36 Burst results for "five years"

Fresh update on "five years" discussed on Del Walmsley

Del Walmsley

00:40 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "five years" discussed on Del Walmsley

"You about bonds of what I found is that you know, it's it's actually been sort of a mission of mine. To know I've taught I've taught at the college level for five years. And I've taught to classes. I've taught a class called financial institutions and markets, and I've taught a class called Investment analysis. And in each of these classes, there was a big section on bonds and nobody knows anything about bonds. You know, everybody just wants to talk about stocks actually had a student in the class. And we were in class. We were you know, we have, like 10 weeks of classes. He's like, What are we gonna talk about Stocks? And what I said to him was. I'm like, you know, the stocks are actually pretty insignificant relative to the bond market. The bond market is way more important, and people just don't have an understanding of how it works. I mean, if you go back in history, you know when we had the dot com bust back in 2000 It did basically no damage to the economy. We had this teeny tiny recession, It was like negative 0.1% GDP. It was a blip of a recession. But when the bond market screws up, we go into a giant depression Bonds. Airway mohr important So you need to check out the bond master class and you need to find out why Treasury bonds at this particular point in time are very dangerous. All the math is there and it's easy math. I walked you right through it so you can check out the bond masterclass and also check out the awesome portfolio. I'm going to be writing about the awesome portfolio this weekend is the portfolio with the highest return. In the lowest risk of any combination of asset classes and where we were just talking about long term investing. And Lenny things compound. This is something you just set it and forget it. You don't even look at it. And just pick up your bag of cash and 40 years. Anyway. Go to Jared Dillion money dot com to check all this stuff out. I want to talk about 0.0%. A p R financing because this was like, a couple of months ago, I saw Promoted tweet from Hyundai Advertising 0.0%. A P. R on an 84 months alone. By the way. The reason they call it in 84 month loan is because people can't do the math. If he said it was a seven year loan, people would freak out like Oh, my God! Seven years. But he called in 84 months alone there. Look, I, you know, 84 months. Whatever doesn't sound so bad. It's a seven year loan. Anyway. 0.0%. A P R. I mean, great, right? And I actually saw statistic that 30% of all cars sold now are getting 0.0%. A p r loans. It's not a bad thing. People aren't paying any interest. I'm going to be buying a car next year if it 0.0% a P R. I'm probably going to finance it. So Question is Should you borrow money if the interest rate is 0%? A lot of people say, Wow, there's no interest. I'll borrow the money. It's still debt. It is still debt. You are getting something today. You're gonna be paying it off over time. Seven year loam and God forbid anything happens over the course of seven years. Seven years is a long time. I'm 46. I'll be paying off alone when I'm 53. That's a long time, especially for cars. A lot of cars don't last seven years. You know what I mean? They do add. That's incorrect. I misspoke. Cars are actually lasting longer and longer, Okay? In fact, 25% of cars on the road are 16 years old or older. Okay, and the average age of a car on the road is 11 years. Cars are lasting longer than seven years. But the point is You might not have the car in seven years. So But 0% interest. Hey, you're not paying any interest. Number all those discussions we had about paying all that interest on car loans. How about not paying any interest? It's a pretty good deal. So the answer to the question. Do you take out a loan with 0.0% financing is do it if you are responsible. Do it if you are responsible. And if you are good with money, and this is like a, you know, a general statement, like there are people who are good with money. And there are people who are bad with money. And I think you know if you're bad with money. If you're bad with money, don't do this. If you're good with money feel for you do this. You actually make money on this overtime with inflation. If you're bad with money. If you have credit card balances, you're struggling to meet monthly payments. Then I suggest you just pay cash for the car. And if you can't afford the car, then don't buy the car. Buy a cheaper car. Get a used car. The other thing is, if you have a 0% interest rate, then it is going to be able to allow you. To afford amore expensive car. We just talked about this with mortgages and being in the show. Especially with a seven year loan with 0% interest in a seven year loan. You can afford a lot of cars. You don't need amore expensive car and everybody does this. All they care about is the monthly payment. Whatever they can get the payment toe works. This is what you do. You're going to a car dealership. They don't tell you what the instructed. They just slide this piece of paper at you. And they say, you know, this is the payment for $37 a month. Does this work? And you're like, Yeah. 470. 30. 40. $73 a month. This works. These loans often offer no payments for 6 to 12 months,.

Hyundai Advertising Jared Dillion Lenny
That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:16 min | 14 hrs ago

That history should not repeat: Hiroshimas storytellers

"Seventy, five years ago, this week, the B twenty, nine, bomber, Nola gay dropped little boy, the world's first use of an atomic weapon. At Eight fifteen in the morning of August six Japanese time. The first atomic thumb has done enemy talk. It detonated over. Hiroshima immediately killing around one hundred and forty. Thousand People I'm was aimed to explode about zero point. In the city at the junction of. Untold River. Three days later, another stroke sake. As Japan marks the anniversary, it hopes to keep the wartime memories alive using the stories of people who survived the attacks. On all. Holland. But the average age of survivors is now over eighty three. But those. This'll be the last chance to hear from those witnesses during a major anniversary. August sixth nineteen forty five was supposed to be a day off for seventeen year old. Takeo to Toco. No Snyder is the economists Tokyo Bureau chief. She had made plans to meet two girlfriends at eight fifteen owning at a train station on the west side of Shema. She was running late, and then she stepped outside, she saw flash and heard a bang. Which you regained consciousness, she found herself lying thirty meters away a mushroom cloud rising over the city. People with charts skin peeling from their arms rushing over a nearby hillside. Mr K. Ohka left's to look for her mother. and. Found rivers filled with bodies took her six days to locate her mom who is still miraculously alive. Mom lived for another twenty two years. We stuck ohka became a prominent voice amongst the hypocrisy shower, atomic bomb survivors, atomic sufferers. Telling Her story abroad many times in hopes of preventing atomic bombs from ever being used again. I heard this tale from her daughter. He got no. Mario. Who's part of a fascinating unique project underway in both your Sima Nagasaki to help preserve the stories, of Hypoxia, for generations to come to, how does this project work? So there are still some hundred and thirty thousand living. inbox. Amiss. Gone. But their average age is now over eighty three and the number who can tell their stories publicly is declining drastically. Just. You got the fact that could have done this. So the city government's in both fishermen sake have been recruiting scores of volunteers like music Otieno to become what they call dense Shosha or legacies successors. These are essentially memory keepers, people who learned the stories of the hypoxia down to the most gruesome details in order to be able to retell them with power and veracity for years into the future do. So the volunteers in, Hiroshima, have to go through a rather rigorous course, three years of study training discussion with hypoxia before they're allowed to retell the stories in public. Ms Higashi, no is somewhat unusual in that. She inherited own story, most of the Dan Shosha, take on a stranger's burden. And it simply because that's that generation of of survivors passing that the these city governments have started this program. Yeah, it is. It's really reflective of the anxiety that many people in here, C.`mon, Nagasaki and throughout Japan feel about fading wartime memories I'm what will happen. Once this generation firsthand witnesses passes away the city governments and the peace museums. Atomic bomb museums in both cities have been collecting and recording testimony for many years. But this then social program is away, they hope to preserve these memories in living form to retain the emotional impact. The comes from searing these stories from another human being. and. So where does this fit in with the the wider of up the bombing of of the war in Japan? For Japan, the Hiroshima Experience became central to wartime memory and park has some scholars have argued because it allows victim narrative to dominate shifting the focus away from the atrocities Japanese soldiers committed abroad in Asia and the Pacific certainly oaks in China and Korea have bristled at the lack of context that some of the retailing's of the aroma and Nagasaki experiences or trey. and. If you look at Japan today, it's of course, wrestling a new with the legacy of the Second World War and its aftermath in particular the constitution that America imposed on Japan after the war, which renounces war bars Japan from maintaining armed forces. In practice, Japan does maintain a powerful military which it calls the Self Defense Forces and its Prime Minister Obey Shinzo years has hoped to change the constitution to revise the constitution in order to make explicit that Japan's military is constitutional and and perhaps to expand the limits of what they're allowed to do. Curiously, the public still supports maintaining the postwar constitution. So in short pacifism is still deep seated in today's Japan. and. What about the the the effort of auction others to to learn the lessons of the second. World War d? How does nuclear non-proliferation look at this stage from where you are. Well. This is another source for concern. Of course, non-proliferation efforts in recent years have been faltering just this January. The Bulletin of Atomic Scientists. It's doomsday clock. It's subjective measure of our proximity to self-annihilation closer to midnight than anytime since its establishment in one, thousand, nine, hundred, eighty, seven, the hawks are are pleased and take solace in the signing of the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons in two, thousand, seventeen, it invokes there unacceptable suffering in its preamble and a nod to how the memory of interesting Nagasaki continues to shape non-proliferation efforts globally yet at the same time, no country with nuclear weapons has signed up to that treaty neither has Japan in fact, which shelters under America's nuclear umbrella. And, and how does that sit with Hypoxia at this stage at this anniversary being marked. I spoke with US Akihiko the governor of the prefecture, and he expressed the view that I heard from many others both your seem sake, which was a wish that Japan would use its moral authority as the only victim of atomic weapons to push harder for their abolition. The hypocrisy. Have Long gramps and spoken about abolishing the bomb before the last houses away. Just to make the do. You call. You can. That's unlikely. But the hypocrisy hope that their stories at the very least. Deter the world from ever using his weapons again. Thank you very much for your time. Thank you very much for having me.

