39 Burst results for "florida"

Fresh update on "florida" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:53 min | 32 min ago

Fresh update on "florida" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"On NewsRadio. W F L A Times on taxes. I'm Paul Stevens, Fox News. The New York Times reporting that President Trump paid no federal income taxes in 10 of the last 15 years. The president, reacting Sunday at the White House. Total fake news. We went through the same stories. You caressed me. The same questions for years ago had litigate this and talk about it. Total fake news now actually paid tax. But you ll see that Susan's my tax returns It's under They've been underwater for a long time. The times also saying that Mr Trump a just $750 in federal income tax is the year he ran for president and in his first year in the White House. Mr Trump has not released his tax returns. Police called Sunday to the Fort Lauderdale, Florida home, the former Trump campaign manager, Brad par scale after his wife reported he was armed and she feared he was about to kill himself, Authorities saying officers convinced par scale to surrender peacefully. They then brought him to a hospital for evaluation. The campaign's communications director,.

Mr Trump President Trump Donald Trump White House Paul Stevens Fox News Fort Lauderdale Susan The New York Times Florida Director Brad
KJ Costello makes SEC history as Mississippi State upsets LSU

This Week In Texas

00:44 sec | 19 hrs ago

KJ Costello makes SEC history as Mississippi State upsets LSU

"Number three Oklahoma in Norman 38 35. Mississippi State knocked off defending champion and sixth rank Della's You in Baton Rouge, 44. 34 Bulldogs led by KJ Costello's SEC record 623 passing yards. Number two Alabama handles Missouri 38 19 4th rank Georgia Cruises by Arkansas 37 10 number five Florida outlasting Ole Miss 51 35. Eighth ranked Auburn over number 23, Kentucky 29 13, Texas holds off Texas Tech 63 56 over time number 10, Texas A and M gives by Vanderbilt. 17, 12 12 Frank Miami blasting Florida State 52 10. The NFL reportedly investigating the Raiders for

Texas Kj Costello Texas Tech Mississippi State Baton Rouge Oklahoma Bulldogs Auburn Frank Miami NFL Raiders Florida Arkansas Alabama Kentucky Missouri Georgia Vanderbilt.
Fresh update on "florida" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:36 min | 33 min ago

Fresh update on "florida" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"To the president's reelection campaign is in a Florida hospital. Police in Fort Lauderdale, Florida say they received a 911 call from Brad Parse Cal's wife Sunday evening, saying the former Trump campaign manager was in his home with access to several firearms and was threatening to harm himself A B C's brand milky. President calls it Fake NEWS The New York Times is reporting on what it says is data from almost two decades worth of the president's tax returns. The Times, says President Trump who claims to be worth over $10 billion paid just $750 in federal income tax is the year he won the presidency in the same amount in his first year in office. While the Times says the records do not reveal trumps true wealth. They do show a quote fundamentally different story than what he's told the American public about his business prowess, instead showing a businessman that it says took in hundreds of millions of dollars a year yet racked up chronic losses to avoid paying taxes. Mark Malard ABC News for now, video sharing smartphone APP. Tic Tac is still available. A federal judge in Washington D. C. Postponing a band that would have made the APP on available in APP store's comment from ABC News, legal analyst Royal Oaks Ticktock got an 11. Hour reprieve. It was on the brink of being banned from US smartphone app. But a federal judge decided that would violate the company's First Amendment rights. The Trump administration argued the owners of TIC Tac posed a threat to national security that personal information on millions of Americans winds up in the hands of the Chinese government. The judge disagreed. The judge did not rule on a Mork comprehensive band set to take effect. In November, Texas environmental officials lifted a warning for final Houston area community to stop Using tap water because it might be tainted with a brain eating amoeba. Residents of Lake Jackson still have to boil the water before using it..

President Trump Tic Tac Abc News The New York Times Donald Trump Florida Hospital Fort Lauderdale Florida Lake Jackson United States Brad Mark Malard Texas Royal Oaks Ticktock
Bars & Nightclubs Back In Business Following Gov. Ron DeSantis’ Executive Order, Miami-Dade Restaurants To Open At 50% Capacity

Heartland Newsfeed Radio Network

00:44 sec | 19 hrs ago

Bars & Nightclubs Back In Business Following Gov. Ron DeSantis’ Executive Order, Miami-Dade Restaurants To Open At 50% Capacity

"It's business as usual in Florida where Governor Rhonda Santa's signed an order paving the way for bars and restaurants to fully reopen amid the coronavirus pandemic governor's executive order. Now allow that businesses including restaurants, bars, and nightclubs to operate at full capacity with limited social distancing restriction and the governor's order also restricted at least twenty five counties with math mandates from imposing fines on people who violate local corona virus mitigation efforts. Says Charles. In Miami Dade County, the mayor says he intends to keep some restrictions in place like fifty percent capacity at restaurants Pam. Fox

Miami Dade County Rhonda Santa Executive Florida FOX Charles
Fresh update on "florida" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

00:36 sec | 33 min ago

Fresh update on "florida" discussed on Coast to Coast AM with George Noory

"The opening of nightclubs will require authorization. The state. Florida's education chief is telling Miami Dade public schools to reopen no later than October 5th Richard Corker and sent a letter to school District Superintendent Alberta Caravello to address getting the district's schools to open back up after the cove in 19 restrictions, letter says Cavallo must say why individual schools can open even if he has reasons to believe the entire district. Should remain shot President Trump claims Democratic rival Joe Biden has been very band to Hispanics, accusing Biden of spending nearly 50 years selling out the various interests. Trump condemn violence and Democratic led cities recently at an event in South Florida. He also argue the economy is recovering well during the ongoing Corona virus outbreak. Speaking on the Ingram angle, Florida governor Rhonda Santa says his state is now reopened for business state, You would see churches.

Joe Biden Florida School District South Florida Cavallo Richard Corker Miami Dade Rhonda Santa Alberta Caravello Superintendent President Trump
States begin to lift coronavirus restrictions, many concerned for health risk

KYW 24 Hour News

00:55 sec | 19 hrs ago

States begin to lift coronavirus restrictions, many concerned for health risk

"To more than seven million Americans being infected the death toll over 204,000 now far more than any other country. Here's correspondent Daniel Bacchus, New York City continues to open with caution, making outdoor dining permanent. I feel like it's really nice to get back to normal and like I also think it's really good for the restaurant, but others are taking a controversial approach. Florida's governor is lifting our restrictions on bars, restaurants and other businesses were prepared. If we see an increase, we're not closing. Anything going forward, we're gonna be able to host the Super Bowl in February. Here in California. Health officials say there could be an 89% increase in Corona virus related hospitalizations over the next month. people tested positive for Koven 19 in a single day, marking the first time since June. 5th that has happened

Daniel Bacchus New York City Florida California Koven
Fresh update on "florida" discussed on Dan Proft

Dan Proft

01:10 min | 36 min ago

Fresh update on "florida" discussed on Dan Proft

"And he had multiple firearms and was threatening to hurt himself. Par scale was hospitalized under the state's Baker Act, which allows the detainment of 72 hours for psychological evaluation. Trump Campaign communications director Tim Murtagh issued this statement. Brad par Scale is a member of our family, and we love him. We're ready to support him and his family in any way possible. Our scale had been demoted from the campaign manager post last July but remained on board with the campaign to help run It's digital operation. George Manzano reporting Under Florida's Red Flag law officials could ask a judge to bar par scale from processing any weapons for Up to a year. Gruesome number. The world is approaching one million deaths Student Cove in 19 that, according to Johns Hopkins University, The nearly one million deaths attributed to the Corona virus in nine months are far more than the 690,000 from AIDS or the 400,000 from malaria in all of last year. More deaths are expected this fall because of the recent surge in Corona virus infections in the U. S. And many other countries, wealth and power have not shielded the rich from the awful power of the virus. The U. S has been the worst hit country in the world with more than seven million infections and more than 200,000 death, reflecting what Dr Anthony about, she says, is the lack of success that we have had in containing this outbreak. Yet there are also signs that death rates are declining, and that people who get the virus now are faring better than those in the early months of the pandemic. I'm Julie Walker on Wall Street down Futures up 187.

Tim Murtagh Johns Hopkins University George Manzano Julie Walker Donald Trump Dr Anthony Brad Malaria Florida Director Aids
Miami Mayor Concerned As DeSantis Lifts Statewide COVID Restrictions in Bid to Open Florida Economy

WIOD Programming

00:19 sec | 23 hrs ago

Miami Mayor Concerned As DeSantis Lifts Statewide COVID Restrictions in Bid to Open Florida Economy

"In Florida is the state's governor, Rhonda Santa's moves ahead with reopening the state Despite Cove in 19 cases continuing to climb in Miami, the mayor says he's concerned. To move to fully lift restrictions could go wrong. I think it's risky to open a full blown. This could be something to backfire

Rhonda Santa Cove Miami Florida
Less than half of US public believes the election results will be accurate

KFBK Weekend Live With Sam Shane

04:20 min | 1 d ago

Less than half of US public believes the election results will be accurate

"That less than half Of the public believes the election tally will be accurate. Less than half So that I'm going to do. The reciprocal is here. Well, then, that must mean a majority things. It won't be. And if that's the case, no matter who wins. If we don't if we do not believe it. Then what happens to our republic? You have tohave. Trust in the fact that the process the system works. So With all of that, and by the way, I've been flipping around on all the various networks today. And The left is apoplectic. They are absolutely come at every topic of every show so far today. About the fact that Donald Trump's not gonna step aside. He's talking to the military about having the military come in. And keep him keep the opposition away and keep him there and and that they're going to make sure that this goes, you know, they're not going to count the balance. There is going to declare that he's the winner and then the Supreme Court will now be in the hands of conservatives, and then they're going to rule in favor of him. But I made her go nuts. Then I looked at the Washington Examiner there right there, Right in the same story in the front of Drudge is writing the same story. So this isn't like some of this is like the elephant in the room that people are afraid to talk about. I really wanna have a conversation with you about this. I don't want people that are just angry. What are you doing, Tom? Why? Why are you talking about President Trump the greatest guy in the whole wide world. I'm not. I'm not talking about who's gonna win or he's gonna lose. I'm talking about the fact that both parties are spending a lot of time undermining the accuracy of the election. Down. Has any election ever been precisely, exactly. 1000% accurate. I doubt it. seen in my lifetime was 2000, Florida. Or I believe it was 508 votes. In favor of George W. Bush. But before this was they went through and recounted and re counted and recounted, And then it went to the courts and the courts ruled about you can't recount Yes, you can recount Okay, Broward, you could recount but Then I went to the Supreme Court. And they finally put a stop to all the recount recount recount. But that did not mean that the New York Times and CBS News We're not still there. Digging with their lawyers. Doing everything they could to figure out what the true account wasn't after. It was a good year, when finally all of the media investigations. Finally came to the conclusion that George W. Bush won by 508 votes. But what's that did was it for the first couple of years of the Bush administration even after 9 11? There was a period where we were all united after 9 11, but but otherwise. It was. He's not a legitimate president. Now that was going all during his first term, And then when he was re elected in 2004 at pretty much, they still did not like him, but they stopped the fact that he wasn't a legitimate president. And so if Donald Trump wins you want this country No matter how much you like him or don't like him, you want the country to know that he is the legitimate president if Joe Biden wins You want to know that as well.

George W. Bush Supreme Court President Trump Washington Examiner Joe Biden Florida CBS New York Times Drudge TOM Broward
Florida reopens bars and restaurants with no restrictions

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

01:01 min | 1 d ago

Florida reopens bars and restaurants with no restrictions

"Governor governor wants wants his his state state to to be be open open for for business. business. So So on on Friday, Friday, Rhonda Rhonda Santa's Santa's lifted lifted all all restrictions restrictions on on restaurants restaurants and and other other businesses businesses in in the the state. state.

Rhonda Rhonda Santa Governor Governor
Florida lifts all coronavirus restaurant restrictions statewide

Business Rockstars

00:32 sec | 1 d ago

Florida lifts all coronavirus restaurant restrictions statewide

"Santa's has lifted all Corona virus restrictions on bars and restaurants effective immediately. That means they can open at full capacity in Florida and counties are virtually powerless. If they want to impose local restrictions local restricts between 50 and 100. They've gotta provide justification, and they've got to identify what the costs involved. With doing that are until yesterday, local governments could go further in their restrictions compared to the state, The Santis, the state is prepared if there is a surge in covert 19 cases, a dead in the Bronx

Bronx Santa Florida
Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:08 min | 1 d ago

Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

"I want to talk a bit about how we got here and why at least since the the famous near Tie of two thousand does just seem to be Florida or at least partially about Florida. Michael ask, you first win and why did floor to become the key battleground? Republican hasn't won the White House without Florida forever. So that's part of the reason that it's become. So you know everybody desperately wants it and it just seems to be the self-balancing State where it's about twenty percent immigrants. But you know the last the last fifty, million votes that have been cast for presidential candidates in. Florida. Republicans. Democrats, are separated by about twenty thousand and we've had just about every election. Every statewide election seems to come down to one percent and just seems like every time another white person. Republican moves down here from the Midwest another democratic leaning Immigrants May move into central Florida from the Global South and so it's a really seems to be self-balancing. Beyond those demographics that Monolithic is it a case of elderly white pensioners voting for Republicans, and more recent arrivals from elsewhere trading Democrat or is there some kind of overlap between spillage among those groups? As you can probably imagine it's a little bit more complex in that I think that there's didn't kind of increasing awareness for both Democrats and Republicans that some of the key demographics here you know the American immigrants but you know you have the first generation, the second generation you have the newer arrivals you have the. You have the Cubans you have the Puerto Ricans have the Haitians. There's such a mix of people and cultures and experiences, and when you add to that kind of the New Yorkers that are coming to Florida to retire, and you have all these different politics and ideologies of mixed together I think you really get. Such a representation of both the Conservatives and the liberals in both the US. But also in Latin America and I think that when you look at South Florida, you see a lot of those kind of play. You see you know from Columbia, you see the Conservatives from Columbia and you see the progressives from Columbia. So you have such a makes of. Of just these ideologies that really comes to shine like Michael said in the way that people vote. Michael is the a geographic split within Florida as well because it's the general tendency in the United States and elsewhere that cities tend to be more liberal more vaguely left-wing rural parts of a given state or given country tend to be more conservative. Is that clear cut in that respect in Florida? Well, again I think. Could certainly right that it's always a little more complicated but that's generally true I think you know you saw in two thousand sixteen that Hillary Clinton did even better than expected in a lot of the urban areas She Barack Obama won Florida and Hillary Clinton. Did even better in some of the particularly in south Florida in Miami and Fort Lauderdale and West Palm Beach and some of the more urbanized area. But Donald Trump there was an absolute revolution of essentially white people in the exurbs coming out and voting for trump in the rural and sort of farther away from the cities you don't want to over stereotype. But it certainly true that the Republican coalition has you know the heart of it is older white people who are very reliable voters and the Democratic Coalition relies on younger urban lots of immigrants, lots of minorities who in the past have not been turned out has not been as High Bianca. Those factors taken into consideration that I guess the Republican Party's and democratic parties in Florida will have an amount obviously in common with the National Party and parties elsewhere is there still a distinctive political culture within Florida like basically what I'm asking are Florida Republicans different from other Republicans, into Florida Democrats different from other States Democrats. I think when it gets down to it when you're thinking of. Our Florida Latinos for example, are they always kind of leaning Democrat or you know Florida South Florida Latinos are they always leaning Republican as people kind of think a lot of the time because of the cuban-american population I think that a lot of that is is changing. So at whether whether or not, you're going to see more cuban-americans still voting. Republican. In the way that they usually do a lot of that is kind of breaking and and being undone because of the younger generation, you know really having more of an experience in the. US and seeing the way that their families grew up in thinking about healthcare and climate change as more of priorities to them. So you know I would say that the main difference if there was one is here you can see a lot of distinctive kind of you see mixed political ideologies in families. So I've met even candidates who are you know Democrats were running now for public office in Florida and their families are different completely different ideology from them. So I think that that's what's interesting right and what makes Florida you know such. Unique and fascinating state is that it's changing all the time and it's changing not just because of the of the new kind of waves of immigrants that are coming in but also the new generations that are really having a different kind of awareness than the one their parents did. We'll talk more in the second half of the program about how Florida may have changed in the last four years and what it might be like in this election. But Michael just before we do that I don't like to tempt fate too much by talking about what happened in two thousand when basically an entire parallel history of the twentieth century got chalked off by a margin of a few hundred votes in Florida but. Still. Talk about that election much in Florida and Walton immense sliding doors moment that was not just for the United States. But as it turned out for the entire world, you know I think that's a great way. Great way of putting it because it certainly was I mean you know you wouldn't have an Iraq war if it wasn't for five hundred, thirty, seven votes the other way. And I think it's just a great example of. Of. You know the way these these elections and Florida are always one on the margins. Sort of every community matters again at the margins these things make a huge difference. I think. You know Republicans have been much better organized since two thousand and you saw in two thousand with that Brooks brothers riot But but everyone knows it's going to be close and and that really is a place where every vote counts.

