that decision It it depends on which side of the fence. You're on if you're you know you WANNA see these original corporation succeed Arctic slope is. Obviously they have an idea of what their their goals are other regional corporations and and tribes might have a different Yeah they may be diametrically weekly on the opposite sides of the fence But in Alaska that that kind of dialogue happens all the time And it really goes to the heart of Alaska Federation original data says about whether the statewide organization that's supposed to represent and advocate for tribal native regional corporations and tribes and villages alleges And so they represent about one hundred and seventy five of the two hundred Twenty Nine federally recognized tribes in Alaska. They don't represent all of them But they're trying to create a policy in which it incorporates as many perspectives as they can and that's part of the convention is everyone it comes together and tries to vote on these things Income to mutual agreement. But there's always there's always the Bay there's always discussion And and not everybody agrees because the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation just recently announced that they're withdrawing from AF en and They said in an editorial to the Alaska Journal of Commerce that endless non-productive divisiveness such as our witnessed at afn convention or not only outside the original intent of AFL offense but they are also distracting from the mission of Arctic Slope. Regional Corporation It some people have been drawing the you you know like that. This debate over the climate crisis was something that led to Arctic slope. Pulling out I mean in editor Oreal they said you know this conflict with. FM has been simmering for a wild well before the less conference. What is your impression of this? Yeah I mean I feel like the Arctic's loopers corporation pulling out is You know a lot of people looked at. FM is sort of aim. Hey Matt defining moment and it was a really powerful moment And it was a really good discussion to have in Alaska But I don't think you know I don't necessarily think that was. It's the final Straw. I think it's RC. was is was planning on pulling out at some point It just happened to be. They through membership goes through two thousand nineteen eighteen And they wanted to pull out at the beginning of the year And that this FM thing it was sort of like you know one more Straw. I guess so to speak but the Arctic Slope Regional Corporation. They really have their own ideas on on how they're going to provide for their people And they just see that as being SAF N not necessarily looking at representing them like they want and It was just an easy decision for them to to to leave. Yeah absolutely well trip were were just about to go to to Break I'm wondering if you might share a little bit about another article you work done They had to do with baby yoga. Yeah so you know like anybody like most news organizations. We wanted to capitalize on The rally maybe iota and so we talked to a few different Alaska native artists who I've been incorporating him into artwork that they've been making to give the gifts Most of everyone I talked to. You is busy and baking Christmas gifts. This was about a week before The holiday and so they were there they were busily making it But it was just really interesting to see how Within Alaska as sort of a a mirror to the lower forty-eight that you know a lot of indigenous people here sort of look at baby otas being they say he's indigenous Eamonn on whether or not you know he might be new PEAC or which but So it was just a really great Conversation with people It was this real Greece into the euro on. Really I love wrapping up on things like that. They just this makes my heart sing and we definitely talked about it on pop culture. Show This this week talking about The many pop culture things in Indian country this year Well if you're just joining us. It's our monthly news. Roundup if you want to join join our conversation give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. That's eight hundred nine nine native trip. We've got to break make and we got the chairman on the line. Can you hang out for a few more minutes. I wanted to ask you a few more things. You're working on absolutely all right. Well we've been talking uh-huh Krause trip is the news and public affairs producer for K.. NBA We're gonNA break will be right back. The end of the year is often a time to reflect on people who have come and gone from our lives on the next native America calling. We'll take a moment to celebrate the lives of some notable native people who walked on in two thousand nineteen. Who are you reading this year tune in for the next? We need of America Cali support by MATHEMATICA currently hiring classroom observers to work on the American Indian Alaskan Native headstart family and child experiences survey which gathers information about about the characteristics and experiences of children and families served by head start programs in tribal communities. They're limited positions available. Application deadline. Deadline is January tenth. Twenty twenty information about benefits and application available at careers dot Mathematica Dot Org Aw you're tuned into native America Calling Monica Brain and it's our monthly news. Roundup show if you WANNA get in on. The conversation gives call one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. Let's head to my home. State Montana to talk with Chairman Gerald Grey. He's the head of the little shell tribe of Chippewa Indians of Montana. President trump just signed the bill formally recognizing the tribe. Welcome back to native America calling German Gray. Thanks for having me. Ah It's great to hear your voice again. How does it feel to finally be recognized? Oh man it's a great feeling of it was a long long time coming for the little shell people and we're just ecstatic about it. Yeah I can imagine. How long did it take well for us? I mean it really back to the mid eighteen hundreds but it's about one hundred thirty years that we've been trying to get this thing across the finish line. Are you gonNa take a break now. Relax take a nap. No you know what the members are already calling and and we've got a lot of work ahead of us to to do and you know we gotta sensors This doesn't happen that often but in especially for any country And there's no blueprint interest you kind of have to Learn our way through it so to speak week and We're GONNA take our time and and get it right so well for our listeners. Who might not know? Tell us a little bit about your tribe. Yeah so we're the the little shell tribe Where have about fifty two to fifty three hundred members The majority of us are in Montana. We're kind of scattered throughout Montana right now because we don't have a reservation were Montana's only state recognized tribe so there's Eight tribes in Montana now All of us are federally recognized. Yeah it's nice and I mean how did it does chip wise end up in Montana You know so if you look back in the day Chief little shell eighteen eighteen fifty to around that time period so there are no borders And when they had the what was called the ten cent treaty which became mccumber agreement where the federal government wanted to buy Chippewa land mostly was in North Dakota For Ten cents. It's an Acre and chief little shell said no it's worth at least a dollar and he walked out of the the negotiations well. The federal government Had add another person sign. It wasn't Was it shouldn't have signed it. And then they kind of Have held US penalized US ever since the little Shell So at that time after he walked out and walked out negotiations He was with a pick group in Montana. I'm hunting Buffalo. So that's how we ended up here so you know you mentioned that the you what you're GonNa take your time and and things like that and one of the things that we're GonNa talk about later in the show today is Supreme Court decision precision that determines when tribes can put land into trust. Is it is there a possibility for for the tribe to be able to land into trust. Trust now or Will you will you just have to sort of buy up land No Way Uh We'll be able to do that. You know definitely in our bill. It was You know at least two hundred acres for to Start a reservation but it was also where we could put that into trust but you know the little shell. Tribe has been very self sufficient for the last hundred and thirty years. We've had to you know do our thing and get by. We're one of those economically if there's land available uh-huh purchasing it and they're Atlanta. We'll always be tech fans so of course. Is there a possibility for getting into gaming aiming you know that's Was We never had said no to that. which is a good thing? There could be but Montana. There's so many smaller casinos You know right now that For us it's not something would look got maybe down the road ten years from now or so we've got some other economic benchers were looking into that better more promising than casino. Air Montana Yeah no I understand. There's a different class of gaming Available in Montana and there's some sort of predictions about whether or not that's profitable Just with the type of gaming that's available Ah What will you be able to accomplish now with Federal Recognition Chairman Gray. So I think the first thing I mean the biggest thing for us this was you know it was writing wrong. It's about for the little. Shell people that was huge You know now what will it opens the door for more grant opportunities that we have access to as federally recognized tribe in not just a state recognized tribe and then I think the first and foremost thing thing is they will provide some healthcare For a members because here Montana native Americans We were dying nineteen years earlier than are non native counterparts. So I think we I think we can do better than that and offer some more preventive initiative healthcare so we can Reverse those numbers for us to start its own clinic or Now now your members will be able to to go to another types clinic. You know. That's one thing where we'll be meeting with IHS right away after the first year to determine that and also the way to Try to map this thing out but you know my hope is is that two hundred acres that will get will probably be around the great falls area. 'cause that's where the majority of membership live but we're not all going to pull up our homes homes and move them onto two hundred acres so for my vision is to have that as Travel Office Complex The clinic or hospital spital and I'd really like to Start a trade school here Montana for for Indian people because we have a lot of two year four year colleges already well. We don't have very many trade schools and I think that'd be a better opportunity to fit a need that You know a lot of Indian. People are good with their hands in terms of carpentry urban tree of plumbing trillions mechanics. That that sort of thing. Yeah I vote that you also get a radio station and maybe start start training folks on radio a I think that would be a good idea. It's wide okay. Now you know so many possibilities with your federal recognition. It's pretty great Who supported your efforts along the way so so you know we've had a everybody has to be honest with you except for one person and Congress? Mike Lee didn't and that was the infant. Miss One vote talk show by last year that he didn't he voted. No but Here in Montana Senator testers Senator Dame's Congressman GM Forte Governor Bullock. Tim Fox All of the Montana tribes of supported us. So we've we've had I mean I can honestly it's hard even named one person that hadn't supported us or or anything like that. It's been just a tremendous amount of support for process and you had pursued both avenues through the interior as well as the Congressional Avenue. Is there anything that you would change about this process. Oh yes yeah definitely I mean honest with you. I mean it's ridiculous you said it it takes so long and it's so cumbersome What's office federal acknowledgment? It's still a broken process Kevin Washburn when his assistant secretary he did try to change the rules to make it a little bit easier because there are so antiquated and and then they did change it. But I think there needs to be So some kind of better standards in terms of The timeline would be nice because you could Partition and you could remain in that process for decades which is wrong and sometimes of have petitioned and become tied led to recognize what you know five hundred two thousand documents ours is over Last I heard over one hundred thousand pieces the paper that we submitted For proof and we're still nuts still sitting in that you know if if this route through the congressional Gresh away well well Chairman Gray. Congratulations thanks so much for taking the time to talk with us today. We really appreciate it. Of course I thank you for having me on. Yeah absolutely and if you're just joining us it's our money news roundup if you want to get in on our conversation gives call one eight hundred nine nine six two who eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native. Hey let's go. Let's take a call. Melvin Zinn santee Nebraska tuned in on K. Z. Y. K.. He didn't like to say congratulations little. Shell people there long effort to get federal recognition condition I see episode. Glad to hear good things day. I do a lot of work I used to and Long Island state recognized tribes and Shit they got recognize. Tuck are there yet but for the longest time they didn't want federal recognition. They were just doing fine as a state. Thank record hikes. Try and now. They're looking at looking at that role. But congratulations to show people. This is news day. You know the elections are coming up. It's very important that native people turn Out but you know eastern Missouri River Majority of eighty people that live out there and have casinos. The workers are not native. We need to get those guys to get are casino. Workers time off so they can go wherever they want. But we need to get out and we got a large voting bloc with our workers we just state it up through to to vote Pie. That's a good idea and Melvin. I hadn't heard that I hadn't heard that efforts of in terms of getting out the vote so that's great. Thanks thanks so much for giving us a call and always tuning in Melvin. It's always great to hear from you and I want to go back to trip. Krause US just for a few more questions Trip voting in an Alaska. That's a big topic hot topic. Yeah absolutely absolutely And Alaska's actually really interesting so because of the PSC which is the the the money that you you quote unquote get for living here when you apply for the you actually apply to register to vote as well So I'd be interested in looking at the numbers on how Alaska ranks with voter registration But with the PF D. I would imagine it's it's pretty high up there but yeah you know voting every year You know election cycles is as well as a really interesting time to be in Alaska. Yeah Definitely I. Also I know there's definitely efforts is to Legal efforts to make sure that the ballots are in you pick. I think it is and possibly another Alaskan native language which which is so important for for some villages to be able to read in their in their first language also trip. You're working on a piece about food. Sovereignty tell us about it. Yeah so Here in Alaska it. It's you know I live in Anchorage. which is a You know pretty decent sized population really big urban centers. I can go to the grocery store and get milk or bread Riva fresh produce and sometimes I take for granted but when you live in a village Some of these places will pay you know seven twelve thirteen dollars for a gallon of milk And that's just the reality of shipping costs And how you know. I hate to use the word remote. Because I don't think the remote they're just really separated from A lot of the shipping hubs that they in turn end up taking on that cost in Perthshire stores I if they even have like decent grocery stores a lot of them have You know package things or can things. Things filled preservatives. Sugar's a really big issue And a lot of areas but there are some interesting villages and tribal organizations. Who are working together to work toward Better Food Security In climate change is affecting that. Because it's changing population migration of animals. I'm all that's changing Subsistence calendars so like blackberries might be In season earlier which is problematic. Because if the Berry Jason Intercedes with like fishing season and you know families have to make a choice. Do they do want to do the other. Do they split up And so so those two issues that cost of of groceries and Sort of climate impacting food is creating security issues But there are really great initiatives that are going on You know we were in September. And they've got this great community garden then That's going on there able to grow their own tomatoes and Pumpkins and are able to sort of use that in conjunction with Getting their food and it's really creating this Really Amazing Culture in which they're they're creating their own food sovereignty and so there are are basically the ones that are in charge of you know what foods that they're getting and it's really empowering the community there are several other communities throughout On the State of Alaska that are doing similar projects There are some larger community organizations. That are are helping people Put them in touch with the right people to create these programs. So it's it's it's really interesting story. Yeah I love food sovereignty and particularly in Alaska anything anything to do with like subsistence hunting and fishing and learning more about How folks feed themselves in Alaska? It's just I don't think we have nearly nearly enough of that on this show and I guess my my resolution for twenty twenty is to do more food sovereignty shows and talk about this issue a lot more trip trip anything else. You're hoping to work on in two thousand twenty not really. Yeah I mean well there is. There's a there's a lot I mean the census is going to be a big story There are going to be a number of stories that come out of the census And that's for Alaska because the enumeration begins January and Tix Bay So there's GonNa be a lot of different things going on But most importantly understood really interested in. You know making sure that you know in we. We have more native people who go into journalism whether that's Radio Prints TV Web And I'd like to see more native journalists and I'd like to you know see more or Alaska native journalists and more more native journalists in Alaska because there are there are a lot of stories here And in my opinion they don't get told the right way unless we call them so here here. Our next guest mark trae hand has a few words to say about that as as well well. It's our news roundup today and if you WANNA get in on the conversation give us a call. The number is one eight hundred nine nine six two two eight four eight. That's eight hundred nine nine native and If there's a new story that you would like us to cover on this show send us an email to comments. It's at native America Calling Dot Com. Thanks so much to trip for joining us today and we go to a short break. Native Americans affected by domestic. Violence can call the strong hearts native helpline offering free confidential support and resources. Strong hearts takes calls else from anyone hurting in their relationship or who may be concerned for someone else available seven. AM TO TEN PM central time seven days a week at eight four four seven seven native. That's eight four. Four seven native more at strong hearts helpline dot. Org Program support by the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center. uh-huh uh-huh Sir Ah Ooh you never junior uh-huh you're tuned into native America calling I Monica Brain And I just want to say thank you so much for listening to our show today today. We really appreciate it. it's so great to be able to Have our listeners Tune in every day and listen to our show. We really appreciate that Joining us now is mark trae hand. He's the editor of Indian country today and he is Shoshoni schone bannock welcome back to native America calling mark. Thanks Monica Happy New Year Happy New Year. We haven't talked to you in like six months. What have you been busy with? Oh I We're growing so fast that we're just trying to keep up with everything We moved to Phoenix during the slashed year. we're about up to almost double the size of our staff. Are Anchorage Bureau. V fully operational in two weeks It's just a really exciting time for us. Yeah I I wanted to talk to you about that. Because trip was mentioning wanting to have more Alaskan native journalists same Alaska. And you know that's something that's near and dear thirty your heart absolutely and I probably shouldn't announced this on the show because It should come in in India country today but Jacqueline estes. It'll be our national correspondent anchorage. Oh that's fantastic. That's great to hear. Well you heard it first here on native American colleague. Oh we are not in competition with Indian country today. Marc all right big news year. Lots lots of things happening. Let's talk about the Murphy case I it's it's I think it's called Murphy versus sharp now but it was originally Murphy versus carpenter. Tell us a little bit about it right. It involves jurisdictions and whether or not the boundaries of Muskogee Creek nation apply within Oklahoma Hulme and It's interesting because in one sense. It's a very big case in another sense. It's not Jonah Dev the title. Right but ambassador to the nation said that because of the way that the tribe and the stay works on multi level agreements that. It's going to be fine no matter what happens win or lose and In a way some of the hype hype about it. overplays what is happening on the ground. The way tribes are now working with states in a much more collaborative way particularly when it comes to law enforcement forcement. That's what I heard you the feedback that when we were working on a show about it was that you know like there was a New York Times headline that said something like I. Half of Oklahoma could be returned to native Americans or something like that and there was some pushback on on headlines. Lines like that because it was misinterpreting. What would actually happen in kind of hyping up people's fears about it and wasn't return of land at all? Anyway it was about your sticks and who prosecuted which crimes and again. That's something that's worked out on that level On by people on the ground in most cases right we did a show on this June twenty fifth. We were hoping that the Supreme Court would have a ruling on it and That did not happen because the Supreme Court decided to hear the case again is is. It's my understanding that's pretty rare. But they're gonNA listen to it again and Come up with arguments one Well we'll see. I mean they have scheduled the argument. So it'll be interesting to see where they go from there. I read something that that it sounded like. The court was split evenly for four because one One judge had to recuse himself from from the case. So that's way they didn't want to have like a split ruling on it right and that certainly is an option because court the court does come up with split rulings all the time. I four two four one. One judge is absent Having gorsuch weigh in on the case probably is a good thing for Indian country though because of all the members of the court he has more more significant experience and engine law than just about any other justice. Yeah Yeah let's talk about the Mashpee and end their situation with trying to get land into trust right well as you were mentioning earlier in the show. There's a real contradiction where the interior arment has has taken a pretty firm view that Based on Supreme Court decisions that tribes that were in existence with a recognized government before nineteen thirty four within reorganization act was passed. They can't take land into trust for them and It's really created a huge dude hole. In terms of how CIA tribes are able to do economic development particularly those ones that are moving into different areas. The the irony of course in all of this is that we're not talking about land that wasn't in the country before it's just this narrow window it wasn't engine country from whatever date to nineteen thirty four asserts. A pretty narrow great time and it was the Supreme Court case that determined that that is guiding the That the cartridge criteria case is that right trick and but even then interior took a much more literal view of the case than most of them in a aw community. That's we had a show about that on the nineteenth and on June twelfth. If you WANNA learn more about that situation do you. Are you at all optimistic. That mashpee will be able to You know that something will change or that. Maybe the Congress will pass something to do a cartoon fix. I think Congress would be the most likely place for that to happen and I don't think the votes are there yet for it and it plays into a lot of Indian provision. But there's this new element in Congress that is let's just say anti-tribal and they are reluctant to move on things whether it be the violence against Women Act or this where the perception is that it's giving tribes jurisdiction over non Indians. Yeah but I mean we just had little shell got recognition in the president signed it into into law and I think he was saying that there was only one person who voted against it. You'd get getting their recognition right. That's a really great I guess the craziness of Congress were that it can happen yet if it involves non-indians that's where you get the pushback right like it's okay for little shell to sort of have their own jurisdiction juristiction but the as soon as they start building their own courts or Prosecuting people who aren't native in their own courts than than we have the problem exactly and I think where you really see this right now again. Is Oklahoma and this idea that the current governor of Oklahoma. So let's pretend this is not involving native Americans right now and if a major industry say Microsoft or Amazon wanted to come to Oklahoma the state would doing everything possible to get them there to keep them there whereas you now have. This industry tribal gaming that has created thousands of jobs pays the state Tens of millions of dollars a year and more than one hundred billion dollars and yet the governor is trying to eliminate it or get more money out of it and shut it down. It's really amazing and it. But it gets to this strain of this real anti-tribal attitude dude popped up in the body politic. The last couple of years you know. I don't know if the governor is trying to eliminate it my impression reading the situation is that The governor is trying to get more funds for from the tribes from the Revenue Sharing Agreement Agreement for the state and he's presenting it as this is what's good for Oklahoma not necessarily like I'm going to shut this down because I don't agree with this but he's willing to shut it down and cut off the economic assets or at least you threatening to which is what's extraordinary. Yeah again again. You wouldn't see this in any other area. I mean if Microsoft they would be saying you're GonNa do this else or leave the state but yet this it's really pervasive Do it our way or else. We had some legal experts on December nineteenth show about that and they were saying that it doesn't it doesn't even make sense because or not that it doesn't make sense but that's not what's actually going to happen because the it's up to the federal government to shut down the casinos and and the principal cheat the principal. Chief of the Cherokee nation also came on and said the same thing like back. It seems like the governor. It was like an exercise in futility. Or because they're not shutting down on on January first. No No. We'll see that next week. They're definitely not going to shut down. And and what is a stake in the do rent a blockade. They can't it's not it's not their jurisdiction to do anything. Well Yeah I remember if they tried to do a blockade. That's what they're trying to Arizona What twenty five years ago and and there was that day where they tried to come in and get slot machines and pick up for blocking the driveway for to make sure that no trucks could get through to pick ups lawsuits so these are disputes? That happen I mean over time but the rest of the country has figured this out and it's like the Oklahoma governor's in this time warp of trying to put back state paramount in an era. That no longer has that instead of working on collaboration. Yeah Yeah it's interesting and the the governor is in fact a citizen of the Cherokee Nation As well it's definitely an issue. We are going to keep a close eye on here at native America calling. Okay mark we gotta talk about. Oh there's so many other things big big news you know that happened this year So what else do you think we should focus on. Well it's funny because we can. Wow we're GONNA at least have a week where things slow down. This last week was crazy and then the next next week is just as good can. We don't get everything so it seems like that for the year ahead is going to be I. I think the election is going to be huge. We already are seeing. We're GONNA popish our list shortly more congressional candidates than we've had before you have a race in New Mexico Where you're going to have multiple Native candidates both in the House seat in the Senate seat in the two primaries More Republicans running across the country. which is going to be the interesting to see the messages they carry Climate Change continues to be one you mentioned earlier in the show I'm working on a major piece. It's GONNA run right after the first of the year Twins transportation is twenty nine percent of us emissions and yet it doesn't get the same Attention than other areas would see talk about a factory or Particularly coal mines but the ordinary stuff we do. Every every day is what really contributes to the climate and yet having those individual actions changed in a way that produces results. It's very difficult for governments Tribes are actually starting to get in this with more and more applications or transportation programs where Tribal Communities Minis are looking at whether it'd be buses or other. Alternative means micro. Transit is the big one where people can get rides to places so they don't have to take a car everywhere work. Yeah that's something. I'm definitely really interested in following. Also you know one big thing we're going to be looking at this. Year is Igwe and From what some are saying is the slow erosion of tribal sovereignty with these case after case after case challenging the constitutionality of the Indian Child Welfare Act. What are you watching for mark? Well definitely In Child Welfare actors a huge huge issue. That's going to continue tinge play out and to me. One of the great ironies in that is that Barry Goldwater was a champion of tribal rights and was someone somewhat in fact when There was he gave about a two hour test. On the importance of tribal religion without notes notes on the return of Blue Lake and just talk from his heart in the Senate floor for two hours and yet the Goldwater Institute that carries cherishes name is out trying to undermine probably what's the most fundamental aspect of tribal futures and that's our young people and making making sure that they have tribal communities and cultures part of our upbringing. I it's just it's something you have to watch closely closely because it just seems to me that They they the case after case has been really kind of looking around for a judge their degrees with them. And they'll find a judge who doesn't and then there'll be another case and another jurisdiction We'll see because it was ruled unconstitutional in Texas And then it was overturned. And then it's going to be Heard again and so we'll be following that carefully mark So one of the things that was a big at the beginning of the year was This incident with Nathan Phillips and the students from Covington Catholic The thing that I noticed is that there was a libel suit that was against the Washington Post that was dismissed and just recently reinstated and The libel suit against CNN NBC. I have you been watching that closely right and again. This is the case of judge shopping where they were looking for the right court to bring it back We were I mean it was one of those situations that it really blew up And there are so many stories over the air that we think. We're really significant that we did that. We worked really hard on yet of all the stories from this last year that particular one had more readership than any story. We've touched differently so I've had the first round of stories had one point seven million hits. Wow what a way to start the year did you end up did and The did you have a libel suit against you. Further for your coverage of it. We did not knock on wood We're fortunate in that respect. Well I we're just right at the end of the Hour I noticed an announcement You have a new president of Indian ending country. Today we do more and more. We're shifting to be our own independent nonprofit and Because it's a phone company. We appointed Karen. Lincoln can Michelle to be the company's first president and she will be running the entire business operations We now have bureaus in the anchorage in Washington. DC and Phoenix is our headquarters. But we're going to be continuing to build our capacity in the country Indian country today doing big things thanks to mark trae hint. Thanks so much for joining us. Let's have you back again next month. We'll we'll check in and check on on that election looking forward to seeing your reporting on this election year. Thank you so much to everybody else. Who joined our show today in particular killer? Thanks to chairman Gerald Grey and trip krause. We're back on Monday with the show remembering those who have walked on in two thousand nineteen are executive producers reducers Art Hughes or Hostess Tear Gatewood Are Associated Producers. Andy Murphy Reno. Spencer is our engineer. Nola Dave's Moses is the distribution director and Bob. Peterson is the network manager for native voice. One Clifton Chadwick resource development specialist into the anchor and producer for national native news. Charles say there is our our chief of operations. I'm senior producer Monica Brain. We'll see you soon support by dream. Spring bring a nonprofit community lender for over twenty five years dream. Spring has been increasing access to business credit for entrepreneurs across New Mexico Arizona and beyond dream spring offers loans for self employed entrepreneurs startups and large established enterprises information about flexible credit requirements affordable rates and and customized lending available by calling eight hundred five zero. Eight seventy six twenty four or online at dream. Spring Dot com down contained Costa Christie Society could do say if he deigned she's tenure in dot the Clinton Healthcare Kor Need Kadarshian East Talk. He saw you okay. Attiyah Healthcare Dot Gov Katiba Span Ca. Two two one eight hundred three one eight two five nine six cookie Medicare and Medicaid services. GW Houghton breath. Native America calling produced in the Annenberg National Native Oi Studios in Albuquerque New Mexico by Qantas Broadcast Corporation native nonprofit media organization funding is provided by the corporation for Public Broadcasting Broadcasting with support from the public radio satellite. Service Music is by Brent Michael Davids native voice. One the native American radio network.