Japan Hypoxia Hiroshima Nagasaki Bulletin Of Atomic Scientists Sima Nagasaki Untold River Mr K. Ohka Dan Shosha Toco America Takeo Holland Ms Higashi Snyder Tokyo Bureau Chief Mario United States
COVID-19 Vaccine Ethics: Who Gets It First and Other Issues

Science Talk

04:27 min | 23 hrs ago

COVID-19 Vaccine Ethics: Who Gets It First and Other Issues

"US government's. Warp speed is ambitiously trying to create test and licensed vaccine for covid nineteen in less than a year compared to the five to ten years typically needed for a new vaccine. The program is borrowing strategies from a crash effort undertaken in the nineteen fifties against polio. Arthur caplan was seven years old when that paralytic disease which had been terrifying parents nationwide came to his town. Last. People. In America. Get. Polio in the Boston outbreak of nineteen, fifty seven, that's where I'm from. Saw Kids in our loans on kids die in the floor. It's one of the reasons I got interested in medical ethics. The Polio vaccine developed in the fifties it saved millions of lives and brought us tantalizingly close to eradicating the disease altogether. But in the haste to produce them researchers and manufacturers occasionally made mistakes and crossed ethical boundaries. Experimental vaccines were tested on intellectually disabled children, for example, as well as millions of people in the Belgian Congo and the Soviet Union who were not given the option for informed consent that today we consider indispensable. Medical ethics come a long way in the past sixty, five years. The World Health Organization has already set up a working group on ethics and Kobe Nineteen of which Kaplan is a member. They have started thinking through many of the tough questions ahead as companies race to test experimental vaccines, and we hope eventually ramp up manufacturing of those who succeed to billions of doses. Worldwide these questions include how can we make sure vaccine trials don't exploit people or enroll too few participants from black native Latino communities who are disproportionately sickened been killed by this disease who will get approved vaccines I and who will pay for them and what if anything should we do about vaccines being sold on the black market? The most immediate questions involve large-scale clinical trials those trials will take months to produce results. Can says, one reason is if I give you the experimental vaccine. Then, I have to wait for the. Virus in nature to infect me to see whether I'm going to do better than a group that didn't get vaccine usually have a placebo control group were you don't give them an active agent and you sort of monitor one against the other. If, you're waiting for natural infectivity with Kobe we have a problem because the Degree to which the becoming infect is very slow. So you'll notice that people are starting to recruit subjects for trials right now in hot spots, they may be looking at Brazil. They may be looking at Atlanta it could be looking at a region of the country that has. A A big outbreak. But at the same time, morally we have to try and tell people who sign up for vaccination studies they should not get themselves infected. So it's a sort of moral catch twenty two, you can't really. Encourage people to be reckless and get themselves. In fact, an the problem is you're probably not going to take sicker people because it makes it difficult to assess whether a vaccine is causing an adverse event or an underlying illnesses causing events. Most of the people who come into these big vaccine trials are healthy volunteer still they're younger. Is An effort underway. In the NIH sponsor trials to try and get more diversity ethnicity and race but a lack of transparency in who is being selected for the vaccine trials has raised concerns that historically underrepresented communities may once again be overlooked. Kaplan says that the preference for healthy volunteers is also one of the reasons that vaccine testers probably won't turn to one otherwise logical place to recruit participants prisons where corona virus has been running rampant, you can't use a vulnerable population because you worry that they can't consent. They're gonNA try and say I'll do it because they want to get out of jail or get parole the other main reason why Is prison populations usually have two or three underlying diseases. I know MTV everybody's at the gym looks such Arnold Schwarzenegger. But in fact, hepatitis HIV drug abuse is a bunch of reasons why they're not a best subjects for for any beginning studies

Polio Vaccine Kaplan Polio Kobe Arthur Caplan Belgian Congo United States NIH MTV Arnold Schwarzenegger Soviet Union America Boston World Health Organization Brazil Atlanta
Elizabeth Wetmore: Valentine

Bookworm

04:36 min | 1 d ago

Elizabeth Wetmore: Valentine

"Today. I'm very pleased and excited. My favorite thing on bookworm is when I'm talking to a first novelist. And it someone whose work I have not previously known my guest on the show today is a booth wet more Beth wet more. Her book is called Valentine. It's published by Harper and it's novel. Beth. Wet more is fifty three years old and this is her first. Book, she's published many short stories in many of the best literary journals, the Kenyon, Review Colorado Review but this is her first time in hardcover. Tell me Beth what feel nights is finally see the book in hardcover. Well. It's all been a little unreal honestly. I worked on the book for a long time and I was ready to have the editor sort of wrestle out of my hands. Honestly I think if if she hadn't wrestled it out of my hands, I'd probably still be tinkering with it to tell you the truth and even now I occasionally spot a sentence or a paragraph that I think, Oh, I'd like to have a do over on that. But on the whole, it's been wonderful and surprising to me I think I. Expected The book to come out very quietly and and so it's been. Marvelous to see how many people have reacted to it in such a positive way and how meaningful it's been to some people. Yes the book has made its debut as number two when it came out on the New York Times bestseller list and it's set where Beth was born in West Texas in Odessa. Now, if you're me, you think Odessa that's near where my family come from in Russia this is Odessa in. West Texas how does it get its name? Well it depends on who you ask You know the they're part of Texas was settled pretty late in the early eighteen eighty s and depending on on what piece of local you believe it was it was named Odessa in part because of the sort of grasslands that that people said resembled the Odessa in Ukraine. And and and that's really been the most sort of certain story I've heard. No was Texas. is known for its. Economy. I'm sure most of my listeners will know this but what is an oil patch? Well. Odessa is in the Permian Basin which is about eighty, six, thousand square miles inside. So and and of course, West Texas and. is is even more vast right than the Permian basin and it's an oil and natural gas rich region of the country I read recently actually that actually until the until the pandemic, it was on pace to outpace Saudi Arabia for the biggest production in world in the next five years That's slow down and been derailed a little bit by the pandemic of course but it's so an oil patches you know a a part of the world where that is the single economy oil and natural gas. It's not a particularly pretty place in the world at least not by most people's standards I think it's beautiful. There's no other way to make a living out there other than working oil and natural gas and Odessa where I grew up on differs slightly from it sort of sister city, of Midland, which is about twenty three miles away in the sense that Odessa's a very working class town most of the people who live and work in Odessa do the. Blue collar work of the oil patch. So they work is the roughnecks and pipe lawler's and fitters and water haulers and That's still even today a pretty male dominated industry women in that part of the world tend to work in support roles as bartenders and waitresses preschool teachers, teachers, that sort of thing So that's where I grew up.