Florida South Florida Michael United States Republican Party Republican Coalition White House Hillary Clinton Columbia Donald Trump Democratic Coalition Puerto Ricans Midwest Latin America Barack Obama Iraq Global South Brooks
Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

Monocle 24: The Foreign Desk

07:07 min | 1 d ago

Florida: The swingiest swing state in the U.S. election

"Want to talk a bit about how we got here and why at least since the the famous near Tie of two thousand does just seem to be Florida or at least partially about Florida Michael Ask, you first win and why did floor to become the key battleground Republican hasn't won the White House without Florida forever. So that's part of the reason that it's become. So you know everybody desperately wants it and it just seems to be the self-balancing State where it's about twenty percent immigrants. But you know the last the last fifty, million votes that have been cast for presidential candidates in Florida Republicans, Democrats are separated by about twenty thousand and we've had just about every election. Every statewide election seems to come down to one percent and just seems like every time another white person Republican moves down here from the Midwest. Another democratic leaning immigrants may move into central Florida from the global south, and so it's a really seems to be self-balancing. Beyond those demographics that Monolithic is it a case of elderly white pensioners voting for Republicans and more recent arrivals from elsewhere trading Democrat or is there some kind of overlap between spillage among those groups? As you can probably imagine it's a little bit more complex in that I think that there's didn't kind of increasing awareness for both Democrats and Republicans that some of the key demographics here you know the American immigrants but you know you have the first generation, the second generation, you have the newer arrivals you have the. You have the Cubans you have the Puerto Ricans, have the Haitians. There's such a mix of people and cultures and experiences, and when you add to that kind of the new. Yorkers. That are coming to Florida to retire and you have all these different politics and ideologies kind of mixed together. I. Think you really get. Such a representation of both the Conservatives and the liberals in both the US. But also in Latin America and I think that when you look at South Florida, you see a lot of those kind of play. You see you know from Columbia from Columbia and you see the progressives from Columbia. So you have such a makes of. Of just these ideologies that really comes to shine like Michael said in the way that people vote. Michael is the a geographic split within Florida as well because it's the general tendency in the United, states and elsewhere that cities tend to be more liberal more vaguely left-wing rural parts of a given state or given country tend to be more conservative. Is that clear? Cut In that respect in Florida? Well, again I think. Could certainly right that it's always a little more complicated but that's generally true I think you know you saw in two thousand sixteen that Hillary Clinton did even better than expected in a lot of the urban areas she. Barack. Obama won Florida and Hillary Clinton did even better in some of the particularly in south Florida in Miami and Fort Lauderdale and West, Palm Beach and some of the more urbanized area. But Donald Trump, there was an absolute revolution of essentially white people in the exurbs coming out and voting for trump in the rural and sort of farther away from the cities you don't want to over stereotype. But it certainly true that the Republican coalition has you know the heart of it is older white people who are very reliable voters and the Democratic Coalition relies on younger urban lots of immigrants, lots of minorities who in the past have not been turned out has not been as High Bianca. Those factors taken into consideration that I guess the Republican Party's and democratic parties in Florida will have an amount obviously in common with the National Party and parties elsewhere. Is there still a distinctive political culture within Florida like basically what I'm asking are Florida Republicans different from other Republicans into Florida Democrats different from other States Democrats? I think when it gets down to it when you're thinking of. Our Florida Latinos for example, are they always kind of leaning? Democrat. Or you know Florida South Florida Latinos are they always leaning Republican as people kind of think a lot of the time because of the cuban-american population I think that a lot of that is changing so at whether whether or not, you're going to see more cuban-americans still voting Republican in the way that they usually do a lot of that is kind of breaking and and being undone because of the younger generation you know really having more of an experience in the US. and seeing the way that their families grew up in thinking about healthcare and climate change as more of priorities to them. So you know I would say that the main difference if there was one is here you can see a lot of distinctive kind of you see mixed political ideologies in families. So I've met even candidates who are you know? Democrats were running now for public office in Florida and their families are different completely different ideology from them. So i. think that that's what's interesting. Right and what makes Florida you know such. Unique and fascinating state is that it's changing all the time and it's changing not just because of the of the new kind of waves of immigrants that are coming in. But also the new generations that are really having a different kind of awareness than the one their parents did. We'll talk more in the second half of the program about how Florida may have changed in the last four years and what it might be like in this election. But Michael just before we do that I, don't like to tempt fate too much by talking about what happened in two thousand when basically an entire parallel history of the twentieth century got chopped off by a margin of a few hundred votes in Florida but. People still talk about that election much in Florida and Walton immense sliding doors moment that was not just for the United States but as it turned out for the entire world, you know, I think that's a great way. Great way of putting it because it certainly was i. mean you know you wouldn't have an Iraq war if it wasn't for five hundred, thirty, seven votes the other way. And I think it's just a great example of. Of you know the way, these these elections and Florida are always one on the margins. Sort of every community matters again at the margins, these things make a huge difference I think. You know Republicans have been much better organized since two thousand and you saw in two thousand with that Brooks brothers riot But but everyone knows it's going to be close and and that really is a place where every vote counts.

Florida South Florida Michael Ask Hillary Clinton Republican Party United States Barack Republican Coalition Midwest White House Republicans Donald Trump Democratic Coalition Columbia Puerto Ricans Iraq Latin America Brooks Palm Beach
Florida lifts all coronavirus restaurant restrictions statewide

WIOD Programming

00:22 sec | 1 d ago

Florida lifts all coronavirus restaurant restrictions statewide

"Across Florida. Are back in full operation if they want to be governor to Santa says he's lifting seeding restrictions, and he wants to prevent local governments from shutting them down. They can operate at a minimum of 50%, regardless of local rule. And then, if the local restricts between 50 and 100, they've gotta provide the justification, and they've got to identify what the costs involved with doing that are with

Santa Florida
President Trump expected to nominate Amy Coney Barrett to Supreme Court

NPR News Now

00:46 sec | 2 d ago

President Trump expected to nominate Amy Coney Barrett to Supreme Court

"Trump says he's made up his mind on who will nominate to replace Justice Ruth. Bader GINSBURG on the supreme court NPR's Michelle. Ross reports that announcement is expected Saturday president trump says, he did not meet with federal judge Barbara Lagola during his trip to Florida this week logo a Miami native has been one of the top candidates for the position a source of knowledge of the process told him PR that Republicans expect trump to pick his other top choice judge amy. Coney Barrett trump would not confirm that. Could be anyone. Could be actually anyone on the list. Announcing. Trump has been pressing for the Senate to move quickly ahead with considering his nominee he wants a vote before the November election

Donald Trump Bader Ginsburg Coney Barrett Justice Ruth Michelle Senate NPR Barbara Lagola Ross President Trump Miami AMY Florida
Mark Meadows Speaks with Reporters

C-SPAN Programming

12:52 min | 2 d ago

Mark Meadows Speaks with Reporters

"Today outside the White House chief of staff Mark Meadows spoke to reporters for a little over 10 minutes on issues, including the replacing Ruth Bader Ginsburg on the U. S. Supreme Court. The president said he needs nine Justice Supreme Court election challenge because he asked me of potential nominees how they will vote. No, he hasn't. Actually I've been in those interviews and I could tell you it would be inappropriate for us Ask those kinds of questions. I think his comments were more just an indication that we need a a full panel on the Supreme Court. You don't want to ever provide a a situation where there could be Tie a 44 ty not to suggest that this should be a 44 tie. I think it should be more of a unanimous decision on some of the facts that I have seen. But obviously I'm not a justice. They would have to hear That case would be highly inappropriate. We wouldn't want to ask a question that would perhaps for some potential nominee to recuse themselves. Should they have to hear this waste but with him out there, saying he needs to have this justice because there might be a challenge. That create bags of a conflict of interest for whoever you well, I know no more than any other judge that has been nominated by Donald Trump or Barack Obama or anybody else. I mean to suggest that just because they were nominated by somebody that they would have an inherent bias, I think we've seen from the court rulings already by the Supreme Court. They're an independent body, and they don't necessarily vote the way that you might think they should. I can tell you that That particular issue is eyes, Probably the least of potential nominees. Worries that it makes you effective profits were kind of expecting a second question. The president will have confidence. I can't speak to the second question in terms of the confidence in director Ray, I can tell you that I was Very, very disappointed to see some of the text messages and emails that came out yesterday. And some of the discovery that was put for from my previous job is a member of Congress. I know that I've asked for exactly those kinds of documents and never got them on that was under the previous director and also under this director on so it is time for direct array to quit in my mind playing footsie with transparency and Deliver those documents. The second part of your question was more that I think. Well, I think if past is prologue, I mean, we've got all kinds of indications that the Democrats are. We're going to use the next 30 days to try Tio shame. Whatever nominee we put four for their faith for their record for who they are, and Troubling. I mean, we've got it. We see even today that way don't have AH continuing resolution passed because Chuck Schumer is playing games with procedural aspect based on a potential nominee. We took down a election security hearing today because Chuck Schumer's playing games that's minor. That's that's child's play compared to what we will see over the next 30 days, But we're prepared for the fight. What we will see is, I think Be thorough Vetting but hopefully done in expeditious way way. I didn't say it was Judge Merrick Isa. Good leading question. You can say that the president's confidence in director, I haven't talked to him about it. Well, I can tell you that we have a number of people that continue to serve at the pleasure of the president that he has different degrees of confidence in on DSo Tio directly speak to that question. Without actually talking to him would be inappropriate about healthcare. Big announcement guys today the president wanted to executive orders now the U. S government policy that preexisting conditions should be protected. Forced the affordable care act right now is that five lost? What are Americans make policy of already existing protection? Well, Peter, you as you know, there's a court case going through as it relates to the affordable care act and what the president Wanted to make sure I was clear not once not twice. But now a third time in signing that executive order is to make sure that preexisting conditions are covered that insurance companies can price people out of their coverage just because of the illness that they have or could have come down with, And it was just a commitment and say that if the court strike that down any future legislation under a Trump administration would guarantee that preexisting conditions are covered. And so From his perspective, It's just trying to make sure that the message is clear. He's been very clear in the Oval Office, You know, Sometimes the campaign rhetoric in the ads that get place do not match the private conversations in the Oval. White House chief of staff Mark Meadows outside the White House earlier today. Scepticism of some because obviously the president president for four years, But they say that it's that they should be protected his only a policy. It's not along. We've never seen a plan. Peter, this is not your first rodeo. And you know how Congress has the inordinate and unbelievable ability to obstruct, especially when you have a divided Congress. I don't know of a single Democrat that would be willing to take down on Obama care piece of legislation haven't served in the car. It's almost like they're Holy grail. Now they'll admit there's all kinds of flaws and all kinds of problems with it that they won't fix, but they won't repeal it. And so it's all about making sure that the message to the American people gets covered. One of the interesting things that no one seems to be picking up on too much. Well, is the $200 copay that's actually is going it is coming from the savings from the executive order on most favored nation big farmer would push back on that. Pushback on that, But we're going to be able to save tens of billions of dollars were actually going to use a demo. Ah, demo for to be Medicaid CMS demo project that will actually allow us to use about $7 billion to pay for those. But those will be offset with savings from from Pharma as we enacted most favorite nation, money way have we have a 10 year? Window on that for those savings, and we're actually working on those final rules. Those proposed rules now to put forth But just like the Obama administration used the same program in the previous administration were going to use it now to make sure that seniors get the benefit of those savings today and that they don't have to wait for those you already prepping initial Supreme Court nominee for confirmation questions and Wilder wise guy sort of Urfa. Person around Capitol Hill with numbers on DSO in terms of prepping any particular nominee that we have. No, we have not started prepping those. We won't until the nomination is full on I see me mean by wise guy could be wise guy or a gal, a cz, a Sherpa, and so as we wait guys in a plural and generic sense I would have seen on so as we look at that. I don't know that we'll be using Sherpa as much we've been working with leader McConnell, in a very direct way of had daily conversations would leader McConnell a number of senators because of covert and the inability of senators to actually engage more on a office by office faces? We're looking at modifying that if there is a need for a Sherpa, we've actually have asked the leader for some recommendations. There were certainly open to that. But I think next week what you'll see Is Patsy polonium myself, making sure that we make the nominee available to a wide variety of senators. Political question. You aware that Amy Kony's merit worked on foot vs board and you know what was her role? Apparently, she was in Florida working for Stuart Levey. According to her question. Yeah, I I'm certainly aware of every nominees record, whether it's Amy Comey, Barrett or anybody else. I can't say I don't think that this is a hanging Chad problem. This's more a mail in ballot. Unsolicited mail in ballot with delays in collection of those ballot issue. Hopefully, we're not gonna have a hanging Chad problem when my last question was president, felling three of your quote, By the way, I think you owe guide okay. Yeah, that sounds like a good stand. Wise wise guys. Okay, campaign. Apparently, the RNC are telling Republican voters essentially that they need To vote absentee necessary. Isn't that sort of out of line with the president's message going to be male in front? And I mean, I think absentee ballots if they've got a normal process, perhaps auntie ballots like we had in North Carolina. I don't know that that process is one that is new or different. I can't speak to every state. All I can speak to is North Carolina, but but I can't. Say you that solicited ballads with absentee requests or certainly something that has been the norm eyes the unsolicited ballots mailing to ever registered voter that he has a bigger problem with and that most Americans should have a problem with that theory is she's been radio programming from Friday. Well, I don't know That's how I'm basing the acceptance. Of the election here is a valid point here is what we want to make. Sure of is that laws are not changed by a few judges making it like in North Carolina consent decree. Don't change the laws that are on the books just so that you can extend the election time. Most states, North Carolina and others have a very long time for them to be able to cast their ballots either in person or by mail leading up to November. 3rd s O to suggest that we should have November 3rd. It's a week plus two weeks like has been mentioned in some states is not. There is not something that I think is necessary. The other is is when you have secretaries of states in a partisan manner, potentially certifying election results. We want to make sure that they do this on on away that's credible and they can with stand the scrutiny of of the public eye on allow a partisan process to get in. I don't know if you're following what's happened. In North Carolina. But it's very troubling where you have a a Democrat group, filing suit against a Democrat, Board of elections and then doing a consent decree. That's not what the American judicial system is all about. It's in my opinion gaming the system. Hopefully, that judge will not go ahead with that consent decree but is very problematic and it disenfranchises voters whether they're Republican, unaffiliated or Democrat. We want to make sure every vote counts. But We want to make sure that on ly one vote count ceremony, I I'm I'm assuming that we were invited. I don't know about the best. You know the invite list. Obviously, yesterday we wanted to make sure before he left town. He paid respects and so way actually adjusted his schedule so that he could do that. Yesterday I travelled with him and, as you know, way made that a priority. Thanks, guys. White House Chief of staff Mark Meadows outside the White House this morning,

President Trump U. S. Supreme Court North Carolina White House Mark Meadows Chief Of Staff Director Barack Obama Democrats Congress Chuck Schumer Executive Peter Ruth Bader Ginsburg Donald Trump Judge Merrick Isa TIO Supreme Court
Johnson & Johnson's Covid-19 Vaccine Produced Immune Response

KCBS Radio Afternoon News

00:23 sec | 2 d ago

Johnson & Johnson's Covid-19 Vaccine Produced Immune Response

"Contender Johnson and Johnson says it's vaccine produced immune response in an early stage trial, CBS's Dr David Angus says the company will now study up to 60,000 people. Now the nexus to see what happens with the face. Three. Does it actually Protect. Does this immune response protect you from being sick or symptomatic from Kobe 19, Florida, meantime, can open up

Contender Johnson Dr David Angus CBS Florida
Florida reopens bars and restaurants with no restrictions

Ben Shapiro

00:24 sec | 2 d ago

Florida reopens bars and restaurants with no restrictions

"Bars and restaurants across Florida can reopen Governor Rhonda Santa's announced executive orders lifting seeding restrictions and he wants to prevent local governments from shutting them down. They can operate at a minimum of 50%, regardless of local rule. And then if a local restricts between 50 and 100 They've got to provide the justification, and they've got to identify what the costs involved with doing that

Rhonda Santa Executive Florida
DeSantis lifts statewide restrictions on bars and restaurants as Florida moves to phase 3

The Savage Nation

00:19 sec | 2 d ago

DeSantis lifts statewide restrictions on bars and restaurants as Florida moves to phase 3

"Rogers Sanchez's lifting restrictions on restaurants Making local officials justify any of their restrictions after complaints about businesses being forced to close. The order that I'm signing today will guarantee restaurants operate will not allow closure, perhaps fueling renewed debate about safety measures.