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12-30-19 Remembering those who walked on in 2019

Native America Calling

59:00 min | 1 year ago

12-30-19 Remembering those who walked on in 2019

"Welcome Welcome to native America. Calling from studio forty nine in Albuquerque. I'm Tara Gate would today. We're remembering a few native people who walked on into nineteen when need auto was a strong Kiowa woman who was a longtime volunteer at the National Congress of American Indians and in language mentor. Franklin Mir was a Winnebago activists who pushed for the removal of alcohol from a town in Nebraska among other accomplishments an emcee Waksal was beloved hip hop artists from New Mexico. Worry more about their lives. After National Native News in this is National Native News Antonio Gonzalez Montana's Democratic senator. John Tester introduced a bill which would award the four belknap the Indian community nearly six hundred and thirty million dollars for water infrastructure projects and recognized tribal water rights claims Olivia wrangled reports Fort. BELKNAP has been waiting on congressional approval of its water right settlement for almost twenty years. That's how long ago the Montana state legislature approved. The tribes is water compact. The thing is it's not valid until it's approved by the US Congress Senator Tester has tried to push for congressional approval twice the the bill would rectify outstanding legal claims against the federal government over its failure to protect tribal water rights and provide water infrastructure with more than half a billion dollar settlement. Some of that money is earmarked for making the Milk River Project and irradiation system that serves thousands of farmers and tribal members more efficient among others. Four BELKNAP season is one of only two in Montana. That hasn't been adjudicated yet. According to a lawyer for the tribes the same source says everyone else's water rates have already been established in the state watercourse besides the Fort Belknap flathead tribes Senator Steve Daines recently introduced a bill to ratify the flathead tribes his water compact. If Congress approves approves the settlement the next step would be vote for tribal membership for National Native News. I'm Olympia Reingold in billings Montana. A federal judge has denied denied requests from President Trump and federal agencies to dismiss lawsuits against them for permitting the keystone xl pipeline. The actions were filed by tribes and environmental until groups. Judge Brian Morris issued his ruling. Just before Christmas Victoria wicks has more when President Barack Obama denied a permit for the keystone xl pipeline to cross across the. US Canada border. He acknowledged the political nature of the debate. For years. The keystone pipeline is occupied. What I frankly consider an over inflated latest role in our political discourse President Obama made that statement in November two thousand fifteen in March two thousand seventeen the newly elected Donald trump changed course by issuing a permit just three months after taking office? We'll finally be allowed to complete this long overdue with efficiency and speed soon. After that tribes and environmentalists sued in Montana Federal Court and efficiency and speed came to a halt federal judge. Brian Morris issued an an injunction in late two thousand eighteen parties appealed to the ninth circuit. But before that court could act. President trump issued a new permit that action made the injunction action and appeal mood. New lawsuits ensued in Montana. And now that new ruling has come out judge Morris notes that the latest executive order erroneously gives the President Solar Authority to make decisions including whether to solicit advice from state tribal and local governments judge. Morris says the constitution gives some powers over foreign affairs to Congress and he says because Congress has acted twice on the keystone pipeline it has indicated its intention to exercise its power therefore he has has ruled that the lawsuits may continue for National Native News. I'm Victoria wicks in rapid city. South Dakota the National Congress of American Indians responded to president didn't trump's tweets on Friday which referenced Indian Country Trump and a series of tweets outline three bills he signed for tribes which imparts said. Thank you Indian country. Sorry for being such an important part of the American story. The term Indian countries spark debate online and statement. NCAA I said it applauds the President Damp for signing the bills and added it finds no issue with the term saying Indian country is often used broadly as a general description of natives spaces and places and a positive sentiment. And it's a legal term. I man Tonio Gonzalez. The national native news is produced by Kohana Broadcast Corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting support by AARP AARP creates. Dan Connect people to unique tools and programmes helps conserve personal resources and tackles issues that matter most to individuals families and communities more at AARP AARP dot org support by NSF railway. Moving our economy for over one hundred sixty five years. Our vision is to operate injury. Rian accident free with safety programs. Training and technology more at Bien SF DOT com slash tribal relations native voice one the native American radio network. This is native America calling. I'm Taraji would today. We're we're taking a moment to remember some of those who walked on in two thousand nineteen from native America. We'll learn about Kiowa leader. Juanita atone also talk talk with family and friends of winnebago Activists Franklin ear and Navajo MC defying. We'll be joining us to remember the legendary wake self health. Our purpose today is to provide a space to celebrate in honor the memories and lives of those who are now resting in here from those who would like to remember member somebody. We work hard to be respectful when speaking about sensitive topics including the passing on of people from tribal nations. We know in respect the the fact that some communities do not wish to speak of those who have walked on and we think those that have offered guidance on this for those of you who are comfortable speaking about it. We are opening up a space for you to remember those who passed was there. Someone walked on this past year. That you'd like to pay tribute to while you can. You're welcome to share their memory. Honor Native Airwaves. The number to join us is one eight hundred nine nine six to eat for eat. It's also one eight hundred nine nine native. We're going to start off today in Carnegie Oklahoma saying hello to earn inside a tone. He is the son of Juanita atone and he is Guy Wa our pleasure to have him here. Si- welcome thank you very much. I'm glad to be here and I want to express my thanks from the family to you for remembering our mother Vernon there is a lot to remember number and the more that I learned about Juanita. The bigger my smile gets of just kind of seeing the kind of energy that she brought to many people Especially the National Congress of American Indians in so many people paid tribute to her and her contributions and we were there at NCA. I this year and I I heard a little talk about her. And so My honor to be speaking of her in Vernon what would you like to share about her. Well I like you. I had the energy that she brought to the national. Congress of American Indians was something that she was very very Glad about you. You know her. Her father was a charter member in nineteen forty six or whether James Doug Amman was a charter member when it was established in nineteen forty six and that kind kind of a spurt her on I think to the energy that she put into her position as The different positions as being the NCAA. I in what did you learn about. NCAA because of her and she. I is one of our r-maine speaking voices for All of the tribes that are represented through their organization and and put Severi strong emphasis on some of the needs and some of the wants that The different tribes might have in the their efforts to continue to be a driving force in the political circle of the United States which we are a very very big part in. What was it about this organization that energized. Her does she ever share stories about seeing tribal leaders Take on hard issues or just even learning about are native resiliency. What were some of the things she talked about being? You know there and meeting so many people. Yeah she was it's very adamant about About the The new between some of the national leaders as well as trade tribal leaders leaders that they might be able to go ahead and put a their ideas and and and and platform Situation so that they could present it to the to the powers that be in the on the national scene and she was very lead that. She's he's able to be there and excited every year. I mean there were two things in this world as she cared about an SR cog were clan celebration every year and and the National Congress of American Indians and just right right up to the time of her death she was Planning to be at that Meeting last October and She the was not able to be there. She passed away on the sixteenth. You know all it was in session and But in spirit we know that she was there licking over there now letting her her kids know what she felt about. That's the way she referred to a lot of the leadership the national leadership as her kids. They they received. They seem to re- Reciprocate that feeling To my mother she gave a lot of guidance. In like I said I heard it a lot of people seeing lots of good words about her and remembering what she brought to it and it seems like this sense of knowing that you are are there to help your nations. She saw her father do this. Your grandfather is well and Vernon one. Would you like to say about her duty to native people to make sure she was there to help. First of all I want to Expression that she was one proud high woman and the the the the difference that She had On on that scale as you know the the I guess you'd call the the Pc Term Native American wealthy people would ask her. Are you a native American. She would kind of look at them and and and a sidelong say well Kiowa. Hi Awhile and I guess you could call me native American and so the the energies as she put in to let everyone know that we are. We are separate separate and independent governmental Entities was one of the main things that I think she took away from her involvement with the the National Congress of American Indians and something that she was also known for her time at Haskell she was a graduate she graduated in nineteen forty seven and she was even Miss Haskell. What does she share with you about her? Time there at the school and Nineteen forty seven. There was A rude you that was going on. And they had Michigan County and Miss the different counties haskell being a big part of the community you know. They figured they wanted to have some representation from there so she was selected to represent Haskell. Ask Ask Michelle nineteen forty seven and again she wanted to Show them the uniqueness of her people so she got her great grandmother No I don't know her grandmother Ida hummingbird to come and help her to dress and help her to to express yourself than the Kiowa language to in her introduction and then representing not only the high was that has co but all of the tribes that were represented nationwide by their attendance at Haskell and so her connection connection to youth was also strong in and I can see why being somebody who had twenty grandchildren. Forty four great grandchildren and five. I have great great grandchildren Thinking about the future. It seems like really filled her heart and she was also instrumental in keeping the language alive Vernon and the introduction Brought by before the view started there was a mention of her involvement all but in a language preservation and The language preservation program was started here in the tribe because we knew that Our languages who makes us who we are and so. She was very adamant that the language was taught in a in a perspective that was going to be able to be a big dip easily. By the way we're trying to learn and And pronunciation over the words and the and and kind of getting away from the use of slang that most of our young people do use with our languages and so she was very instrumental and And developing new program and in supporting the program also so as one of their advisors and mentors to the program and to all of us that All of our children grandchildren. Great grandchildren the children and great. Great grandchildren got Got The in depth Teaching from her about how important West to learn our language which truly a remarkable woman right. Now we are talking with Cya tone He is the son of Nita. Aton whom you're hearing about. She passed away this year at age. Ninety one was a longtime employee and volunteer for the National Congress of American Indians. She was Kiowa. And maybe you knew her. Learn to finger to or you have heard of think for your passion to pick up your own Kiowa language you can join us at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four. Eat anything more you'd like to share about your mother. I guess what to say. How lucky man I am I I'm seventy one one years old and I was able to say Mama until just about about two and a half months ago and that was very Special to me and Though the thing that she told us on her deathbed whereas you keep going nobody cries for me. Because I had a beautiful life she met she met four presidents and many any many outstanding celebrities from From all over the nation all over the world and and then to be able to say that we need to tone hold was. My mother is one of the greatest honors that I have and I from the family. I appreciate you very much for taking the time to recognize her on your program. Well thank you so much vernon in any thoughts words of encouragement. 'em Cy to those who are also morning or thinking of her today. She would want everybody to remember that she was a part of of your live should but do the National Congress American Indian. She was an advocate for all of the tribes and all of the traps to be just as strong as they could be into. I do Learn all they can about our interactions with the government so that we can have a stronger stance in this nation. Thank you so much I appreciate appreciate you honoring your mother and teaching us a thing or two in a no. There are many memories to be shared because he started flowing out at NC. I hi this year and if that is somebody who you're remembering today you can share your thoughts. These phone lines are also open for you to. If there's somebody walked on that that you'd like to pay tribute to you. Can one eight hundred nine nine. Six to eight for eight is the number and just hearing more about when you to atone makes me think of strong matriarchs that we have in our family and you know what it means to carry on all those teachings and keep passing them on especially especially if it means learning the language and maybe that's the story or something that really struck something with you today to remember somebody really important important in your life you can share your thoughts. One eight hundred nine nine six. Two four eight is the number and of course just words of encouragement if you have some of those just for family members numbers you can call in one hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is the number to join us I'm gerege would host a native America calling on our program. We'll start counting down the days of twenty twenty with their December December book of the month. The twenty twenty Salina Bookshelf calendar is a tribute to the Navajo Language and culture. We'll also hear about the NEBULA seasons. We hope you'll join us as we send off the old year and make way for the new one support by freedom lodge providing healing for seven generations offering a one of a kind two hundred our historical trauma masterclass beginning in May twenty twenty on the Oneida nation in Wisconsin for professional counselors therapists social workers and educators. There's no charge for tribal members. Now you can imagine an end to generations nations of suffering and the future of native wellness registration deadline is March. Second Information and registration at Freedom Lodge Dot Org. uh-huh uh-huh You're tuned into native America calling interrogate would from his LETO Pueblo. And remembering those who walked on in two thousand nineteen and if you have something you'd you'd like to say Somebody you'd like to pay tribute to you can call us at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight and right now joining us here in Studio forty-nine is MC defy who is hip hop artists and He comes to us from the Navajo nation. He is a close friend of the Apache MC week self walked on earlier this year defined my pleasure to have you here back in this seat in our studio. Ah for another conversation and this time I know this one is heavy one in. I'm really honored that you would be here to speak of such a lovely person Weeks Self Health and for the folks were tuned in. Maybe they never had a chance to say hello to him. Shake his hand but they heard his music. And would you like to say about week South and and what he meant to you and maybe even how you understand the world. Yes good morning gene or good days everybody in this is. MCC defy from the denomination Just WanNa I came here to honor my best friend wake self who's has been a prominent MC and artists in New Mexico hip hop community for well over a decade for those who haven't ever met him before you're a man he was. He meant so much to me. Because we began our arap careers together as Young young artists probably teenage years. Still so together. We grew from here in the South West and branched out internationally nationally. And I'm always very proud of all his success and accomplishments he's gained as an artist and also as a human being you too. He's helped me in many different ways like to grow as person and artist. Who So it's an honor to be here with them to honor him just before the show listening to to an interview that he did on generation justice and some of the things he had to say was really You know strong and powerful just even his message to the youth talking about believe in yourself. Love Yourself Try your hardest and accept the fact. You're unique in era blessing. A lot of positivity in he really concentrated on bat defy For you having somebody who knew how important it was to keep our nation's keep anybody who is in listening range on a positive level for you. How important was that or did you learn you? You know from him how to keep things positive. I definitely learned how to keep things positive from wake especially on our travels and tours we've had countless tours throughout the country over the years and even through the hard times like he was always very positive and kept that outlook throughout the time. And that helped me me grow to like I was saying a little bit earlier to kind of not complain. Inches always just believe in ourselves really so so I mean we started together at a time where I felt like there was I mean our family. We had family support of course but when we had traveled on our own indefinitely had to believe in ourselves or to continue and yeah he was very instrumental neat like continuing to in hearing him. Am say things like ideas are bulletproof. Man that there's a lot of weight in that And then thinking of music it being like water it it being like medicine. I've even heard you use those terms to and lot of times when people think of hip hop the think of darker side of it or sinister side right in what He brought forward was even a moment about reminding people to respect women One of his songs that went really big league in really touched a lot of people and even put You know hip hop on call about Treating women right in thinking about how you know masculinity healthy masculinity anything you want to share about his work to really push forward some really important issues yes. He has a new upcoming album coming out soon. It's titled Ready to live. It's combination of his musical journey. Close collaboration with with super producer engineer. Smoke into d-6 Matt smoke which he was also very instrumental in providing the instrumentalist. Wake selfs up messages and messengers lyrical. Craftsmanship it just sounds really great together. I've heard a few songs on the album. Actually I've heard the album. It's amazing but It's GONNA be released. I believe on January third early twenty twenty and for those interested in hearing his music. It'll be available there on that day. There's a release party as well on that day at sister. Bar Here in Albuquerque New Mexico the the party will begin at APM to one one am. Seven dollar pre-sales. I mean excuse me I can't mention any of that I'm sorry but nowhere. It's nowhere You know the first hundred people through the door do get a CD copy. And that's something really important. I think you know thinking about how the work that he put into this I understand that he was actually making beats and and really win inside to figure out. What Kinda Music Zik? He wanted to put out even learn how to play the piano. So on this album. We're going to hear for the first time His music mastery in the sense of of doing that. And as an emcee You know what that's like to to say. Okay I'M GONNA I'M GONNA hold this wheel to And just knowing that that is about to be released defy any words about how he really. Did you know. Give a lot in this little bit more about the album mom. Tom Was a message of loving growths. Clearly present throughout it eleven songs can be considered to be kind of like a magnum opus of his work. Because he's he's done A. I think maybe four more albums before or something like that. I mean we've done so many albums that some that are unreleased together we had a group called Definition rare but the music Really speaks for itself. It's an amazing album. Like I said I believe his music and message will live on for many many generations. Certainly you know what we're going to go hit in here a little bit From one of his albums this is his song. Title New Mexico Definitely it could be an anthem especially you know his tribute to What is important or just what is New Mexico? Let's Gordon here that are tribute to the life in memory of weeks self Apache. AMC right here. On native America calling Oh Nice Briscoe was born in Eastern Eastern New Mexico Medical Center the same hospital liberal Aswa when my parents attend to this beautiful. Saint Paul's forget the existing. But it don't matter about soul feels at home this it's really love Sandy. Hill the shrink from the surrounding land might catch me a half with Duke City let our brain know what I mean all the best places in the world if you ask me. We have Christmas all year. Half red half greenheart. Don't like it here rent. You say bad thing allow pay for the gas money just to help us legal half of pro sports teams so everyone's a local or hey begin. aggie that's dependent on it force. Not The land of entrapment is is the place where my mind is free. Finding peace away