Odessa Beth West Texas Harper Ukraine Permian Basin Colorado Review Editor Valentine Lawler New York Times Midland Saudi Arabia Texas.
Breland Talks Country, Hip Hop And Protests

Here & Now

04:26 min | 1 d ago

Breland Talks Country, Hip Hop And Protests

"The music video for the hit song. My truck starts off like mini country music videos, country star Sam honey with a wide brimmed hat walks through a cloud of dust. Yoke and drank my leg. Come you. Can Take Mama and Yuka small. Schools these horns you can say you hate me you. Down to my truck. Then a young black man appears wire brimmed glasses and a huge grand shoves him out of the frame. Out. At the start of this year, he was just a recent college graduate trying to break into music then truck up and the song hit number one on spotify viral fifty chart back in February. The music video now has over twenty four million views and counting religious music defies definition. He's country trap hip hop aren be and so much more, and he joins us now from his home in Nashville to reflect on his music and his life as part of our series on how artists are reimagining and reflecting the current moment in their work. Thanks so much for being here. Thank you for having such a glowing introduction to bring you with me everywhere now. Oh Yeah I'll do it. So you're a recent college Grad, writing songs trying to break down the doors of the music business, and then all of a sudden you're going viral with this country song what what was it that actually got you to try your hand at Country Music Just. Always trying to do things that I think can can push the boundaries. I don't like to feel stagnant. So this was kind of came about kind of a challenge show in the studio with with some friends of mine, and we were kind of talking about the new wave of. Country Crossover records that had been that have been coming out like Old Town road and I was just like I feel like I can make a song like that and it would be pretty dope and they were like Nah man you can't make like that and I was like, okay challenge accepted so. Just started. Working on it and was able to come up with something. I guess that that stuck with people you've mentioned other artists like a little gnaws, of course, with Old Town road We also know though about the massive debate over what country is and who country belongs to. What is country to? country to me is a genre of music that is really just defined by strong songwriting and storytelling I think anyone can can make it. I think anyone can you know their based country music stars who are from? Other countries you know between. Fine and have been there some others, and then it really just comes down to the music and then whether or not people accept you I want to deepen that a little bit though because the New York Times reports that my truck isn't really picking up steam on traditional country music stations which are known to be pretty conservative. Do you even about that? I mean it would be it would be nice to have gotten more country radio support I. Think like Sirius Xm, the highways played it a lot. But in terms of traditional country radio, I don't think we got any spends I was hoping when I put Sam Hi on the remixed that would have probably validated it a little bit but it wasn't quite enough and I I understand it though because if you listen to country radio, it's. Tends to be wide dudes over forty so. For me to be a twenty five year old black dude. I, have a song, eight hundred weights and like hip hop production on it like it would've been a lot different than what was currently being played. My thing is if all of these country music fans are these a lot of them who are under thirty for example, are also listening to like drake and Migos, and even like our day and those cat, why do they have to leave the genre to get their fix of like bars and like hard beats like I feel like? Especially, with after after my truck came out I, realized that audience needs music and I know how to make it and I can I kinda stand in my in my own lane and help carve out a sub genre of music that speaks to the millennial modern country fan

Sam Honey Yoke Sirius Xm Yuka Small Nashville Spotify New York Times Drake Migos
U.S. mortgage rates hit record-breaking lows for eighth time in 2020

KNX Morning News with Dick Helton and Vicky Moore

00:25 sec | 1 d ago

U.S. mortgage rates hit record-breaking lows for eighth time in 2020

"Just when you thought mortgage rates couldn't get any lower the gun lower hitting record highs this week, according to latest survey for mortgage giant Freddie Mac, the average 30 year fixed Down to 2.8% this week. And by the way, the eighth time this year that we've seen the benchmark mortgage rates slipped to a record low. The 15 year fixed now down to 2.44% and the five year adjustable down to 2.9%.

Freddie Mac
Cameron Diaz Explains Why She Felt 'Peace' After Leaving Behind Her Acting Career

Donna and Steve

00:46 sec | 1 d ago

Cameron Diaz Explains Why She Felt 'Peace' After Leaving Behind Her Acting Career

"Quit acting five years ago and she couldn't be more at peace during yesterday's in group health, the sessions with Gwyneth Paltrow Charlie's Angels star, said Hollywood's intensity was a major factor in her decision to step back from the spotlight. When asked how she felt about walking away from a movie career of that magnitude, Cameron said. She felt a sense of calm a peace in my soul because I finally was taking care of myself, she said Yet, yeah, that's harder to walk away. Hard to walk away, But I'm sure she had a lot of money on DH That does help. You know, right easier to walk away if your celebrity has a ton of money. And if you're somebody else, but but that fame only once more fame money usually only wants more money. So being ableto say, Take a pause, shall pride come back a little bit, and she'll be welcomed back.

Gwyneth Paltrow Cameron Hollywood
A Song For Peace

The Promised Podcast

05:17 min | 1 d ago

A Song For Peace

"This is the story of a song that is in a way the story of this country in the spring of Nineteen, sixty-nine at a sidewalk cafe on Richmond Street tucked in from the corner of Dizengoff. Street in Tel Aviv a twenty four year old poet named Yakov or Janka wrote Blit met a twenty five year old musician and arranger named yet year Rosenbloom and the two men became friends the cafe was called California and the. Place, itself said something about the people who made a habit of spending their days especially, their long nights there. The first thing to know about Cafe California is what it wasn't just one hundred and twenty five meters up Dizengoff was a legendary Bohemian cafe called carseat. It had been in operation since nineteen, thirty five, and since then it was the place where you can find some of Jewish palestines and then Israel's greatest poets and writers. On Alterman and Lebron's Sean Ski. Lay. Goldberg. Alexander Penn great writers who had been young and who grew old drinking coffee in the afternoon and vodka in Iraq at night at the simple spare tables of cassette alongside these luminaries in the nineteen sixties. New Generation staked claims at the table, the actor or. The singer Oregon Stein the architect Yaakov wreck there and many others cafe California was not seat from its vantage half of long block away even the young people at seat where old carseat was yesterday's Bohemia California was today's Cafe California was founded in one, thousand, nine, hundred, thousand, nine by a man named Ab Netanyahu who was only thirty two. Then that had lived a good deal of life. Netanyahu was born in nineteen twenty seven in the southwest corner of what is now Iran in a place called Abedin on the Persian Gulf just. Across the border from Bosra not far from Kuwait at six he was sent to board at Saint. Mary's a Jesuit School in Mumbai where you had an aunt, his parents abandoned. Persia. For India when he was twelve at sixteen and Nineteen, forty three, he lied about his age and joined the Royal Indo British Air Force in time after he trained to watch the Second World War wind down at twenty one he came to fight in Israel's war of independence and never left taking a job as an El Al pilot when he was decommissioned. It was with a few restless L. Buddies that Netanyahu opened cafe. California soon, it was filled with the city's young wannabe writers, directors and poets the people most eager to knock from their sinecures the city's old writers, directors, and poets who argued and held forth at carseat. Ab Thanh was a magnet for Bohemians and he came alive when he was with Bohemians, their company produced in him at once a sense of satisfaction. He had found his people but also a sense of restlessness eighty, nine ton was in constant search of his next Gig in nineteen sixty five he ran for Knesset advice of a friend who worked in PR he pledged that if he was elected, he would fly to Egypt to meet with General Nasser to seek peace after he failed to win a seat in parliament, he anyway bought a nineteen twenty seven steer. Men by playing that, he named piece one on February twenty, eighth nineteen, sixty six, he took off and flying low to avoid Israeli radars he landed in Port Saieed the Egyptians sent him back the next day Nassar had refused to see him back home a retired David Ben Gurion told reporters that not tons trip was an event of moral and political importance and quote pope. Pious gave him a medal of peace and Robert Kennedy and Bertrand Russell sought out his company not much later the notion took hold of Natanz, that music held the key to altering. Israeli. In the summer of Nineteen Sixty Nine AB NATANZ bought a Dutch cargo ship named MVP SEATO MVP stands for motor vessel and he rechristened it the MVP piece from Holland he sailed to New York to raise money and set up a shipboard radio station. His plan was to anchor in the Mediterranean outside territorial waters of Egypt and Israel and broadcast songs of peace that might open the minds of Israelis any. Alike his sojourn to New York stretched biblically three years would pass before he returned with ship in good repair with mixers, turntables, ABC cartridge machines, reel to reel tape machines, and fifty kilowatt transmitter to help not on- by what he needed John. Lennon. And Yoko Ono signed hundreds of posters of the two of them in bed in Amsterdam their famous bet in which not on sold to raise money for audio equipment. John Lennon also offered not time yet. Rolls. Royce grads to sell at auction, but the practical impediments of shipping the grand car stymied the business, the carpenters, Johnny Mathis and other musicians recorded for non promotional clips in praise of peace. Not an idea was that new music might open minds in Israel Egypt. The station eventually began to broadcast in nineteen seventy-three as the voice of peace

Ab Netanyahu Cafe California California Egypt Israel Dizengoff John Lennon Persia Bertrand Russell Tel Aviv MVP Johnny Mathis Alexander Penn Rosenbloom Bosra Iraq Yoko Ono Nassar New York Persian Gulf
Time To Re-Think Linear Personal Financial Planning