Rogers Sanchez
Trump won’t commit to peaceful transfer of power if he loses

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

01:26 min | 2 d ago

Trump won’t commit to peaceful transfer of power if he loses

"A presidential election is just 39 days away. Here's correspondent Ben Trace. With new polls showing President Trump trailing Biden in several swing states, He again suggested he might not accept the outcome of the election. We want to make sure the election is honest, and I'm not sure that it can be even though Vice President Mike Pence insisted in Wisconsin, they would on one condition. We will accept free on A fair election results a day earlier, the president would not commit to a peaceful transfer of power. We'll have to see what happens, Democrats and several Republican leaders put the president on notice. You are not a dictator. We've had an orderly transfer of power every four years since Washington that will happen again. ABC News Political director RECLINES as Joe Biden likely won't change his low key campaign strategy even as President Trump has ramped up his campaign rallies. Clearly the president is campaigning in ways that are contravention to the recommendations of his own health officials. Biden has tried not to do that. He's picked up the pace a little bit, but it's been a point of contrast for better or worse, that he's wears masks and their social distancing at his events. In a way that there are no trumps, and I don't expect that to change entirely. President on the road again today for rallies in Florida, Georgia and Virginia. Biden has been preparing for the first presidential debate at case Western Reserve University in Cleveland next Tuesday night. 10 10 wins will carry it live

Vice President Joe Biden President Trump Ben Trace Mike Pence Western Reserve University Abc News Wisconsin Cleveland Political Director Washington Florida Virginia Georgia
Government Support - With Justin Stefanovic, VP Global Partnerships at Misfits Gaming Group

BIG Esports Podcast

04:50 min | 4 d ago

Government Support - With Justin Stefanovic, VP Global Partnerships at Misfits Gaming Group

"The support it's been great I think it's been I think. If KKOB it hadn't happened I think we would have had a much faster. Adoption from local fans, businesses a very good job. Connecting on locally we do have some strategic partnerships locally and we've tried to work with some local businesses I think. One of the things we've taken from a I. I should say that So. For us it was a matter of like it was almost two fold. So we're already in this franchise leads right that had a localized proximity to a to a team like where we represent Florida for call of duty and overwatch like. So you from that were right. We should probably have presence in the markets when we have an event or sell tickets. Or merged people know what the what the Hell we are and and Ken Ken we can can we get more money can we can get better deals we work with the different, a different teams internally within the State of Florida to help brought to reach their fan base things like that. So it was almost like, okay, we need to have a presence here. And we moved our our LA operations, which is our over watch league team. She to Florida and several people from Berlin outside of outside of this running the Berlin office and LLC team. Most a lot of those people came came to Florida's well. Working with the city and county we said listen we want to have our headquarters here and we're going to. Bring a lot of jobs. We're going to bring a lot of people down here, and from that obviously, you can work with cities for your brakes on taxes and and just you know. Helpful. There's all sorts of programs for small businesses to help out with. With all sorts of expenses. So I think we looked in a lot of those. We talked a lot of economic boards like even even even talked to some city. Where we're going to be in Boca the whole time, and then there was talk me down to Miami and just looking at see like what these cities but the county's could offer us if we bring thirty jobs and that was thirty jobs pretty quickly I mean let alone scaling up down the road so. And that's where you know we said, hey, we're going to do this What can you do for us? It didn't have to really be a lot of ink or even may anything I think we just ask a question and I think if you don't ask sometimes you know the county and city aren't GonNa, just open like Oh yeah had come here's. We'll help you out with this. This doesn't this. If you say listen like we're GONNA bring jobs we're going to bring revenue we're going to bring opportunities you know how can we work together then you start getting the different boards in the The county level state level listening to you about how so. Yeah I've I've I've done a little bit of token the past Locally here in Australia with sommes and and councils, and the state government that we used to have, which is a liberal potty. You know about exactly those kind of things about hacking you support these people to provide jobs into the space and you know I talked to I talked to three full five teams are all based in Sydney and Melbourne versus Sunni rivalry here in Australia it's it's almost like L. A. Versus New York I guess and saying to them, look these teams would move if you provide them with some support and these government. Austin. They've got a lot of facilities that are fairly empty office spaces that are looking to fill L. even like the Australian Football League, they bought a stadium. He had stadium announced called Marvel and they're always talking about how it got so many empty rooms in the small function rooms in spices and things like that too. So it can you work with a game who's just you know raised I million in seed capital and his hide five ten stuff to give them an office face you know to you. Give them give them some tax benefits give them some support from the from The v Victorian Chamber of Commerce. For example, you know help them with the with the business development departments within the local and federal governments because there are. So many of these know there are local is a local government potty or local government business here in Australia that takes game development companies, I've. Essays does to his in China and takes them to tencent and say look he is the best that we have to offer you. Can we hope to facilitate some wet between you guys and I think that a lot of the time I feel like in in as bullets in infamy? Personally. I've alienated myself from every other traditional startup business where often people say wasteful it's way different. Yes we're startup. Yes. We had to raise money. We have a pain L. U. S.. Business like everyone else. But in some way we feel like way different. But ultimately, we're not you know we still need. Jason money we still need sponsors. We still need profit and loss. We still need staff facilities. In the NBA sports is just business.

Florida Australia Ken Ken Berlin LA Boca Australian Football League NBA Miami Tencent Victorian Chamber Of Commerce Jason Austin Sydney New York LLC China Melbourne L. A.
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

09:21 min | Last week

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"To have festivals they plan to be at Neighborhood Block parties they planned to try and saturate the area with information but these in-person. Get Out in counts events had to be canceled. You're listening to Florida matters I'm Bradley George were talking about the twenty twenty census with Vera cone of the Pew, Research Center and Mike. Schneider. The Associated Press will take a short break here and resume our conversation in just a moment. This is Florida matters W USF eighty nine, point seven I'm Bradley George my guest today are vera cone of the Pew Research, Center and Mike Schneider of the Associated Press and we're talking about the twenty twenty senses talk some a lot about the changes. The trump administration has made to the sense is one of the issues that come up fairly recently is There's a plan now to effectively shut down the count about a month early diverse. What's the the rationale behind that and what kind of effect would that have on getting an accurate count? So the the basics that originally census count was gonNA stop in early July but of course, the pandemic affected that. So the bureau extended the deadline to the end of October and said that it would ask Congress to extend the deadlines for publishing the first numbers out of the senses and effectively set said that we wouldn't be able to produce all this information on time to meet our legal deadlines unless we get an extension. So they didn't they. The House voted to extend the the House led by Democrats The Senate has which is led by Republicans has not voted to extend that deadline and the Census Bureau which is under the commerce. Department has said we're GONNA just end it up earlier a month earlier the end of September because we wanNA, make that legal deadline. So that's the the rationale they've more or less given. Some of the advocates and interest groups are concerned that this won't leave enough time to do an adequate count and also process netted the data as it needs to be edited to remove duplications, for example, or fill in missing information from people don't respond to get a good accurate count and they're issuing pretty strong warnings about that and have added those warnings to their lawsuits. Challenging the trump administration on its conduct of the senses. Mike what's been the reaction here in Florida? To ending the counter early. Florida stands to gain anywhere from one to two new congressional seats, and if there's another account in Florida Florida's not going to get those seats so there is a lot at stake. If there is an undercount. Is there any way to to fix that? Is there a way that you could I want to do but have like some kind of pro forma census where you can try to fix the the inaccuracies with the with that count? Well. That's not clear there. There is some talk among some people. Oh, having a second census, but it's not that easy I mean really years or spent planning this. This thing the first set of numbers come out about reapportion the seats in the House of Representatives have to be based on what's called an actual enumeration that is you know the account of people without any additional adjustments. As the Supreme Court has left the door open to letting numbers be adjusted using statistical techniques for other purposes. So for example, distributing money and there's some talk that maybe that could happen the census. Bureau it should be said we'll be doing its own research to gauge the extent of the undercount. So within a year or two, we should know what what amount they've undercounted or over counted certain groups, and that may help guide what remedies would be undertaken. You talk a little bit about the apportionment cross where states are awarded or made. They might lose congressional seats based on their population. What are the? What are the factors that that that? The drive that what's going to the metric for figuring out, which states get seats in which states lose them. Well, it's complicated formula, but it basically relies on the fact that the number of seats in the house is capped at four, hundred, thirty five and has been since nineteen ten. So even if every state is growing the state that's growing faster, we'll get the seats over the state that's growing more slowly. After each state gets one seat because every state does get that minimum the. So the states with the most rapid population growth which happened to be generally those in the south and West States such as Texas and Florida are projected to gain seats were population changes taken into account and states where well the climate and may be colder or of those states are more established a projected to lose seats based on. Population Change. We've done some additional analysis based on what would happen if the trump administration's idea of excluding unauthorized immigrants from the portion account is, is allowed to go ahead and what we've projected because we we do our own estimates of unauthorized immigrants on the on the state level. What we've projected is that Florida Texas and California would each lose a seat that they would otherwise be entitled to get because of population change and those those seats would go to three other states. So instead of getting three seats, I think Texas will get to that sort of thing Again we don't know whether that will happen because it has been challenged in court. And chances are that no matter what the final divvying up of the seats are it will end up in court and there's been some very interesting court cases over the years have gone up to the Supreme Court where you have states digging it out for the last the last seat in Congress Oh. and. It'll be having a time when. When there will be elections happening in the balance of power in terms of state legislatures, which in many states determined the congressional seats that will that will be a factor as well which reminded me. On, top of all the problems with the pandemic and with question over citizenship a lot of the problems for the census has come from this constantly changing schedule I mean it has been so confusing not only for the US Census Bureau in Peru Census takers are currently out right now knocking on doors but also for state legislatures who it I thought, they weren't going to be getting their numbers for redrawing their districts until later next year you know they were likely going to have to pass bills in the legislature changing the schedule odd. Now that the census looks like the Census Bureau looks like it's going to have. It's numbers on the original schedule there. Scrambling again, to you know to figure out what their process is GonNa be for redrawing their districts. So I think just this constant locks in the schedule is also caused a lot of concern on problems. Vera a Mike mentioned the the the census takers. numerator is the people that the sense hires every ten years I remember in two thousand, ten census and that happened in the middle of recession and the census hiring was enough to make a dent in the unemployment rate. Here we are. Again, twenty twenty were in the middle of an economic crisis. has the Census Bureau Don Enough hiring keeping in mind also pandemic that it would would have any kind of effect on on the economy or the at the unemployment rate the way it did ten years ago. I think in general, it has a minor temporary effect on on unemployment And in terms of affecting the quality of the census, the Census Bureau was quite concerned beaten in a low unemployment environment. We were in earlier this year that it would be able to hire a enough people. Also people of good quality, the ones based in the neighborhoods and who are knowledgeable about the process, and so forth. There's a little bit less concern about that. Since the there are so many unemployed people although there have been reports of some folks not. You know being hired and then saying well, I don't really want to go out there even if they're giving me a mask ordering me to stand six feet away. At what have we heard from census takers in terms of how they're feeling about the safety of what they're doing you know do they have p? Jan, they stay socially distanced and talk to people. What would. What do we know about that I. Think. That's a real concern I talked to census workers who were already go but then changed her mind decided not to become a census taker because of the pandemic I talked to a couple census takers this week or out in the field.

Census Bureau Florida Mike Schneider Vera cone Supreme Court Texas Bradley George Florida Florida The Associated Press Congress House of Representatives Research Center Senate US twenty twenty California
Interview with Thriller Writer Andrew Allan - burst 1

The Crime Cafe

12:28 min | 2 months ago

Interview with Thriller Writer Andrew Allan - burst 1

"Hi. Everyone may guest is the author of the wall Asher Thriller series you also right to grind house hulk. We've gotten talked about. He is an infomercial writer and director is also into wild cope movies making them I believe. And runs a website called daily. Grind House Dot. com I guess today's Andrew. Allan. Hi Andrew. Thanks for being here. It's Sure thing I love your resume I mean you're you're by it was fascinating to me because I love sill as well as books I assumed that you were infomerrcial rendered director before you started writing books. Yes. Yeah I, my career is little bit weird in the sense that I went to film school and then I, broke two commercials while I was working on developing movies and I ended up getting a job at the home shopping network, which is based here in Saint Pete Florida and. It's bizarre. Everyone presumes it is, but it was really great experience and I learned how to do a lot of things including sell on TV and that often into doing infomercials, which is selling on TV so and I have to say I love it as ridiculous as it sounds I it's great profession. Sounds. Really cool actually. What made you decide to do infomercials and what prompted you to start writing books? Money prompted me to start doing infomercials. Is You know we all need it. We all like it. But three Oris was. Like I said, I. Learned to basically sell on television when as at. and. That is a natural transition into infomercials and when I decided Lake Age San. I knew I wanted to make my writing or sorry make my living still riding in. If, directing producing commercials. In what was great about infomercials was at a Niche. So instead of just saying, Hey, I'M A. Commercial writer and there's ten thousand other people are competing with. I said been infomercial right better and maybe ten people on meeting with. So now I can like authentically say one of the top it from our show writers world and I've got a ton of experience done thousands of commercials in the ask aid and all that sort of stuff so. It's great and that's how that came to be the reason I started writing books. was because I I remember reasons when I was creatively frustrated had been making movies had been writing screenplays in. which were fun and some of them got made some of them did. But all of them required collaboration and I had reached a point where I didn't really want to collaborate anymore. At least for a while, I needed a break. And that's even on projects that I absolutely loved movie that was aching with my best friend and. Even then like we would get into arguments and about I just needed a break from that. So I wanted to do something on my own and that's when I decided to write a book had a story. Kind of kicking around that I'd never been able to turn into a script. I finally figured out how to make that work in book form, which was the first of Asher took and. Took it from there, the other the other part of that story is. I was actually reading a book by. A very famous author that we all know who I'm not GONNA name and Not to sound Eric and I thought it was terrible house like a weight. and. I actually caught myself saying I could do better. And? You know a very arrogant thing to save for someone who's never. But I decided to see if I could back up. And I think I did. unbelie speaking I didn't think I was right. Funny because a lot of writers actually do start offers those kinds of thoughts I do this. Anyway it wasn't even looking down at the writing it was in fact. The looking at the idea of being writer was more like this story is not entertaining be and. I know enough about story structure from screen plays and things like that. where I could look at this and say, really was about me thinking this guy should be doing a lot better for albig their name is and how much money. Yeah. You points for originality on coming up with a protagonist is infomercial writer. Director. But I see that you've drawn from your own background or at least I assume you have. Tell US little about wall. Ask How is it? He gets into the kinds of situations that would lead to thriller. Series. What I had to figure out. As. He is comes from my background. I did go down the road of right now and that's because. As confident as I was writing commercials in his confident as was writing movies I had no confidence whatsoever writing a book so I figured I ought to. Rely on everything that I could get off the so. And then plus the idea. Of Him being an infamous rider was intriguing. You know. I. Like all of us had written read million books about cops and lawyers and soldiers, detectives and reporters. That's great. People are probably doing it better than me. So let me try something completely different. And I worked at it worked because I think wall what I like about wall. What I like about these books is that he has to rely persuasion to kind of get by doesn't mean he's not physical. There's a lot of action in the books and But. But he is a true amateur sleuth who has nothing to do with. Justice and basically starts out he lives on the Rainbow River, which is a real. River Donnellan Florida about two hours north where I. In he's he's in the river because data's friend's house by the water and finds his friend dead on the Bank of the river. With an alligator in the process of Jim up. But it's clear that the alligator did not kill him so. One thing leads to another and the villain in the story overplays its hand. And attempts to kill. Walt. And it becomes very clear that he has to do. Something a balance it's no. A- paranoid. It's legitimate in in the Diet figuring out. took. Let's see you also, right. Does poke at the series also correct. Those books like you fun. Grind House. I I. Guess. Okay so Basically the Grind House was forty second street movie theaters in the Sixties Seventies in eight Times Square. And They Kinda just show like all the really gross horror movies the karate movies, all kinds of stuff you know movies that were generally looked down upon, but also provided extremely visceral thrill. And I love those movies I think they're A. A love cult movies, and so my grind house pulse series is basically me coming up with ideas for grind house movies, it putting them at goes. It's different than like the wall Asher stuff is war. Thriller Mystery Thriller Suspense Ryan How's Paul is pushed things over the edge a little bit more. you know there's more violence and there's You know just like you'd see in those insane movies and they're really they're. Their books of movies I would love to see. Yeah Yeah. You. Should check public domain deserves some really crazy things that you probably already know that. That's for sure. Oh my gosh. If you receive Nanos hands a fate. Badly. I had yes. Oh my God. That's all say about that. There's some movies that are just so bad. You have to see them. That's one of them. Well, that's a little part of my resume I produced Herschell, Gordon Lewis's last movie. Own Donahue Herschel is he's the guy. He was the first guy to put Gore in a move back nine hundred and sixty three in the movie blood feast. and He did other movies like wizard of Gore or girls and two thousand maniacs. E, Kinda started it all and he was. Low budget exploitation filmmaker and I had the great fortune of. Meeting him in basically getting to produce a movie for one of my heroes. While that's fantastic. That's wonderful To get back to Walt. Is there an overall story ARC in series? So the first book was really just a test to see if I write a book. Well and that feeling. Of. Really sort of rabbit story. There was a slight. Subtle hints. To where it could go beyond that story. Then after I thought about it and I liked the process and I thought the book went well and I didn't get demolished by reviews as like yeah I'll continue the so. As it exists now there's a three book. Arc. Where each is a complete story of their full length novels, but the villain is the same in the three of them. The Antagonists Casino tag is more of a secret organisation kind of thing than just one person specifically. So there's arc with that and then in between each novel. I, I wrote an Avella. And those are side stories, featuring walt and some of the same characters from the boat but not related to that big overarching story. So. Just kind of Nice it's sort of like a breather in between, but you still get to spend time with the characters. That's cool. Yeah. Most of those are. Rooted in the fact that. Waltz basically best friend up on the river where he lives. Dining digi who is actually a criminal biker. And he's into all kinds of criminal stuff but he's just Kinda like one of those Florida Good Ole boys who are fun to be around and for whatever reason he likes wall is completely not of his world. So in the NOVELLAS. Those. Tend to focus on D. G. Getting Wall to do something for digi in that usually on the danger things like that, and and that's what cell shock which giveaway book for this interview is one of those things. Lead. US