from the rest of the world so mocking breathe cow heart is never forget what started. Take your back up man by Robert but back home where the heart is never. Forgive the Florida they say you sound like you're despite your fat but on that or fraud why not be covered. Most of family stay. I got Brexit galloper. Alex Thomas Kerala Carlsbad Lipa Gordo. We know Farmington. Las cruces Carrizo for motor the center. Rosa Diverg Colegio Crown Point Tieger Cubatao spot with a SIP Brockhouse Harrison silver city. PATs clove Asuka presumably this strictly for my people out there with the home state. Feel when I see Ziggy flag. Rape got the best chilly. That's the truth really power Albuquerque forecast to exceed more than a show about cooking matthew built from television. We got small community culture by tradition. And this is my life the southwest taste tops of a young man with the new state of the heart is never forgive us. Lord they say is not your despite your rat rat but up at for profit but that is where the hardiest never forgive us Lord. They say it's not like you're I put up for fraud but I'll be coming back and again. It is an honor to play that song in memory of wake south who walked on this year maybe he was somebody who provided a lot of encouragement urge meant to you through the music. If you like to share some thoughts you can call in one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is number and again if there is somebody that you are remembering remember in one a paid tribute to who walked on this year. You can call in one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. We're going to hear now from a caller. We Got Glen in he. He missed brings to Mexico tuned on key. UNM blending giving us a ring. You're on here. Good Morning Happy New Year but I. They had a grandmother who came from Germany in nineteen hundred who is my spiritual mentor Bible reader loving person liked to embrace folks raised four boys on a farm in Kansas Anyway. her her teaching her mentoring spirituality. helped me throughout my life In nineteen eighty six When our governor Tony and I had a sanctuary proclamation for the whole state and encouraged us? WHO WORKED WITH CHURCHES TO HELP refugees coming from Guatemala and solve it or I did that and was later given nine show any counts for doing it and spent three weeks in a federal court? One hundred thousand one dollars legal bill for three good attorneys and got a credit because the journey the jury felt that the governor's proclamation covering and so that that I credit my grandma for having a deep rooted spirituality and willing- willingness to risk and help others. There's and then I had a son who just gave up six and a half years as the director of a New Mexico. Faith Coalition for immigrant justice helping refugees from Mexico and Central America. And so on and so what grandma Frieda Hiney what's her name taught me showed me went through me into my life and my actions onto my son son. WHO's thirty two years old now and so God bless the grammas and the Ancestors who give us those kinds of big samples of how to live life in a better way than what trump is teaching days. We'll Glenn when we think of the people who we have in our corner in that sense that have taught us us really strong themes or even just pass that onto another generation We are really keeping those memories in in a good way. And that's the reason we are opening up these phone lines and you know making that space for people to share because with these people come into our lives and they teach us a lot got any for smart we listen and we pick up these good things and you know what we also love him where we have them and for you defy anything anything you want to share just thinking of Glenn in how You know some of these things do pass on through us and in who knows the teachings that wake self gave you how you're going to continue neat. Pass those on shout out to Glen Shots all grandmothers out there and he's right yeah like grandmothers definitely instill with the ways to live better later. I feel like I've got to give shout out to my grandmother too. I'm very fortunate to still have my grandmother's on both Mon- attornal than paternal sides and Yes I just want to share my condolences to everybody out there. Too especially with clan defy when the news came of wake walking on there are a lot of people who were really you know the the kind of their frozen for a moment in in really an outpouring of what it meant to lose such a good soul You know here Hearing his voice and being able to see him on stage age in that kind of Outpour Really I think woke up a lot of people in even caught the attention of the mayor. Tim Keller even him coming now and in paying tribute Two weeks off and his contributions to New Mexico and defy. When you think of all the things that He did give through the music and even just somebody who was also encouraging people to be creative And and as he said in that interview view with generation justice you have to reach in yourself to create your authentic self and creativity. Sometimes it's it's a battle within yourself of saying okay. That's good enough. I'M GONNA put it out but when you think of his words of encouragement of even just being an emcee anything that you want to share that he told you about you know just write it get on stage. Don't be afraid anything like that. I mean she when I first met wake self he was just amazing. Free styling engines is. I mean very kind of shy at the beginnings and and I felt like we were both there to help each other kind of grow out of that as much as we could but as many times we were on stage. I just can't stop thinking about the Times where he it was amazing outlet. Yo I got step my game up to and like as a group rare. We were just there to definitely help each other. Uplift one another Soviet so yeah man but every time I hear that New Mexico anthem I get really hyped. I get excited. So thank you for playing that. And for you defy anything else. It's two people you know that. Wake self touched any words to those folks. I know we all cope in our own ways. Each day is like sometimes. It's just taking deep breaths really helps and just being gentle with ourselves and like with with one another as a main thing too especially in these times because we got a role in together I just I just hope we all take care of one another take care of each other and take care of ourselves and just I I. It's hard to just give advice. You know because I'm dealing with like a lot right now. Like I just pray every day. They just stayed busy working on music myself. And I know like I. It's hard to talk about. It is it is and I commend your strength because being here to honor somebody like this Is is not easy and being naval to talk about this too Takes a strong heart and I commend you. For that defy a lot of people look up to you and your music and I know that there are many stories stories that there are to be shared about everything that your best friend brought to this world and I know you continue to do it through the music and always pounded on the pavement and taking your music to even just argh our smallest citizens of our tribal nations to make sure that we remind folks how important written this medium is how important this mess medicine is music and I appreciate you sharing with us today. And we're going to continue here folks but you can can join us to one eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is number defy wish you a lot of strength support support for this program. Provided by the American Indian Higher Education consortium the collective spirit and unifying voice of thirty seven tribal colleges and universities -versities for over thirty years a heck has worked to ensure that tribal sovereignty is recognised and respected and that tribal colleges and universities are included in this nations higher education system. Information on a tribal college or university near you at A.. H. E. C.. Dot Org uh-huh Yeah thanks for joining us today. Here on native America calling remembering those who walked on in two thousand nineteen phone lines are open. If you'd like to share you can join us at one. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight right now. We're going to say hi to Pandora. Who is in Seattle Washington tuned in online Pandora? Thank you for reaching out go ahead. You're on we're good morning. Yacht a Yes I am Pandora Mike and I guess is mom I just I wanted to say Good Morning Josh. And thank you for your words of encourage Nick I'm talking about Our Andy as I called him. Wake self off You know wake south inspired so many across many nations with his music has movement his inspiration and I was very Moved by his his. Love his care for his mom Barbara Martinez She is also a grandmother and I wanted to Also share that. I I know he loves me so much to as I loved him and still do and the memories that we have had In honor of women was most important and watching The lyrical twin warriors as I called old and best buy and wake south growing up through the years making music together sharing their inspiration for all cultures. All nations was You know just Truly inspiring and I am I I instill inspired every time. I hear his music that the song in Mexico brings tears to my eyes this morning and I just have to call in. Thank you for sharing sharing that and you know one of my other favorite Songs have of Wake south with deaths I is Hunger hunger pains. I love that Song as well as it brings back memories of The good times and the good the the good movements that they had made together and I I want to say those are good. Good things to keep in mind and I also want to Give condolences and well wishes to I'll presenters there and their families and extended families and friends into the hip hop nation for honoring Wake South as we move forward. We've looked forward to a mini more. Good Times comes with those of you who are presenting now and carrying on the legacy for those that have walked on. Thank you for having me in. Have a wonderful the whole wonderful day in Pandora. Thank you for raising such a wonderful son. It's our pleasure to have him here. with us in in defy. Why I know you got to get going here and we have some more folks to introduce Here but Just any wrap up words go head to fight yes. Thanks for having everyone on the show just want to remind everybody about wake selfs Alvin release in wakes tribute for his album. Coming coming soon ready to live as title and the album released tribute party will be Friday January third. Twenty twenty downtown at sister Bar Hearing Albuquerque New Mexico his music will also be available on digital platforms. Some more information to be announced announced. Just keep in tune much love. Everybody loved wake self forever in love everyone thank you all right. Mc Defy thank you so much for being here with us and right now. We're going to take you back to Oklahoma to say hello to another one of our guests. Jennifer Lemere is with us. Yes she is. The daughter of the late activist Franklin ear. She's also a member of the Winnebago tribe of Nebraska Jennifer. Thank you for being with us. Thank you so how much it's an honor to join you and you know I really appreciate those kind words from Pandora it's It's been a tough year and it sounds like it's been a tough year for are for a number of folks but but I appreciate you. You haven't me on will thank you for being here Also on the line is Kevin embarrassed. He joins US today. At a Lincoln Nebraska Bresca the managing editor of Indian DOT COM and Kevin is Rosebud Sioux. It's our pleasure to have him here. Kevin thank you for being with us as well doc. WHOL wash the issues up? Hilo thank you for having me. It's a great to be here and I'm happy to join Jennifer to talk about A great man that we both in Franklin Mir did a lot and I think every time that I've read an article or have heard his voice. I was reminded of the dedication and That our community members have to make our places better on this planet In he put a lot of love in two different Things that he stood behind stood up for in for you Jennifer Anything you want to share this is your father. Were talking about How you you remember him his legacy and the things he did anything? You WANNA share Jennifer. Wow you know putting together some notes just in preparation for this for this is call There's there's so many things there's so many different areas that he was involved in You know white clay. I was was a huge accomplishment of getting the four liquor stores closed down and you know during during that it was always a fear here for me that he would never live to see those closed so in two thousand seventeen it was. It was just such a huge celebration. And but there's one thing that he always said is you know our work just now begins even though the stores are closed. There's so much historical trauma there that continues and it's GonNa take you know years and years to recover from that so so we have a group. That's still very active and and trying to develop a trauma center in Whiteclay Another another major issue that he Had A lot of impact is his his political work with the Democratic Party and I think one of his biggest legacy spent. I'd like to share with with Indian. Folks is being involved loved. It was so important for him for tribes to have a seat at the table and have a voice and I think that's you know I think we have to continue on to be involved in especially in such an important election. Year is make sure tribes are involved in the election process. We have to have received the table indeed and that is a very important thing in Kevin Speaking of having that seat at the table why the vote matters The I need of American presidential debate. That was held Baird Frank's name and in his words were used People were talking about him in any thoughts of how presidential hopefuls know the name. Franklin Mir in the work that he did any there yeah Franklin. Mary was a long time activist within the Democratic Party. had served. Well he founded the the a native American caucus at least here in Nebraska and know for sure and he was the longest serving native member of the Democratic National Committee and and found it both in Nebraska needed caucus and the national native caucus of the Democratic Party when he passed You know some some very well known native people including debris from New Mexico Issued condolences to the family A lot of people here in Nebraska knew him everybody here in Nebraska. I'm really Pollen tweeted the passing of frankly and my good friend hero for any country for justice and a voice at every table will leave a void that none of us can easily fill his activism. And Kinda generous heart will be missed. So yeah he was definitely well known from the from the tops of our federal government down to you know everyday people who who he treated everybody the same same you know. He never never treated anybody any different. No matter what their title was kind of education they had it didn't matter to him and Kevin you also followed his story very very closely for Indians Dot Com and talk to me about your conversations with him or getting that chance to interview him a once L. Whiteclay Nebraska decided to close down those liquor stores. Anything you want to share you know. It was kind of one of the crowning achievement chievements of his life. I guess I wouldn't put up. You know. Certainly having children and things like that you know his family was so important to him. And I know that spirituality and his love for his creator was was paramount. Came out and everything he did. He said a prayer before everything he did. But that said You know he spent twenty years fighting to shut down the beer stores in Whiteclay and and for a long time. He didn't have much support you know he would have rallies he would go to. The governor's office to protest And there would be very few people oftentimes with One of those famous sayings is You know when very few people showed up he would tell those show up. Everybody that needs to be here is here. That's all that matters. And it's one of the great Gifts that he's given us given to us are his words Beautiful words that he had he was such an order But Yeah it was definitely a crowning cheesman in his life and And you know I think certainly one of the things that he'll be most remembered for us as the man who shutdown Klay and given any words that he shared with you or things that you just begin to understand about him of why he continued why he pushed forward in worked on the issues that he you did well. This might be better for Jennifer to maybe address. But you know he did. He did lose a daughter. Some years ago is Beloved love a daughter Lexi and One of the things that he often said was that He he wanted to be received well when he when he saw Lexi in the afterlife life and and just wanted to know wanted her to know that he'd done everything he could in this life To help those. That didn't have a voice to to make a better life. Hey for those that We're really struggling and I think that was one of his prime motivations. Wow so again. I'm speechless. Just thinking of all all the things that he worked for and people who are also remembering him Jennifer anything you want to share you know. I just want to echo. What what Kevin said there are you know he? He grew up very poor. You know and and from a very large family of very good family a gold star family and I think that's where You know he developed some of his passion for for helping everybody. He kind of started as a native activist but he he eventually morphed into more. We're of a civil rights. Activists Social Justice activists. He really grew One thing I wanted to let folks know. Is You know his his three attributes. I mean there's there's a number of things that he's done and a- are is known for but but three of the main attributes I think think of him as he was kind he was so humble he was so humble and sober sober forty years sober and just the the impact that he had on so many people. It's just been so overwhelming I mean I I get messages all the time about one. One Lady Lady sent me a message. She talked to him for five minutes on an airplane nine years ago and she seek me out to send me a message because of the impact that he had on her nine years ago. And it's just it's it's been pretty overwhelming it's The love that people had is just so inspiring to me. The love they had for him is so inspiring to me. And I think you know His works not over. It's it's just planet in a lot more of us you know and it continues on in Jennifer anything that you will close to your heart. Something he told you something he taught you you now. Now there's there's a number of things Here's here's something that he always said you know is just treat people good I mean I don't I don't know that it gets any any more simpler. Just be good to people that's it you know and and that's what I try to do and it's I. I'm really trying to to follow along in his footsteps. Everything I do now is how would he handle that. How would he do this? How how would he say that? I'm really I will never fill those shoes. But I'M GONNA do my best to to carry on his legacy and carry on his projects and carry on his good work work and continue to try to be a voice for the voiceless. Thank you so much. Jennifer go caller on the line. We're GONNA see hi to Melvin incenting Nebraska tuned in on cheesy. Y Que Melvin. Thanks for calling. You're on here. Yeah so I pay tribute only to Mike Herminio Research. This Guy January Pine Ridge but I grew up with Franklin South Sioux City Nebraska. And you know one thing people forget about frank was that he was it. Great Ball player a coach. It'll and one thing that I always seen about. Frank was he did the issues or the issue. You never red look for recognition or any of that stuff you stuck with the issue. It was a good man. Like my cur- many horses. The same way like was a council he served on the council binary was -secutive director. It treaty work for forty fifty years. A big loss over there was it was another one it was for the people will seek recognition. Just deal with issue. It was like Franklin or we lost two great men and one year. I knew both very well and It was a big Las Issuer. Melvin thank you for remembering during both of them with US and You know what there are many people that did work on this year and we just wanted to Pay Tribute in and and I think also. I'm giving those words of encouragement to to all those who are listening who have lost somebody this year. Either some related to somebody who was close to them or somebody just You know was cog in their community and kept it going in and I send a lot of words of encouragement Kirkman to you to strength and thank you for your encouragement to teach us and talk about these people and to carry on their teachings in a know takes a lot and we thank you for turning to This radio program to think alongside US and to also for those who are learning about these great individuals individuals and learning. What page in native history that they wrote so that we could all learn so that we can all thrive and be stronger? I appreciate create you tuning into and again our thoughts go out to all of the family members and friends and fans of the people that we talked about today. Okay and thank you to all of these family members who also shared their words. Um We wish you a lot of strength and look forward to seeing Your gifts is that you continue to give us through these airways thanks so much and also before we in we do want to take a moment to remember a member of the family that just recently walked walked on Mel Seder was Elliott. He passed on on December four. Th Alaska public media called him in Alaska Broadcasting Pioneer and he worked in television and radio and he was instrumental in building. Anchorage a Anchorage Radio Station K.. And as well as Ky.. On the Hopi reservation nation in many of their projects in the US and abroad he was the father of quantocks operation. Officer Charles Safer He will be missed. Our thoughts go out to him as well. I'm your host hair gatewood. We'll meet you here tomorrow. Support by dream spring. A nonprofit community lender for over twenty five years dream. Spring has been increasing access to business credit for entrepreneurs across New Mexico Arizona and beyond dream spring offers loans for self employed entrepreneurs startups and large established enterprises information about flexible credit requirements affordable rates and customized demised lending available by calling eight hundred five zero eight seventy six twenty four or online at Dream Spring Dot Com art not sees a young corner on here. Luke healthcare health care coverage to demaurice quaking. Now he's DOT COM one eight hundred three eight I. Five Centers for Medicare and Medicaid services does not been an Easter look Native America calling to produce the birds national native voice studios in Albuquerque New Mexico by Quantum Broadcast Corporation and native nonprofit media organization funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting lasting support from the public radio satellite. Service Music is by Brent Michael Davids native voice. One the native American radio network.