Inside the Spa Business | Spa

03:19 min | 1 d ago

Time To Re-Think Linear Personal Financial Planning

"Most of us are familiar with these three basic stages of life school work retirement you spend the first twenty years of your life plus a mind is getting an education. You spend the next forty, forty five years going to work, and then you spend another twenty years plus minus in retirement hoping like hell that you've saved enough money to have a quality of life in your time and now. The interesting thing about these and I'm not a financial plan I don't pretend to be but I've certainly spoken with a few of them over the time and it strikes me that the conversations are always tend to assume that you have a linear progression in your career and in your life which doesn't happen, and of course, right now, there's a lot of people who are getting stressed out about the fact that that linear progression in terms of the earning capacity has stopped because of either lost their job or taking significant celery cats and they're worried about whether they're going to have enough to live on in retirement little lived through the next next year or so I guess. But the thing to me is that careers are almost never linear anymore. I mean my parents generation you worked at a company, you kind of work your way up and most of them stayed within the same company, my generation most people I know have had at least one Korea change over their working lives now I'm fifty. And I think the next generation, they probably going to have two or three career changes and so this current. Pandemic this current crisis and financial crisis that a lot of of finding themselves in. In a way we almost should have planned for we should have already been planning for a couple of dips. You now career progression now financial progression if you like our financial capacity to earn and to save, and if we had done that right now, we'd be sitting back saying, okay. Well, this is one of those dips that I talked about gone from one career path to another career path of accepted that I'm going to take a bit. Of A pay cut initially. So I'm not stressed out about that I've got to make an in place to defer home loans and collins and that kind of stuff because I planned for deep but I think where we go wrong financial planning is that we don't we don't factor in the dips and I think the dips are not only smart financially I think then necessary personally I mean right now at this age after thirty years in the workforce. The idea taking a year or two off, and then coming back refreshed sounds like a perfect idea taking a sabbatical. Financial Planning and personal financial planning thousand allow for that. We assume a linear progression and life is not linear up. So for those of you in your fifties like me or even a bit later, maybe it's a little bit light to start changing your personal financial planning in a big way. But for those you in your twenties and thirties have I, you think about what this this current crisis has alluded you to the fact that they may be whether they're. Formed by necessity like now or a personal preference on assessing to change career path and plan for the deeps plan for the fact that you'll personal financial plan will not be a linear progression.

Collins Korea
Should You Offer a Lifetime Deal?

The $100 MBA Show

06:05 min | 1 d ago

Should You Offer a Lifetime Deal?

"WanNa. Start today's than by explaining why businesses consider offering lifetime deals. The bottom line is, is that lifetime he is often generate a large lump sum of revenue of cash. It's a cash grab really they might partner with a deal signed with large affiliates or they offer it to their list, and because such an incredible deal, it's a lifetime deal. They'll get lots of sales at the start people see this as a way. To Fund, their business at the star. So that's kind of the motivation behind lifetime deals outside of that. It also gives you new users, new customers, people to give you feedback the star and people that are invested. That's really the positives and and there's not really much outside of that. That's positive. Just being frank but for many people, that's a lot. You know making a lot of money at the start to fund the business. Can, really help them and really propel the business to avaiable full-time option for them and allow them to make some hires and scale quickly the issue is that most products and services have a running cost. So even if you say for example, sell a lifetime deal for a thousand dollars per customer yes. You'll earn a thousand dollars, but each customer will have a cost for each subsequent year to come. Agree. Thirty forty, fifty, sixty years for long as that person is alive right and some of us don't really do the math and that leads me to my I tip. You got to do the math. How much does it cost you per customer per year and a lot of people are like well, I sell my product it's course it's a forum it's something that really has a minimal cost on my end. And that's pretty much it. No you gotta dig deeper. You have cost Phantom costs that you're not counting like how much it cost you per customer for your web hosting to host your community to host your APP how much that cost on a monthly basis divided by the number of customers is cost more per customer. It's not a once in done kind of thing, the more traffic you have the more you have to pay what about customer support the more customers you have the more support staff you need the more time take from them you need. To factor that in, are there any other costs whether it's your time or money that's involved every time you have a customer, break it down because you might find out yes. This might be a very small amount per customer in it's worth to offer the lifetime deal but often more times than not when we do the math, you're like, wow, we start to break-even after five years and after five years we're losing money. Then after ten years, we're really losing money. So this really is a red flag that you can raise before you offer a lifetime deal. My next tip is you have to make sure that if you're going to offer a lifetime deal, you don't offer a deal or a plan or a product that they will not outgrow. The play of the lifetime deal is to give them something that is valuable, but is just to get them started. The point here is that get them onto your platform onto your product. And therefore get used to it. Love it enjoy it. But at some point, they're going to outgrow whether they need more contacts in your APP or the want to get access to more training. Basically, we're talking about here is you want to offer them the basic of basic plans. It's still valuable. It's still something that you would charge a monthly or annual basis for normally but. You, WanNa push them towards upgrading anytime. You're running a lifetime plan you should aim for seventy percent of the people that by will upgrade out of the lifetime plan. So lifetime is something that's basically temporary this takes a bit planning the six a bit of a branding and package INC when it comes to offering this lifetime deal so don't rush into a lifetime deal if. You're not ready. Make sure you're crafting the right one. So you know that people will be graduating to different plants off the lifetime. The third thing I want to mention is often in my experience lifetime customers in general, not all of them of course, but in general will tend to be difficult customers to deal with what you mean by that well, people that don't invest much. Will actually cost you more time and more headaches people that actually pay you a lot of money. They do the work that get the most out of it and they're professional they get it. They understand the onus is on them to make it happen. But those who pay the minimum and Gopher lifetime deals people that maybe don't really take action but they will complain about every little thing if they have the opportunity of course, I'm speaking in. Generalities of course, there are lifetime deal customers that are hard working that are serious about their business and they are great and they're not headaches. But if we're talking about a percentage or a majority of the users, higher paying customers are lower maintenance customers that's just the facts of business. So I want to give you some direct advice. If you do the math, you have a graduation plan a plan to get them to upgrade out a lifetime. And everything pans out and it's very, very minimal cost on you. Even if you stretch out of twenty thirty years of this customer being active, then go for the lifetime plan if not avoided if you can even if it means growing slower if you're still looking for that cash grab, my advice is limit the number of lifetime members whether it's one hundred or two hundred people Max and then you. Close it. This will create scarcity and it will also allow you to say, Hey, this is the amount of money I will get from this lifetime offer I can work with us the influx of cash I need, and from there you're only dealing with a minimal number of customers that are dealing with the lifetime planet you have to pay for for the longevity of your business in for their

Partner Frank Gopher Package Inc
75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

Between The Lines

09:42 min | 1 d ago

75 years after Hiroshima, they're still feeling its impact.