Writer Walt Director Grind House Asher Saint Pete Florida Andrew Allan United States Rainbow River ARC River Donnellan Florida Gore Lake Age San Florida Eric Donahue Herschel D. G. JIM Paul
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

12:18 min | 7 months ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"This is Florida matters. I'm Robin Sesing. Ham despite not being officially allowed to live in Florida until seventeen sixty three Jewish people escaping expulsions and exclusions were among the earliest settlers of the state. They've been politicians business leaders artists Nobel prize winners and more and what is being called. The first comprehensive history of Jews in Florida was published this month. The book is called Jews of Florida centuries of stories and its author Marsha Josipovic. Who's with me in the studio Marsha? Welcome to Florida matters. Thank you it's good to have you here. So the book is more than four hundred pages of stories and photographs going back to the eighteen. Hundreds what was your impetus for putting all this together. Well it starts back in the sixties. When moved to Florida? I was originally from West Virginia and moved to Florida. My husband was in the military we moved to McCoy Air Force Base in Orlando. And I'm a person that asks a lot of questions Jews in nor- not notoriously ask a lot of questions so I got to Orlando and I got very involved in the Jewish community organized Jewish community and I started asking like where did people come from. When did they come how long they've been here? How did they contribute to the community? How did they get along with the Non Jewish community and nobody had any answers and then I got very involved in the statewide and national organized? Jewish community? I was invited to sit on the first United Jewish Appeal Young Leadership Cabinet and I went to my first retreat in Washington and as the women sat around. We talked about how we got involved why we got involved. Almost everyone said because my aunt my grandmother or my mother before me was involved and then I realized that in Florida we didn't have those depths of generations so Jewish continuity which is the major goal of every Jewish organization and every Jewish families continuity I realized we had a major challenge here in Florida because people did not know the history. I found out that in the northeast with scholars never addressed Florida. They always thought it was post world. War Two condo commandos mentality Miami beach who cared and they really honestly thought these academics that it started post World War Two so I got very entrenched and passionate about this subject and began a two hundred fifty thousand mile eight. Your Trek around Florida set up task forces and thirty. Different communities recruited hundreds of volunteers. I did not do this alone. I had lots of help. Now you're talking about. I don't know if you're going into the mosaic project. Because I know this turned into a big museum exhibition called mosaic. Right yes that's what that's what I'm leading into. That's that's what it led to the issue was that no one had ever dug into Florida. Jewish history are you. Let me just ask you are you. What did you studied? Are you a historian you would you consider yourself a self taught historian? I'm definitely self taught. I was trained as a Dietitian. I worked in a hospital and When I it was and I realized myself that I needed to see pictures of people here. Their personal stories see their things and then they became alive and then I remembered them. I now I have you know thirty five thousand photographs that I collected and people always say to me. How do you remember the names and dates as they're like my children you don't forget your children's names and dates because become very important stories have really become part of you that you've really taken them in and I guess a lot of them just going through them really moving? Thank you especially the early early families. I wanted to ask you talk about some of these people. Who would you say? What's the WHO's the earliest family? Who was the earliest Jewish family in? Okay the the longest Continuing Jewish family in Florida is the Dolinsky family from Jacksonville. Actually they lived in this area too and there were perfect family for telling the story because not only are they longest continuing Jewish family they came from Prussia and they landed in New York in the late. Eighteen Forty S. They came to Jacksonville by eighteen. Fifty when I say they the the first first person that came was Philip Dolinsky and he brought from Europe his father and mother. His mother unfortunately died in New York but he brought his father Abraham at eight siblings to Jacksonville so there was a whole large family and this was an eighteen fifty. The family ISTEL IN JACKSONVILLE. Still Jewish into the eighth generation but a lot. I mean tentacles all over the state because I saw you said he had a hotel. In Fort me absolutely polk county he had holdings and borrow so all over the state right. That's with Jews in the early days while even today is not a new phenomenon They moved around. According to the economic opportunity. First of all they came to America. And you mentioned expulsions and exclusions originally came to America because of anti-semitism fact. It's a word. I use fifty times in my book because what propelled people to move from place to place and the cost of the exclusions and expulsions in Europe. They came to America and the Jews that came from the early in the early days from Europe. They were never allowed to be farmers. They couldn't own land so they were very attracted to Florida because it was an economic opportunity was religious freedom and they could work the land. That's why so many of the early pioneers you're saying they couldn't work the land back in Europe right on land right Europe but when they got to the United States so they got into citrus. They got into Florida was attractive because they was a way for them to be independent not have to work for someone else to support their family. And that's what they were looking for. They were looking away to support their family in freedom. So yes that Dolinsky family. You mentioned yes. They moved all over the state because as economic opportunities opened up like when Tampa opened up when different areas opened up they would moved to strike out a new fortune and one area would decline in one opportunity in one area would would be on the rise so they moved around the state but they had their roots in Jacksonville and the family is still enjoying. They're still there so were they. Founders of that synagogue in jazz one of Mars. Dolinsky was Phillips. WanNa fill brothers. Became the first president of the second congregation in the state. Which is a Hamath Hassett in Jacksonville? He was also mayor at the same time. Law The only Jewish mayor still right in Jacksonville. we've had Over two hundred Jewish mayors in Florida in the early days there were more the first one was Henry Brash Marianna in eighteen seventy nine and is because they were educated. They came educated. They were trusted. They were good speakers and people people respected them. I think some people might be surprised about that that there would be that much tolerance for Jewish people that they would elect them mayor of their town. Wouldn't you you know lot of times? You wouldn't think that. But South Carolina the same way. There was a lot of tolerance towards different religions towards the Jewish religion. Back then right. Surprisingly I spent thirteen pages of my book which is a large chunk on politics. I have a list of every Jewish. May I hope every you know I always say you know as best I could get? It took me years. I've been doing this for thirty five years. This book is a combination of my thirty five years of research so I listed the Jewish mayors all the Jews in the state legislature all the Jews in the federal. In in who have been Basler's. We've had one Jewish governor David Schultz in nineteen thirty three. As a matter of fact he was attacked because of antisemitism his opponent stated that he was Jesus Alma Pesca Pilat Episcopalian but my my opponent is Jewish and he tried to use that to you know to put him down. But he actually got elected. By the largest plurality of that time I think people would be familiar with the name Yuli and Levy County. That was an early Jewish family. Right Moses leaving no in central Florida around Gainesville okay. Moses Levy is the most important person in early Florida. Jewish history is a very important person in Florida history. He was the first developer in Florida. The form the First Development Corporation in eighteen nineteen. His Attorney was Alex Hammer Alexander Hamilton Junior. Who was the? Us Attorney for the district at that time. So he Bought a hundred thousand acres in like starts getting Gainsville area latches county orange seminole county all the way over here to to Hillsborough County Tampa. It one hundred thousand acres and he formed a colony a plantation in Mecca. Nope call pilgrimage plantation specifically to bring Jews that were already being persecuted in northern Europe before they were even persecuted in Eastern Europe to bring them to central Florida to become farmers and as I mentioned Jews in Europe. Were not used to being informed. They they were not farmers because they couldn't own land so he brought them to central Florida just a little south of Gainesville. He was a founder of Mickey. He brought he. He devoted a thousand acres to this plantation and they spoke Hebrew. They taught them farming. He brought the first citrus trees. He bought the first sugar tree. Sugarcane trees How many people? There were up settling there. There were probably about thirty five. There were five Jewish families that came Felix Wartburg of the German. Warburg family was his agent in Europe to recruit. In fact Warburg came there to live himself fact on the campus of the University of Florida. There's a Lake Warburg name for him. There's a Levy Lake which is Off The property where he has plantation but he He was the first. Commissioner of Education for Florida was responsible for the first public school and Saint Augustine. He was amazing. He was a brilliant man. He was against slavery. He was an abolitionist. He went to England and spoke out for abolition He had slaves but he believed that his slaves should be free when they became of age. They wouldn't but he wouldn't free them until they were educated. He wanted to keep families together. He if he was known as an abolitionist in Florida that would have been a problem because the Florida economy was based on slavery at that time. So he was a practicing Jew than it's worth about early to mid eighteen hundred eight. He was his plantation was from eighteen twenty to eighteen thirty five but he came into Florida in eighteen nineteen when he started buying land. But I think I read in your book that his descendants now do not consider themselves Jewish. That's that's when you ask me. Who is the longest continue to be the Dolinsky? Okay but he was of course very well known because he was the father eventually of David Levy Yuli when he got he got divorced. The family had come from Morocco and gone to Cuba. Saint Thomas in Cuba as a matter of fact. It's very interesting. Because his son David Levy who you mentioned became the first person of Jewish ancestry to serve in the US. Senate there have been. There's been a book written about Judah Benjamin Has the first Jew to serve in the US Senate but he was not. He was eight years after David. Levy Yuli and they were actually cousins and their fathers were business together in Saint Thomas. And it's interesting that both of the sons became. Us senators went from Louisiana one from Florida. So David Levy you only became the first Florida senator. He was actually responsible for bringing Florida in as the twenty seventh state in eighteen forty five. He helped draft the constitution. He had back to the plantation. He had worked on the plantation with his father. And that's where his father wanted him to be and they had many differences of opinion..

Florida Jacksonville David Levy Yuli Europe United States David Levy Philip Dolinsky Orlando America Tampa Nobel prize Marsha Josipovic Moses Levy Warburg University of Florida Robin Sesing West Virginia McCoy Air Force Base Levy County
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

04:41 min | 8 months ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"Let's take bold action and bring our state back into the sunshine for too long. Our system has placed you in the shadow of debt depression deficiencies and distress. I know you and I know you won't better this year. Similar to those in the past my caucus will fight to ensure that you are brought into the sunshine of Prosperity Promise Provisions and Purpose House. Democrats are engaged. We're ready to work. Smooth State for this is Florida matters. I'm Robin Sussing Ham. And you've been listening to special live coverage of governor Rondi Santa's state of the state address and the Democratic response. I'm here in the studio with political reporter and analyst William March so William after listening to the governor state of the state address. When did you take away from that? What were the biggest points that he made? I guess one thing I'd say Robin was. The speech was not was not long on specific policy. Proposals was long on praising. What's been done recently? What was done in the last legislative session As opposed to suggesting a lot of new initiatives I thought one thing that was significant was the first subject he actually proposed new action on was water quality and the environment. And I think that's going to get some notice from the environmental community is. He's coming out strongly in favor of harsher penalties on cities that dump untreated sewage because of inadequate treatment systems That arises at least in part from problems that have happened in Saint Petersburg Other than that continuing to spend At the rate of about six hundred fifty million a year for three years on springs and water cleanup projects then he went on to talk about education and the fact that As you said he talked about things that were going well. The fact that the Higher Education in Florida is is top ranked in the country and also he brought up vocational education which he said is making a comeback in our high schools. He praised Educational Choice. Which means the availability of charter schools or vouchers for private schools? Known you specific in that area but he promised a new set of academic standards coming soon from the Department of Education and one specific. There is More focus on civics and history in those academic standards. You know you mentioned. He didn't talk too much about anything controversial. He didn't bring up. You know abortion he did he called He did mention a parental consent. Bill but he never said the word abortion He never talked about climate change or affordable housing. He talked about really the things that he felt like had. Were going well and had been going well. In the past year he did though mentioned e-verify which is going be a tricky issue for him. Well for the most part Rav and I think what he's done is. He's tried to emphasize in this speech areas. Where he feels like he and the legislature either already agree or can come to an agreement like asking for the parental consent bill for abortion. He knows that they're eager. Republicans are eager to pass that e-verify as one of the areas where There could be conflict on heat. Brought that up did not suggest any compromise or suggest where he would be willing to compromise on that issue. He just said it'd be good. For the rule of law protect tax payers and place an upward pressure on the wages Floridians. His point is that Low income workers shouldn't have their wages depressed by cheap foreign labor and that having e-verify which is when employers have to use a federal immigration database Would help without with that situation one more thing. Let's see he talked about. He did talk about raising the minimum salary for teachers In to forty seven thousand five hundred dollars which would put Florida at number two in the country for starting teachers pay that it would be a huge increase. That would be that would be a big increase for starting teachers in a lot of but not all Florida counties Then of course in the democratic responses you heard the arguments y Democrats and many teachers believe that dishonest is proposal is inadequate. Florida matters is a production of WSF public media. The engineer is Craig George. The show was produced by Christie Oshana. I'm Robin Sussing Ham. Thanks for listening..