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10-10-19 Native romance novels

Native America Calling

59:00 min | 1 year ago

10-10-19 Native romance novels

"Them to native America calling from Studio Forty nine in Albuquerque. I'M MONICA BRAIN ROMANCE NOVELS RAKE in over one billion dollars every year while it's hard to say how murdered indigenous people after he announced his intent to support the Keystone Excel pipeline in court Olivia rheingold has more the Canadian Museum of history it comes after years of research into what happened to indigenous children who were taken from their homes and placed in the schools and never seen again from the this is national native news Antonio Gonzalez Tribal Leaders in Montana are pulling out of the Attorney General's Task Force on missing it won't cross into Roosevelt County where the reservation is located for National Native News. I'm Olivia Reingold in billings Montana a special one person's cases that's something he worries about for his two daughters pipeline projects and crime rates are connected according to the recent Canadian inquiry into missing and murdered billion dollars in property taxes he's filed a motion to intervene in a lawsuit to support the pipeline Monday but I guess what do you have to say to The tribe attorney general of Montana Republican Tim Fox appointed members to the task force this spring now some are resigning because Fox who's running for governor wants to join a lawsuit and serve Montana's specifically fort Belknap who say hey this would benefit us we don't want this I think that I haven't looked at that statement indigenous women the pipeline would cross the Missouri River a quarter mile upstream from the Fort Peck nation debris says the pipeline would economically develop some parts of the state Justin debris is one of two who resigned since Monday the Task Force has eleven members including eight tribal representatives the only tribal member who could be reached we invited a few native romance authors to join us today and talk about Combating Stereotypes in Native Love and lust join us right after national native time for broadcast says she's considering leaving the task force and his talking it over with her tribe debris says man camps that house temporary pipeline workers would increase violence and Tony was held recently in Canada to remember the indigenous children who died in the residential school system as Dan Carpenter Chuck reports a banner health the news I'm Dan Carpenter and Antonio Gonzalez emotionally and sexually abused many also died Dr Bernie Williams is an elder and survivor of the residential school system there's a lot missing still names of nearly three thousand students who died the cloth banner was blood red and the names of two thousand eight hundred children were emblazoned on it in stark white the banner was the native voice one the native American radio network I usually have a central love story and a positive ending you can spot one by the book cover which includes a couple embracing with this is native America Calling Monica Brain Romance novels it's novels including Contemporary Romance Paranormal Romance and Historical Romance in historical Romances where we're most likely produced by colonic broadcast corporation with funding by the corporation for Public Broadcasting Support uh-huh the need of American characters while it's a huge market in Genre Romance Writers of America the Association of Romance Writers of America Agree Ramona farms offering wholesome and delicious foods from our Aaron crops as our contribution to a better diet for the benefit of all people we are honored to share our centuries old comes after the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission called for the government to create a register of those who lost their lives because of the residential schools for national you know that that's a correct statement because the tax revenues from the pipeline being built alone will will the eighteen hundreds to the mid one thousand nine hundred about one hundred and fifty thousand Canadian indigenous children were forced to attend the church run government funded schools thousands were physically or without a shirtless man you know the ones romance novels bring in over one billion dollars annually and there are a bunch of different kinds of romance be a benefit to all Montana's former task force member decreases the CINNABON ensue tribes won't be able to collect on the pipelines property taxes it's a very emotional because I I often in my journey often wondered what happened it's believed another sixteen hundred children may have died the president list ax do we need more or less of this kind of fictional storytelling gives a call join the conversation you can call in anonymously if you like is that there could be more diversity in writers that was in response to a national public radio piece last year about the diversity in the genre aggie okay so I imagine that you read romance before you started writing at tell us about some of the first row romance has to are you a fan of romance novels we know Romance novels have different levels of sensuality what do you think about telling native stories that include the number is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight that's a one eight hundred nine nine native joining us from Fort Francis Ontario Survive Roseanne Bittner those those types of historical Romance Authors and what impression did you get from them when you absolutely so tell us about your journey from Reading Romance novels to being romance novelist yourself I read the majority of the bad things that follow that suck says the pipeline would be an economic boon for the state primarily filling the seven counties it's supposed to cross with sixty three whether they were fine fiction romances or anything like that whatever came off the top of my head and then it wasn't until maybe the national native news is farming and culinary traditions online at Ramona farms dot com and by the law offices of snarky chambers sexy the people are remembering that so and so didn't come home 'cause mid never came they were wherever they were wherever they were buried around two thousand and ten when I decided well I'm GonNa Start Writing about the my own people and I started reading romance novels I enjoy this I I liked the the development of the relationship within the non children and everything like that so so that's how it all started and how did you end up getting published I would just write short stories just for myself to entertain myself I've always been that way using my imagination in Canada is Maggie Blackbird she writes romance starring Canada's Indigenous People and she is OJ from Northwest Ontario. Welcome to native America calling me Miller and monk men national trial rights law firm with offices in Washington DC New Mexico California and Alaska and online at Oscar Dot com support of the Keystone Excel pipeline shaking your hand with one hand but on the back he's crossing his fingers in telling the state to go forward as pipeline as Senate boy Ninsu triple member where are we didn't know that I'm eighty years old now and that's fine the to see something like this for me is really heartwarming also et ton author in Nova Scotia over we belong to a website it's first supporting Romance Authors and it's called Romance d what what do you think that it played into the fact that she read it so quickly responded so quickly that the fact that you're native had anything to do with it in Canada because I was looking for a Canadian publisher for for the tax purpose 'cause I wasn't sure how how how that works in the states so I thought it'd be in this hour we'll talk with a few native Romance Authors About Native Representation in the Shawna and what it takes to write this kind of love story and you could join that was that she didn't mention anything about native or anything like that so that's great well what was the title of the Book Blessed It's my weeks but I was really surprised when the owner herself emailed me back the next day and said she'd read the manuscript and she wanted it so so it just took off from the financial schools and Canada my father and his brothers and sisters and everybody all attended them so he was a great resource for that and I wanted novels that you've read this would be a stretching of a bit back but I used to read a lot of Johanna Lindsey a lot of I'd really like I'm a people person so I like feeing how people tick and romance gives you a really good look into that rejections and things like that did was it that your editor was really looking for a native author do you think that played into it and And I WANNA ride in contemporary times and and let people know what what were really like that you know we we fall in love and we get married and we have devotes and that met her and she told me about where she was she published her book and I thought okay great parents and aunts and uncles who had gone to the school and how it impacted Darryl in his present day life so we are talking with Maggie I wrote the book I I on I had to make sure you do a lot of networking I with other authors in Asia and blackbirds she writes Romance novels that have are focused around Canada's indigenous people and that's sation today romance novels what do you think give us a call and share what was the if you read romance novels what was the last one that you read call us and tell us about it the number is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight mega imagine that you put a lot of thought into Marie and Emory's off former Lover Daryl it there's the Gay Romance Yeah Yeah Yeah Approaching these really difficult topics like boarding schools a residential schools in Canada into your your books talk to us wow that's that's really exciting to hear that you know you hear so many stories of authors who say that they can sort of wallpaper they're wall with I think she just liked the writing when she emailed me back she had their fifth good writing I like it I'm going to send it to our acquisitions department and and when I was about Oh I'd say maybe twenty three twenty four I started writing and just kept on writing ripped I have everything all set and ready to go so I emailed the publisher and I was expecting to wait for standard it's usually four eight up in Canada I wanted more isolated community a lot of them are are flying you can't get there you know by train or the theory was born from so the first one is about the deacons deaconess Ojibway full-blooded and it's about his his youngest son a plane or anything like that and my brother actually used to work up in those areas as the fire prevention training officer and wanted wanted to write about that to combine it also with a lot of them also have a Christian churches through those reserve and I thought you know what it would be level that the different conflicts the hero or the heroine had with each other and how they would resolve it the book itself and how you combine the research into it like I said I wanted to touch on when I can he has a quite a bone to pick with the religion he lost the law he's an intergenerational survivor and that means he had if my first published book and the Motto Op Families Series. Oh yeah tell us about this series Oh yeah yeah I wanted to touch on we're up AH to spirit and and it just kind of took off from there where Amri discerning the priesthood and Darryl feels otherwise about it well all I wanted to talk all I wanted to write about what was the conflict between the two main heroes because conflict is what drives career just to work with the publisher in Canada and she told me about her publisher An extra fee bucks so I said okay well you know I have my manual live that impacts Daryl where he picks up on that as a young boy for years old and if what he grows up and fees is what the residential at that and you're sort of process for deciding what to put in to share nuclear when you're doing all your research and older and combining the residential school was only not troll to to happen because it impacts how many communities and people even to this day you know that that's that's happening in their lives whether it's you know figure out what is true calling is as the priesthood or is it his ex lover who has darryl and who has a big chip on his shoulder we're going to get into some of the stereotypes that show up in Romance novels when they write about native characters will be right back very upset the and the drinking or anything that they try due to not numb the pain so daryl's aunt who his family alive when he was four years old so he and his aunt was also raised in the residential school and she has a big chip on her shoulder so a lot the Clemma th river has the same rights as people according to a new law passed by the Rock Tribal Council in New Zealand members. Sorry I had cousins who lived up there too so and I took it also look into those listening to the newscast earlier about the Indian it's a slap in the face to their own people and yeah that's so interesting I can't wait to take a look at it everything it's only to make the story real what it really focused what you're really focused on when you're writing is the actual plot oh God you know I've always written and like I said I was drawn to the romance genre probably when I was about twelve years old I'd say and you like if you had those are traditional and those who are are Christian and that they're all in intermixing that way so that's where it came from native America calling Oh mance novel and how they're going to resolve it so Ameri he's a you know at the beginning awful he's a Catholic seminarian and he was trying to okay God John in read it we are talking about Romance novels today and Maggie Blackbird is with us she's Ojibway for North West Ontario the school has done to his aunt and how would have made her very angry and very upset so automatically you know blame George Gallup a cultural heritage night and pow out online registration in September thirteenth at N. I. E. A. Dot Org Proud to support this show Kamori tribe fought to have a river given person hood status is part of a growing movement to protect the environment we'll learn more about it on the next came up with the story I really wasn't trying to be controversial or anything and then when people were reading it they would mention this is a controversial subject and I would think Oh okay well the apple's convention center October eight through the twelfth we'll explore critical topics that advanced educational opportunities for native students will connect with friends and colleagues with an you're listening to native America calling a Monica brain sitting in for Tara Gatewood we're talking about romance novels today it's a big industry and there are so if you like romance novels if you've picked one up and he really like what you're reading give us a call and share one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight cockup donnelly a new nine and they try to survive through it like my dad's story you know where he came out of the school very angry very better be about them do you like the number is one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight that's eight hundred nine nine native what the whole I guess you would call it theme through it is Reconciliation and review the National Indian Education Association is Celebrating Fifty Years of building education nations strengthening and advancing native control of native education at are just a few native writers are making some of our romantic fantasies come true if Van Romance novels give a call what and we've been talking with Maggie blackbird. She is a romance novelist based in Canada. Maybe anything else you WANNA share about your series Louis the whole the the main theories are is the two families that are in conflict and one of course is the motto op-eds written about a Western band in grassy narrows in Western Ontario. I don't know if that's where you're from but it was a book called a poisoned stronger than love and starting with the first one blessed how does the series developed through through time batting one another's different beliefs and and trying to reconcile them that that's basically the whole over overall arc staying to be able to sort of we've all of these stories together with these with these two different families we're talking romance novels today if you WanNa get in on the conversation have to two books and also last touch on the Cabernet family who are traditional and or against having for the series and each one has to have to do that each book it sounds like a challenging topic but also really interest it was just an incredible book that obviously deals with love but in a non fictional fashion and about what happened to you and 'em hey there thanks for calling in today what are you thinking about when it comes to romance novels Monica and Maggie's this is candidate Johnson the the Deacon who have embiid finally to embrace the religion that the Deacon was taught in the residential school where Darryl field actually in the one book redeemed the heroin bridget does mention it all all the rivers I have in there are fictional course to the population being moved and having their traditional ways basically bludgeoned both by mercury poisoning and Really dealing with these these difficult topics like grassy narrows you know they've had a boil water advisory for wait is it like twenty or thirty years you know yet lead family where the Deacon he has raised his children Catholic and it is also the cabot family how do you manage to sort of weave those things into a into your stories and still make them something that people WanNa keep reading and and just relocation and I just wanted to be used for writing about these very important subjects so much for giving us a call and Maggie you know that's an interesting thought about you talk about residential schools and things like that in in your work for the arc kind of goes all the way through with in my previous novel where the deacons elder for religion a lot of Western culture everything br brought into the preserve and what they're trying to do is preserve the culture so they class that's great let's get some more voices to our conversation about Romance novels and if you WanNa get in on this conversation phone lines are open one eight hundred nine nine WCHS the stories that we read definitely affect our understanding and help us solve problems it's your kind of everyday life that you live with and life still happens you know people still get up they said but she talks about how one had a mercury dumped into the river and and what's happening to it and of course the Reserve Jud he falls in love with the cavities youngest daughter and like I said they're they're both on opposing sides and what there's six to eight four eight joining us from New Mexico is me POW she is a professor in the College of Arts and Letters at Michigan State national but what I'm using his grassy narrows as an example of a how how she wants people to be educated. ESPN Nunan You John I wanNA keep turning the page you know that that's a really good question because I do write about those those topics -sidered romance novel Candida No but the title is explained to the gentleman I spoke to it's a poison stronger than love is the university an avid romance reader and writer and Faculty in American Indian Studies and she has Indiana Miami Ancestry what do you to romance novels and when did you start reading them. I started reading romance novels when I was fuller between Whoa what's happening with the indigenous people of Canada and so it's just a matter of you know when you look at it yes I started reading them and I liked the novel center because they were women in them you know the western detective fiction didn't really have a lot of women in for this series for another one that I'm looking at down the road it would be the sixties scoop and how it impacts the hero wasn't heroins we talked with Maggie a little bit about just you know every romance writer starts with a passion for Reading Romance Welcome to native America calling me Inky also we've got Karen Kay joining us from Connecticut. She is a historical romance author and she is Chuck Eleven or twelve my mother belonged to this Group of women sort of reading circle where they would trade paper bags full only because I spent seven summers and I'll park in northern Ontario which is imputed with the Jip- way traditions and philosophies and I just finished reading a book many Romance Novels Include Native Stories and characters there aren't too many the Tel realistic stories because there aren't too many native romance novelist name of the Book and so it seems to remain since it don't want the Ojibway of Western Ontario where Maggie is from all right thank you any kind of rose that seem to have any power or agency and so I've been reading them for a really long time and I think when I was in my twenty leverage started looking for romance novels that might have made people in them and as you mentioned really found only historical novels the same ones Maggie taught and adopted black feet welcome back to native America Calling Karen thank you hi hello me let's start with you a series also from the library and then I really became a fan of the romance genre when when you call one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight let's go to Candida an Albuquerque New Mexico tuned in on ladies and there was a tough time for me and especially at night you know and I discovered that I would read romance really love them and then when I I kinda gave it up and then when I was in high school I rediscovered them in another after I had my children and my husband was gone a lot during that time and I had baby to two small kids they were both day life and what they experienced and all become a part of the story for that one was the residential schools for and yes probably around the same time that she mentioned that it's eleven or twelve and I got my romance books from the library couple John DOE novels it would calm me down enough to go to sleep and so- Romance novels really became a friend to me and that's really that's GonNa be in that series so I it's just building in a part of who they are and what their life is about what a bad they still fall in love they get married they still have children so that's how I weave it in it's just a part of of their about Joanna Lindsey Bittner and so I've been I've been reading for a really long time what about you Karen did you start when you were in in your team Brennan's novels Western detective fiction around with each other like every couple of weeks a new bag of books would come to our house and and so John John John Quincy I I decided you know I wonder if I could write these because I just fell in love with them they became something that was a part of my life at that time and they have remained that way to this day me when you I like about Romance novels now that I'm older is I lake having that moment where I can disappear into a story what about the process that goes into creating these stories and telling them sure call us and share one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight Karen you write historical fiction historical Romance tell us in the mid west living their lives every day contributing to their community buyers factory workers farmers and so that's one of the does something that you can delve into the story and recognize your own personal experiences or see yourself in every day kinds of folks who are natives in this country where's the romance in that farmers and lawyers the you know was involved with a white woman sometimes they were they were definitely sort of sometimes captive or there's another relationship kind of like the dying savage trope so I didn't like that about them I found some folks who Kathleen Eagles Sherry with someone in the in the tribe and I remember reading it and thinking is any of this true is this correct native woman who was captured by a tribe as I I don't know maybe like a teenager or something like that and she grew up in the tribe and then fell in love with that I don't have to fix but it got people in it that I recognize I love that do you find romance novel things that made me think maybe I should try to write them and to represent that sort of the very non-stereotypical like middle average a mixed blood woman who was in love with the white man or some sort of you know noble savage man who there's been some really interesting work I think around African American Romance Novels in the past ten years also with a variety of kinds of occupation but I think the farm family and Wisconsin and you know there are always lawyers and CEO's and various other folks that are mostly White Meeting of a native American Romance I was already an adult and I had children that's how long it took when I was in high school the only thing I could find presented and I wasn't seeing anyone like the native people I knew right not on a reservation not really in a big urban area just sort of native soaps what kind of thoughts did you have when you first encountered native characters romance novels I mean there were very similar they're almost always either a sherry white feather married to native p married to native men who seem to write a little bit differently but they were writing contemporary and and you know the throughout Grad School as I'm getting this degree focusing on native studies I got more and more dissatisfied with the way that I was seeing native people like you know that had to do with really what my scholar self would say reasserting American colonialism into the genre right this well let me just back up just a little I I got well my first to read that had any native Americans in them was James Damore Cooper last Mohican the year slayer etc I read them but they certainly weren't romance as far as historical romance a lot of research goes into your well I mean there is romance in that if you look at if you look at Romance novels that are not needed focus without native characters Laurie handle and read a whole series historical romance you're going to be researching the tribe that you're writing about and also that time period that you're writing about or something that you can research like for instance I really am fascinated by the old ancestral scout took the they used to call their scouts wolves and those people were incredible those men were had in came into the environment that wasn't part of it they were instantly alert to it wow wow and I found was extremely interesting and I really love the concept of the old scouts and particularly they were taught to be to put their perception out way into the environment way out into the environment so that if something but some had other duties besides hunter like Warrior Scout Medicine Man chief etc and so you you research a lot of that probably I think more research goes into that than anything else and to try the way they talked the word usage I have lots of dictionary and it's called the wind scalp by Tom Brown junior and knitting fascinating book as soon as found out about this clan that each try pat the clan of the wolf or the scout amazing abilities since sensory perceptions that are unusual and they were talking the which I there is a book is not written by a native man but he was taught the way of the scalp by an old Apache scout anything just amazing so there's a lot of research that goes into a historical that's the first thing is to research the tribe research the you might call it the profession with his Scout with chief with you all men went out and they hunted they were all hunters support for journalism that raises the awareness of child wellbeing to citizens and to policymakers provided by the Annie E. Casey Foundation building a brighter future for here's our vision is to operate injury accident free with safety programs training and technology more at the NSF dot com slash tribal relations right and publish and you are invited to the conversation as well give us a call if you like romance novels one eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight children families and communities information at a e cf Dot org support by be NSF railway moving our economy for over one hundred sixty five he's here of Lakota and black feet and what the cinnabon that the assembling waffle that's another whole research another research that I love to sign language and of course all thanks for joining US Today on native America calling we are focusing on Romance novels written by Native Authors. Do you have a favorite romance doc I'm just curious how you approach you know your writing making sure that it doesn't include a lot of stereotypes historical romance that involves native characters are where we find the majority of the stereotypes about native people and that's a one eight hundred nine nine native we're GonNa go short break after the break we're in the continue with romance novel Authors and Let's see much crow I have lots of dictionaries Here of the language itself and stew large amounts of sign language they would abbreviate it down so that not everyone could follow exactly what they were saying mostly however I have to be honest here I do not like saying bad things about any nine six two eight four eight Maggie Blackbird is with us she writes romance novels that involve Canada's Indigenous People and Oh try new sign language and when tried we get together or people that didn't speak the same language I found out that they didn't criticism and be that good or bad I just do not want to have that come from my mouth at the same time and so you haven't incoming culture it's different than the one that that you want to really portray in your book not hang on Karen we gotta go to a short break I wanna talk more about your historical Romance novels that you share the and really look at it from her viewpoint what she's seeing as opposed to watch she's always been taught in many ways to I learned so much from my study of the Iroquois the government that they had their their mind uh-huh noblest are you a fan of native romance do you think we should be telling more of our love and relationship stories give us a call tell us what you think one eight hundred doc and so the viewpoint is from that particular person who's looking out upon it and seeing similarities and differences liked but overall I would say that writing about the Iroquois taught me how much do a lot of research from captive stories about that which was difficult it's not something that I I really we're also a little bit difficult to write about because of torture so I when I I really kind of left it out really good question I don't put a lot of attention to tell you the truth because you're writing history and we've got Malia Powell she's a professor and an avid romance reader and writer and Karen Kay she writes historical romance and she's is native population. I just have a sing about it that's from my tent and from my mouth is not going to spe- free was quite impressive and if you read stories of that time even in England they would comment on I tell you the truth I just I couldn't except perhaps in one book I put in not much torture but the heroine yeah uh-huh and and not spoken about very much and sometimes I blog about it because I really think that's very very very important I can tell shows up in in your novels malaria of I want to ask you that same question about how NATO writers when they're writing about native characters how they can avoid stereotypes and the common pitfalls that sort of put native choctaw and Karen before the break you were talking about the amount of research that goes into writing historical romance I find that a lot of at that time and showing not only good qualities but things about it that they don't like yeah our country is different yeah that's really interesting Karen it's an interesting perspective that throughout native America of freedom we're free you know no change on us and that that you know some people who were yearning the Indian excuse me for saying that we're at the Indian influence because that's what they were called at that time influence over the Americans isn't malaria these and and why this is what it is one of the hardest things that I had to write was the series that I did on the Iroquois it's a it's a difficult series and in many ways but a wonderful series and blur managing their relationship to their communities to their jobs too dominant culture Doing amazing are and I was what you might call bothered by what you would call food length who also had a reason for navy from America really influenced people really influence people there was a quality about and then sometimes not as much as a helmet with a hero you know getting into his viewpoint and you'll see the same thing he'll be looking at differences contemporary is there's so much material out there that that you can represent as real life everyday life but I also say you know it's is that the the call of freedom with everywhere and all the colonists due to this wow that's quite a legacy it's a little bit harder go when you're trying to push back with editors and with even with readers right with Beta readers I've had folks say Oh you know this that fascinating and even how they influenced our our own country and and the people who who wrote are the role that was played and making this country

America Canada Karen Kay National Native News Montana Maggie Blackbird writer Antonio Gonzalez Roosevelt County Olivia rheingold Albuquerque Darryl Daryl publisher Olivia Reingold Canadian Museum of history Chuck Eleven Attorney Washington Oscar Dot
Global Access To COVID-19 Vaccine; Cleveland To Rename Baseball Team