"This bomb has this frank for twenty thousand tons of TNT. Harnessing, the basic power of the universe. What I fifteen I am on August six, nine, hundred, forty, five, the US Air Force dropped the little boy uranium fission bomb on central hero. Shema. Making it the first city ever to be destroyed by a nuclear bomb. On August nine Nagy became the second when the bomb exploded around thirty percent of Hiroshima's population that were killed instantly many more died in the months and years to come. Now, the bombs brought to an end to world war two but the wool was horrified at the human cost. Russia has since become a byword for nuclear holocaust forever linked to the words never again. Now, this week marks the seventy fifth anniversary of the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki joining me to reflect on the legacy of those events. Tashi. Tauch. She is assistant professor at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service and the author of political fallout, nuclear weapons testing, and the making of Global Environmental Crosses. Welcome. Tasha. Thanks for having me and Michael Gordon Professor of history at Princeton University and Co. it is a of a new book called the age of Russia. Welcome. Welcome. It's very good to be here. Now, Michael the fear of the nuclear age is the period after World War Two when the US dropped the bomb. The fee was that the nuclear weapons would become a common part of conventional warfare but in the seventy five years since he Russia and Nagasaki, there's not been a single bomb dropped in a conflict. Question is this because deterrence works or have we just been lucky I would say we've mostly been lucky It's quite rare that there are conflicts between nuclear-armed nations. The major example is the nineteen sixty, nine border conflict between the People's Republic of China and the Soviet Union. So there haven't been many occasions for things to escalate, and there's a strong incentive in those cases to de-escalate. There have however been very close near accidents whether missile just that needing on its own or people launching almost launching in fear of an attack and there. Have Been Plenty of conventional wars that could have escalated that way. So by and large, we've been lucky but we've been abetted by the fact that there has been an ambient taboo that has grown over the years against nuclear first use although that is rarely the policy of any nuclear power. Okay. Now from an Australian perspective, Tic- Japan was seen as an aggressor in the war, the war crimes but also as a victim because of the destruction wrought by the nuclear bombs have is the wool remit in Japan now aggressor and victim. Tarshi. Many pass through consider themselves as victims thinking that Japanese were misled by the government inter- Disastrous Wall Conquest. In this view here stands at the as the ultimate symbol of Japanese victim. But today is victim narrative faces two competing accounts. One is to recognize Japan's acts of wartime aggression, including tweeting massacres, forced labor, and sexual violence. If we see hero Shimmer from this perspective, it takes on a whole different meaning not. Not as a national tragedy, but rather as international event. killed not only the Japanese residents but also many colonial subjects and allied. POW's who are present in the city at the time of the Tom Bombing. The other interpretation that has also gained for Japan is to see the wartime conduct Japan as an act of self defense. This This lesion is narrative recaps here. As the ultimate proof of Western aggression. So fitting the predation of Japan's Joel Roles as. Aggressor and victim during the war will gain the upper hand in the future will depend on how sweet society around the world comes together and develops a shared understanding of the complex legacies or Corna reason on the war in the Asia Pacific region and back to the United States markle. There's a popular conception that Washington had to drop the bomb that it was the only way. To win the war, of course, the war in Europe come to an end in May of forty five. This is early August two, forty five is that true I mean what? What President Truman's options? So. This is a great question and it's one with a lot of confusion around it. Functionally. The only way the only government that had any power to end the war was the Japanese government which was in a position to surrender and the question was when would that happen would have happened later or earlier by summer nineteen, forty, five, it was already clear that the war was militarily lost. President Truman and the US government in general had basically fixed options of what they could do to try and encourage the Japanese government to take that move. There's only two that people usually talk about dropping the atomic bomb or invading the home islands of Japan. Both of those were on the table also having the Soviet Union inducing them to enter the wars of belligerent which happened on August eighth increasing the intensity of firebombing tightening the blockade of foodstuffs into the home islands. and modifying the terms of unconditional surrender to allow Japan to keep the emperor. The interesting thing is all six of those happen Truman pursued all sex and the war ended. It's unclear which ones were determinative. But the point is there wasn't like we had one option or nothing else. The US had plenty of options and exercised actually all of them. On the one level target for the bombs was obviously Japan on another level. Real target was the Soviet Union. How did the Kremlin of you? He Russia Mirror Negga? Second Markle. So. Really, the question here is a small set of people within the Kremlin stolen and his closest advisers and you that there was an atomic bomb project going on in the United States for years they've found that out from spies from Britain from spies in the United States, and they had their own uranium enrichment and bomb development program that was going on at I would say a medium scale What happens after the destruction of Hiroshima is I in absented himself for a few days he went into a depression and didn't. React to any of his advisors and then immediately massively escalated the Soviet development of their own atomic bomb. So they were both caught by surprise and not caught by surprise. It's true that the Americans didn't always think about the Soviet Union as a factor in any decision related to how the war was going to end but they also very strongly, we understood that the key issue was trying to get this the Japanese government to surrender faster because the faster they surrendered the less impact. The Soviet entry in the war would have to how the end game would play out in Asia, my guest, Michael Gordon, and Tashi Hitachi, and we're reflecting on the seventy fifth anniversary of Hiroshima. Tashi. One, hundred fifty thousand atomic bomb survivors still living in Japan. In fact, as a guest of Japan's Ministry of Foreign. Affairs this would have been in September twenty, sixteen I met one of one of the survivors now they're all in education and public law has plied an important part in shaping Japan's post-war Pacifism. Now, as generation dies out, is the role of pessimism in Japanese politics is that diminishing especially in the face of Rausing China Toshi? I don't think the passing of the atomic bomb survivors will diminish the strengths of pacifism in any short-term. The correctly memory of human magazine Japan has been fairly robust and the taken deep roots in popular culture. I can think of a good example that is Japanese animated wartime drama film released just four years ago in two thousand, sixteen cold in this corner of the world. This picture accounts of the wartime life in here she was a smash hit in the box office. Be, atomic bomb survivors will also active in passing down lessons from the world's first nuclear war to the next generation. The city's over here streaming nagy training. Many Japanese Ron Tears as storytellers who share the testimonies are waging victims and a second generation survivors are spearheading efforts for peace unjustice. Well, that brings me to today and really in the last that he is the end of the call was thirty years ago the US. And the Soviets on Strategic Arms Reduction Treaty non stop this was President Bush senior and Gorbachev in Russia in the inside at Union. Then just as it was collapsing now, both agree to significantly reduce their nuclear stockpiles and of course, the updated treaty between Moscow and Washington that expose I. Think it's February Knicks Jeez. So that's just a few days after the next president is warning Michael Do you think it will be resigned. I think that's entirely dependent on the results of the election. Joe. Biden has indicated that he would refine the treaty The trump administration has had many opportunities to re-sign the treaty, but they have not taken advantage of those opportunities yet. Russia's indicated that they're very interested in extending

Japan United States Soviet Union Hiroshima Michael Gordon Russia Japanese Government President Truman Nagasaki Us Air Force Tic- Japan Washington Nagy President Bush
Is Tiger Woods about to make a putter change?

Fore Play

05:50 min | 1 d ago

Is Tiger Woods about to make a putter change?

"Talked again, we talked a good amount about him. He looks great. There's a lot of positive thoughts about his chances this week he warned in Oh five. He won here I think that he never shot higher than sixty eight and then in two thousand, nine, the President's covers here at harding park he went five Oh and so he has good history here he is still the. Reigning Masters Champion. Ugly, Fifteenth. In the world, some are trying to point. So some negatives like he's only played four competitive rounds in six months. I'm not focused on that I. Don't think he gives a shit about that. He showed up to Zozo championship last year in Japan and it felt like we had seen him play golf or any decent golf in months, and he's won that tournament in Atlanta. He showed up to the President's cup. We were there. We were physically there watch the entire thing. Play the president's coverage has several the best players in the world, their best player, the President's Cup in a landslide. So Tiger Woods smile and yet focused I like his chances this. I think he's come a long way since Monday and a lot of people's minds in that. All is incredibly exciting. On. Monday because. If we remember in the last podcast, you said, he really had no chance. That's true. Well, said, he's the favourite. Video and a you know with the weather and everything else that I would write this low on his list Jimi play whatever rig said because it wasn't that wasn't what we said and it certainly wasn't when said he was literally what I just you in you in the New York Post or two peas in a pod newer post tweeted out. Tiger Woods needs a miracle this week at the championship it was like what the fuck is going on and you know rig says similar points new. York Post. I said tiger. Woods is the favorite I said that on Monday show Tuesday show Jake will find that but I just ranked course and the the fact it's fifty five fucking degrees and narrow fairways. Low on the list of tiger woods majors coming up in the next four five years. It's not that hard. Of course, is not the art of course, I gave Frankie thumping already park last night. On the game. So it was like I I I could go out there right now in wooded. So the overall. Well I you know. I didn't realize we were GONNA play a marathon session of golf club twenty, nineteen I looked at the time we're finished up three and a half hours. My back was sore. I couldn't feel my feet like it's not built for endurance I'm just not built for endurance but I smoked you. At harding. Park. So I'm not too worried about art course conditions. By the way, we're not just a heads up just while we're talking about it. We said we were GONNA stream tonight, Thursday you're listening to it but we didn't realize that the coverage goes so late. So we will not be streaming tonight, but we will doing Tuesday Thursday next week. So be on the lookout for that. Last Tiger related thing new putter. About the new potter, he's got the Scott Newport. I think it's like the two point. Oh it's the one with the different weights and couple of different reports about it. Some saying he's definitely putting it in play other saying it's GonNa be a game time decision he. According to Steve Stricker, Tiger really likes it. It's a little longer in length with have been over as much. We can practice as putting a lot more which makes a lot of sense So that would be a good thing for the back and then another aspect of it is that apparently it's got adjustable wait we have heard for decades now tiger. Could just couldn't get the speed right or you know other Greens were little slower than I thought and I guess instead of having to make that adjustment in your fields or in your judgment calls in, you're putting in how hard it he can just tweet the weights and the Scottie, and that's what he likes because you know if the Green Bay speed them up from. Wednesday Thursday early days beat him up from Saturday Sunday whenever he can just kind of tweak the weights part of me going into this feels like well, tiger woods has won thirteen or fourteen major championships with that part of that is the elder wand. That is the thing that he flipped and spun in circles right in front of our faces that ad US bedazzled. Is the horn. Rocks. And any other usage of any other putter is not only blasted, but it's it's him searching a tim trying to find something which means he's not comfortable, and then the other part of me says, it's Tiger fucking. Would you give them a wooden stick? You give them happy. Gilmore's little hockey stick putter. He'll go out there and win because he's the greatest time you give them any driver persimmon would as a matter it'll just go out and win because he's better than everyone else and it doesn't matter So I'm a little torn on the whole thing. But it's Tigers putter. So everybody's talking about basically I'm just praying for success I mean, I do I think it's the right decision and adding and subtracting weights based on green speed that seems Like, if I'm just going to pick up a new tool every time when it's GonNa be different weight I don't think that I'm going to have much accessible but again, I'm not tiger so I'm not so keen on that. But Hell. If he's got confidence conferences key and if he thinks that's going to help them make more. Than you know play with a hockey stick or whatever. You just said you know so. Tricky one, but you were rooting for dagger. But I don't like I. Don't I'm not as doesn't work for me and I'm not a fan. I am not a supportive of the change I want that other potter to just pile up major victories and lurch. You said what I was GonNa say where changing the way day to day on a putter seems like a nightmare scenario I get that stegar woods. He's the greatest Golfer of all time but I need everything in my bag and again I'm not comparing myself to tiger woods but I need everything to be. One way just needed to be the same all the time. So messing with putter way just seems like a crazy idea but again, if he likes it if it makes him comfortable, that's GonNa give them better chances week. Thank God.