Robin Sussing Ham Florida Bill Purpose House Higher Education William March Rondi Santa Christie Oshana Saint Petersburg Other Department of Education Educational Choice engineer WSF reporter legislature Craig George analyst
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

11:16 min | 8 months ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"This is Florida matters. I'm Rob Incensing Ham. There's a lot of voter interest in the upcoming elections the primaries just weeks from now there's also some concern that our elections may come under cyberattack or run into other problems that could compromise their dependability. How worried should we be about that in the studio with us? Is Brian Chorley? He's the supervisor of elections for Pasco County and with us from Washington. Dc is miles parks NPR reporter on the Washington desk who covers election interference voting infrastructure. Brian and miles. Thanks so much for being here evidence. Thank you so Brian. What is coming out? What what are the upcoming elections that we're looking at well? We have on Saint Patrick's Day march seventeenth. We have the Presidential Preference Primary. Which is going to be a whole bunch of democratic nominees and also for the first time in. Twenty eight years in Florida. We have the incumbent being challenged president trump will be on the ballot for those that are registered. Republicans to vote along with three other individuals last time that was ninety two when Pat Buchanan challenged President Bush. Forty one so brian voter databases into Florida counties. Were breached by Russian. Hackers ahead of the two thousand sixteen elections but state officials didn't know anything about it until last year. Why did it take so long for Florida? Leadership to be made aware of the problems while I certainly can't speak to the Secretary of State Florida or division of Elections. But WE HAVE TO REMEMBER. It was a fishing attempt going back to two thousand sixteen. I know because I received one of those nefarious emails. If you along with my colleagues state but she didn't click on it. I did not nor did my staff And that was obvious. Goal was to deliver the payload of malicious software. But we know there were there to reach why the F. B. I. has has a policy. Well they'll notify those that were The victims if you will and they don't share it necessarily with others so there seemed that point there's going to be in this communication or a lack of communication among between the federal and state government. Which is a little little concerning to me has Alexis Minister. Yeah so miles. I think Governor Rondi. Santa's was a bit irritated that he just heard about it. I think with the Muller report earlier in Two Thousand Nineteen Was going on there. Yeah it was. It's interesting. It's kind of crazy to think that the governor of a state would hear about something the same time. Say Me Reading the MOLA report. I found out the fact that the governor would be finding out at the same time. This kind of goes back to this broader issue that we've been reporting on a lot. The last couple years leading up to the two thousand sixteen election. It just seems like the federal government did not have a super clear game plan for how to deal with election interference. It was kind of ad hoc when they would figure something out. They would talk to the person who they think was the right person. But they didn't have a whole lot of plans in place and so in the last couple of years thing that they say makes twenty twenty a lot safer than two thousand sixteen isn't even as much like technical advances as much as there's a plan in place now for who gets told what the F. B. I. came out with a statement. I missed basically. We've changed the way that we're going to communicate about cyber attacks in a case like Florida. They didn't say Florida specifically but it was very clear what they were talking about now. Rather than just notifying the county and saying it's up to the county if they want to notify the state or if they want to notify other people they're going to notify the head of the state elections as well which in most cases would be the secretary state at the same time or right after as they notify the county so that hopefully means that this this this twenty sixteen issue won't be happening. If the similar issue happens in Twenty Twenty Bryan let me piggyback off. What miles saying? That's that's a great point. Not only is there. Communication but with elections being declared critical infrastructure. Back in January of two thousand seventeen there was concern about was federal overreach of Elections Administration ended up being one of the best things that ever happened because elections has is he the table the underpinnings our democracies just smidgen important. I think we'd all agree so we are working tirelessly with Department of Homeland Security also the F. B. I. B. Dhs has been invaluable quite frankly. I have colleagues on the Nation. I speak to and they've done testing on site testing remote testing. They've provided training and guidance. And so that not only communication but we also have what's called. Izhak which is under the umbrella. Dhs It's a communication network and so we have several of my colleagues in Florida that are on what's called the Government Coordinating Council so election mysteries working directly with D. H. S. and the FBI and all of our intelligence community law enforcement to make sure that we have not only planned place for communication with a plan to make sure that our elections are secure for two thousand twenty better communication with the federal government. All around it sounds like miles as you said the. Fbi said that they are going to change the way they do things and try and communicate better with the actual state leadership where counties have been hacked the FBI also said that in the case of hacking the interference in those two counties in Florida Leading up to two thousand sixteen election that no votes were changed or anything like that. Like no results were manipulated. What officials say is the point of just hacking into a computer system and just sort of messing with people. Well there's a couple different points of view on that the bottom line is we don't know the motivations of these these attackers but we do know that they were inside. The system of these two Florida counties enough to where they were able to see a lot of data and they were able to see the back end of the infrastructure. There's some debate about whether they could have potentially changed some registration data. This is all publicly available data so it would have probably been figured out. Had they decided to change anything but the point is there's a lot of different potential motivations. There's you know some camps that say potentially these Russian attackers were breaking in. And kind of mapping out the infrastructure seeing how the back end systems work in these cases with the intention of coming back whether it's twenty twenty twenty twenty four or just down the road at some point government infrastructure in the United States doesn't change that quickly. It's not like if they come back in two to four years. That probably most of these systems will not be radically different. So that's a potential that they could have just been kind of checking out the scenery to see you know potentially planning a future attack the other thing and maybe the more likely case is that they were able to succeed without even changing any votes if you define success not as affecting election results but about affecting doubt in the electorate about whether any election results were affected. Elections are pretty complicated subject so when people hear hacking they hear that election system or two counties election systems were breached. I don't think there's a level of nuance between a for a lot of voters that are able to make the connection that oh my vote wasn't affected Versus Oh they just were able to see some publicly available data and we actually had. Npr DID A survey poll. That found this to be true that there more than forty percent of Americans think twenty twenty elections that there's going to be a foreign country who is going to be manipulating votes like actually changing votes. Which is a radical misunderstanding of. What even what happened in two thousand sixteen. We've never seen that in American elections. We have proof that has ever happened and yet a sizeable chunk of the American populace thinks it did which potentially could have been the goal miles and this is criticism of you personally but to some of that fault lie with the media that there is so much confusion. I have thought about that a lot over the last couple of years no insult take and I think a big problem from two thousand sixteen that we realized was that there was a not a lot of understanding and it was clear. And I think that. That's what makes me feel bad about it is it was cleared. The federal government even hadn't thought that much about how they were going to deal with this. Guess who else hadn't thought about it. The media there were a lot of reporters out there who had never really covered election infrastructure. Before me included. So you had this this year to year period as these attacks were happening and then in the immediate aftermath where the federal government didn't know how to communicate about them. We didn't know how to message about them. They were telling people. It was secretive in a way that a lot of people think was detrimental to public confidence. And then you had reporters who in some cases were either reporting things that were not helpful for the public to know or not reporting them. In a way that was easily digestible. See kind of had this mismatch on a lot of different levels that just led to a lot of confusion. Brian Mild makes some great points It's just important to remember. They throw terms like Election Systems. Breached in essence. What you had were individuals in two counties who clicked on an attachment your listeners. Every one of us if you go to your Yahoo Jima whatever account. We get spear phishing emails every day. You know apparently there's some of Nigeria. That wants to twenty dollars. If only I'll click on something. Give my social security number. For example. Voter database is important to note. That's no way connected to voting tabulation system. That's one hasn't do the other as far as Casting your vote physically casting your vote. There is concerned about of course going in miles alluded to altering butter data in Florida. Not only is it publicly available free so you know you had two states Illinois in Arizona that were truly had their state voter registry system as reported in the report truly breached and the. Gr You went in there and left kind of footprints of what they were doing. That didn't happen in Florida but gre the GRU that's Vladimir Putin's CIA. If you will military component in Russia that that was responsible for doing a lot of the central let it be known that they had been there. Unknowingly or knowingly. Yes our every. One of our tells agencies came to that conclusion but the point miles allude to is is spot on one of the the goals of these various actors and tons Aquinas. Choose road voter confidence. And so I hear that all the time I got and talking in my community sadly that think they succeeded because the voter confidence has eroded Since two thousand sixteen. And that's important that we get back and also it's polarized Americans one kind of leads to the other. So it's it's a concern that voters have confidence that they know when I took over my current positions this brother elections in two thousand seven. That time we use touchscreens in most large carriers in Florida and made a decision to go back. Let's go back to paper ballots at the time. No one realized what a great this is going to be in two thousand eight. Because you can't hack paper you know that's one of the best things have for going. Old School Saint. Security's going back to pay belts. Not all states have that as Florida's yeah and miles. You've reported that some state is using their phones or using an APP to vote in the upcoming elections. There are these pilots happening across the country in these small pockets of West Virginia allowed overseas and military voters to vote on their phones in two thousand eighteen and then for the first time ever in King County which encompasses the Greater Seattle area. All eligible voters will be able to cast a ballot in a border supervisors election which is again not the presidential primary. Not the presidential election. But it's a step in that direction. There's a lot of people who are pushing a while at the same time..

Florida federal government Election Systems FBI Npr Secretary Brian Saint Patrick Brian Chorley Presidential Preference Primar division of Elections Pasco County Washington Rob Incensing Ham Twenty Twenty Bryan supervisor State Florida Governor Rondi Pat Buchanan
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

12:46 min | 9 months ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"And then you know let me know what. Where do you think the really interesting interesting debate is going to be the session? What Committee hearings are you GonNa make sure that you're going to be sitting in on? I am going to be paying a lot of attention to education. I think number one education makes up the majority of our general revenue spending in. It's the second largest piece of overall overall state since the state spending it's impossible to ignore and with as many asks as have been proposed every single committee is is going to be not very much one to watch as the legislature tries to grapple with how to fulfil governor dances. Goals another issue. I'm going to be watching is how this issue of e-verify plays out. We haven't really talked about that yet. but for those who don't know what it is. It's a federal system that that states can use to see whether or not certain people are qualified to work in the United States and it is full of holes and it has been controversial. And you know governor. Santa's wants Florida Florida businesses to use this. But he's GonNa get a lot of pushback especially from the agricultural community he's also already getting being pushed back from the Senate over this particular issue and so you know whether or not he gets that it has been tried and failed before that is going to be an issue to watch. I think I just wanted to to underline what Lynn just said. This is one more. This is another example of an area where Rhonda Santa's honeymoon in office could hit some bumps. He's well staked out in favor of e-verify but it has Proposals to enforce it have failed on more than one. Recent in more than one recent session of the legislature over the last few years because because of opposition from agricultural interests and others many of whom employ large numbers of illegal immigrants and don't want to be forced to verify people title citizenship status when they're hired a lot of these interests agriculture and tourism are very politically powerful. Also high on the agenda as always. These are these divisive cultural issues concerning abortion and guns gun rights and gun control. There is an abortion bill. Will that set to be heard by the full house. It's already ready for the full House that requires parental consent for a minor to obtain gene and abortion Lynn. What do you think's going to happen with that I think that is actually going to pass the fact that it's been teed up early kind of signals the legislature wants to get this done and out of the way You really don't want to get mired down in something like this. You don't want it to drag out. It's sort of sucks the oxygen out of the room. But I think that you have seen the house Has Obviously ready for it. The Senate is close to teeing it up and governor the Governor Rhonda Santa's agrees with it so you know the legislature has been sort of trying this for years but I think now is the time where it will actually pass. But that's you know once it passes the legislature groups already ready to sue. We've we've seen this sort of time and time again. What I think is really interesting about this ears? Sort of culture wars fights Is that advocates for. Some of these bills are really pushing the idea of parental rights And that's something thing that I think is a new Emergent conversation they're framing a Lotta these around. I am the parents. I am the guardian of this. This child it's my duty to protect the this child and you the legislature the things that you pass sort of infringe on that and that's sort of now emerging in a a Lotta these culture war conversations when parents are really stepping up and saying these are my kids. I should have a say over what they do. And that has been something that we've seen so far during committee weeks with a lot of these issues. So I think that with respect to the abortion and requiring parental consent in most cases not in all cases but most cases. It's going to go through. It's GonNa go quickly because the legislature doesn't want to get mired down in it and that's not the only abortion restriction. No it's not there as heartbeat. Bill has also been filed which prohibits abortion when you can detect fetal heartbeat. That bill has not moved in previous sessions. My guess is it won't this year because the Republicans who control the legislature. Don't want to push the argument. That far of my guess is they. Don't want to enact what would amount to an on almost complete abortion ban but It has been introduced and as Lin noted. We're the parental consent. Bill is much more likely to pass. it's worth noting. Florida now has a law regarding parental notification. This would move it forward to parental consent. And and I'm just curious about that. So notification did a parent have to just sign off saying yes I know of a about it. How did you How would someone prove notification as opposed to consent while the medical authorities involved? If I'm right would be re have been required to notify parents. Parents when they when they perform the now they actually have to get an active consent. This would require right if this passes. And as as Lin Lin said this will probably repeat the pattern that we've seen over the past several years of the legislature passing abortion restrictions that are popular with the conservative culturally conservative base and then litigation being filed overtone right and so the interesting thing is the state. Supreme Court has overturned these bills sales in the past. But isn't that. The makeup of the Supreme Court is a little different than it has changed drastically because of appointments by Rhonda Santa's who Ah has already made three appointments to the court changing the majority to to a majority of justices appointed by Republicans. And so that could have some this year airing on issues abortion. That's right this year. Could be different in terms of how the Supreme Court reacts now the Gun Bills Goals say seem to run the gamut there. There are bills making gun control more restrictive and then there are other bills that would repeal the restrictions that were past After the MARJORY Stoneman Douglas High School shooting. What what seems to have a good chance of making it this year? Lend Glenn ooh that's a toughie You know I think that with respect to the gun bills because so much of this is just high into school safety any proposal. That targets guns in schools is definitely going to be one to watch The Marjorie I do do not believe that you're gonNA see the legislature walked back some of its provisions. That were put in place by Marjory. Stoneman Douglas. I think that that is a no go I know that Anthony Santini's actually filed some of those repeal bills But I don't think that they are going to get anywhere if there's anything if there's anything that the legislature has sort of put its foot down about it. Is that the laws and rules put in place after Stoneman. Douglas are absolute. So it's probably really think you're going to see any sort of appeal. Yeah and you know what it's probably important to point out at this point that about ninety five percent of the bills that are filed by the legislators. Don't even never reach the governor so it is really a small fraction of bills that ended up going anywhere actually only a small fraction ever. Actually we got voted on even Elon Committee rocks less on the floor of the houses of the legislature itself. But I will say one proposal that I think I think we'll definitely be one to watch is whether or not the state will move ahead with some sort of expansion of the red flag laws Those those have been working law enforcement has been using those you know those. Those are the laws that enable law enforcement to petition the court to remove firearms from people bull who are deemed threats Now there are proposals to expand that to allow family members and some other people to sort of raise similar alarms. The legislature slater may consider that there's also the task force that Senate President Bill Galvano created. He charged senator. Tom Lee to sort sort of look into how do we strengthen some of these provisions and so that group has not come out with recommendations yet it might roll out something later on on As session gets going but that's going to be something that people should be paying attention to. Yeah that Task Force. It seems like they would have some bearing on this session. Then the right and it's unclear what they'll propose most likely they'll propose things in the area of mental health funding Behavioral Threat Assessments assignments. Something like that I think We could also note that campus carry is likely to be a big issue again this year and that is the right of the right of universities. Well anyone who has a concealed carry permit. which which part of that is you have to be twenty one so not all students but but those twenty one and older who have concealed carry permits would be allowed to carry weapons on campus And the the university presidents in general are strongly opposed to this particular. John Thrasher at Florida state so the state tourism agencies is life is hanging in the balance that is visit Florida. Will there be another extension for the funding for visit Florida. Glenn what do you think well. That's definitely what the Senate wants. The Senate is firmly in visit Florida's corner but that is not what the House wants a house speaker. Jose Louisville would be perfectly happy. If visit Florida died in a fiery is very much opposed to This agency and elite US perspective is Florida Capri much market itself. We don't need a tourism agency to market US WHEN WE ORLANDO and Disney and Miami. Do a perfectly good job marketing themselves million dollar paycheck to pit bull that just put everybody over for the ads did it did. And it really soured visit Florida in the eyes of a lot of People but the flip side of this is that visit Florida is not just marketing. Miami and Orlando you know it's marketing places like crestview. It's marketing places in the the Pan handle places that you know people would not think to go. It does a lot of work with a lot of local tourism Departments in the ground. It did a lot of work after the hurricanes to say hey Florida's still open and so there's really this kind of tug of war. It has a new leader in former Senator Dana Young who was tasked past with sort of leading this. And it's it shrunk. It's gotten a lot smaller After the legislature cut its funding by a lot last year and Dan. You Know Young's argument is that the agency is leaner it's meaner it has learned its lesson. No more pit bull contracts but is that going to be enough to save it and that's GonNa come down to really Senate President Galvano House Speaker. Jose Leyva and again governor Ronda Sant now governor onto Santa's is okay with visit Florida's so the question is who is going to win this battle. I will tell you that this is going to be one of those things that is negotiated at the last minute. It has usually is during final budget negotiations. So what happens to that agency Is something that's going to be decided very late in session but the people who work at visit visit Florida are hoping that they will get some sort of extension another bill that I'm interested in now. I'm a nonsmoker. And I know lots of US have probably gone to the beach and we put down our towel and were there to breathe in the nicey air and we start breathing in the cigarette from the person in the next towel over and it's gross But Senator Joe Gruber's is pushing a bill that would ban smoking on the beaches and and the state parks. I'm wondering if.