Here & Now

42:29 min | 5 months ago

Global Access To COVID-19 Vaccine; Cleveland To Rename Baseball Team

"Peter o'dowd thanking you for listening to the here now podcast and inviting you to contribute to support your npr station at donate dot. Npr dot org slash. Now here now helps you make sense of the world right now. The impact the pandemic on the aspect of our lives the transition to the biden administration. And how that will change washington and america in your hometown. And all the stories from around the country the local and regional news that resonates everywhere so make a donation today in that investment will come right back to. It is more important than ever. Just go to donate dot. Npr dot org slash. Now we're building. Npr stations thanks to you now. Let's get to the from. Npr wb. you are. I'm tanya moseley. I'm peter o'dowd this is here now. It is a historic day in the fight against the coronavirus pandemic this morning. The first publicized vaccination in the us went to a nurse at long jewish medical center in queens new york and over the course of the week many more frontline medical workers across the country will receive the first dose of pfizer's vaccine but that good news comes along with the devastating milestone about three hundred thousand americans have died from covid. Nineteen and that number is expected to rise. Npr science correspondent alison are rejoins us with the latest and allison. The fda issued emergency authorization for this vaccine late friday now. It's actually being administered to some healthcare workers. We've actually been watching these trucks. Pull up and people getting their shots. How has this rollout gone so far. Well it's just starting as you mentioned we see the first images of healthcare workers being vaccinated today with the pfizer vaccine including that critical care nurse at the long island. Jewish medical center you mentioned. She says she feels very hopeful today. And don't we all right tonya. This event in new york was streamlined. And promoted by governor andrew. Cuomo who says the vaccine only works. If the american people take it More than six hundred sites will receive shipment of the vaccine this week. I've spoken to physicians in charge of coordinating distributions at several large hospital systems around the country. And they're ready to go for instance. johns hopkins and baltimore. They tell me they have planned to begin. Vaccinations on wednesday. They're ready to go But we were talking a lot about this visor by vaccine requiring ultra cold storage. Could that jeopardize jeopardize. It's safe delivery. You know there has been great attention in the planning and executing of this delivery everything from the packaging that pfizer is using to keep the vials cold at that minus ninety four degree fahrenheit temperature to the shipping itself delivery of the packages. This is highly orchestrated and you know lots of people working together. Operation warp speed. Ups state leaders coordinators at the various hospitals. All of the hospitals receiving shipments. This week have been planning for months. They've got the freezers on hand. And they will be able to keep these vials and storage once files come out of deep-freeze. They need to be used pretty quickly within five days so there are lots of logistics here and remember. They won't have much supply to start but that's expected supply of the vaccine is expected to ramp up fairly quickly. Yeah covid nineteen inch has killed around three hundred thousand americans. That is such a grim picture. What can we expect in the coming weeks. We are averaging about two hundred thousand new cases a day and between two thousand and three thousand deaths and the upward trend in cases in hospitalizations and depths. That began before. Thanksgiving is really just getting worse. I spoke to angela rasmussen. She's a virologist at georgetown university. Here she is even before the thanksgiving holiday. We were on a steep trajectory in terms of the number of new cases and in terms of the number of new deaths and i realized that everybody has pandemic fatigue. We're tired of living like this. But i would also remind people that we are at basically nine eleven every day in terms of the number of people that were losing and that number is going up when we hit three thousand deaths day. That's about two people per minute. Dying from covid. Nineteen so this vaccine news is wonderful but right. Now we need to stay vigilant with masking and social distancing things that you've heard before it's all critical right now that really brings it home nine eleven every day so we know that yeah absolutely so we know healthcare workers and nursing home residents as you said our first in line for the vaccine how long until it's available to all of us you know. The federal government has purchased about one hundred million more doses of the moderna vaccine. Madeira has already applied for emergency use authorization and an advisory committee meeting on this subject to set up for later this week so it could be approved very soon and the the leaders of operation warp speed have said one hundred million americans should be vaccinated by the end of march okay. President trump rescinded a plan to have white house staff in the first round of vaccinations. What do you make of this political gesture right so yesterday. A spokesperson for the national security council at the white house had said that senior officials across all three branches of government would be getting vaccinated to kind of ensure the continuity of government right but after that announcement there was negative reaction on social media will really questioning whether this was fair given the limited supplies to start and then trump tweeted last night. That people in the white house would not be getting the vaccine right away nor would he now. It is not clear whether he even needs the vaccine himself since he had cova and recovered experts. Still don't know exactly how long immunity lasts. That's npr's science correspondent alison. Aubrey thank you much. Thank you so much for this update. Thank you for having me well. Many healthcare workers already go eager to roll up their sleeves and get the new vaccine. At least a few are wary. If not deeply mistrustful of what's inside the vile martha bebinger our home. Wbz massachusetts reports every day. Dr mark lewis and fellow anesthesiologist at tufts medical center insert breathing tubes for cova patients who need intensive care. We are in their mouths. We're right in their face. We're literally inches away from their face with full protective gear of course but for lewis. The vaccine offers a whole new level of safety and assurance. I think it's a game changer. And i would compare it to get front row seats at a rolling stones concert back fifteen years ago. Signed me up. At least a few physicians aren't so sure. Dr michelle finkel. An obgyn in cambridge supports vaccines in general. My children are fully vaccinated. I get a flu vaccine every year but right now finkel is pregnant. Pregnant women were not enrolled in the corona virus vaccine trials. So finkel has a lot of questions that aren't answered. Although i think the vaccine is likely safe and effective now what happens. If if or when it crosses the placenta and if there's any danger to the unborn fetus in utero or after birth finkel says she's leaning toward getting the vaccine but still isn't sure what she'll do barbara brosio a nurse who cares for kobe. Patients in worcester the largest city in central massachusetts says until a few weeks ago. She was adamant. Get the shots. Because i felt like it was a new vaccine. There really it was rushed through brush. Brescia says her resistance is crumbling during a second crushing wave of kobe patients. I'm just tired of the fight with the covert. I just want to see it. Go away in. it's not going to just go away. So the best option is the vaccine there signs that a lot of nursing assistance tax lab workers and cleaning staff share braschi ios initial concerns one of the state's largest healthcare unions. Eleven ninety nine. Sei you has pulled members asking if they are ready to get a coronavirus vaccine. Preliminary results show about half of respondents. Say no tim foli. The union's executive vice president says many. Sei members are women of color. Who remember the to ski syphilis. Study and other dangerous unethical medical research. We know there are some barriers and obstacles and we need to make sure that we're doing the all that we can now to make sure folks have the information that they need to feel comfortable taking the vaccine. Some hospitals are reaching out to hesitant employees especially staff of color. Who were asking why they should go. First we understand how that can create concern and build on mistrust of exist. This is dr. Joseph veteran court the chief equity officer at mass general answers this way in both spanish and english language videos. You're getting it. I is because you are especially valued and it was because you're especially at risk and the in court says mass general will reinforce that message by reserving vaccination appointments every day for employees from chelsea revere and other communities with high infection rates. It's not clear. How much pressure hospital employees will be under to get vaccinated. The shots will not be mandatory and tufts medical centers. Chief medical officer. Dr salwen guard says if staff are not ready to get the vaccine. He'll take that into account when deciding who goes i. My hope is that we can make this as democratic as possible and get as much input from individuals as possible but since hospitals are receiving. The first doses. They may set the tone and expectations for vaccine priority groups that follow. Here's umass memorials doctor. Kimberly fisher she ran. National corona virus vaccine opinion. Study earlier this year. Physician recommendations for a vaccine are very influential and one of the most the strongest influences in a patient's decision about whether or not to be vaccinated so the spotlight now is on. The doctors nurses physician assistants and other members of the medical teams. We turn to for guidance about our health for here and now. I'm martha bebinger in boston. Well even as the first shots go into arms of healthcare workers here in the us and in the united kingdom. The crisis is far from over. Britain's health secretary says london and surrounding areas will be placed under the highest level of corona virus restrictions starting wednesday as infections rise rapidly in the capital. That hancock says that a new variant of the virus may be to blame. He says that the government must take swift action after seeing very sharp exponential rises in greater london world. Health leaders are warning that rich countries are already leaving. Poorer ones behind in the race. To distribute a coronavirus vaccine. Here's melinda gates co chair of the bill and melinda gates foundation on cnn. Everybody needs this vaccine. And if we only get it to the high income countries this disease is going to bounce around. We're going to see twice as many deaths and our recovery of our economies is going to be much much slower than we get the vaccine out. Everybody well joining us now. Is thomas boy. Key director of the global health program at the council on foreign relations and thomas nurses and doctors in the united states are getting shots as we speak today. How much of a headstart to rich countries have over the rest of the world certainly for most countries. They're going to be months behind where we are in the united states the uk and european union the uk and the us are starting to distribute vaccines now. Canada and europe will come next if you're in a country like say south africa. It's uncertain win. You're going to get vaccines because it's really a handful of countries. Eight plus the european union. That had off the earliest doses. We'll talk more about that. One of the issues is that these richer countries are making deals directly with the vaccine developers. That's right so they've made advanced purchases of potential candidates. So let's take the pfizer vaccine The first one to be granted emergency use authorization. Uk and the us eighty five percent of that vaccine capacity by the end of twenty twenty. One has already been purchased by handful of nations. And that's gonna leave other nations out. There is a multilateral initiative. That's meant to by early supplies for other countries too but it's been starved for resources as wealthy nations have used their funds to buy their own doses. I i wonder if you're referring to kovacs. That's the arm of the world health organization that is supposed to help distribute vaccines around the world because there was supposed to be a group that that's dedicated to making sure poor countries. Get this vaccine. That's right so Kovacs is exactly what i'm referring to. It's a initiative led by the world health organization but also involving some prominent Global health ngos and intermediaries that their goal is to secure doses so that there's an equitable distribution of vaccines worldwide. Driven by health needs. Not just the size of the country's purse. The duke global health innovation center predicts that many people in lower income countries may have to wait until twenty. Twenty three or twenty four to get vaccinated. What do you make of that. I mean what does something like that mean for those countries and really for the world it means that the pandemic will persist longer and that's troublesome because what people need to remember are two things in the united states ultimately we need at least seventy percent of the population to be vaccinated with this vaccine for it to end the pandemic on its own. That's not likely to happen. Because to the united states historically is horrible at acceding adults for seasonal flu annually generally have less than fifty percent of the population vaccinated even smaller Smaller share of individuals in high risk groups. This vaccine in the united states and other countries primarily a tool to protect the most vulnerable. It means the virus will continue to circulate and if this pandemic lasts longer because we're not breaking transmission chains not protecting most vulnerable in other countries. It's gonna leave americans at risk. Well some people are already warning. The rich countries are hoarding the vaccines. We see that. Canada has ordered enough shots to cover its population five times. This is something known as vaccine. Nationalism rate i mean how much of a concern is this. It's a big concern so actually nationalism is the phenomenon of countries prioritizing their own needs over other nations for vaccines no one expects canada and the united states to forego vaccinating high priority populations like frontline health workers or elderly in long term. Care facilities. To question is whether those nations will seek to vaccinate everyone even low risk adolescence before we see any doses shared elsewhere. The problem with something like what canada has done is vaccine manufacturing is scarce of kenna's use its resources to buy up capacity to manufacture. Vaccines by early doses. It keeps kovacs and other Efforts to try to supply the world from getting the vaccines. They need to protect their high highly vulnerable populations. Is this something that pharmaceutical companies understand. I mean what are they doing to address this issue. Pharmaceutical companies do understand this. They have no interest on in being in the midst of a fight over access to these vaccines. They get it some. Your listeners may remember in the early days of hiv treatment access crisis in south africa. Where the firm. Pseudo companies fought south african government over tools to try to expand their access. It ended up in a case called thirty. Nine pharmaceutical companies feed nelson mandela. They don't wanna be in a situation like that. They would much rather see doses distributed globally. Which is why pfizer has reached out to kovacs. Other companies have reached out to kovacs to what is really driving the lack of access here. Frankly is the shortsightedness of wealthy nations using all the resources to try to cure doses for themselves. Now another thing. I'm thinking about is the logistical challenge that this distribution process will be in our own country and then i think about what it would be like in a country that doesn't have the resources of the united states that doesn't have the transportation infrastructure that doesn't have cold storage in their hospitals the way that the united states does. How much of an issue will that be. It's gonna be a big issue. So there aren't many settings where you can distribute a vaccine that needs to be kept at minus seventy degrees centigrade Globally there's just not going to be much capacity to do that. So ideally what you would see our wealthy nations with the capacity prioritizing their access to the vaccines that they can distribute and perhaps leaving the vaccines at other nations. Were able to distribute for global efforts. But that's not apparently what we will see what we see is that wealthier nations are prioritizing their access to all vaccines which means even the ones that are suitable for low resource settings. There may be a long delay before they become available. Globally thomas boy key director of the global health program at the council on foreign relations. Thanks for your insight. I do appreciate it. Migrate pleasure thanks for having me months into the pandemic millions of americans are still out of work and relying on federal emergency unemployment programs to stay afloat and later this month. Those programs could expire main public. Radio's robbie feinberg reports on what that might mean for the tens of thousands of people in maine who are already struggling to make ends meet for years heather. Cv worked in pet stores in southern maine offering advice about nutrition to animal owners but when the corona virus hit cb says. She was forced to leave her job because of her asthma and an autoimmune disorder basically getting cova especially with my asthma would be a death sentence at first. Cv says her family did okay. Husband often worked at least eighty hours a week at his healthcare job and her additional federal unemployment benefits of six hundred dollars per week made a big difference but those ran out a few months ago and c. says because of her health conditions and the need to be at home to help her eleven year old child who has autism with distance learning. She's been unable to return to work. Cd says her benefits are now less than two hundred dollars per week. So she's begun selling blood plasma to afford food and other needs. It's just trying to juggle everything. And i just you know. I'm gonna go sell plasma tomorrow like that's that's where i matt like. I gotta go sell my blood again. So i can get the kids through the weekend and it's hard. It's hard and it could get even harder later this month. That's an emergency. Federal unemployment benefits are set to run out. The expanded benefits were created as part of the federal stimulus package passed in march but without action from congress. The state estimates that about thirty five thousand mainers could lose benefits essentially. This is like throwing somebody have an airplane. Terror shoot andy. O'brien is a spokesperson for the main afl cio. People are very desperate. They're at risk of losing their homes and not knowing how they're going to feed their family much less. Give the kids at christmas. O'brien says main is heading into the winter months at a time. When kobe is spiking and unemployment is on the rise. So it's getting even harder and harder to find work and of course main is a lot of seeing some kind of a seasonal economy and so in the winter months unemployment goes up anyway so it's a real perfect storm and you know something needs to be done earlier this month. A bipartisan group of lawmakers announced a plan to extend the benefits as part of a larger stimulus package but that will need to make it through congress and be signed by the president in the meantime laid off. Workers are trying to piece together enough to simply stay afloat. Were struggling struggling. Hard jamie hills who lives in burnham with her two kids says the expanded benefits programs helped her with basic needs but with benefits potentially running out. She's already worried about christmas. I'm just hoping that they're happy with just a couple of just literally probably just a couple of small gifts. Because i can't afford it. Heather seavy the mom we met earlier in. This story says more days pass without new federal funding for unemployment. She feels left behind at a time that she and her family need help. The most i was like how. How does this happen. That the people here in this country that have worked the hardest and the longest are the ones that are suffering so hard right now and it's like we're invisible. The extended unemployment benefits are set to expire this month on the day after christmas for here and now i'm robbie feinberg support for this. Podcast comes from the boston foundation. A resilient city and region relies on the boston foundation to bring people together to solve greater boston's most serious problems from the hardships of covert to the fight for racial equity and other important issues that affect the lives of everyone in our community. Learn how you can help build greater boston. That works for everyone by partnering with the boston. Foundation at t be f dot org slash partner. Twenty twenty one will be the last season cleveland's major league. Baseball team will be known as the indians. Nickname native american groups have long called racist and demeaning. The team has used the name since nineteen fifteen and an official announcement is expected sometime this week. Join us now. Is the executive director of the cleveland. American indian movement are aimed. Sundance is a muskogee person. Who goes by one name and sundance. I know this is something that you and other groups have been working toward for a long time. What's your reaction to this news. My reaction is you know it's positive as you say we have been working for a very long time. Cleveland aim in particular. We have been working on this for half a century so it's not a moment too soon. We hope that Everything that happens. We'll be positive but we are a little dubious as well Well maybe because you've been working on this issue for so long you say decades. Why do you think it has taken this long. Well you know. We are by every measure the poorest people in the country We have no purchase power and to be honest with you. The baseball team was masterful in weeding this narrative bat Basically indoctrinated to think that they were somehow honoring indigenous people. But you see it. Just the opposite. Certainly we see a jeff the opposite in an environment where we are the poorest people in the country the least educated the lowest life expectancy the highest rate of teenage suicide the highest rate of missing and murdered indigenous women to have a baseball team named after. You have honor really. Does us an injustice understand that activists like you have been going to baseball games in cleveland for a long time trying to make the case to fans in person. What's that been like i mean. Have you had backlash when you try to tell people who are supporters of the team that the name should be changed. You know the backlash from fans have been minimal. We have had many fans support us and now that the change is apparently going to be made. I believe they're going to be many fans who support the change At the stadium. You know we do talk with fan. Who are against the name change but their arguments are not really a coherent and especially on opening day where many of them are inebriated. Their arguments are incoherent. so for us you know everybody has the right to be wrong. Our issue really with institutional racism. How much work still needs to be done across all of sports as you. Well know the nfl team in washington dc recently retired its name and logo this year. It's now known as the washington football team so the domino's as it were starting to fall but it's still a lot of names out there that people find offensive. There are a lot of names out there that people find offensive at the professional level. But you know in ohio. Also at the Secondary school level. We have a number of Systems here that have Native mascots and we are working to change that in ohio but have been slow going because we have to do this on a school system by school system basis. We've been speaking with sundance Muskogee person and executive director of the cleveland american indian movement. Thank you very much for your time. Thank you day. Passions are high over the fate of more than three million acres of public and private land and northeast montana. Two groups have very different views on the fate of this vast area. Alison fox is head of an effort to turn it into the largest nature reserve in the nation and she's a relative newcomer to the state by montana. Standards originally from vermont fox was twenty one when she visited the state about twenty years ago to work at glacier national park for summer and she never looked back. I am happiest when i'm out in nature deep in nature and i The that summer that i visited i met the man who is now my husband on the top of the going to the sun road in glacier national park and i decided that that point that i wanted to make montana my home. Fox's now the ceo of american prairie reserve known as apr. it's backed by silicon valley funders. Who spent millions of dollars buying up private land with the intent of creating something of an american seren getty. This requires removing the livestock that have grazed the area for more than a century and replacing it with species like elk antelope prairie dog pronghorns and bison species that once roam the land so far. Apr's purchase more than thirty private properties. And he's at least fifty more to make the vision. Complete that includes land owned by longtime rancher deanna robbins third-generation montana and part of the united property owners of montana. We don't just occupy this land. And i think that's what a lot of people don't understand is our life's work is growing food and this is a hungry world so our life's work is providing high quality protein to feed the world. And we take that very seriously. We're proud of that job that we do. Robbins feels the american prairie reserve vision of an american seren. Getty is an assault on her way of life. We'll hear more from her in a moment. But first my conversation with allison fox about why. This country needs insane. Getty and why. Montana is the place for it starting at a global level as you know the planets while places are disappearing at an unprecedented rate and less than half a century. We've lost sixty percent of wildlife populations and temperate grasslands are actually the least protected terrestrial bio and yet. They contain incredible biodiversity three hundred species of birds. Nearly one hundred species of mammals sixteen hundred species of plants and the are also important carbon sink and they contribute to clean air and water. So it's for The preservation of this ecosystem and an intact ecosystem. That's the the main y behind the worked american prairie reserve does. What do you want to see. These grasslands look like ten or or twenty years from now your right to frame this in decades you know we really see this project unfolding over over many decades and in the you know in the next decade and the decade after that we will focus on continuing to acquire habitat we'll focus on continuing to restore that habitat to we will ensure that species that were once home. There can make their homes again. You know we have a conservation herd of bison and that's been one of the important species restoration efforts that we've lead and then that people from really across montana but across the nation in the world are welcomed to this landscape And whether they're there to bird watcher hunt or hike. We want people to experience nature at american prairie reserve. this goes beyond natural conservation. You mentioned the people visiting but it's also restoring of indigenous cultures. The fort indian reservation has supported. Your efforts tell us more about this work. You're doing with native communities yeah. I'm glad that you mentioned the coda tribes because they're important partners for us and Important constituents in the region so we work We work with those two tribes in a in a number of ways first. We work on local economic development opportunities. So we partner with local economic development corporation on fort belknap to develop ecotourism opportunities thus far that his included a naturalist guiding training program. In employment of cultural interpretive guides it also includes employment of caterers and photographers and other small business owners from From reservation hopefully one day we would love to see the management of america previous facilities conducted by members of those communities. We also collaborate on species efforts so the started with the bison We work together to support each other in the management of herds and we have Agreements in place to trade animals for that genetics because our hearts have different genetics And you know as american praise grown are heard when we have surplus animals. Giving to tribal herds across the great plains has been has been one of our priorities but there are some detractors who feel this might be big outside money coming in and really changing local ranchers. What do you say that. Yeah we receive support from all over the country and a bit from around the world as well and a lot from montana and so this is a project of global significance and thus it has attracted the attention of people who care about grasslands and species restoration and public access and recreation opportunities and so There's there's room for for both on the landscaping. There's room for us to work together. We we do run. This conservation bison herd now is growing but we the majority of our properties that we own now we are leasing those that were grazing on those properties out to out to neighbors and other community members who who graze cattle on those lands. And we're supporting agricultural economy in that way the by locally and hire locally and you know we we to our to our part of community we are a group of montana's running this organization we live In various places across the state many of our staff live on our properties and in neighboring communities and We we've been here for for fifteen years and we care about the place and look forward to being a productive part of the community for decades to come that was alison fox. Ceo of american prairie reserve rancher. Deanna robbins is now leading the effort to stop this project signs that pepper the region that say save the cowboy. Stop the american prairie reserve robbins. And i started off our conversation by talking about what makes the grassland so unique in perfect for cattle ranching and hunting. it's rough country. It's arid there isn't much for water unless it's water that we've developed and that's why it has become so purposeful for livestock. Production is because when we developed water to one of the few ways that we can utilize the grass. That grows here. The grass is very high in protein and minerals so it's good for growing production livestock and It's been considered the highest purpose of the land for over one hundred years as i mentioned. The american prairie reserve has a lot of financial support from from donors in silicon valley and new york city. Places that are far from montana. Does this also impact how you see their conservation efforts that does concern us because it's it's basically a takeover of this area by just a few individuals with fast financial resources so that makes it a very elite project that doesn't necessarily speak to the public like the marketing says that it will. What would your family do or or what do you plan to do. This effort goes through. And i mean your land is at stake. What's what's at stake is. It would simply become too. We raise cattle We have a cow calf operation where we sell a calf crop in the fall that is grown into beef production that would be too burdensome to raise our cattle in the midst of apex predators like grizzly bears wolves free roaming bison enormous numbers of elk and deer that would all be competing for the forage because we have no way of keeping that wildlife off of our properties and so once they grow those numbers of all those the predators and the competition for grass. They would eventually be on our ranch too. So it's why we're working so hard to stop them and we believe that we will. Do you see anyway to work with them. Moving forward what's non-negotiable. Yeah no it is non-negotiable because as i said before for them to succeed with their three point five million acres goal our communities our family ranches that are all in that target area. And there's a lot of them. Would all be gone in these are. These are vibrant healthy communities a culture. That's been here for over one hundred years and really hasn't changed much Some of my neighbors are people that my grandfather homesteaded alongside back in the early nineteen hundred. There's real continuity here. What does it mean to be a cow boy or a cowgirl cowboy to me is an entrepreneur and independent spirit very social but we're also very independent in in how we work and very proud to be part of that culture. That's the robbins in montana who opposes the american prairie reserve late last month. Cuba's communist government began facing an unusually broad movement demanding more free speech and expression it was led by the island's artists. The regime is refusing so far to negotiate with the movement's leaders and it's even detained some of them but tim padgett of member station w. l. r. n. a. miami reports. The artists may have galvanized enough public support from ordinary cuban citizens and the world outside cuba to make reform possible. A these are artists protesting in front of cuba's ministry of culture. Last month in havana. They were denouncing the conviction of dissident. Rapper dennis o. Leaks he just been sentenced to eight months in prison for contempt because he posted a video of cuban police entering his home without a warrant. The demonstration led by an artist. Group called the saana cedra movement. Alarmed cuba's communist regime because it drew hundreds of supporters including celebrities. Like movie star louise pedagogy and at first this was the result has announced. Cuban officials had agreed to a dialogue about free speech and expression but the regime has since backed away and now condemns the artists per usual. As puppets of the us and cuban exiles in miami cuban president miguel de as canal calls their protests and imperial show orchestrated by the trump administration. Still instead of being crushed. The artist push for free. Expression is resonating strongly in and outside cuba. That's prompting many to ask. Could this lead to some measure of human rights reform there. I'm cynical but also very hopeful ruben. Row houses a miami dade college english professor. He heads the nonprofit other oceans which builds social and cultural bridges between the us and cuba. He's in touch with many cuban artists including protest leader. Luis manuel otero who until december third was detained by cuban authorities. They'd say this will not stop. This movement has been one of the biggest of my recollection. Right now it's a different time in history. Cubans have internet now. They're communicating roha says one of the artists more immediate reform demands as the repeal of decree three forty nine that law was enacted two years ago and it requires cuba's artists to get official permission for just about every paint stroke song cord and scripts sentence they create but the artist insists. This is about more than tight. Regime control over them under. Tanya get is a leading cuban installation and performance artist and a leading artists dissident. She wants dressed in public as asante god known for haunting people on their birthdays if they failed to keep their promises and she did it on the birthday of cuba's than dictator fidel castro. So when the artist outcry began last month. Brugera told me cuban police kept her from leaving her home for more than a week and she was put under house arrest again on december six. It was assigned that this campaign scares the government more than others. It's faced even so bruguera is helping lead that campaign which is also known as n. twenty-seven after their big november twenty seventh demonstration. She believes it will last because ordinary non artists cubans are connecting with an artist movement. In ways they hadn't before on lake capsule cuomo thanks to social media access cubans have today. They see this isn't just about art. It's about rights abuses. They face to they can get arrested just for complaining about long food lines restraining. An artist is like literally filling their tank with rocket fuel. Award-winning miami playwright. Carmen pelaez a cuban american and a friend of ru garris surprising. Cuban artists are at the vanguard of this uncommonly potent challenge to the regime after all polite says cuba's original independence hero. Jose marti was foremost poet. He gives the people a better story. Any shows them how to make it a reality. The cuban artists have made the braves space. A safer space to be now still rubin row haas of other oceans says. The cuban regime is just as determined to control that cuban story these days rojo's points out. Cuba's artists had actually experienced fewer restrictions over the past few decades. But because the regime has had to give cubans more economic freedoms in recent years. He says it has crackdown on artistic freedom again as a way to keep cubans from getting too bold because they loosen the screws on part of their system. And the rules. They had to grab control of the cuban revolution narrative and who has a narrative more than artists. And for the moment. Those cuban artists have the stage for here. and now. i'm tim padgett ami and we wanna take a moment here to remember british spy novelist john macara. Who died saturday. He was born david cornwell and grew up with a conman of father who was frequently in jail. The car works as a british intelligence officer. Then got into writing. His books include the spy. Who came in from the cold and he was famous for his ordinary spike characters. Who didn't resemble heroes like james bond. He is on fresh air in two thousand seventeen when you really have put a character together piece by piece what makes it. Work is a piece of yourself and until that happens the character. That doesn't have doesn't really have being a tool. Many critics considered his work true literature. Lecarr a would let his books be considered for literary prizes. He was eighty nine years old now. Production of npr and wb. You are an association with the bbc. World service unbeatable tanya bosley. This is here now.

us pfizer finkel american prairie reserve kovacs robbie feinberg Peter o'dowd biden administration Npr wb tanya moseley peter o montana long jewish medical center alison are rejoins Jewish medical center governor andrew ninety four degree nineteen inch angela rasmussen President trump
01-27-20 Count on being counted