Tiger Woods President Trump Hockey Harding Park New York Post Japan Harding Steve Stricker United States Jimi Tigers Frankie York Scott Newport Atlanta Jake Green Bay Greens Gilmore
Anthony Davis Has Room to Grow

The NBA Show

06:11 min | 2 d ago

Anthony Davis Has Room to Grow

"GonNa Focus on the Lakers, which as an editor is near and dear to my heart because sharks picked the biggest red meat team on on on the table here. But they've been really impressive with us are there to one and Anthony Davis looks like probably the best player in the bubble thus far chunks. Why don't you leaders us through some of the things that have been happening with Lakers why think for the record this is called the impossibly good-looking persons corner just clarify. For. Their how dare sir? Okay so we're looking at the Lakers thing to me that's jumped out in the first three games is how they're playing when Anthony Davis playing without Lebron on. So that was been their biggest problem. All season is those non Lebron ad minutes because he idea was. Okay. If you have a D- then Lebron can rest he can get. His breaking it as time off, and they'll still be fine. But before the restart when eighty was out of the Ron, he was minus three and five, hundred, six, hundred minutes as those are important minutes Lakers have to win in the restart I mean obviously is a very small sample size but who cares where we're doing podcasts in the restart their plus night. Eighties playing without Lebron. That's just a massive flip on their whole situation and to me watching those minutes was set out to me I think number one. Not Having region Rondo. I think that really kind of low key killed their team because when rondos playing he has to have the ball right like Rondo can't play off the ball Swiss hole in the ball he's not really a threat to score someone's really guarding him and then on defense that giving you much either so like Alex the numbers when ad and Rondo without Lebron it was minus five and without Rondo they're playing Caruso and waiters with a d the floor is spread and the thing. Anthony. Davis. You don't need a traditional point guard Anthony, Davis give eighty the ball in the mid postals kill people right? He gets the ball then it kicks shooter instead of the Rondo. So it's like ADP without Rondo back great and the other thing too is eighty at the five. So they're going eighty Kuzma than like Greener Casey Caruso waiters whatever. Eighty s numbers at the five the year are insane. They're absolutely ridiculous. So cab. Looking at that with no Devellano Dwight Eighty has a usage of twenty eight shooting of Sixty six point six. Now base that means in English as eighties in the ball, like he's hardener Jaanus and he's been the most efficient player in the league. So if looking at those two numbers, there's only been one player in NBA history that had to be that efficient at that. High usage not staff like five years ago. So basically, when eighties at the five, he does a established about shooting threes he's basically scoring at will every single time I think long story short eighty more room to grow I. Think we're seeing that right now like leading a d. plan space given him the ball he's got levels still the go to get into them right now. Yeah I. So the biggest thing off of that, which was great I just wonder if their margin for error is too thin right now obviously the Lakers have been incredible. So let's get that caveat out of the way I think probably favorite if not among the favorites for the title. People like to remind us on the group Chat specifically Chris Because I don't think sharks was. One I remember that yeah. Where we pretty much we troll the Lakers after their first loss of the season and. Venture like the succeed but clearly, they've they've far exceeded those expectations. Great. Please don't ask me. But I do wonder as bad as Rondo has been at times. As much as Bradley is the fifth most important guy on that starting lineup at times I do wonder if the margin for error is a little bit more thin and you are relying on the cruise of the world on the Casey Visa, the world more than you would like to my wrong rob now I mean I'm I'm pretty compelled by this whole situation that sharks laid out like the idea of shifting some of those pieces around and unlocking ad in a different way like makes logical sense to me given his skill set this is. The Guy, who can you know Kevin O'Connor talked in in the restart this week about how? Bam. Out of Bio Converts Defenses Ad in the mid post has a similar effect where if you clear out, you give him space and a straight line drive past almost any big in the league like that's such a powerful thing that there should be a way to orient pieces around that. Make Sense I. Think I get skeptical is in that margin for error and it's in, you know if you look at kind of the core of these lineups. AD and CAL Kuzma, and Alice Caruso or kind of the three man anchor of it and in around that, there's a revolving door of guards. You got some Danny Green minutes you get some dion waiters minutes he gets JR Smith gets in Casey ep you got whoever they cobbled together in that minute in the rotation at those guys scare the hell out of me a little bit and I think you know when you flashback to eighty as a Pelican and where he was some of where they fell apart without drew. Holiday on the floor without kind of more traditional point guards on the floor which just not having competent entry passers not having guys who could get a d. the ball in positions to score, which is it seems like such an easy thing. But the thing I don't trust dion waiters to do but it is a thing. Maybe I do trust Danny Green to do it. You know like some of these more professional veteran level guys like that distinction I think is an important one and probably the difference between bubble seating. Games bubble playoff games, right where you're getting Jr's and the demons at least lower in the pecking order if not out of the rotation on a regular basis entirely, and then you're looking at these minutes where it's you know, Danny Green Casey P. and those guys and cannot work I. Think I. Think there's a chance that it does but I do get a little bit suspect just in the sense that once playoff defenses are really keying in on what this lineup look like and how it works what does that? Mean deep because you know Jaanus has had that scrutiny in terms of a big who handles the ball who's creating for space lineups like we know what that looks like in defense is know what that looks like defensive kind of just been dealing with these Lakers lineups without Lebron floor all year haven't had a lot of trouble with them, but they haven't hammered them either in terms of the the mechanics of how they work. If this starts working, then you invite that level of

Lakers Rondo Lebron Anthony Davis Sharks Dwight Eighty Casey Caruso Danny Green Alice Caruso Editor NBA Dion Kevin O'connor ADP Jr Smith Casey Visa RON Jaanus Cal Kuzma
Shane McMahon introduces ‘RAW Underground’ in WWE that has scripted MMA fights in wrestling

We Watch Wrestling

01:46 min | 2 d ago

Shane McMahon introduces ‘RAW Underground’ in WWE that has scripted MMA fights in wrestling

"WWE under. Underground where underground now, where in the storage closet coming to you live with Shaneco Mac he's sweaty but that doesn't stop him another to do with it. He'd be sweating if they were in a meat locker, don't matter no ropes. No rules. Man. I have never. Liked Shane McMahon like From twenty five years ago up to and including today. Just. CanNot stand him. You never met a happy guy when he came back. And I was like, what is an I remember like people being like Oh my God. It's going to be Shane and undertaker mania on I'm like what is wrong with you? Why would you WANNA see that. Shane is just he's GonNa jump off something High Ching Ching Ling God, the entrance, the heat he would get with the fuck in the mean street posse and stuff. But fuck man now like when they were hyping like Shane, McMahon's back I was like. Oh. Boy. This is the break glass in case of emergency I. Guess. Underground. Yeah and the you know I saw that the under thirty or whatever was up. So there was some curiosity whether that holds over I. Don't know that you've also got the The the faction with MVP, which has what are they called Har Business or murder business or something. To. US News whatever I mean at least that would be something I I just whatever it was like that was the first one on the that was just the first name on the list. Go with that.