legislature Florida Senate Rhonda Santa Bill Galvano United States Lin Lin Lynn MARJORY Stoneman Douglas High Stoneman Douglas Supreme Court Glenn President Senator Dana Young Tom Lee Marjory Senator Joe Gruber senator
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

11:53 min | 9 months ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"You're talking about a lot of money In addition to that he also wants another three hundred million dollars for a bonus program. You're talking when all is said and done about a billion dollar boost Into K twelve and the question that lawmakers have and where he's already he's starting to run into the pushback is where the heck are we going to get. That billion dollars from something is going to have to give and already you're seeing a little bit of blowback on that proposal. I think House Speaker. Jose Leyva who was very sort of Luke warm to it And then you're GONNA have to deal with you know if they pass and if they allocate this money how does it filter down because teacher pay is something that is negotiated down at the Individual School district level so Aw that is probably one of the biggest priorities for session and that is definitely going to be one that involves a lot of tug of war between the Legislature Governor to Santa Mantis. And even the Teacher's Union. So William I mean one thing that legislators must do and really the only thing that they must do during the session is pass a budget and this is a good money year. This is not a lean year. The economy's going along pretty well. What does the money looked like this year? Lynn was mentioning more money towards education. Is that going to be a battle because the state does have some money. It's certainly will be a battle. The state does have some money. But it also has some major needs needs Education is one of them. The prison system is another world. Probably talk about that later and this could be one of the governor Rhonda Santa's first real conflicts with the legislature. Because after he's how wonderful honeymoon for its first year office Because he has staked himself self out for a sharp increase teacher. Pay On and as Lynn mention some Some legislators including Jose Alita the very powerful speaker from the State House are not super crazy about the idea. It doesn't seem like one of the most divisive issues. Everybody likes to see money going towards education. Everybody likes to see teachers. Paid more. You you hardly ever hear people shouting. No we don't want more money for teachers. Sure but the question is how much and how they they do it the And the the Teachers Union. The teachers themselves are not crazy about about dishonest proposal. Because it's yet another bonus US program. The dirty little secret here is that the Republican legislature does not want to simply appropriate enough money for the schools to pay teachers well because because as Lynn mentioned salaries are actually negotiated at the district level with the Teachers Union and the Republican. Legislators hate the Teacher's Union and don't want to to do anything that would involve them with the process. They want to themselves set the amounts of money that teachers get and set the criteria for it. And that's why we end end up with these endless bonus programs instead of simply teachers roses coming in this program would be in addition to the raises right Len. Well yes but keep in mind again to what Williams said they want it to go to forty seven five. How do you get there when the legislature created the best and brightest program That by all accounts was a failure and they did it so that they could circle invent the teachers unions. So the question is how do you get to that level and keep in mind. That's only for starting teachers. What about those who have been teaching for five ten fifteen twenty years? This is a real point of contention. How do you do it while trying to go around the unions when you know the the the law the Constitution gives that negotiating power to the local unions? So you have a real issue here both with breath how how the legislature will do it whether or not they're going to try and put this bonus component in which is what governor Santa's wants and even when they put some of this money into k twelve. There's still a lot of trickle-down going on here. So it's complicated. It's not just as simple as saying we're going to do this and get it done. I just wanted to point out the best. And we mentioned the best and brightest program. And that's the thing. Yeah that's the existing bonus program. That's just gotten gotten a lot of of opposition so so lynn mentioned the problem. That this that this Pay Program the salary increase would affect only starting and teachers and then you'd have teachers with five or more years experience who are suddenly making the same amount as people just tired fresh out of school but Lynn. Correct me if I'm wrong. Isn't there another a problem that there are some counties including I think Miami Dade where the starting pay is already higher than the four that descend US wants to set. Yes yes there are and so the question becomes well what happens in places like Miami Dade places I think Broward another high. Pay County where you're already at or above that level. There's no answer to that right now and so. I think that some of the concerns that some of the lawmakers have raised about out how they go about doing this are legitimate And it was interesting to me. The Senate has already voted to start moving forward to repealed press best and brightest and they to raised some of these concerns while admitting that the bonus programme did not work out exactly as they thought thought it would so very big goal one of those you know big hairy audacious goals that's been laid out but the question is how do we get there and you're going to kind of conceal you're going to see that as we get closer and closer toward the end of session and into budget talks that's going to get really complicated and really really weedy so I haven't really heard anything new about charter schools This year William. Anything is the battle for that pretty much over her. I don't know that it's over and but what happened was last year and last year session. The legislature passed a major piece of legislation that made a fundamental change in allowing state funding to go to private schools And it's also passed a lot of favorite of legislation recently favorable to charter schools. What what they did last year was for the first time they allowed state tax revenue to go directly to to private schools through the the voucher program in the past? What's what's been happening is? Corporate tax payers were allowed to divert their tax money into contributions to agencies that provided vouchers for private schools. Now for the first time Money that's already been paid to the state and taxes can go from the treasury into those programs and this this is of course a major change and raises a constitutional issue. And it's being litigated. There's a lawsuit against it so I don't think you'll see anything coming up in this year's legislative session that will be as major as what past and is now being litigated And last year session so moving on you mentioned the the Prison System William and one of our local legislators state Senator Jeff brandis of Saint Petersburg has really been pushing hard for reforms to the state's criminal final justice system. Can you tell us a little bit about that sure. Well what's happened. Is that the secretary of the Department of Corrections. Mark Inch recently recently made a report to the legislature to the effect that the state's prison system essentially is in crisis because of low pay staff turnover over the kind of budgetary problems that have resulted in thousands and thousands of of brand new inexperienced guards on duty of staying being forced to work twelve hour shifts mandatory overtime and basically inches warning was that the problems have gotten so bad that he fears they could easily lead to major violence within the Florida prisons. He even has asked all of his the high level staff of the prison system. I'm to read a book about a deadly riot in nineteen eighty in New Mexico and how that riot occurred fearing that something similar could happen here. The in addition to that there have been several three or four incidents over the last year in which violence by prison staff members. Prison guards against inmates resulted in major scandals including one incident in our calipers and left a woman inmate paralyzed from the neck down for life. After a beating I several guards. This is going to be a critical issue for the legislature to face. And it's going to require to solve. It is just going to require money. So Jeff Brenda specifically I know has been looking at reform packages to reduce the sentences of young adults and juvenile offenders. Lynn Lynn. Can you tell us about that. Yeah so a lot of the proposals are dealing with issues like gain time. which is you know getting time off for good behavior and mandatory minimum reform? We've been talking about these things for years. Last year brand had a really ambitious plan that if the legislature had approved it. I believe that state economists had estimated. It can save more than eight hundred million over ten years. You're talking about Florida. which is a state that has the third highest prison population with some of the lowest paid employees to sort of guard that population our prisons? Thousands are crumbling. You saw a lot of damage due to many of them during the last few hurricanes so this is a serious issue and Brandis has really been pushing to reduce the state's prison population. You know it's going to take a lot of money to be put into the system to bring a lot of these facilities up to code up to par but Florida does not want to build any more prisons. So what do you do you either. Invest the money or you reduce the population that you have to guard either way. Something has to give and I think that the book that Secretary has been circulating. It's called The Devil's butcher shop. And he's been very passionate about that. He's been talking to anybody. You know who will give him a microphone to say we have to do something and this is coming coming off about a decade long push to sort of cut the corrections budget cut cut cut cut cut and now it's sort of at a at a very Critical stage so now. It's time to cut sentencing. I guess mandatory sentencing which has become controversial that something that lawmakers want to change and also reducing sentences for for the younger offenders and maybe for a less serious drug offenses things like that I. I personally think it's interesting to note robin that that these kinds of proposals Eliminating Mandatory minimums in many cases on allowing gain time in mini cases. Basically all they're doing is undoing. The anti the get tough on crime steps that were taken in the nineteen ninety. You're listening to Florida matters. We're going to take a short break and we'll be right back. This is Florida matters. I'm Robin Sussing Ham. And today we're talking about the upcoming state legislative session. My guests are William March longtime political reporter and Tampa Bay Times correspondent and Lynn had her the news director at W. FSU which is the NPR member station in Tallahassee..

Lynn Lynn legislature Florida. Teachers Union Teacher's Union US Rhonda Santa Senator Jeff brandis Republican legislature secretary Miami Dade William I Robin Sussing Ham Jose Leyva State House Pay County Santa Mantis Individual School district treasury
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

01:47 min | 10 months ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"At syndicated by the labels they all do taste like what they're made out of. which was that was important? It was very important. One thing I wanted to mention gene is when I looked at the map of the Florida wineries You're in Saint Petersburg but a lot of them I'd I'd say the majority of them are in really small towns and rural areas. And they've got to be helping the economy of whatever tiny little town that area and I think that they they're sort of a rural economic driver that that we hadn't thought about right when you talk about agrotourism how big that's getting in the state you know with people full having their small farms and having activities for for families and people to visit and get those organic and locally grown produce is. I think that these isn't local wineries. He's Florida wineries just fit perfectly into that and they're definitely off the beaten track a lot of them. Do you ever go around and try Vince. Do you ever check out your competition or go round to other wineries. Yes for you know many years. Of course we've been members of the Florida wine and grape growers association. I used to be their treasurer. Her So yes got to meet everybody at the annual conference and then we do go around in visit and being on the state's Viticulture Advisory Council. We have opportunity to come in contact with a lot of them. Vince shook is president of Florida Orange Groves. Winery Chuck Hallway is a hobbyist hobbyist grape grower and winemaker and Gina Birch is host of great minds podcast from wgn. Thank you all so much. This has been so much fun because because nine purchased. Thank you for by very enjoyable. You can tweet us at Florida matters and know that Florida matters is available as a podcast. You can search for it where wherever you get your podcasts.

Florida Vince shook Viticulture Advisory Council Saint Petersburg Chuck Hallway wgn treasurer president
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

10:24 min | 10 months ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"White wine which when it's made properly as much like a Chardonnay Cigna except it has that kind of Musky pop to its stink. You're very distinct. And then we have a noble which is is a similar Red Berry which we use a lot of times for our grapes? Angry it makes a great sangria wine. I'm sure events knows that and Admire admire Vince and his operation. He does a lot of things in Muscat grapes. Most growers don't so My aspect MMA hobbyist is. I'm I'm not financially in involved in it to the point that I can't display with my grape so we do a lot of blending we do a lot of I have some new cultivars I find in coming up. I still have room to put more Roseanne. I'll put a few plants in to see what happens. University of Florida brought the delicious to market. What seven years ago I believe Dr Dennis Grave From University of Florida Culture Breath Dat in Apopka and He gave a presentation which Benson I heard of the Florida Grape Growers Association annual conference and I said Dr Gray. How did you get the name delicious for that grape? And when you know he said well everybody who had tried them said they were delicious so it stuck so you know that kind of thing that runs our industry. It's kind of a senior pets. The tremendous amount of science behind it considering it took him almost fifteen years to bring that grape variety or that grape cultivar to market known. The they're working on at the University of Florida as you mentioned also Florida Am University has a viticulture department. They're having a great harvest festival. Coming up you know. There's a lot of research going on to make grapes. I guess guests more suitable for Florida and good. Now there's a difference between a tasting grape and a good wine making grape isn't events yes and that's what a a lot of this research is directed towards is to find the best varieties and do the The most experiments to develop those varieties that will have the characteristics to make the best wine. So a lot of that research is funded by the viticulture. Advisory Council for the State of Florida and Department of Agriculture. Yes Florida porn the culture and consumer services right the different varieties that Like Chuck referred to that are now coming out onto. The market is a direct result of a lot of that research search. So that's kind of exciting. So what's the difference between a hobbyist chuck and a commercial grower because chuck you say you're hobbyist but it sounds like you're pretty serious areas The differences were not licensed so night and day thing licensing requires a lot of oversight by the TB Tax Tobacco Bureau A lot lot of compliance goes with that we do not sell it we make just enough for personal consumption and frenzied correct. Jean what about Bolt Florida wine. How do we judge? The quality. Are there competitions. Are there awards that are given to Florida wine where they would be maybe compared compared to each other rather than compared to a Napa Valley winery or a New York state led most all states have some type of competition though they do it a lot of the state fairs. There's and we do have that type of competition here in the State of Florida and I think what makes Florida at also unique is besides the grapes. It's the tropical fruit wines. So then you're talking about a whole `nother category of wines and how they're made and the quality and perception. I think Florida nationally. Dan even within our own borders. People have a perception that there's not any good wine. It's all Kiwi or it's all And that doesn't mean that the Kiwis not good. It's just not grapes so people are looking at it differently. and that's apples and oranges. It's Kiwi grapes. It's not the same. It requires a change in your mindset. You know I can NC. How a lot of wine connoisseurs would look down their nose at a mango wine or avocado wine? I've heard of they do make that in Miami. Hey make that in Miami so so you could see how a Somalia in a fine French restaurant might say we would never carry a sweet avocado wine but it does require a a different mindset because it's apples and oranges vince. I want you to talk about because you guys at Florida orange groves winery. You make wine at of tropical fruit. Yes we make forty three different kinds of different tropical citrus and Barry Wines to justify that for me Let's start way back about thirty five years ago. Oh and there was a study that came out in the Wall Street Journal and it was the first study on all wine consumption in the United States at that time eleven percent of the people in the United States consumed all the wine line that was sold forty percent of the population said they had tried wine but they were not drinking it and the rest of the people who did not drink you know alcoholic beverages look caught our eye. Hi In that study and we were in the citrus business. At the time squeezing the difference uses and everything. I haven't been out of college too long so we were still trying to make all wine out of the different citrus. Chris Juices yes. We did in our dorm rooms anyway. That's study was interesting because they went back to the forty percent sample. That said they had tried wine and they weren't drinking it and then he asked them one simple question. Why aren't you drinking it number one answer? It does not taste like what it is made out of number for two didn't taste like a great exactly and number two. It wasn't sweeten up number three. We don't taste like the taste of alcohol so if you look at that as an entrepreneur her and you say well my goodness that is a potential market. That is four times as big as the existing wine market in the United States. Therein lies the appeal appeal for the type of wine that we are making so this has been quite an evolution for us. It's been thirty years in the making to get where we are today. In the tropicals goals side of the variety productions especially. But we always like to say when we're pitching our wines for sale to you know whether it be restaurants or whatever that mindset that you're talking about is the hardest thing to get over okay so we always say they look Our winds will bring flavor and style characteristics to your meals that regular grape wine can never hope to accomplish so you pair them with the right foods and you're off to the races when I give my talks at Disney because we're a good partner with one of the things I talk about. is we make a cranberry wine. I said now. What are you going to pair that with? We have Thanksgiving coming up Turkey mashed josh potatoes and gravy and cranberry wine and there isn't a person in the audience. That doesn't look left around. Go like Oh yeah it does sound good. So that's what we're after. We're after that that market. How much fruit do you need to make the wine? The rule of thumb and it varies up and down depending on what type of fruit that were making but generally it goes ten pounds ten pounds for one bottle of wine. Is that expensive or does it depend on the fruit. It is and that's one of the problems that we have. Is that grapes. Basically are you know one of the least expensive things to make wine out of really when you go to red raspberries blackberries act berries mangos key limes things like that. You have a whole different production process. That's involved in getting the juice like for example mangos. I mean you've got to put them or well how we used to do it You put them in commercial potato pillar rough up the skins on the outside. Then you have to enzyme the the meat of the fruit off the stone you have to get those stones Outta there is quite a process so in mangles are a lot more expensive than grapes are so but you can't charge a lot for mango wine. People won't pay it. I mean one reason. Listen I think these are attractive. Winds Gina Right is because their people would see them a fruit wine as an affordable wine a typical. Yes one of the things that makes some of the wines wines made from grapes out of Napa expensive as as you pointed. It's not the fruit it's to real estate it's what they're paying in mortgage for that really nice piece of property that's high up on the mountain that has all of this history and these high ratings so they are able to charge a hundred and fifty dollars for this Napa cab when really you know if those same aim grapes in that same style with somewhere else. It might be a twenty dollar bottle of wine so it is. There is disparity there as well. It's not just with like the mangoes Versus is the other fruit. I mean it's it's I think it's with the industry in general. That's interesting so chuck. You are using grapes you know. Have you ever thought about using MM fruit or do you ever know. The grapes are enough of a challenge. The the fruit is a challenge. I was listening to Benson how much it takes to make a bottle of wine. Mine is twelve to fourteen pounds of musket and grapes per gallon of wine. A gallon makes five bottles of wine. So there's surprised comparison so a lot less expensive for US check you are retired. You're retired financial wealth adviser so how much let's have you put into this one all winemaking equipment. How much would it set somebody back to to start making line to start a vineyard and then by the equipment the vineyard and the equipment the bottling and everything you have in fact my wife is packaging manager? Talk if you don't mind I'm going to ask an intrusive question but like yeah. How much do you think you have invested in in all of it? It's under ten thousand dollars per really with the acreage and the grapes. Acreage is different. Yeah the acreage adds another sixty seventy two. It probably right but you love seeing the grapes out there they do. They're my babies. How many acres do you have in grapes? One one Acre and it makes all those very prolific then musket. Okay Okay and then. What about you Vince? How many acres and what do you do? You have groves yourself or do you buy the fruit. How do you work at for most of our wines that we make we? Actually you purchased the fruit. So there's no way that we can have You don't have to have a main house key lime groves and things like that we work with producers that are willing to squeeze the juice to our specifications so we do have some land at We lease for musk dying. Vineyards that Get as qualified as a Florida farm..