Native America Calling

56:30 min | 1 year ago

01-27-20 Count on being counted

"Welcome Welcome to native America from Studio Forty nine in Albuquerque. I'm Tara Gatewood. This is the year for the senses last week. The process officially really kicked off in need of America in a remote village in Alaska. The first person counted was a Yupik. Elder geography language and mistrust cost are all barriers that historically work against getting an accurate count of Alaska natives and native Americans coming up. We'll get reminders about the importance of the Census and what the process is like. We'll jump into this discussion right after national native news This is National Native News Antonio Gonzalez a federal civil suit filed against the city of Fairbanks Alaska by the fairbanks for his back and play. KABC's down bras has more the native men known as the Fairbanks. For George Freeze. Kevin Pease Marvin Roberts in Eugene then sued the city of Fairbanks banks for malicious prosecution and withholding evidence actions. They say led to their wrongful convictions of a nineteen ninety-seven murder the convictions were subsequently secondly vacated under a two thousand fifteen prison release agreement with the state a deal precipitated by new evidence showing others were likely responsible for the beating death a fifteen year old John Hartman. The men's ability to sue the city for damages hinges enlarge part on whether vacation of convictions meets a legal standard of invalidation pointing to a legal dictionary. Definition referenced in the Ninth Circuit Ruling Fairbanks for attorney. Mike Kramer says the majority opinion equates the to the convictions of vacate or means to invalidate. We respectfully if they got it wrong. City of Fairbanks Attorney Matt Singer sites dissenting opinion of one of the three ninth circuit judges who maintained that vacation of Fairbanks for convictions under the twenty fifteen agreement with the state fall short of us. Supreme Court precedent singer says the city may appeal up to the US Supreme Court. Meanwhile another major case was remanded. Back by the Ninth Circuit Justices to Federal District Court. It involves whether the fairbanks for can even sue the city after agreeing not to seek damages under the twenty-fifth deal with the state and Dan. Ross Ross in Fairbanks Alaska an energy company. In the trump administration have renewed their request to dismiss lawsuits against the keystone xl pipeline proponents and opponents opponents of the pipeline restated positions on the record in December. When Montana federal judge Brian Morris denied dismissal of the lawsuits and asked for further? Briefing briefing Victoria wicks reports. Judge Brian Morris asked parties to discuss whether the president has the authority to permit pipeline to cross an international border when the US this constitution gives control over foreign commerce to Congress attorneys for the Department of Justice in the US Attorney's Office in Montana. Say the president also has constitutional institutional powers over foreign affairs and as commander in chief following that thread. The President Claims Authority to permit the pipeline based on new State Department's finding that the importation of crude oil has global energy security implications and importation from a US ally is a vital part of national security pipeline. Blind opponents disagree saying permitting K.. Excel has nothing to do with diplomacy or national security the native American Rights Fund or North represents the Rosebud Rosebud Sioux tribe and Fort Belknap Indian. Community they argue. That Transcanada is not a foreign government. It is a for profit publicly traded corporation with the mission of making money any for owners and stockholders each side will file response briefs by February fourteenth in the meantime opponents will likely renew their request for an injunction to to prevent preconstruction activities. TC has planned to start in February. That was Victoria. Wicks native people rallied at the Utah State capital over the weekend again to oppose a bill which discourages the removal of India mascots by schools the Utah League of Native American voters. Organize the event ahead of the legislative session. Monday demonstrators say India mascots have harmful impacts on native youth. The bill's sponsor representative wreck. Ship told the Salt Lake City Tribune. He surprised over the controversy. Saying it's intended as a blueprint for communities. I mean Antonio Gonzalez mm-hmm national native news is produced by Colonic Broadcast Corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. Like the circle of life. There is an opportunity that comes around every ten years a chance to participate hoping and let our voice be heard it lets others know who we are and where we are the twenty twenty cents. This will be our opportunity. Take shape our future for generations to come shape our future start here learn more at twenty. Twenty Census Dot Gov paid for by the US Census Bureau native voice one the native American radio network. This is native America calling interrogations would in Alaska the census is under we. The rest of the country will have to wait a few months to fill out their census forms or talked to a census worker but in Alaska. It's actually easier to count people during the winter. According to an audit by the US census American Indians on reservations were undercounted by almost five percent in two thousand ten but long before this year senses kicked off many tribal liaisons. Were working hard to get the word out about the senses by talking with tribal leaders organizations about the importance of being counted today. We'll get the many reasons why it's important to get an accurate count for the twenty two thousand Census and on wall also hear about the very first person that was counted in twenty twenty. She's Yupik and ninety years old. We'd also like to hear from you. What do you think about the senses says? Are you planning on filling out your form and do you know what information is use. The information is used for when you fill it out. Call US right now. The number is one eight hundred nine. Six eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and joining us now from Anchorage. Alaska is done a Bach. She is a tribal partnership partnership specialist for the US Census Bureau End. She is a member of ood. Saga vote NATO Council and just another disclosure. The U S census is is bureau is a sponsor of Aquatic Broadcast Corporation which is native American callings parent company. My pleasure to have her here Donna. Welcome good morning. Thank you in Donna. Tell us about the kickoff. For the census at Took me Yes yes we Alaska was had a very warm reception for the US Censor Dot Census Director Dr Steven Billingham. And he made a wonderful wonderful tour up in Anchorage and was able to Network with a lot of census partners in support of ensuring an accurate count account of Alaska natives and all Alaskans He had there was a beautiful Media briefing that was hosted by the Alaska Native Heritage Heritage Center here in Anchorage and we had governor Mike Dunleavy as well as the Alaska sense working. Group Co Chair Gabe Lehman and and the chief of the tribe. Aaron Leggett's as well as Alaska Native Heritage Center Director Emily Eden Shaw. Welcome Dr if you're doing him in his media briefing prior to Traveling out to the bay. Which is a remote Alaska Native village in in southwest Alaska About an hour flight from vessel into. Why Start the census in Alaska? I think it's very important that The Remote Alaska operations has been prioritized by the. US Census Understanding during during the winter months before the spring saw that It's it's essentially easier to count people in one location or are in their remote village. Because they're less likely to be You know out subsistence fishing or hunting which often occurs after the spring thaw a- and that's just Given the accommodations of most Alaskan native people living in remote villages throughout Alaska that rely heavily upon their subsistence lifestyle into are there more plans throughout the nation on maybe picking a particular time to make sure census mm-hmm is is kind of beefy in certain areas in our native nations. Are there any other similar. Plans I can't speak to that. I can only speak speak to expense. Essentially the vast geography of how large Alaska is and how the remoteness of you know hundred eighty six off-road village communities it's it's a lot of ground to cover You know they're very expensive and costly flights to travel by airplane You know from hub communities out to remote villages and that intentionally of prioritizing the remote Alaska count during the winter months I think is advantageous to ensure the most accurate participation of people answering the knock on the door or when a census taker comes to visit their households in. So what can you share about the first person to begin counted in twenty twenty I it's very exciting Lizzie to me. Go Ask like you mentioned the ninety year old elder Sh- is considered a very traditional Member of the community and she was elected by the noon Aquatic Traditional Council or nominated to be the first kristen counted based on her Vast traditional knowledge sure love of her language and it was very exciting for Dr Steven Billingham to visit her household there in took sick and and count her and fill out dot questionnaire in person And that's a moment that he got to share and I think really appreciated the warm reception of the village and Just it's just a beautiful community There on Nelson Island Drayton near the Bering Sea and they made him feel very welcome and it was just a really wonderful experience for doctor. Telling him to engage in and the whole community showed up and support at the school there and took pay with a warm reception and It was just a really wonderful all that and maybe you saw some of the media coverage on this any thoughts in what happens when our elders are supporting something like this one. Eight hundred hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number we look forward to your calls and maybe you have signed up to be a census worker to help get the word out Supporting the get counted a campaign against call it that Any thoughts about what it'll mean to help your community be accurately counted often often. We hear that The numbers lead to funding and support for native nations. Have you made this a priority. You can share your thoughts. One eight hundred nine nine six two you eight four eight so Donna would have you been sharing with tribal leaders about the senses in how tribes can possibly benefit from inaccurate account for count It's been a wonderful engagement there. A large level of support from Alaska We've we've been talking about privacy and confidentiality on behalf of The Census and we really want to reiterate the privacy privacy and confidentiality of Those members that are are are being counted We all take an oath for life to not disclosed or share information when we are counting people and we take got very seriously It's it's We I mean we understand their trust issues between the sovereign tribal governments and nations and and and the government and the US Census Bureau. I think it's been really wonderful to be received onto numerous tribal governments agendas and outreach to tribal councils to support them provide them all all the information that they they need to know so that they feel rest assured About the oath that we take for life as census employees to not share Any information That is is is gathered in this vast data collection effort That will cross our nation. And and that's often been the most concern from Tribal governments is is really protecting that privacy but also so you know working with policy leaders across numerous organizations to find their support and we ask through partnerships of support of tribal well health organizations tribal health nonprofits INC serve regional and village corporations housing authorities We the ask for their support to help promote and and support census enumeration efforts so that we can ensure the most accurate count in in that exposure voege has been a wonderful experience on different agendas. there was a wonderful Resolution that was actually sponsored. By the noon Aquatic Traditional National Council in took which was vetted at by and supported unanimously by the South West Regions Fifty eight tribal governments and crucial VAC. Doc and the vessel census tracts that was boarded onto the Alaska Federation of Natives Convention last October here in Fairbanks Alaska A and and that also received unanimous support. By over one hundred seventy one village corporations twelve regional corporations one hundred and Ninety one tribal governments and so there is definite support of ensuring an accurate count in the twenty twenty. Cents is from the vast Alaska community incidental woods filling out the census. This time around mean hundred years from now It's it's a beautiful opportunity and and the way that I personally have looked at Participation in the census is it's just a snapshot in time that helps inform not only we are representation you know of of Congress and our local representatives at the state level It also helps draw geographic a graphic boundaries for political representations but more importantly it helps preserve You know the eligibility of federal refunding that maybe coming into our state and You know every year on an annual basis. There's an estimated six hundred seventy five billion dollars that's disseminated by the federal government to to stay in the form of Community Development Block grants you know medical assistance. Thanks for healthcare systems I got programs for tribal governments and and that's really important in Alaska. We rely tremendously tremendously on those federal. Those federal grants to support our runways or to support our aviation carriers with federal bypass nail. It helps support housing public education transportation. Safety The the programs of the Federal Program Lists Go on and on and and census data helps inform that allocation of those funds. Did you knew that it has a role in all of that that she just listed what do you think I think one eight hundred nine nine six two. Four eight is the number and Any thoughts you want to share or maybe that one time you looked at census numbers generations back. What do you think about having that opportunity to be counted in and give a snapshot of what is the reality here? Twenty twenty any thoughts one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is the number and please be have questions. Now's the time to introduce you to some more folks coming up here in this hour. Who more information? So if you have any questions on the census In what it means to fill it out dial in now phone lines are open one. Eight hundred nine nine native the World Hoop Dancing Championship is coming up soon. At the Heard Museum every year hoop dancers from the United States in Canada compete to be the best with hoops flying in all directions and coming together to tell a story. It's a style of dancing that brings many tribes together. We're talking about hoop dancing on the next native America calling support by dream. Spring a nonprofit community lender for over twenty five years dream. Spring has been increasing access to business credit for entrepreneurs across New Mexico Era Zona and beyond dream spring offers loans for self employed entrepreneurs startups and large established enterprises information about flexible credit requirements armaments affordable rates and customized lending available by calling eight hundred five zero eight seventy six twenty four or online at Dream Spring Dot Com. You're tuned into native America Calling Tara Gatewood from misled Pueblo. We appreciate you joining us today and are really glad you've chosen has been a little bit of this day with us. We're talking about the twenty twenty senses. Are you planning on filling out your form cost share. Why warm even why? Oh you aren't GonNa do this. The number join is one eight hundred nine six two. Four eight is the number and we heard a little bit from Donna. Bach Tribal Apple Partnership specialists for the. US Census Bureau based in Alaska In she's here with us also and introduce you to another another voice coming to us out of Los Angeles California we have Jessica Imma touchy. And she is the Partnership Coordinator Four The Los Angeles Regional Office of the US Census Bureau and she is a citizen of the chickasaw nation. Our pleasure to have her here Jessica. Welcome thank you good morning from La. Hey Hello and so we heard a little bit about Alaska. You work with several parts of this country Anything you want to say about You know filling out this form. How far is it? When can people started filling it out? Yes thank you. So the Los Angeles region essentially covers seven state eight and within those seven states we have three hundred and ninety four tribes. I'm so we work really closely with tribes and tribal governments a tribal partners like north. So they'll be excited to hear from Jim later Like AFN. Which Donna mentioned? We also have a strong partnership with NCAA. I and their Indian country counts campaign. And I think those partners those especially those national partners have been really critical in helping us get the message out about the importance of the census offenses why Indian country should pay attention to the census. What it means for tribal communities All of those type of things. I know that it was really important to me. Whenever I heard my tribal leader Governor Anna Tubby speak at the national press conference which was held on April first twenty nineteen eighteen and for the first time the Census Bureau invited at tried to speak and talk about the importance of the census in Indian country and he really phrased it and in which it really resonated with me? that the census is really about sovereignty. So it's about the things that are important to tribes. It's about outlining the details of the federal government's responsibility to find tribal programs as a part of their trust responsibility to try. And it's about acknowledging our ancestors and the fight to get us to where we are today and that we're still here and that we still remain so representations important but it's also about how he planned for our future and since the state that can help us do that you know it can help set the course for how tribes may need to grow and expand and look at business opportunities on all of those kinds of things providing health of care Providing housing to tribal members. And I think that's the goodness that often gets overlooked about the census and so we really try try and meet one on one with the tribes and and have those conversations About how that really impacts locally within a tribal community community as well as within urban areas as well you know we know that sixty percent of American Indians do live in urban population areas. Several of those are within our region agent Like the bay area like Los Angeles. Seattle Portland Anchorage you know. All those areas are really critical to. I'm like Albuquerque. You Ellen so we we talk about the importance of the census not just within tribal communities on reservation areas but with urban areas. Too So Jessica. The reason you're able to quote that sixty percent is because of a census that you again that is that is part of it right. It shows us Where people are you're in? The census is not just account of population. But it's also account of housing it outlines demographics for the country It shows the population shifts It really is about reapportionment. And so it determines our our representation in Congress and you know it helps us celebrate folks folks like deb Haaland you know there and and You the having to native American women in Congress now and and how you now we can carry votes and how important that is and so Son Says it's important. You know what it allows us that kind of information while I am really interested Austin to see what the two thousand twenty cents says about that number because a lot of times we hear that figure Sixty percent of native Americans living in urban settings I wonder how that number will change. If it'll stay the same go up go down but there are other things that people are wondering about. Our populations of native Americans Americans What are you wondering? Maybe even some predictions of what the senses will say. I'll take those calls to one. Eight hundred nine nine six two four eight. Let's go ahead and take a call. We're going to hear from Joseph in Hookah California tuned in on K.. I. D. E. Joseph. Thank you for calling year on here. Thank you for taking my call. I talked with a few people in our communities. I asked him well. What are your concerns? Do you have any concerns or questions about the twenty twenty senses and and some of the comments that I heard the concerns that I heard had to do not with the confidentiality of the numerator ze but with AH A probably I. An easy feeling about giving that information is the federal government about them. And how would this this information could it be used against us. I think that was a fear that people who were expressing. So can you address. That things are bringing up. Joseph Therein Hookah Jessica Anything for Joseph. So I have heard that question A couple of times uh-huh about how can that information be used against us And I think I try and wrap my head around it really to kind of understand where aware that fear stems from it and I know that there's a long you know distrust of the federal government and oftentimes you know when the federal government has came out and collected information from American Indians from tribes. It hasn't been with good intentions right. It's it's always kind of produced a a negative effect. And so I definitely understand the root of that I know that that Donna mentioned Emily Eden Shaw And and they welcomed that she gave at the Alaska Native Heritage Center. I'm for the press event and one thing that really struck with me that she sat as a part of that. Welcome she talked about you. Know the census it things like the census haven't always been with good intention right the federal government all. We hasn't always had good intention. And and so we've had to come a long way to you. Know we've come a long way but we still have a long way to go The Census Bureau Is Really Adamant About having purposely tribal consultation. We held fifteen consultations leading up to the twenty twenty cents us and we've And those completed and twenty sixteen eighteen and then recently we've we've added onto more. And so you know I think that. The Census Bureau does now understand the importance of talking to tried that at-bat consultation is critical hearing from them and their concerns and the things that they may be worried about. is valuable and so I I think that kind of helps alleviate some of those fears because it becomes part of a conversation that we're having with them and it's not something that we're doing to them and so I I think you know that that's been better. Joseph anything else Anything else I are are these census. This is being taken online. And how complicated will that be for people in rural areas. That don't have good. Internet access in Greek question thinks Joseph. Go Ahead Jessica. So yes you can't complain. Your census online you can start as early as march the twelfth where really excited to let's see about Being able to have an online census and and how that may increase response rate Obviously there are those concerns in areas swear broadband may not be as great. And so they're all there are still other ways which you can complete the census so you can complete it by phone or you can still complete pleaded the good old fashioned way paper form in those areas where we know that there's great broadband and most likely people will complete it in a way that is not online we still have a process of what we call update enumerate where we'll leave a packet of information at the housing unit And it will have a paper form in in there as well as information for online or for The telephone in case they want to be able to choose so I think that's the great thing people now have a choice and they have options and just go with that said what are some of the things that people should be looking for it because you know we live in a world of a lot of fraud and you know it might be people who potentially see this as an option to create fraud water things that people need to know to make sure that they're actually talking to a real census person and Any safety any safety tips on that or precautions. Go Ahead Jessica absolutely and that is a concern of ours. You know making sure that the the public is well informed. So every census employees does have a federal government census badge. They should be able to show that to you at at any request to see that they do carry an official census bag What that looks like? And and you know how you can. Visually recognize that right away is available on Census Dot Gov so you can see you know what a bad should look like what what Census bag should look like And they'll give you hit their heads on on census dot Gov tips. I I should say for how to