Shane Mcmahon High Ching Ching Ling Shaneco Mac WWE Shane Har Business MVP United States Murder
Emily Gorcenski - Making Nazis cry

Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

06:19 min | 2 d ago

Emily Gorcenski - Making Nazis cry

"People might not know who you are, which would be an awful shame because you one of the coolest people ever. Would you introduce yourself. Sure My Name's Emily Sanski. I am. Anything say work as a data scientist. But also activist and as many who? Studies on tracks modern white supremacy in hate movements. Technologist hockey player. All sorts of things. So I don't know what is what does it mean to be something where somebody? Wow, that's big. That's big from the from the very beginning. I think one of the things that when I was reading about you. A lot of places at set that you're a person who is known for making that cease cry. What does that stem from? That is true so As a little bit of background I'm from Charlottesville Virginia. or at least I spent. Ten years living there. And of course, Charlottesville was the site of the infamous neo-nazi rally in two thousand, seventeen where. A terror attack happened in the TIKI torches and all of that stuff right so sort of. Stuff that we've seen all around the world. And one of the Neo Nazis that was there marching at the rally was a man by the name of Christopher Cantwell and during Tiki Torch Rally, he pepper sprayed me. Along with several other people. And? End You know he was also at the time filming a documentary with Vice News And so what happened was after the rally in the? Vice and HBO. Race to put out this documentary about what had happened they had some very dramatic footage and. Christine was featured very prominently in in all of this and talking about. How he wanted to kill more people and you know showing off his guns and all of these things. Well, the thing is I knew who can't was and I knew that he pepper sprayed me because he posted a picture of himself pepper spraying me as his facebook header the next morning. So I went to the police and made the decision to rest charges against him. and. When he found out that there is a warrant for his arrest. This was shortly after the vice documentary came out with all of his bravado in his you know McKee's mount all of that. So this. News of this warrant comes out and he records himself in a hotel room somewhere in North Carolina or somewhere. Crying. On on this like stream because he's worried that he's got this this warrant for his arrest. And so this sort of very poor. Poorly intentioned little video that he produced. Of himself like sobbing, not quite sobbing but definitely sniffling. Earned him the nickname of decrying Nazi. So he became in within the span of just a few days he went from being this. You Know Big Bold Neo Nazi to this reduced hulk of a man. Who is crying because he you know got caught doing violence. And so that became a sort of a worldwide mean. And this happened because I was one of two people to press charges against him so. I've earned the reputation for making Nazis crappy, and since then I've also made several other Nazis cry for various reasons. And so I guess that is just now the reputation that I have. It's it's funny. You should say he was caught. Doing like very much promoted himself doing the line. You know it baffles the mind. This was such a bizarre sequence of events right because you know here he is somebody that went on camera and talked about how he wanted to be more violent. He was trying to be more violent. You know all of this stuff. and. Then when he acted violently, he bragged about it, you know Oh look at all the you know he calls everyone communists, of course, but all the commies that I guessed. And then he gets caught doing it and then he's like, oh no, there's consequences for my actions. Any cries. But it didn't end there right because. Sensible people when facing forty years in prison as he was. Would Shut their mouths but he did not know he started he continued recording his podcast from jail. And then when he was let out on bail. Despite having literally admitted to pepper spraying me. He then sued me and my co defendant or CO complaining rather in Federal Court. So there is a federal lawsuit against me. For claiming that he pepper sprayed me. Of courses lawsuit eventually went away. It was fine. But it I mean the tied up year life and as a result of this and as a result of his. Many. Attempts to to silence and intimidate me and I actually had to leave Charlotte. So I had to leave the country. In fact, I now live in Germany And so you know the sort of. End of the story or the maybe it's not the end. But the chapter that the story is now on is that Chris can't will plate pleaded guilty to. Two counts of assault. He was let out of jail. So he didn't get the forty years in prison. You got you know basically. Slept on the rest and sent back to his home but he was banned from the state of Virginia for for five years. Well, he didn't make it five years because now he's sitting in a New Hampshire. Jail. Awaiting federal charges where he is now facing thirty two years in prison for extorting. In violently threatening. Another fellow nutmegger.

Mckee Christopher Cantwell Charlottesville Chris Emily Sanski Scientist Hockey Facebook Assault Federal Court Virginia Christine New Hampshire North Carolina Virginia. Germany Charlotte
Columbia Sportswear's Gert Boyle Faced Down Sexism and Ageism

Business Wars Daily

04:29 min | 2 d ago

Columbia Sportswear's Gert Boyle Faced Down Sexism and Ageism

"Boyle. Grew. Columbia sportswear into a downfield powerhouse is the third Nar five-part series on the origin stories of iconic companies. We originally aired this episode about boils legacy after she died last. November, let's listen back. She was one tough mother and proud of it. Gert Boyle, the ninety five year old Chairman of Columbia Sportswear died earlier this month since then accolades poured in for boil, she was a formidable funny icon of the outdoor apparel world notorious for her resilience and her toughness qualities that empowered her to guide Columbia from near bankruptcy in the early seventies to what the New York. Times. Now calls the largest outerwear brand in the United States, a three billion dollar business. Gert Boyle was born gertrude lamb from in Germany in one, thousand, nine, hundred, twenty, four, when she was thirteen, the family fled Nazi Germany moving to Portland Oregon there her father lamb from bought the Rosenfeld hat company worried about antisemitism. He changed the name to the Columbia hat company. Columbia evolved from hats to outdoor year including a fishing vest that Gert than a homemaker raising three kids designed. Gertz husband Neil Boyle eventually became CEO of the family business. But in nineteen seventy, the forty seven year, old leader suffered a fatal heart attack. Suddenly Gert found herself at the helm of an eight. Hundred Thousand Dollar Company. She had no idea how Neil had run it nor how she and her son twenty, one year old, Timothy would manage. As CEO of Columbia Gert frequently encountered sexism, but she always had an acerbic comeback as the new. York Times reported Gert recalled that a businessman upon learning. She was the president exclaimed, but you're a woman her answer. You know I noticed that when I got up this morning. Still, the combination of rampant sexism in her inexperience almost killed the company by Nineteen seventy-one. Gert. Agreed to entertain an offer to purchase it. But when the buyer a man offered, only fourteen hundred dollars she custom out and slammed the door in his face wrote Doug Schnitt span who profiled her for outside magazine. Gert said for fourteen hundred dollars. I would just as soon run this business into the ground myself that encounter galvanized Gruden Tim with a combination of unconventional strategies including being the first to use the waterproof fabric. GORTEX. They saved Colombia and set it on its growth path while all of their outdoor industry rivals including the north face in Patagonia. Marketed their wares to elite climbers and adventurers girding in Tim, we're happy to sell their products. Products at department stores at lower prices that strategy shocked the young industry and it worked so too did the Marketing Campaign Gert? Boyle is best known for the one that featured her as just what she was. One tough mother that campaign which ran from nineteen, eighty, four to two, thousand, five depicted gert down to earth mob oil. Now, take no nonsense mother who didn't suffer fools gladly, and who would allow nothing less than perfection A. A string of TV ads showed Gert using her son Tim as a product Tester to prove that they're outerwear was both warm and waterproof. In the first. She had tim dressed in Columbia's famous three layer system. Walk through a car wash. Her favorite one was one in which she drove a Zamboni on a hockey rink. Right over her long suffering son dressed in Columbia gear. Of course, he was lying the ice breathing through a straw. Straw apprentice out of the same era for the boundary peak parker quoted the Middle Aged Gert, saying I've got hot flashes to keep me warm. You'll need something that zips mob boils tough. Mother ads are credited with transforming a little known business into a household name inside the company. Her wit was also on display. She summed up her guidance for other leaders. This way early to bed early to rise work like hell and advertise. She might have added and work like hell. Until the day you die, she made it to the office on her ninety fifth birthday in March and was still having business discussions shortly before her death on November third according to outsides Schmidt's Pon. Gert Boyle will be remembered for many things among them, her belief which she shared often with younger women that a woman could do anything and also her conviction that older workers are assets in the workplace. Indeed, in her nineties, she wrote perhaps my presence in the office offers a message that managers liked to put older workers out to pasture. Out. To lunch.