Florida University of Florida Florida Grape Growers Associat Vince United States Florida orange groves winery Benson Grave From University of Flori Muscat Chardonnay Cigna Florida Am University Miami Bolt Florida Roseanne Chuck Apopka Barry Wines Wall Street Journal Dr Dennis
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

01:47 min | 10 months ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"At syndicated by the labels they all do taste like what they're made out of which was that was important was very important. One thing I wanted to mention gene is when I looked at the map of the Florida. wineries You're in Saint Petersburg but a lot of them I'd I'd say the majority of them are in really small towns and rural areas. And they've got to be helping the economy of whatever tiny little town that area and I think that they they're sort of a rural economic driver that that we hadn't thought about right when you talk about agrotourism how big that's getting in the state you know with people full having their small farms and having activities for for families in in people to visit and get those organic and locally grown produce is. I think that these isn't local wineries. He's Florida wineries just fit perfectly into that and they're definitely off the beaten track a lot of them. Do you ever go around and try Vince. Do you ever check out your competition or go round to other wineries. Yes for you know many years. Of course we've been members of the Florida wine and grape growers association. I used to be their treasurer. Her and So yes got to meet everybody at the annual conference and then we do go around in visit and being on the state's Viticulture Advisory Council. We have opportunity to come in contact with a lot of them. Vince shook is president of Florida Orange Groves. Winery Chuck Hallway is a hobbyist hobbyist grade grower and winemaker and Gina Birch is host of great minds podcast from wgn. Thank you all so much. This has been so much fun because because nine purchased. Thank you for by very enjoyable. You can tweet us at Florida matters and know that Florida matters is available as a podcast. You can search for it where wherever you get your podcasts.

Florida Vince shook Saint Petersburg Viticulture Advisory Council Chuck Hallway wgn Florida.
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

02:59 min | 10 months ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"White wine. which when it's made properly as much like a Chardonnay Cigna except it has that kind of Musky pop to its distinct very distinct and then we have a noble which is is a similar Red Berry which we use a lot of times for our grapes? Angry it makes a great sangria wine. I'm sure events knows that and Admire admire Vince and his operation. He does a lot of things in Muscat grapes. Most growers don't so My aspect MMA hobbyist is. I'm I'm not financially in involved in it to the point that I can't display with my grape so we do a lot of blending we do a lot of by have some new cultivars I find in coming up. I still have room to put more Roseanne. I'll put a few plants in to see what happens. University of Florida brought the delicious to market. What seven years ago I believe Dr Dennis Grave From University of Florida Culture Breath Dat in Apopka and He gave a presentation which Benson I heard of the Florida Grape Growers Association annual conference and I said Dr Gray. How did you get the name delicious for that grape? And when you know he said well everybody who had tried them said they were delicious so it stuck so you know that kind of thing that runs our industry. It's kind of a senior pets. The tremendous amount of science behind it considering it took him almost fifteen years to bring that grape variety or that grape cultivar to market known. The they're working on at the University of Florida as you mentioned also Florida Am University has a viticulture department. They're having a great harvest festival. Coming up you know. There's a lot of research going on to make grapes. I guess guests more suitable for Florida and good. Now there's a difference between a tasting grape and a good wine making grape isn't events yes and that's what a a lot of this research is directed towards is to find the best varieties and do the The most experiments to develop those varieties that will have the characteristics to make the best wine. So a lot of that research is funded by the viticulture. Advisory Council for the State of Florida and Department of Agriculture. Yes Florida porn the culture and consumer services right the different varieties that Like Chuck referred to that are now coming out onto. The market is a direct result of a lot of that research search. So that's kind of exciting. So what's the difference between a hobbyist chuck and a commercial grower because chuck you say you're hobbyist but it sounds like you're pretty serious various big difference The differences were not licensed so night and day thing licensing requires a lot of oversight by the TB Tax Tobacco Bureau A lot lot of compliance goes with that we do not sell it we make just enough for personal consumption and frenzied correct. Jean what about Bolt Florida wine. How do we judge? The quality. Are there competitions..

University of Florida Florida Grape Growers Associat Florida Dr Gray Grave From University of Flori Florida Am University Bolt Florida Chuck Vince Chardonnay Cigna Apopka Muscat Roseanne Dr Dennis TB Tax Tobacco Bureau Department of Agriculture Jean Benson
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

03:59 min | 1 year ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"We all need roger. You were saying that you took a scuba diving trip down to the reef to actually look at what was happening. What did you see down there. You know i i got a chance to see coral up close and it was devastating it was it was very sad to see coral that was dead that you see coral that is living but what has lost all of its color color that we were that were very much used to seeing to see less animals in those coral reefs that were relying on them. Yes you got the shark doc once in a while and some fish but i seem to recall back in the seventies when i was there as a kid much more vibrant in color much more species of fish. It was really really fun on while snorkeling was fun. It was also again depressing just to see the crashing of this right before our eyes so if only four five percent is alive right now carrie i mean this. This has to be obvious to people who are down there. Snorkeling kind of looks like a ghost town. I think it it depends on your perspective so as rogers said he had been there thirty years ago. <hes> and i think sometimes of people haven't seen it previously. They don't necessarily understand what's it's happening. <hes> if you didn't see aquarium that had eight hundred fish and you saw one that had a hundred fish you may think that still think that aquarium is beautiful wilhite but you never saw what it was like before so he's looking really pale and white now compared to how colorful it used to be. It is so what happens is after the coral loses its tissue that algae will start to over grow the skeleton so you do still have that three dimensional structure of the reef at least for a little while so you will still have some fish <hes> but ultimately that coral gets overgrown by algae so it just sort of <hes> looks like a sandy covered algae patch and then eventually things he's get in there that start to erode that structure and it will collapse and that's when you really start to have problems because now you don't have the habitat and the structure for fish anymore and for lobsters stirs and and things that need those places to hide telling me bravo. Let me build on that because i can't carry brought up. It was very interesting because we were snorkeling down there. There were several of these other snorkeling boats. You know you can come down as a tourist and you can go out on a guided tour and those folks were there and they are having the time of their life because they may not have had a reference friends and so for them to be able to get in the water to snorkel you see this florida arenas while you're in the keys and you see some animals. Maybe you see a shark. Oh by once in a while. We obviously want to preserve that so let's talk about research. That's being done now to save the choral aaron. You had talked a little a bit briefly about what you're doing to transplant sort of cut coral up into into little polyps and then transplant those is that the main indirection of your efforts mote marine laboratory has been a leader in coral restoration so part of that is the actual physical propagation and out planning leaning of these corals and and we do utilize techniques where we can fragment corals up into new individuals out plant them onto the reef but we're my science. It's kind of comes in and fits within the restoration scope is is that i screen these different quarrels that we're using for resilience to some of the major threats that are affecting the reef tract <hes> some of the ones that we've been talking about such as increasing water temperatures and and disease and and a funnel that information into our restoration practitioner so that they can and populate the reef with as resilient quarrels as possible so that they can be surviving hundreds of years from now. I can't imagine how slow that work is because because corals grow at what like a half an inch a year maybe a couple of inches a year so putting down those corals waiting for them to grow as got to you've got to <hes> have patients. That seems like yes so some coral species do grow very slowly typically just a couple of millimeters year but we've actually revolutionized the technology -nology for.

wilhite roger rogers carrie florida four five percent thirty years
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

02:48 min | 1 year ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"The mississippi and from other rivers in the area that caused fluctuating salinity and turbidity values but in in addition to that the corals when they're little larvae they actually need a hard bottom to settle onto so they don't settle onto sand and grow. They need like a rocky. Eh formation and the majority of our coastline tampa bay is actually sand with very little hard bottom for corals to settle on <hes> but it also gets bit too cold in the winter here for them to thrive so we actually do get a bit too cold <hes> bit to sandy <hes> a bit too turbine for corals to grow up the although some species do you can find stony corals here. They just don't form the large <hes> barrier reef structures that you find in southeast florida just isolated coral. He's here so erin what's happening with the coral reefs in florida. Unfortunately the florida reef track has been declining for or at least the last fifty years or so <hes> the initial significant decline started in the late seventies and early eighties and that was associated with a disease outbreak that scientists call white band disease. <hes> was a disease that affected most of the staghorn in the elk horn corals. Those are the major major branching species that covered most of the reef tract back in that time period. These two species are listed as threatened under the endangered species act after that particular outbreak we have seen subsequent global bleaching events that have had regional impacts in florida as well so that's associated with really warm water temperatures in summertime those water temperatures stressed the corals out and that symbiotic relationship that they have between the animal and that single cell breaks down in the corals appear bright white because their coloration with the algae has disappeared and the corals basically will starve to death if they don't require that l._g. Over time and so the combination really of those increasing water temperatures and subsequent disease outbreaks have continued unfortunately over time has caused the florida coral reef to go from about fifty percent living coral cover so if you went to a reef and and you dove there in the seventies about half of it would be covered by hard corals now you go to that same reef and often it's only covered by about four five percent so we have lost lost the astronomical amount of living coral cover and that is potentially affecting the function of that reef to act as it should into provide the ecosystem go system services that we all need roger. You were saying that you took a scuba diving trip down to the reef to actually look at what was happening. What did you see down there..

florida coral reef florida florida reef tampa bay mississippi elk horn roger four five percent fifty percent fifty years
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

04:03 min | 1 year ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"Protecting and restoring our blue planet because you know while you have quarrels the animals and you have plans and you have water if humans and we are all connected why do folks come and visit florida. Why do folks come and live here. In florida it really is our unique environment and we are so intertwined and these reefs down in the florida coral reef track that both scientists work at really kind of the center of marine life and marine biodiversity so we're we're going to keep doing what we can to make sure we protect them not only for the plants the animals that survived on them the fish that survived but also humankind yeah so so that's important point. I don't know if people realize how important the coral reefs are to fisheries. He's so talking about what humans depend on what people depend on the fisheries that we need to have a lot to do with the coral reef system isn't that right that is correct so many of the recreational and commercially important fisheries species do depend on coral reefs for at least a part of their life cycle so many fish in the snapper and grouper complex for example spend a part of their life if not the majority of their life on coral reefs chiefs and without the structure and the basically the coral reef axes the condominium for the fish and other species that live on the coral reef if and once that structure goes away the fish no longer have anywhere to shelter so they will leave the area to find better habitat so a lot of these really common species that you're eating at local restaurants do rely on coral reefs and in addition to that it's a huge part of our tourism in florida so scuba khudai vein and snorkeling and just enjoying our our beaches is such a critical part of florida culture in florida tourism that right without the coral reef those industries would suffer severely okay so aaron a couple more basic questions corals kind of a mystery so so one one is why do they grow altogether. I mean kerry talked a little bit about how a baby coral will land in the sand and stick their air or on iraq but why why are they altogether and like a coral colony or community well corals have developed a unique <hes> life history straight strategy by being a colony so they start off as just an individual polyp when they settle on their substrate but in order for them to grow they actually have to create new polyps and create skeleton over time and so in order for corals to get bigger they actually have to create more and more of these polyps and they're all connected to each other so they can share resources sources which is a great advantage but they also are all connected to each other said they could potentially share things like pathogens as well. Which is why sometimes when you see see a quarrel. Get a disease or or have an issue in one side of the colony can actually affect the entire coral commie because of that connectivity but another great the advantage of that life history of being a colony is that you can fragment these corals you can take one large coral and cut it up into tiny little pieces and now you have lots of individual quarrels that can grow new colonies in create new ecosystem through time through that asexual reproduction technique meek and we utilize that and restoration in order to you know start out with a very small number of individuals but create thousands and thousands over time through that a sexual propagation allegation yeah that's gotten to be a really important part of your restoration work and we wanna get into that but first roger you had mentioned that the florida reef reef tract is the third largest in the world. I think that's amazing and why is it where it is in south florida and down in the keys. Why don't we have of coral reefs in the gulf. We have them outside tampa bay. What is it about those waters that is conducive to coral reef. Why i'm going to turn it over..

florida coral reef florida florida reef tampa bay south florida iraq kerry aaron roger
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

03:27 min | 1 year ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"Erin dan hi and from the florida aquarium kerry o.'neil is the senior coral scientist at the floor aquarium and roger german is here to he's. He's the c._e._o. Of the florida aquarium thank you both so much for being here but thank goodness okay so let's talk about coral. Coral is kind of weird. I mean it's like nothing else. People don't know whether it's a plan torn animal. Where does it live. Why does it live in these special places carrie. What is coral sure so a lot of people think that coral is just a rock or a plant. It's actually an animal and it lives only on the bout 'bout top inch of it's hard stony skeleton made of calcium carbonate that it builds over time as it grows so the coral actually has little mouths and little tentacles and has soft tissue on the outside of this hard skeleton and they come in all different shapes and sizes and colors. There's and some are just big mounds and some very fine and branched chain and all of these corals species growing together are what form the coral reef inform all all this intricate habitat for all the other organisms that rely on a coral reef so take home message is that corals are animals <hes> just because they don't have eyeballs <hes> <hes> and they can't give you a sad little look doesn't mean that they're not live than they actually are victims of their own circumstance because once they've settled the very first i part of their life they they settle onto a rock and then that's where they live for potentially thousands of years after that they can't get up and move away from things that are happening to them. They can't run away aaron but they do live in a symbiotic relationship with plants with algae right and that's what gives them their colors. Yeah absolutely corals roles themselves. The animals are often just translucent you know so when you're looking at the coral colony you see a vibrant coloration but it actually has very a little to do with the animal itself that color that you see the unique browns and greens and oranges sometimes even blues are associated with the symbiotic relationship russian ship that these animals have with a single cell algae that live inside their tissue and the common name for that single cell algae is called suzanne kelly those those little algae's actually provide food for the corals to live through the process of photosynthesis and the coral animal themselves. Give those anthony home home to to live in an and so it's a form of protection and these are really ancient creatures. I would think yes they've been around for millions of years. Some they've withstood did the test of time. Although of course the species that we have now weren't around millions of years ago so they've evolved into different species and providing different niches says for our ecosystem so roger german your c._e._o. Of the florida aquarium tell us about florida's coral reef chief and why the florida aquarium feels like it's important to be involved in those research efforts so i grew up in chicago and i have to be honest. I didn't realize that the the third largest coral reef tract in the world is right here in florida so coming down here. I was like that's really cool. People travel you know thousands of miles to the great barrier reef even australia or believes but we have this amazing nature in our backyard and the florida aquarium we are committed to.