be able to verify that the person at your door is in fact. A census employees in trouble nations be notified upon which Census takers are going to be on the community. So is that another check that you can call your office. And if so and so isn't on a list that that might not be a census taker absolutely. That is one thing that we are trying very hard to work towards and so the first part of that is it's really trying to hire from within tribal communities themselves. We can't do that every time you know. Sometimes we may not have Applicants some areas may just not too small in terms of their workload to be able to hire from there. And so maybe we hire from a neighboring reservation area. But you know that is the first goal Secondly secondly we have like Donna Troy partnership specialists that work directly in the communities and so they they have what we call a tribal liaison at each tribe and and they work hand in hand with those people and so when we do have since its employees coming out onto the reservation we typically like to give them a one to two week notice and we'll let them know ahead of time The rules of engagement on how to check in properly at the reservation. We notify the tribal liaison and the tribe that a person is coming. We let them know who that person is. And so. We've you know we really try and go that that extra effort to make sure we do have things run as smoothly safely unsecure early as possible in just water things that the public can do to help speed some of this up and and I know going door to door that takes time that takes people is is there. Are there things that citizens can do just kind of a speed up the process or alleviate somebody having to go door to door or will you do that anyway. That's the great thing about completing it online so if you complete it online and you're able to do that we we are tracking what we call real time responses and so we'll be able to look at what some of these response rates are as they come in So not only is it more convenient. You know maybe might not. I'd have access while you're at home and and rural areas but if you come in to go to your Tribal health provider. Or are you come in to go. You know into town to come for something else and you do happen to have good cell signal. You can complete your forum on your hand held device life and so that alleviates having to have somebody come and knock at your door all right. Thank you so much now what about you. What are your questions calling right now? One eight hundred nine nine six two four eight. We're also going to go to Las Vegas Nevada today to say hello to Dr James Tucker. He is vice chair of the National Advisory Committee Committee on racial ethnic and other populations for the US Census and he is pro bono counsel to the native American Rights Fund. My pleasure to have Dr Tucker here here with us in understanding prefers Jim so jim good day to you. Welcome and also just another disclosure. NAROFF has been a sponsor of native America calling in in the past Jim. Welcome Good Morning Sarah. Thank you so much for having me and for Talking about the important subject and so I think we're getting a little technical Nicole and that's usually where the questions come in Jim Is there anything specific that you just like to inform folks about about filling filling this out Or if you have You know certain situations that You know you have two houses. which do you fill out anything like that? Go ahead Jim sure so. I think that I I think the point a really highlight here is that The Census Bureau and its partners including the native American Rights Fund are are really here to make it a simple easy process And you know to that end it. It's not a long questionnaire you know sometimes when people hear about surveys as they may think oh this is going to take the hours. No on average It takes about ten minutes to fill out a complete census questionnaire and Really probably the two most important questions for Indian country are You know especially with the race and ethnicity box You know there are several boxes you can check. You can check more than one But to make sure that if you are if you are American Indian or Alaska native that you check the box that is American Indian Alaskan native have an equally important that you fill out the blank underneath that Blank is there for you to identify the tribe or tribes or villages. Is that you associate with you. Don't necessarily have to be an enrolled member of the tribe It could be you know. It's very common obviously in households that You know one parent. Maybe a member of one tribe The other parent a member of another and you may want to identify with both. And and that's that's great. You should feel free to list both The other part of this is that whether it's the census or its partners like Nar Ncaa. I The National Urban Indian Families Centers or the folks at the local level or the tribes themselves. There are people there who are who were there to help you make this a very easy process to answer your questions and to make sure you're filling out the form in wave you feel comfortable Accurately reflect reflects all the information about your household into Jim. What about people? Who are a little leery about that? That there is no You know that you don't have to have a C.. I B. in order to check native American In many discussions. We've had on this. Come on this program about people who who are identifying native aren't citizens of a nation. Would you like to say about all that. So one of the questions that have come up very early in the process and and when I say early this was actually several years ago now was whether or not there should be a tribal enrollment question on the on the questionnaire and there is not and the reason is because because that's an act for each of the each of the Alaskan villages and federally recognized tribes to identify on their own who is an enrolled member member. The census form is all about self determination. So you list who you are you identify who you are on that form and again Dan it doesn't it has no binding effect on the tribes. You know it doesn't affect tribal enrollment But it does matter because it you know there are many people people who may not be enrolled numbers try but definitely consider themselves native American and they need to make sure that that's reflected in the census regardless guardless where they live regardless of their you know their heritage They should feel free to fill that out if they believe that. That's who they really are and and it it's be reflected on the census for all right. Thank you for addressing that and We're GONNA continue with our discussion here. Twenty twenty cents is his kicked off. And you know when you think of these times. The last one that came through. What was your experience? Then did you learn anything. Got Some things to share about that. We also have folks on on the line who are directly connected to the US senses Maybe your feedback would help them with this year's count go ahead dial in share your thoughts your stories and of course if you have questions now's the time Dial right now. Don't wait another minute because you know we wanna be able to give you information that you're curious about one eight hundred nine nine six two eight. Four eight is a number we do look forward to hearing from you hang tight. We'll be right back like the circle of life. There is an opportunity that comes around every ten years a chance to participate and let our voice be. We heard it. Lets others know who we are and where we are the twenty twenty cents. This will be our opportunity to shape our future for generations interrelations to come shape our future start here. Learn more at twenty twenty senses dot Gov paid for by the US census. That's is bureau. I'm Tara Gatewood here with you. This is native America calling. Our phone lines are open and we are in a discussion about the twenty twenty senses. ASSIST ANYTHING YOU WANNA share. Go ahead enjoying their is time. You can join us at one. Eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight. The census happens every ten years. Here's this year is the next one Again if you WANNA join us. Eight hundred nine nine native With us today out of Vegas Nevada is Dr James Tucker Aka agem He is here with US and Also want to introduce another voice that we have out of Anchorage. Alaska we have Nicole Borough. Mio Uh uh she is the Executive Vice President General Counsel for the Alaska Federations Natives Aka. Afn Our pleasure ever hear Nicole. Welcome as well and and You know just thinking about this and in Jim you mentioned that it's ten questions. Are you able to say what those ten questions are. It's actually it's I believe it's twelve questions but it takes about ten minutes and they're very either very basic they will ask For each person in the household to identify defy You know what their ages what their race or ethnicity is and You know again. Identifying where you know where their bill you know what their village or or tribal affiliations and Just a variety of other very basic questions like that but they're very basic questions to reiterate a point. That Don on an Jessica both made that control a lot of outcomes they they control federal funding They control what you know what. You're a representation. TATION IS GONNA look like and that's really important for Indian country because if you don't have representatives people who represent you and represent your tribe there's not going to be anyone there to protect your tribal sovereignty and so we WANNA make sure that you know. Everyone has an equal voice To be able to elect candidates who respect tribal sovereignty. Protect your culture and make sure that Indian country gets its fair share of federal and state resources all right. Thank you for that Nicole. Welcome anything you want to share about. the connection. AFN has to the twenty twenty census. Thank you Monica. I'm happy to join the program. This morning then is joining the process to really engage in a boots on the ground outreach effort in rural Alaska we have about two hundred very remote isolated native villages and the effort To have boots on the ground representation there has fallen a little bit short of what we hoped it would be and last time that happened. We had a severe undercount undercount in our rural villages that would detrimental so That's where offended is hoping to lend its expertise this time around a write in so James I'm I know a lot of times when people are talking about The senses that native Americans were undercounted in the past Any reasons for that and what's being done to make. I'm sure that that doesn't happen again. Sure and you actually alluded to three of the points. At the beginning of the program you had mentioned geographic isolation language barriers and in distrust of the federal government. But there are other reasons that are tied to that poverty cultural. I ice elation literacy issues Native Americans are very a young population. They're very mobile population. There's high levels of homelessness and Housing Stability Lack of broadband access and The other one that really kind of cuts across Indian country is not traditional mailing addresses. You know that you don't necessarily have someone living at one-two-three Elm street they may live. Got A place you have to give a geographic description on how to find them and so taking all of that together The Census Bureau with its partners including AF EN in north NCI and others are are working to really fill in those gaps And just by way of example. One of the one of the things that we found was that that there was not going to be adequate language coverage and then working directly with the Census Bureau where we're able to identify exactly where we needed needed to fill those those gaps and thanks to that we we are. We actually expect to have more language coverage this sense than we've ever had before in Indian country Upwards boards of about two dozen languages dialects including about half of those are going to be in Alaska in Nicole. I know that if N. does a lot of work with tribal nation there in Alaska Alaskan villages in corporations Is there anything you like to share from this site because we have said that A lot of times census numbers there's dictate how much funding will be received but when we think about our tribal leaders how tribal leaders think about the senses. Very Eh Articulately and they take the long view they understand. What's at stake in a very keen way when it comes to federal appropriations There's also also a firm belief that the federal government owes are Alaskan native tribes in American Indian tribes especially trust responsibility and today that's often carried out through the various the federal departments and agencies through formula funding to tribal programs. So it's not just morally. Nice that the federal government encounter people. It is a legal necessity that they do so in order to uphold that responsibility into nickel. What do you think is the best way to get an accurate? Throught census number of a native Alaskan Native Alaska. Well in the long run. We'd like to see this part of the Federal Workforce Compaq out directly to our tribes and tribal organizations in the short term. We're going to do as much as we can working with our other partners. I'm I'm Jim mentioned. Several of them included to get that boots on the ground presence right now because Rural Alaska is connected through many different large families. But it's also hard to sometimes infiltrate those systems if you're not familiar with the different different residents from the different regions because we have twelve separate geographic regions based on our land claims up here and there all night and day different to each other. So you can't just take one plan of outreach for one of the regions and think that it's going to work in the other eleven and so we have been tested out there for information your questions to individuals. But is there any information you'd like to specifically give to tribal leaders about the census some or even how to get the word announced Nicole absolutely. There's three main takeaways that we hope as ASEAN Tribal leaders will take away. The first one is that filling out the census is absolutely necessary Like Jim said it's twelve quick questions very basic we expected to take about ten minutes But the results lasted decade and and have billion dollar impacts the second one released to tribal affiliation. Because there's been some confusion around that question What we are hoping that tribal all members both here in Alaska and lower forty eight? We'll do is put the name of their federally recognized tribe and later this week we are going to be posting a complete list by region of all the federally recognized gigabytes tribes in Alaska and the final point. That we hope to really get across. Is that if you have a native married or living with the non native that the native person rights themselves in person number one so the whole household is counted as a native house. All right. Thank you for that and gems Muslim wondering sometimes Language is a necessity in in. Is there any effort to Have Census Information in the need of languages. Yes there is an and I I guess just by way of getting started. The Census Bureau has provided some basic templates like a language which glossary that identifies all the terms and words that need to be translated into the different Native languages and dialects and to that end. We've been working with Partners partners around the country really in about ten states primarily. We're really talking about primarily the western states plus Mississippi to make sure that we are getting the level of Translations that are needed to that area and and it varies widely Alaska Took a good example. You have a village that basically about out half or more that they'll edge is You know needs to get assistance and you to be able to fill out their census form and that ranges to where we may see and other states like Idaho and the DAKOTAS where there may be some need. But it's not necessarily going to be at the same level and so what we're doing. We're working with partners to translate Some of the basic census words the glossary the information having public service announcements that will be in native languages and separate and apart from that the other piece of this oftentimes uh-huh people miss is that this is also about respect for native culture because even in places where we're finding there's a high level of English proficiency the the tribes still want recognition that they do have a distinct culture and a distinct language and out of respect for that whether it's in Alaska or the lower forty eight. Many many of tribal complete count committee is state complete. Count Committees are working on actively promoting You Know Buttons T. Shirts slogans that use native languages just to recognize the importance to that area. I think you for that. Also here with us today is done a buck trouble partnership specialist for the US Census Bureau. Based I in Anchorage Alaska Donna. We're getting ready to wrap up the hour and just wanted to give you a moment if there's anything that you felt. We really need to be mentioning as the twenty twenty cents since his kicks off. Yes tear up thank you. I think what I would just call out to. All of Indian country and Alaska Native tribes is just acknowledge their sovereignty and their continued support and collaborating with the US. Census Bureau employees because it truly is about sovereignty in their long-term game of self interest to collaborate and ensure the accuracy of the data data. And I I think if there's just one ask is that And I think it was mentioned in Indian country news article that participation in the census assist should should be considered almost like an act of rebellion. So that we can become counted we are we are Native we our sovereign he we matter your important and and To be documented that history with the National Archives is is a gift to the future and it is is about shaping the future and so I'd like to just end my commentary on and thank you for for hosting a all right. Thank you great to hear Your Voice. Dona also also on the line is Jessica Emma Tachi Partnership Coordinator for the Los Angeles Regional Office of the US Census Bureau and just of course any final comments but I also also know that you work with native Hawaiians. We didn't get much time to talk about that. anything you want to leave us with about that or just more information as the census kicks off so yes. I'm here so on January fourteenth. We did release our national media campaign campaign and that includes American Indian Alaskan Native and Native Hawaiian Pacific Islander media campaign. And so you can find things like our fact sheets. It's our posters are toolkits some great. PSA's those are available on our website at twenty twenty census dot Gov so I would encourage Folks to go online and take a look and see what they can utilize in their community. There are some great templates as as Jim mentioned you know you can take those templates you. You can translate them into your native languages and and really utilize what's going to work within your community and so That would be great. I would encourage folks to you set up and be volunteers On their tribes complete count committees Get being volunteers. I any get out the count events that may be happening and then also just as a final reminder I would like to state that the census is safe. It's easy and it's important in and that's the one thing we are overall message going into the twenty twenty cents us So we look forward to having A great count for any country three and without mention That made me think of something that you know we wanNA encourage People from our own communities and a lot of time census takers their own communities You feel that safety but then there's sometimes where that's the last person you want to give any information to is someone else from your drive. Can somebody requests. I'd like a different taker. or or an alternative real quick disco. That's what filling it out online and on the phone allows you to do it. It gives you that personal control over your information and what you're sharing so if they don't want to share that information within the numerator they still have those other two options okay and we've mentioned website and you just said phone number so go ahead and give those out just twenty. Twenty Census Dot Gov website will provide she with all of our outreach materials. Okay in anything else. You WanNa leave us with Jessica I think that's that for the most apart. That's it I would really like to thank our partners like nerf and like af en so I really wanna give some you know. LOSE OUT TO TO JIM in the coal for the great work that they're we're doing we we couldn't do it without our partners. All right. Thank you for that in Jim. We are getting closer but they're still about a couple of minutes left anything else you. You wouldn't leave us with so just two words one is that it's oftentimes said it takes a village to raise a child. It takes a village. It takes an entire community working in collaboration consensus to make sure you get a complete count and the other related point that I think we really need to emphasize I I I obviously Don't want to repeat everything that that just Donna said but it's really important. People also consider applying for jobs as census takers and the website for that again is. It's twenty twenty cents. Dot Gov love backslash jobs there is still time to get your application but that window is closing. My understanding is there is about another five or six weeks left but please do apply because it's very important that every community every tribe have a trusted messenger from their community to to be. That census taker are coming into the door asking people questions in just a reminder. When does it officially kickoff and win? Does it end so that well. The AH has officially kicked off on January twenty first and took bay. It's GonNa Continue And people will actually see The the for the follow up with a with a census taker is going all the way through June and July. But we really want to encourage people to fill it out a long time before that in part because we don't want it we want to make sure we don't miss anyone and we don't want to wait until the last minute. This is too important really. It's it's important that you fill it out as early as you can With the understanding that in most parts of the country. It's going to start in earnest in about mid March all right. Well there you go folks if you missed anything in this hour you you can find it. Inner Archives just go to native America calling DOT com. And if there are more thoughts that you have on this or if you found this one of our podcasts you can leave your comments on the website. tweet them to us to at one. Eight hundred nine nine native and there you go information on the twenty twenty senses I'm also curious a folks some as it goes along. If there are stories or anecdotes that you have about taking the census or maybe even being a census worker feel Oh free to share your thoughts with us you can also email them to us comments at native America calling dot com. Thanks again to everybody. We heard from a great information in and thanks again to our guests Jim Tucker Nicole Romeo Jessica Imo touchy and Donna Bach. Tomorrow we're going to talk about hoop dancing tsing. How much do you know about it What happens when you see somebody hoop dancing? Maybe you are training the next hoop dancer of your family. Anything anything you want to share on that. We'll be ready for your calls and You can even start things right now on facebook. Are you hoped answer. Is the tradition vibrant in your family. Family your community go ahead and start that conversation on facebook or even tweet it to us. Our twitter handle again is at one eight hundred nine nine native. I'm your host Tara. Arrogate Woodward is kicking off the week. And I look forward to having you with us again. Tomorrow Support support by Freedom Lodge providing healing for seven generations interested in learning to heal generational trauma. You can be among those who join a dynamic two hundred. Our historical Oracle Trauma masterclass taught by Dr Ruby Gibson and staff beginning in May twenty twenty on the oneida nation in Wisconsin for mental and behavioral health therapists and domestic domestic and sexual abuse advocates. Registration deadline is March. Second Information and registration at Freedom Lodge Dot Org boo playing well takes practice and teamwork sodas staying healthy let healthcare coverage guard you on and off the court art contact your local Indian health care provider visit healthcare dot Gov or call one eight hundred three one eight two five nine six a message from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. A native America calling produced in the Annenberg national native the voice studios in Albuquerque New Mexico by Broadcast Corporation. A native nonprofit media organization funding is provided by the corporation nations for public broadcasting support from the public radio satellite. Service Music is Bhai Brent Michael Davids native voice. One the native American radio network.