florida scientist roger german suzanne kelly australia carrie chicago aaron
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

13:42 min | 1 year ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"This is Florida matters. I'm Robin Sesing ham. It's the end of an era at the university of south Florida after nineteen years as the president of USF, Judy Genshaft is stepping down today on Florida matters. We're talking about the highs and lows of president gin Chaffetz long tenure. I'm going to say at the outset that Florida matters and USF public media is based at the university of south Florida and received support from USF but is editorially independent with me in the studio is Mark Schreiner assistant news director at W, USF, and longtime, producer of university vit. He's been reporting on the university of south Florida for many years, highmark. I Robin, thanks for having me, and Steve newborn WS assistant news director and reporter, Steve attended USF as a student in the eighties. So he seen a lot of changes to the university over the years. Hey Steve glad to be here. Well, nineteen years that is an unusually long time for one person to remain a college president, isn't it? I mean, what's been her secret to her staying power, do you think Mark thinks this thing is Robin nineteen years? I think she passed Jon Allen is the longest tenured president of USF about five years ago, Jon Allen, the first president of the university. And what I think, really worked well, for president Genshaft is that she was always a cheerleader for the university, the joke that has been going around particularly for the last year, but it was very noticeable every speech she ever gives and I mean, you probably wouldn't like someone asks her, you know, paper or plastic. She probably says paper and then she throws in a go bulls at the end. Making that the bowl logo. Yes. Which should I'm surprised one of her hands isn't, you know, posed. An but, but she's, she's a huge like I said, a huge cheerleader for the university while at the same extent a job like that you need to be politically, astute, you need to work with not just a board of trustees who you answer to, but you work well, with city legislators, and of course, with the US F system. You're not just talking Tampa. You're talking Saint Petersburg, you're talking Sarasota manatee. You're talking Polk County with lakeland in polytechnic for a while there. And then state lawmakers because of course it's a state university. It gets funding from the state, and she was very much into a strengthening those relationships and keeping strong bonds with those lawmakers and powers that be in the community constituency. It's a big university. Do you know how many people it's actually? And that's the other thing that that is really being trumpeted now is the idea. Of the growth that took place in the two decades under, again shaft, you know enrollment growing by forty percents. Oh my God. Yeah. Yeah. Right now, I want to say realize that yeah, that's the thing is that just the growth in terms of students. I want to say between the US F system. It's in the neighborhood of now, fifty thousand students on the three campuses of USF Tampa, Saint Pete, and Sarasota manatee, and then another thirty thousand staff and faculty, Mark talk a little bit about her background. She was a professor, I guess she started out, yet, she actually went to university of Wisconsin Madison, social work and psychology. And then she really focused in on school counseling when she got her graduates, and doctorate at Kent state university, and the, the focus, there was how schools reached out to students and you saw that more and more throughout her tenure with the honors college back when she started in two thousand USF's honors college wasn't even a college. It was an honors program at the time. Quickly. She wanted to set it up as a college brought in directors to run it as a college, and now the last probably the last thing that she's going to be best known for is this twenty million dollar gift to create an honors college that will bear her name, twenty million dollar gift from her and her husband. Stephen Greenbaum for this college, that's going to expand to about five thousand students, and at that ceremony in may, when she talked about the gift, one of the things she stressed was the idea that this was something that she has always been about from her education days from her days in college of focusing in add student achievement. All right. So you mentioned Mark that she came on board as president of university of south, Florida and the year two thousand and Steve, she got kind of off to a rocky start. She became president in July two thousand the next year. We had nine eleven and then soon after that the admit. Station suspended a professor by the name of Sami Al Aryan, and this was a national brouhaha and you were were reporting on that at the time, right Semioli, Iran was a professor. He started a group called wise the world in Islam institute at USF L on came under investigation by an independent documentarian by the name of Steve Emerson, who basically accused wise of being a front for a group called Palestinian Islamic Jihad, which was later declared a terrorist group, by the United States government, the month after nine eleven you gotta remember emotions were running really, really high and Ari on when on the Bill O'Reilly show, the O'Reilly factor on FOX and a Riley, basically ambushed him. And people were phoning in death threats bombing threats against USF so Genshaft and the new university board of trustees. You gotta remember the board of trustees had just been established. Replacing the longtime board of regents here, and it was a group of basically business people who are running the university. Just a lot of disruption at this time disruption they came to an agreement that they were going to fire him. They didn't actually do it at the time. And this created a firestorm of controversy from professors, who believe that the university should be a beacon of academic freedom. This became a national even international issue, and it really didn't come to a head until L Aryan wasn't died about the federal government about a year later, and they quieted down a lot of people who were defending him became silent at that point, because it looked like okay. They had reasons beside freedom of speech. They had reasons to suspend him. And you've got to remember back then the image of the university took a really big hit of we, we were being called jihad. You really a nationally. We're getting getting to be embarrassing. Yeah. Rodney plot of bad press. So Steve, you're. Reporting on this story of Al Arian and the university of south Florida, at the time and we have some archival tape of Judy Genshaft at the time. This university has been through a great deal and it's, it's hurt the university, and it's been very difficult for us. And I believe that, that severing all ties of this misuse of our university is a very important step. This university is larger than this particular case. So she did, so she survived that she went on, but then Mark, she did have some run ends after that with faculty. And again, you're going to have that, that, that push and pull at any university, where faculty and administration bump heads. Whether you're talking a pay issues or tenure or things like that, one of the big arguments at USF, which is a big argument in higher education in general, right now is the use of adjunct faculty, which are. Professors and instructors who, don't get a tenure don't get benefits in many cases are poorly paid are working basically part time jobs, as a full-time basis. So that has long been an argument anytime that's Genshaft salary came up the idea that she was at one point in time, the seventh highest paid public university presidents in the country as of two thousand sixteen seventeen academic year, that argument always was, you know what about the faculty. What about the adjuncts how you paying them? But again, it's an industry wide issue right now recently, the university decided to consolidate all of its branch campuses, and this caused quite a bit of concern among people in Saint Petersburg, especially where USF Saint Petersburg, is located. I'm going to put the disclaimer on that of the university may have decided it, it may have been decided outside the university that USF was going to consolidate. There's a lot of. Speculation on who really came up with this idea was it Representative crisp rolls, a USF alum based out of palm harbor. Was it president shafter self? She has been quoted multiple times as saying that she had heard talk about consolidation being an idea, but she was surprised when the state legislature put it in a proposal. But again, you know that there's never really been a definitive answer of whose idea it was as far as I know. But the concern was for years. And this again, predates president Genshaft, the idea of Saint Petersburg, and Sarasota manatee wanting more autonomy, maybe even at some point, separating and becoming their own colleges, while again, the state's nest necessarily was going to allow that, but the campus is ended up with a lot more atonomy under consolidation. Some of that on Tommy is going to be taken back some of that's going to. End up in the hands of Tampa. What comes with consolidation though is more money for those regional campuses. And what a lot of university officials are praising is the idea that a student now can enroll at Sarasota manatee can enroll at Saint Petersburg, and end up taking the same classes that they can take on the Tampa campus. So kind of keeping them as as strong branch campuses with their own identity. But at the same idea, making those programs cross borders across the three, I think one thing that probably in the back of president in Chaffetz mind. This whole thing was the, the lesson of what happened to the USF lakeland campus USF had a joint campus with Polk munity college for many years, and after the started bursting at the seams, literally, they USF wanted to build a branch campus. USF polytechnic is what it was called and somewhere along the line a very. Powerful politician by the name of GD, Alexander who was speaker of the house at the time is very big landowner a Polk County as well. He decided that he wanted to make this a separate campus and he used his considerable political will to basically cleave this off of the us system. And it became Florida polytechnic. It's now this beautiful building with, well, it's university state university. Right. The, the beautiful building this right on I four. But that had to be in the back of her mind. The lesson there of how to keep these branch campuses in Sarasota and Saint Petersburg in the USF or breaking off. And I thought, you know, people who are involved in that very bitter, fight must have also been thinking, well look what happened to the branch campuses. After all good thing, we went ahead and became an independent university that was one big fight that Judy Genshaft ended up losing, when USF lakeland, which became USF polytechnic. It's split that was in two thousand twelve that was that. Must have been quite a rough time. I'm not going to necessarily say that they lost because what ended up happening after, you know, USF losing. Yes, the polytechnic campus which I'm sure was a loss for the university. What happened then was the budget deal? The budget battle that immediately followed that in early. Twenty twelve where JD Alexander basically is the guy who controlled the pen and control the money was going to say, you know, what USF you fought me on this. I'm gonna punish you and he was looking at cutting funding for the university somewhere in the neighborhood of one hundred and twenty eight million dollars. I mean that is like taking a blow torch to a university. That's almost a fifty percent budget cut at the time. And I remember there was a lot of talk about salaries being cut. So it was affecting people in personal level, a lot of angst around, there was and again, that, that goes all the way from faculty down to, how's it going affect students classes. We're talking about being caught, and you saw something similar when? Then preeminence happened with the university preeminence being a mercury get into that. But just as an explanation, a metric system that the state sets up that allows for extra funding for schools that reach these levels at a point in time when USF looked like it was going to attain preeminence, in join Florida and Florida state's the goalposts got moved, and I had the opportunity to watch the board of trustees and president Genshaft at that time rally the troops, and they did something similar with this budget battle back in two thousand twelve and this is again, that political animal that political power that a president needs to use is to reach out to the community to reach out to not just your board of trustees, but businesses around the community to reach out to lawmakers in the community to reach out to power brokers and say, we need a hand..

USF president Genshaft president Steve Emerson Mark Schreiner Sarasota US Florida Saint Petersburg USF L university of south Florida Tampa university state university university of Wisconsin Madiso Kent state university Polk County professor Robin Sesing JD Alexander
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"Through these agricultural areas. It's a double edged sword. When you're working in agriculture, you want, you want that land disdain agriculture the best that you possibly can. But recognizing the growth and development in the state of Florida is not something we take lightly. I mean, it is, it's how we move our citrus up and down those highways. Mean it's how we again, sustain economic viability. I want every piece of egg-laying today to stay Aglun. That's not necessarily rational and it's not going to going to happen. But that's my passion. Those roads are important, you know, in and it's a piece of Florida, that as folks who are genuinely concerned with the economic basis of, of the state of Florida. You have to consider Kevin, what have you heard? I really haven't talked to anybody about that particular issue. But again, I assume if it would involve. A lot of purchasing of land a lot of that land would be citrus. Grove, not once you get farther. And when you get into Henry county and Collier county. Those are the big growers with thousands of acres but in Polk County and maybe even a little bit in highlands. You're probably talking about a substantial number of small growers. And if they get an attractive price to purchase the land for whatever they'll probably take it in a Robin. I think it's the tip of the iceberg of the discussion we had today citrus is down, but we're not out in, if there's another toll role. Dama middle of the state, there's gonna be some winners and losers. We still have currently five hundred thousand acres. We've been known to be able to plant and harvest eight hundred thousand so there's gotta be a nice. Natural carve out either around the turnpike's, or we can still have substantial acreage. I have more concerns with more people moving to Florida and the whole water issue. Then a few growers might sell their land to another turnpike or not. But at the end of the day, Florida citrus been here, one hundred years seven point two billion dollar in economic activities. We're not going away and I look forward to getting back to that ten billion dollars of economic activity. All right. We'll leave it there. That's mike. Sparks EEO, Florida's citrus mutual, we've also been talking to Kevin before senior reporter at the ledger, and Shannon Shep executive director of the Florida Department of citrus. Thank you also, much key, Robin. We're highlighting the citrus industry this week with a special two part series. In addition to this Florida matters, you'll find the stories online at USF news dot org. Lord of matters is a production of. W USF public media. The engineer is Craig George the show is produced by Stephanie column beanie. I'm Robin Sesing ham. Thanks for listening.

Florida Florida Department of citrus Robin Sesing Kevin Robin Polk County EEO USF Aglun Collier county Henry county Grove engineer Shannon Shep executive director reporter five hundred thousand acres ten billion dollars two billion dollar one hundred years
"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

Florida Matters

05:51 min | 1 year ago

"florida" Discussed on Florida Matters

"This is Florida matters. I'm Robin sussing ham, your bottom from the Florida sunshine orange juice seem like an easy sell, and the days of Neto Bryant citrus has shaped the state's identity for one hundred years, but it's been a tough ten years with freezes hurricanes development, pressure and worst of all the disease, Hong long being otherwise known as citrus greening, and when the industry, needs help the most Tallahassee doesn't seem to be that interested. There's nobody with a powerful political position right now that has a citrus background and legislators just cut the budget to the Florida's citrus commissioned by about eighty percent. Citrus is at a crossroads we have in the studio with us, Kevin. Buford senior reporter at the ledger. Mike sparks, the CEO of Florida, citrus mutual, and Shannon Shep, executive director of the Florida Department of citrus. Thank you also much for being here. Thank you. Kevin you recently wrote kind of an alarming article at the ledger. The orange growers have not been able to sell any of their Valencia orange crop two processors this season. Yeah. It was an unprecedented situation. Basically, the orange juice inventories had gotten so high that the processors were no longer interested in or there was insufficient demand for the new crop of Valencia's and from what I understand subsequent to that article, it all goes back to hurricane Irma, when there was a lot of concern among the processors of how quickly the crop would recover so they made these long term deals with importers, mainly from Brazil to bring in imports, and it lasted into this season. So that's what led to the up of inventories and for the market, just basically freezing for an entire. Fire month in may. So Mike, sparks you represent growers. How does that strike you that they haven't been able to sell Valencia oranges and that there are contracts in place with foreign growers? Well, you know what we've had is as Kevin describe somewhat of the perfect storm. But first, let's make sure we understand just how material this issue is if you're a grower that did not have the opportunity to sell this fruit. This is a huge issue. But the vast majority of the growers have long term contracts, they are involved in other citrus coops, but there are a few growers that were unable to harvest and sell their fruit this year, it is frustrating, especially after we're just rebuilding our crops from hurricane Irma, but you can somewhat understand it. The processors our partner in this industry could not be caught short. They had to negotiate long-term contracts with Mexico and Brazil, so. So their inventories or high that limited the cash market, which is, again, a small amount of this year's crop. But very important at those growers at participate, President Trump is, you know, he's concerned about foreign imports. He's put tariffs in place, and other obstacles are there, anything Shannon's ship, anything like that happening to help Florida orange juice, Florida orange growers with say Brazilian imports? We have long-standing trade agreements that have impacted Florida orange juice and imported orange juice most of those for negotiated back in the late eighties early nineties, and many of those tariffs that were placed on imported juice, or now waning or gum on there haven't been any dumping cases or any type of world trade violations, that would lead us to do anything else, different, but that would be something Mike's organization would handle on behalf of the growers if there were. Right now. You know, we're kind of in the right we're not in the right zone for growers. But we are where we negotiated to be back in those NAFTA negotiations. I've heard some complaints from Florida orange juice companies Mike, I mean about foreign imports, but Shannon says things are about where they should be. We'll think about it. The, the fact of the matter is in Florida. We cannot grow enough oranges to keep our processing fully on board. We've lost sixty percent over the last decade of our processing capabilities. And so there are the needs for imports come along with production. We've also lost the capability to process, the oranges because those places have gone out of business. I guess the processors have gone out of business as the orange crop has been decimated. In those processors are big national brands like Tropicana minute, maid Florida's natural and so those big processing. Clamps are made to do one thing, crush oranges and make the high quality orange juice that we enjoy. So there is going to be more imports from Mexico and Brazil, and the tariffs that are there are still good. Now, the other thing to address the high inventory, and this is for Florida orange juice only USDA has been very receptive and made another commitment of United States Department of agriculture purchase a bonus purchase of orange juice of not seven, but now, ten million gallons. This can help get the Tories to down and put upward

Florida Mike sparks Kevin Florida Department of citrus Shannon Shep Brazil hurricane Irma Mexico Buford Robin sussing Neto Bryant Hong reporter Tropicana Tallahassee Trump United States Department of ag partner CEO executive director