The Census Alaska The Census Bureau Jim Tucker Nicole Romeo Jessic US America US Census Bureau Donna federal government Tara Gatewood American Indian Alaskan Native Congress Alaska Native Heritage Center Dr James Tucker fairbanks Alaska Native Heritage Center Anchorage Alaska Native Heritage Heritag Albuquerque
03-13-20 Bighorn sheep

Native America Calling

56:32 min | 1 year ago

03-13-20 Bighorn sheep

"Welcome to native America Cali. I'm Tara Gatewood bighorn. Sheep are in a conic American animal. They are an important species for several Western tribes to the Pyramid Lake by you tried and Emma J nation or currently working to restore bighorn sheep populations that have disappeared bighorn. Rams with their distinctive curled horns are also prized trophy hunters and they're benefiting tribal enterprises coming up. After the news. We'll hear about how bighorn sheep contribute to culture environment and economic development. This is National Native News Antonio Gonzales the ALUMNAE nation in Washington State is responding to its first positive report of cove in nineteen according to a press release. The tribe was informed Thursday about a case involving a tribal employees in response. Tribal Health team is recommending closing schools for fourteen days and non essential programs and services as temporary measures as Morris learned about the corona virus and its impact on the community in New Mexico schools. Serving native students are closing. Due to corona virus. Health and safety concerns Santa Fe Indian. School will be closed through April nineteenth. The school board's hundreds of students mini travel in and out of Santa Fe to tribal communities and Albuquerque. The native American Community Academy will be closed through April six following the state's directive to shutdown public schools. As of Thursday night there were six positive cases in New Mexico. Tc energy plans to start pre construction of the keystone xl pipeline in mid to late March according to news reports. That's weeks before a federal judge will hear arguments from tribes and environmentalist asking for preliminary injunction a lawyer for the Rosebud Sioux Community and Fort Belknap Indian Community Says T. C. is jumping. The Gun Victoria wicks reports. Federal Judge Brian Morris set an April sixteenth hearing and great falls to consider summary Judgment and preliminary injunction requests but TC energy has said it intends to start preconstruction long before then according to a report by the Glasgow Courier. Tc's Greg tensor met with Valley County officials at the end of February at that meeting. Tensor said prep-work will start this month and into early April with about one hundred workers brought in West Furlong as an attorney with the native American Rights Fund. He says it's important. The energy maintains the status quo until after the hearing because cutting down trees and moving ground are damages. That can't be fixed by a court order. Tubas jobs can resolve this case all the tribes claims that have been allowed to go forward. That construction shouldn't happen because it will tip the scales in favor of allowing the pipeline to go forward Potentially regardless the outcome of the case the Department of Justice has argued and briefs that the presidential permit allows only the first one point two miles of the pipeline that crosses the international border and tribes aren't affected in that stretch. Doj is also said that federal agencies not the president and force treaties. Furlong disagrees saying tribal rights. Don't stop a mile short of the border and that the US government in its entirety is obligated to protect treaty rights. Furlong says the judge will hear North's request for a preliminary injunction at the April hearing but in light of the news of imminent construction. Tribes will reconsider their next step for national native news. I'm Victoria wicks in rapid city. South Dakota Twenty twenty cents. This materials went out this week. And IS BRIAN REPORTS ORGAN. Officials kicked off their census. Drive on the warm springs Indian reservation coordinators to say the two thousand ten cents undercounted native Americans by four point. Two nine percents challenges include some tribal members distrust of the federal government and reservations often based in remote rural locations. Shayna Radford is the US Census Bureau's tribal partnership specialists for Oregon. Idaho she says. Oh Six hundred. Seventy five billion dollars in federal funding. They can't afford to overlook anyone. It's important for folks to understand that. American Indians and Alaskan natives are historically undercounted communities or hard to community as we say and so that's really a big focus for our region and for The Census Bureau as a whole. So that we don't get four point nine percent again. Raffard says. They've hired native Americans to be census takers to help tribal members feel more comfortable. People can also optimism at twenty two thousand census data online or over the phone. The deadline for responses is July thirty first for National Native News. I'm Brian Bowl and demand. Tonia Gonzales national native news is produced by Kohana Broadcast Corporation with funding by the corporation for public broadcasting. Like the circle of life. There is an opportunity that comes around every ten years a chance to participate and let our voice be heard it. Lets others know who we are and where we are the twenty twenty cents? This will be our opportunity to shape our future for generations to come shape our future start here. Learn more at twenty. Twenty Census Dot Gov paid for by the US Census Bureau native voice one the native American radio network. This is native America calling. I'm Tara Gatewood bighorn. Sheep are important animals too many tribes in recent years a few tribes started reintroducing the animals to places they inhabited at one time but had disappeared because of over hunting and habitat loss last month period. Pyramid Lake Pie. You tribe in Nevada and the mandate had Dotson Ricker. A Nation in North Dakota released bighorn. Sheep on the reservation for the first time in at least one. Hundred Years Program Here we pre periodically explore the relationship among animals tribes in the environment and the show is devoted to bighorn sheep today. If they're significant animals to your tribe give us a call and tell us about it or if you have questions about the current role their plane or restoration. You can call in to. We are at one eight hundred nine six. Two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native. Our associate producer. Andy Murphy spoke to Nicole Williamson about bighorn sheep. Makiya is the director for the Nez perce tribe cultural resource program. Here's their conversation. Starting with the traditional name for the sheep Tricia name in our maybe put Gar- nesper language for bighorn sheep for the mail. It's noon and for the female. Is He at day and for the A young a young kid. I guess you would call it is Look at which was the name of one of our well known chiefs. That was the younger brother of Young Joseph of eight hundred seventy seven war-fame kind of explained that cultural connection that the Nez perce people have with the with the sheep. Wi- think for us and and I guess more. Broadly with the ungulates species are as we call them. Where loot allocating does that travel on. Four legs with whom animals that goes back to the time of creation for US and When the animal people as they were known as that time were preparing this world for the coming of the not with our the Indian people on this land. All of creation. All of life at that time was was named in placed in order for this change that was coming to the land and the first one to step up for us was not so much an exam and right on his heels was to be seen The whitetail buck right after him. Thereabouts was the other Ungulate type species including the bighorn sheep and so that whole process of all those animals being named and ordered was how that life would be would be rendered upon landscape. Talboys animals would come to us in the and and how in the in our long house that they are served in accordance to how they are gathered throughout the year so many of the ungulate species such as the Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep were. They stepped forward to provide was was there meet of course but also they're hired because prior to the coming of. Non Indian people that the the specific ceremonial clothing. That was warned that women's justice some sometimes erroneously called detail. Justice are the men's Buckskin shirts and leggings were made Most appropriately from the rocky mountain bighorn sheep because of the fine quality of of that material. That hide so if you look at say pre eighteen seventies clothing or eighteen sixties era clothing other nesper people predominantly is made and constructed out of hides that were ten from a rocky mountain bighorn sheep and then also along with that. The horns were very valued Not In terms of a trophy type. Animal as a non Indian and other modern people see them today but their functional use as Different types of ladles and cups and especially the bighorn sheep horn both that the Nesper people constructed which Myself I have my own experience of constructive that particular type tool that was associated with the Nesper people as well as other surrounding tribes that lived in the area that had rocky mountain bighorn sheep. So what does this relationship look like today? And how has it changed? There's kind of two different fronts. In that regard there's on this side advocacy that the tribe provides on behalf of the continued presence of the Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep on this landscape in order to provide those opportunities but via our article three treaty rights that were reserved in eighteen fifty five by our leaders at that particular time reserved rights for hunting fishing gathering pastoral usual customary which includes oftentimes. Us National Forest property as well as other federal lands and so on these lands we practice many of our treaty rights that exceed our current reservation current eighteen sixty three boundaries and beyond even our ceded territory into our usual custom where we still hunt these animals and they fulfill their promise to us again. Going back to that story and and they're brought to our long houses used To renew that agreement you might say between the people that do the Nesper people and these animals that have sacrificed and give themselves to us so that our life is sustained but beyond that it's truly a relationship in that we play a role in how the role in their continued existence on this landscape and that also goes back to that story where at that time animal people lost. Their voice lost their ability to advocate on behalf of their own self and that responsibility was transferred to us as native people as people and that was the key. Williamson director of the Nez perce tribal Cultural Resource Program and to listen to the full interview with him. You can go to our website. Native AMERICA CALLING DOT com. And so we turn to you. What kind of connections does your tribe have to the bighorn sheep? What do you call them in your language calling right now? One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is the number right now. We'RE GONNA GO TO CROW agency. Montana say hello to Dale Old Horn. A He is a professor emeritus of Native. American studies at Montana. State University billings. Any Department headed me. Trees incre studies native American Studies at the Little Big Horn College. He's Uppsala. It's our pleasure to have him here. Dale welcome thank you in so dale hearing the Nez perce connection. What were you thinking? Well thinking about some of the similarities although the The cultural references that McHugh with WHO by the way is my nephew His Father Melvin Paul Williamson and I were second cousins in. Kobe was my brother. It was interesting to hear the key again and The cultural references that he was making was a little different from the crow worldview and a crow belief statement and So there's so many things to to think about when you listen to it but the crow belief statement holds that there's only one God creator and create created all things everything that exists because he was created by God including good evil good and bad and also the crow belief. Is that the God God placed power in seven entities and through which we are gifted with spiritual knowledge. And but we don't know which of these entities or of that of which of within the entities where the spiritual gifting might come into what degree and so that's why the crow have reverence for all things In addition to that of because of that The what we call in in our language the absolve language By two things without fires. Those are the animals that live outside the houses and homes and we have a special river reference of for many of those things because Some of them have a spiritual iconoclastic of regard by our people. And of those. You know the the story of the seven sacred rams come to mind and the story of big metal where he was a rescued by the seven sacred rams in what is now the Bighorn Canyon. Where the yellowtail reservoir is and Behind yellowtail dam and The the gifts that came to the young boy of was from the seven sacred rams and of them their chief was big metal himself. And then when we think about that it's a spiritual gift things that we aspire to and in our way we pray to the spirits of for those spiritual gift ings and You know the the new place of the bighorn sheep. Is that like many other things that were hunted out by settlement pressure There was a a simulation force assimilation also Saw The demise of much of the game around here so that all over the western west of the Mississippi that happened and because of that you know that forced the native Americans into submission and now we find that The forced Submission through starvation of that was brought upon us by the United States government and their agents including the Christian missionaries Has led to a lot of cultural dissonance and misunderstanding or lack of understanding goodall. When we do talk about that and I think it which makes these kinds of conversations extremely important of just what these connections have what role they play in our lives. What role they play in understanding who we are and how we relate to other lands that we were That we are connected to in like you to tell us more about this because it's important to know this side of our indigenous history and We'll get deeper into that coming up after this break. Hang tight the federal agency that provides schooling for forty seven thousand native students making Major Changes Bureau of Indian education officials. Say THAT CHANGES WILL THE ADMINISTRATION. And make it more accountable. We'll hear about what's next from those heading up the agency on the next native America calling. We hope you'll join us like the circle of life. There is an opportunity that comes around. Every TEN YEARS. A chance to participate and lead our voice be heard it. Lets others know who we are and where we are? The twenty twenty census will be our opportunity to shape our future for generations to come shape. Our Future Start here. Learn more at twenty. Twenty Census Dot Gov paid for by the US Census Bureau. You're listening to native America calling target from a sled a Pueblo. Today we are talking about bighorn sheep. The Pyramid Lake by tribe recently reintroduced bighorn sheep to their reservation. They are important species for cultural as you just heard reasons as well as ecological reasons. And how do you connect to the bighorn sheep joyner confrontation by calling one eight hundred nine nine six? Two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and just before the break. We introduced you to Dale Old Horn. come in to us today He is Uppsala and he's also a professor Immi trees of native American Studies at Montana. State University billings our pleasure to have him here. Entail police continue. You were talking about our relationship To the Big Horn of course the crow relationship and even thinking about a time when they went away y they did please continue. Oh just referring to the time. When the settlements in the West occurred and how Abraham Lincoln was pushing for settlements in the west and he pushed through the Homestead Act which gave away the native lands totally disregarding the treaties that were in place and opened up these lance for home sitting by US citizens and of course at that time we still had in our view nation status but little. We know that there was language in these treaties took away their sovereignty and and our ability to who owned lands in the Supreme Court case called Johnson versus Macintosh. And we to or to all of this pressure. Because of the starvation policies that was used by the United States government and their agencies including the Christian missionaries and the native people. Being forced into submission by starvation became somewhat policy within their lands and were forced to give their lives and of course. There was a lot of nefarious dealings with the United States. Government as most people have learned by looking at the testimonies of the peace commission as it was called back those eastern the treaty days and how the United States government did not tell the truth to the native people but the end result was that we were nearly wiped off the face of the earth and then the weakening of these native people also resulted into lack of understanding of the native culture and the original. Let's say the ideology worldview needed people but some of it's still remains although it is under strong strong pressure from the forces now from within these tribes crow being included a where there's opposition to native cultural expression native culture knowledge and so when we look at things like be corn sheep. And how I kinda classic you were in the spiritual regard of the crow people along with a different animal families It is important to note that the native knowledge and then they regard for those for those beings have has diminished over the years but they are still important too many of us and Thankfully some of this knowledge spiritual knowledge does well Remains as taught and luckily to me by both my parents and my uncles and and several members of the original crew Culture Committee which I was a member for quite some time and the big Horn mountains The North Slope being still under the present day TROAS avaition Is declared was declared by the seven sacred rams to be there mountains hence the name was the mountains of the coins or the bighorn mountains and when map makers non-indian map makers came in. They dropped off the apostrophe. Yes and made it be corn mountains and they said that if the name was never changed and the name of the river which was also there's the two rivers of which belongs to them would never be changed at the crows with remained and So we even had a a a pretty good discussion some time ago Where they had changed the the E- corn of Water Reservoir To yellowtail reservoir and we had that changed back So that the name would not change because of that belief and I was listening with interest about the economic impact. That's they they could have and Since the bighorn sheep had been hunting out of you have not regained their population in in strength onto reservation itself The there's bitcoin sheep. There's a pretty good sized heard on the East priors which is North and west of the Big Horn mountains but Crow people don't hunt them very much and historically the hides of the Ba- corn sheep. Oh was Priced for the for somewhere because They were thinner than the your skin and Like what McHugh was referring to Cros fashioned and shaped the rams horns into bows and They used him in war and in hunting and Of course you ate meat Everything that The Assad Oga took from nature. It was for something and sustenance of a because we know that in order for others to live something else must die so when we consume plant when we can eat an animal the plant where the animal must ice that we could. We could live and we being on the apex of this. Oh Food Pyramid of we are the ones that take from the largest are just nature for us to survive and the economic impact a C could be a tremendous amount. Although we've tried that with our buffalo hurt and the impact of it is that a buffalo hunting of for the high dollar game. Hunter is not that high end to listen. It doesn't begin as much as we would. We would hope if I can interrupt because I think you hit a really important point where just even letting the outside world know the difficult decisions we do have to make In order to maintain our tribal communities in in speaking of reverence for these animals even knowing that their numbers have gone down. You know. Sometimes it's hard to explain that that even though we venture into some of these Different Economic Ventures it is sometimes a really heavy thing in sometimes. The outside world doesn't understand and and I think that just goes back to Even just having Respect in our nation's in an we have that and knowing you have been You know Somebody that people look up to in your own tribal nation that that burden our leaders carry to make these kind of decisions and your thoughts of when we come to that point when we say maybe this is something we should venture into or maybe come to appoint and say you know what it's time to stop this and bring these beans back to the numbers they were. I'd like to hear your take on that In terms of the buffalo heard you know we have a very healthy Buffalo herd here but The we had brought in some Big Game Hunters but it's not that much and it doesn't have much of an impact at all On the economy of the crow people Because she being smaller number If if the went into commercial hunting for bighorn sheep I think the economic impact of that would be even smaller The the reason why the Crow tribe and other tribes have had to do. This is at the Indian. Reservations are so poverty stricken we have to look mad the many many resources To try to make a little money to help sustain the living of our people and those those Sorry to say have been very minimal in providing cash into bad pockets of the Tribal members and so as far as economy is concerned The it is so small that if we if we were completely eliminated The missing of those dollars would be very small in very narrow impact but at the same time in the sense of heard. We need to call those numbers. So that can become manageable. So that's another aspect of it because it's a limited area of land that they're they are on and if they Grays it out. Oh we hate to see them to be starving to. It's so that's a. That's another consideration. There there is a lot to consider a until Dale because we know their numbers aren't were they were before contact What do we teach our children? Even you know even when there isn't restoration about the specialness if you even see one of these Beans in their own habitat. What are we teach our children Or even just our community members about you know the specialness of of seeing one of these things I think it's a larger than that To to teach a child that the buffalo special is very narrow in scope but to teach the child about why of the Animal Kingdom message where special to to the crow people and possibly to some native tribes other native tribes. I will I don't I'm not so arrogant as to try to represent their views for them Their beliefs better expressed by them but From the Crow Indians standpoint data point If we try to talk to them about the belief ways of the crow people and why they are important and not just buffalo or bighorn sheep or just the Eagle or the fish. Or what have you of why they're all important? In the belief of crew people that would help sustain them to come to more Cultural Understanding and creator of Cultural Knowledge. Which would then combat against a larger problem that we have of dysfunctional and social scientists will tell you that when people lose our identity they go into what they call it an identity crisis which is a main contributor to developing this functionalism dysfunctional ism then expresses itself into other things like substance abuse of eating the wrong food and developing diabetes alcohol abuse and alcoholism abusing drugs in leading to drug addiction. Which leads to a detrimental home lives of the children and Children learn what we say and the learned what we do become cyclical and before we knew the next generation is affected by the same problems that we have been experiencing and this all started in the eighteen eighties. When the Christian missionaries became successful in Diminishing the importance of the native culture and now today on many Indian reservations. The native is no longer prevalent But there's a what you know. Prevalent is identity crisis. That's going on in. We constantly hear about how high numbers go. And it's important. You point all of these things out In getting us back to our own tribal understanding of healing or to even being strong Dale. I appreciate your thoughts and folks. Maybe you'd like to share some words. Dale you can call in now. One eight hundred nine nine six two eight four eight is the number and maybe you even want to talk about the significance of the bighorn sheep to your own tribal community. Go ahead and give us a ring. One eight hundred nine six two eight four eight. Is the number down like to introduce you listening audience to another guest that we have on the line with us in Nixon. Nevada is Emily Heckler She is an environmental specialist for the Pyramid Lake tribe. And my pleasure to have her here emily. Welcome to Native America. Calling in so emily hearing where you know these beings and how they rest in our tribes and culture and of course As Dale mentioned you know each tribe has its own belief and understanding You see how important they are and we also look forward to people calling in and Sharon even more of that importance You're also called in to Bring more importance to to the numbers and the return of these animals in in some of their natural habitats. And tell us how you fit into Making sure the bighorn sheep are where they've always been. Think that Indian Really I'm this whole movement begun decades ago and I'm really came together this last two years and being able to have the capacity to take on a large project like this and bring bighorn sheep back to the reservation Here in Nevada and it was a very significant event for the tribe and just to have bighorn sheep. Back on the reservation of back home again and We've been working very hard with the Nevada apartment. Wildlife Tribal leaders to coordinate this huge. We large effort to bring them back and Came to head in January when we released Twenty two bighorn sheep onto the east side of the Pyramid Lake reservation on the lake range. I'm great bighorn HABITAT Peaking above eight thousand feet of sea level and we'll have the capacity to be protected into the future until they population can reach sustainable level to sustain future harvests of the animal. And be able to bring that tradition back the drive which hasn't been an opportunity for travel members and like you said earlier over one hundred years so we're just very thankful to have is opportunity to work with the fish and wildlife services who funded A large portion of the Financing this project Along with the Nevada bitcoins unlimited their donations to the drive to have the financial civility to do projects. Like this in. So I'm sure there were a lot of things that had to be put in place may even lots of discussions to make sure that this was rolling? And I'd like you to share the details on that too. of understanding when nation does decide Let's do something about the small numbers you know. What all needs to be considered Even in a traditional sense. What are some of the things that need to be considered in embarking on a project like this? We'll talk more with emily coming up here after the break but you can also join us to one eight hundred nine six two eight four eight is number to join us and you can also reach out If you find this enter- podcast which if you didn't know you can find this program on Itunes Stitcher soundcloud and You can also listen to it on our website. In Our archives native America calling is where you find Our five as well as links to other things but we will continue the conversation. These phone lines are ready for you. What would you like to say about bighorn sheep? Maybe you've even been part of the restoration Coming to your own community you can talk about that aspect to one eight hundred nine six two eight. Four eight is a number and we look forward to hearing your thoughts. Maybe even hearing your own language spoken on these airwaves support Ramona farms offering wholesome and delicious foods from our heirloom crops as our contribution to a better diet for the benefit of all people. We're honored to share our centuries old farming end culinary traditions online at Ramona farms dot com support by periods dot com proud to provide traditional and contemporary American Indian craft supplies from feathers furs and hides to con- shows fringe shells and beads in rapid city or online at prairie edge dot. Com WON'T BE LAB. Thank you for tuning in to native America calling. I'm Tara Gatewood. Today we are focusing on bighorn sheep. They are culturally significant to many nations. What about your tribe? There's still time to join our conversation. Were at one eight hundred nine six. Two eight four eight. That's also one eight hundred nine nine native and just before the break you heard from Emily Haggar She's an environmental specialist for the Pyramid Lake by tribe. Our pleasure to have her here until emily share those details. How did this project kickoff? What needed to be in place in order for it to happen a good lesson? I picked off in early two thousand eighteen and we've been working very diligently throughout the last year after years to get everything in place that needed to be done. So that's tribal council approval that's Depar- that's approval from the Nevada Department of Wildlife and that collaboration and memorandum of Understanding and contracts and all the paperwork that had to be conducted and then there was really just a collaboration and making sure that once these animals are on the landscape. Then what how are we gonNA monitor them? How are we going to ensure that they are Sustainably growing how can we protect them so The resolution like Dr? I'm declared the California bighorn sheep species of protection Meeting cannot be harvested Intel bighorn Sheep Management Plan hasn't been developed has identified sustainable population. So I'm working to protect those Into the future looking you know towards the next five to ten years. What does that look like? What are the animals? Look like on the landscape Some movies forward in that you know you have to. All of our animals are attached with a Chinese. Gps callers. We're getting twelve points a day coming into the natural resource department to really see where are these animals dispersing to How are they intermingling with each other? How were they moving across the landscape? What Spring Lake Habitats Utilizing So we're now that we're past the point of release we're really looking towards the future and Really keeping a very close eye on these animals as they adapt to their new habitat or new home here on the reservation and coming back to the planning process. And you don't really what it took to get here. Is You know really a lot of hard work. Done by the Tribal Council anybody. That community The pain relief drivers very tied to pay me. Lake itself in as a clearly Dakota. They're very tied to their fisheries so for decades With the water words of the West and really working to make sure that To Pay Me Lake has a water. Quality needs or in the habitat for their fisheries so for decades really was the focus of the tries to cover the fisheries in. Wow We've been very successful to do that over the last few decades We still have a long way to go on that so to take on a project like this. That's so large incapacity. Not You know two years in the making and just planning Making sure you have the financial resources you know. Supportive the tribal council and all the agencies that needed to be involved was. Do we have the capacity to care for these animals into the future on the National Research Department is a completely grant funded entity so you know. We have the capacity. Now say okay. Yeah we have his relationships with these agencies and these granddaughters did make sure that they can sustainably put together a program to protect them into the future and author them as they Drop their yearlings in the spring and be able to monitor them and have that equipment in place. It takes a lot of money. And we're in the middle of that two emily Children more about where these animals came from and of course the transportation of course releasing them out from the Sheep Creek range which is in north central of Atta. They were originally supposed to come from the black range which is just north of the recitation. However winter storm encroaching pushed us to a different mountain range Very last minute. We had a helicopter company. Come Out Quicksilver air out of Colorado. And they do all the captures for the state of Nevada. So we Contract with them and they did a neck helicopter capture and the grange early morning. We began it son up so he left when I'm up in Nevada at about Four am went out and we started capturing first thing in the morning first thing in the sun came over the mountain and helicopter key get out with good visibility and it really was a large group effort from the Natural Department being their staff members. Biologists State Veterinarian Game Warden. Volunteers all came together to to make sure that each individual animal check. The temperature is checked. let samples. Were taken here samples we're taking. Vc's were taken. And they were monitored very closely for them and they touched the ground until the minute they were in the trailer. I'm headed down to pyramid lake so it really did take an army in an entire day of very close coordination between everybody to make sure that these animals were taking care of the best way possible very stressful situation for an animal so but we do everything to make sure that they are As healthy as possible when they are taken and transported release into a new habitat. And I'd like to hear more about You know adapting back to this place that you have released them to. I got a caller on the line. We're going to say hi to. We have SAM. Torrione Nevada reservation in New Mexico and We're going to go ahead and say hello to them listening in on Kym. Sam Thank you for calling your ear and you're on the Navajo reservation. Sam Go ahead aloe. Hi Tara I've been a long time. Listener in several times caller. I love this topic and I just want to encourage the the The HABITAT People are doing and To have this bighorn sheep and helping them out is is good news and so you know being a two now all my life. You know People before us to talk about this and that how sacred all these mountain creatures are in including Buffalo and the highly honored was the the Golden Eagle and you know sanctuaries lead recovery centers are doing a great job and you know I wish them the best because there are linked to our traditional and culture and we have. We do have stories down. We we've been told and how they resemble to to the Teaching and the ceremonies. And so I. I'm just I'm just don't cry now. Well thanks sharing all right Sam wishing you the best thank you for your call there on the Navajo nation and a year common. Sarah so welcome you can even email them to us. Our email addresses comments at native America calling DOT com. So emily the reintroduction Anything about What the bighorn. Sheep are facing right now where they've been brought to Are there any threats literally about two miles north of the pyramid on the west side of the Lake Range You try to get them up into a mountain range. I would really direct them through canyon to that high mountain terrain where there are more safer from predators and Do the sitting road concerns and you have large equipment. You just do the best. You can get where you need where they need to be in direct them in their new habitat and then you've been doing a lot of exploring and we've had all over the mountain range. They've gone all the way north and thousand they're really just exploring their new habitat in what we try to do. Is Take these animals from habitat similar to what they're going to be going into so that they can adapt more quickly to their new habitat As far as reg the bighorn sheep the you know the overharvesting the eighteen. Hundreds and really for Nevada. It was heavy influenced by the Basque people that came over with the sheep herders. And you know back then. We didn't know as much as we know. Now about diseases and diseases. Domestic Sheep Kerry They carry Pneumonia disease that is fatal to they made a bighorn sheep population. So that's also thought to be what was one of the downturns besides overpop- besides over hunting in Nevada specifically was domestic sheep. Grazie and we don't have any domestic sheep grazing on the reservation or within the Near Facility. So we don't see that as large threat and not needed as Nevada Department of wildlife to our species that we just reintroduced however that's where our. Gps callers come in Rams they like to go and what we call walkabout in you know that you really will explore habitats further and have a larger home range than female you would have so we hold the Monitor them at twelve points today which every two hours that if they do decide to go and do an area where we know. Domestic sheep are off the reservation. We can very quickly react to that before any threat to disease to dig when she established population on the reservation threatened. But that's really where we bring science and the technology that we have now to be able to very closely monitor these animals to make sure that is animals kidding. I'm thrive into the future and we'll be doing a lot of have that assessments and nutrition assessment throughout two twenty twenty two twenty twenty one And really while we're doing these big large monitoring efforts throughout this year and into the next tune a seven years. Also be working this year on augmentation and then when tation what that means is we bring in A number of animals from a different mountain range and that really goes to help improve Biodiversity in their liles and their genes. And you have a larger genetic areas there which allows them to to have a stronger ability to adapt to the landscape. So there is a threat of disease or predation Whatever just threat not easy. I mean that Heard they'll be able to adapt to more quickly and their numbers will be able to expand We do expect that there will be predation events in the future we do expect some mortality It's the name of the game in the business. So we're definitely watching these animals closely in developing management plans and strategies that will best suit the needs of the animals. Now in in I think to just thinking about all the animals relate to each other in in you know. They're dependent on each other for certain things and the plants are dependent on the animals too. And so I think it's really interesting to be thinking about. How the whole thing connects and then of course in that. Circle is our connection as indigenous people in so emily. I appreciate you sharing a little bit about what's going on there in Pyramid Lake And we are getting close to the end of the hour when reintroduce our guest joining us today Is Dale Old Horn coming to us from the Crow Agency in Montana He is a professor emeritus. I was saying that wrong before emeritus of native American Studies at Montana. State University billings Dale There's a lot here and especially just hearing what's going on there at Pyramid Lake for us to think and consider and hearing. The story was going through. My mind is also thinking about The things we do to our environment and and you know even getting to this point where The Big Horner. No longer were they were in in. What are your thoughts? What would you like to leave us with? What are the big lessons We can take away from what we heard today. Well the big lesson is that the Agriculture in the United States usually Impinges of negatively on wildlife and native habitat for as your astutely of observing as the plant life as well as you pointed out to grazing of by the appropriate animals on the appropriate habitat. Actually encourages the re growth of that Plant life as well as it contributes to the health of the animal but now with the farming. That's going on the The all the different things that is necessary for the economy of the United States. And the places that we live in Often Times Many things that were very very important for the culture of the native American people Seem to be not as important anymore for the economic growth of of the Agriculturalists as well as other people the industrialised pipelines and everything that that the United States relies on for each economy so that becomes a point. Where of the old way of life has now become Let's say Stunted in its growth of by another way of life that relies heavily upon capitalism and things of the like. And so. What do we do? That's the million dollar question. What do we do about it and That bears a lot of discussion. That bears a lot of thought and it bears a lot of study but it is something very important to think about indeed in down. We're going to wrap things up here and Dale going into the weekend. I know a lot of people are concerned with. Things were seen in headlines. Real quick any words of encouragement. You want to end with well The encouragement that I share is a word of encouragement that I learned from my folks who are both A nativist native people spoke to crow. Language is English language very well. Is that keep your face strong because our creator of will always provide something. Something may go away but that thing that went away may come back but if it doesn't it's replaced by something else that is good that is also for your benefit as a person so peope maintain your sense of identity as native people because without that we've become lost and I've always said losing. It's not winning right. Dale Old Horn. Thank you for joining us. Also thank you to Emily Hagler. It's going to do it for our program. Thank you to our crew here at Native America. Calling Art Hughes Monica Brain. Andy Murphy Marino Spencer also thinks to roll monger SIA for engineering today. Malays Moses is the distribution director and Bob. Peterson is a network manager for native voice. One lifton Chadwick is a research development specialist. Antonio Gonzales is the anchor and producer of national native news. Charles say there is our chief of operations. Jacqueline Salih is our president and CEO of Quantum Broadcast Corporation. I'm Tara gatewood support by the American Indian. Higher Education Consortium working to ensure tribal colleges and universities are included in our higher education system Info on thirty seven tribal colleges and universities at a HEC DOT ORG for native Americans affected by domestic violence. The strong hearts native helpline offers peer to peer support and resources. It safe confidential and toll. Free at eight four. Four seven native program support by the National Indigenous Women's Resource Center Ninety Percent Dot and Beatles. Eight as reluctant. Cats are GONNA lock them up and man mud suited. Akilah hot cancer. You've lived immediately. I go who was developer? Need Jalil Boxer Goo Healthcare Dot Gov question. I are go who one eight hundred three one. Eight two five nine six or not giving MONUC to qucken centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. Native America calling is produced in the National Native Oi Studios in Albuquerque New Mexico by Qantas Broadcast Corporation and native nonprofit media organization funding is provided by the corporation for public broadcasting with support from the Public Radio Satellite Service Music by Brent Michael Davids native voice. One native American radio network.

Pyramid Lake America US Tara Gatewood National Native News Nevada Dale Rams United States government Montana US Census Bureau State University Dale Old Horn. director Antonio Gonzales professor Tribal Health Native America