Gert Boyle Columbia Columbia Gert Thousand Dollar Company Chairman Of Columbia Sportswea TIM CEO Boyle. United States Germany Neil York Times Doug Schnitt Portland Oregon Gertrude Lamb Gertz Hockey
Jared Young Explains Why Kindness, Honesty, & Integrity Are His Top Priorities

Dose of Leadership

06:19 min | 4 d ago

Jared Young Explains Why Kindness, Honesty, & Integrity Are His Top Priorities

"Jared Welcome to the show welcome a dose of leadership. Thanks to be here. Well I'm excited to learn more about employer advantage and really your leadership philosophy. It seems like I'm. Looking at your background man you've you've done a lot of things and now you're the president of employer advantage. Traveling the world working in various branches of government learning multiple language Arabic is that right to get that right you understand. Yeah, Eric my Undergrad is an Arabic. Wow. Well let's start. Let's talk a little bit about how we got to employ advantage. What was the kind of as you're going through school and working what was your dream at the time? I can tell you my dream was not to end up in. Joplin. Missouri. But I know my I guess my my dream candidate evolved. By the time I got through law school I knew I didn't want to be a lawyer and so I had to figure out. What I wanted to do. So I went into corporate law for a little while I was looking for a chance to pivot to the business side of things because I decided that's what I was really interested in. and. Had A a cousin in DC where I was working Who have happened to have a father-in-law that was? Had founded a business along time ago and was looking for some help some young blood to get into the business to. Start with. A succession plan. and. He learned me out to the Midwest and. I guess we haven't looked back. So how long has that been? How long have you been in Missouri five years five years so prior to that, you were working in various branches of government and you're doing it was many. as an attorney as a lot. What was it doing what we doing government? So I worked before law, SCHOOL In the private sector actually in the healthcare it sector but then during law school and after I actually thought. I thought government was what I wanted to go into. That's actually part of the reason I studied Arabic in my Undergrad as well. It's thought government was around I wanted to go but as I got more experience in government i. realized. I didn't think that was going to be for me. and. Why was that? Would you see there that just turned you off to it I think. I worked with a lot of great people and saw a lot of really interesting things but. The the kind of lockstep. Advancement structure of most of the government. Offices wasn't very appealing to me I I saw people that had been there for thirty years and it seemed like if you wanted to get anywhere, you had to be there for thirty years and there's no getting anywhere without putting in your thirty years. there. There's also the factory you know have a pretty large family. We're expecting our child next month and I knew if I was going to support a family of that size. It's Government salary. Yea. I I know I understand the attraction in the allure. I thought about going into government to at one time when I was laid off from American you know. In the lure was kind of a the security, the job security, everything else and. I got to say a lot of consulting work with the government I've been out of the marine, corps and doing this. And it's such a challenge because what I found is that there's There's just this kind of embracing of mediocrity and it's nothing against the people within it. It's just it's it's a culture of mediocrity. I think and I don't know what your thoughts are on that. Again, I don't into government bashing session but well, exactly I that's I. think that's probably what I was trying to say with trying to dance around and be a little diplomatic but I I totally agree I and I think you're right I don't think it's any individual person just as. Houses that it's the it's the whole system is just too big. It's too bureaucratic right and an end. To. It's that too big to fail mentality. They all know that that they're going to have a job they don't have the pressure of trying to turn a profit to kind of motivate them but. I don't know if they're they're tons of fantastic. Working in government and I I admire the work that they do. But with a lot of great intentions, you're right in the. Same reasons that just wasn't for me I needed to be around a little more Spontaneity. In the the fact that if Wanted Faster Pass towards performance in the object objectives that just seemed like it was applaud you know what I mean like a slow applaud. Yeah. Yup totally get it. Very. Cool. So I'm curious to before we start talking about your roles a president here. What live in Jordan for four months? What was what year was that and what was that like? In two, thousand, nine It was awesome. Just incredible experience. You know as part of my. Undergraduate studies studying the Middle East Arabic So I got to go there and really just immersed myself in Jordanian culture. In my Arabic study I had just gotten married the year before. So my wife and I join me and she actually celebrate our first anniversary in Jordan. Wow and just an amazing cultural experience you know when you visit somewhere as a tourist. You see some cool things but you don't really get a good feel for what people really like where the country's really liked but when you live there for a while. We were able to go to church there and and just make friends interact with people in their everyday lives. It was just awesome to. Be Part of a culture this. So completely different from ours you're live two years in Sweden, but Sweden in so many ways this is just a lot like America so it wasn't kind of a full foreign experience, but Jordan was definitely full foreign experience and There were definitely parts of it that weren't as fun. You know there's water rationing. There s he had you know. Limit, your showers and and and just be really careful with your water and we had bedbugs. there. Definitely. Reasons. That we were happy to go home but man, I wouldn't trade the experience for anything such memories of time that

Jordan Missouri Government President Trump School Jared Midwest Sweden Eric Joplin Attorney America
How to find (or become) a good CFI

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

05:00 min | 6 d ago

How to find (or become) a good CFI

"People keep asking me how to become a better CFI. On how do I get better as a CFO or if you're on the pilot slash students side of it, you can say, what am I looking for when I look for a good? Good CFI. I mean, that's a really tough one to answer honestly because you can. Be Brand new to the game. And you might have had fantastic instruction and you might have. A BIG APPETITE FOR Washington struggle I mean that's not a bad but he might enjoy helping people solve problems. Born teacher and just because you're new doesn't mean you're bad. Without bragging I sort of think that's the situation I was in right I met Richard. I knew I wanted to be a teacher. I was intentionally putting my whole heart into an reteaching some of the stuff that he taught me on and. Certainly Green when I started a lot of mistakes and have corrected a lot of those things since that I still make mistakes. But I think I was a pretty good teacher straight out of the gate. Had A colleague enough for jet blue and I distinctly remember him saying to me one day. He said, Hey, dude, I can't I'm feeling really guilty I can't see my students. For anything, except ours. He was seeing as little our Johnson, his logbook. But even though he was coming from that perspective, he did a pretty darn good job. Right? He he had a sense of responsibility when it came to teaching people and he was doing his best. Now, you can have an old timer who hasn't worked at a flight and Flying School or Fight Club and twenty years. Maybe he has fifteen thousand hours in his logbook but I might be a really bad teacher you know set in his ways not. Not, keeping up with the things that are changing on. This just illustrate how it's not a very simple problem. Certainly from the student pilots to know. If, you've got a good instructor how to find a good instructor if the instructor you're working with this week in any way. But one thing you can ask are certain you know metrics I'd ask how many students that person has put up for a check ride in the last say three years. Or two years, which is the. Recurrent training interval required for CFI's we have to go back for a flight instructor renewal course every two years. And it doesn't have to be a lot. If someone says I put ten people through in two years says something and someone says that but one person two years that's fine to. The point is they're working with an examiner and that's really When I think about that question what makes against the F. I? How do I find a good CFI? And I struggled a look for some common denominator among all of the people I just started described in a two personality types I just. Any one of those things is some version of peer review. That's an extremely important part of the process for everybody. Phase checks, for example. I rely on fees checks heavily on even if it's not an official face check, I love it when my students. Take a lesson I can't be there and I say they want to eat fly with Mary this day or Fly with jaffer whomever it is. It doesn't even really matter what I want from that instructor is one hundred percent honesty no ego involved right? I've been doing this for. Twenty years more than twenty years now, and I want to know if there's holes in my game and I'll give you a great example. You know this is probably five years ago. So there I am fifteen years into Jane. On and I sent a student on a number two as a lesson or a check but he goes out with Jeff Rappaport who jeff was a pretty new CFO at the time he was my instance student. So you had been a relatively museum. and. Jeff comes back and says you know you're seeing it in great on this this this and the other thing. But I noticed that he didn't do after landing checkless. and. You're right. I don't think I'm very militant about after landing checklists. You know if you don't pull check this out for every climb level offer descent on you like white on rice but am I really that diligent about an after landing checklist when the wheels are on the ground over staring at the park probably not and is that a good thing? No. No that's not a good thing. It's a whole that Jeffcott immediately, and then certainly in examiner would catch. Right. So I immediately plugged that hole in my game. Haven't seen the all the time just made a mistake on Patriot regarding night currency requirements and one of the guys on my content team cut in, and we now I call the examiner and get to the bottom of it, but it's that Peer Review I. think that keeps instructors sharp. Keeps instructors current and saying relevant information. I'm in. It also inspires confidence. For the student.

Instructor Johnson Jeff Rappaport CFO CFI Richard Washington Flying School Jaffer Official Mary Jeffcott Fight Club
What We Can Learn from a LOT of Blood Samples

Healthcare Triage Podcast

00:43 sec | Last week

What We Can Learn from a LOT of Blood Samples

"This episode, we're going to be talking to Tatyana for rude and Brooke pates about the Bio Bank. What is it? What does it do? How can we use it for research including COVID Research Brooke. Tatyana. Welcome, Brooke, can you tell us a little bit about yourself and what do you do? My name is Brooke pay I manage the operations of the. INDIANA. By obey can have been doing that for about seven years now. So all of our intake of samples are recruitment of subjects. That is all falls under what I do. Well, how did you get to this? What training via have? What did you go to school for degree to get what? What do you do to get this job? I have an undergraduate degree. Degree from Butler University in Biology, but always liked the ethical issues related to the technology of the science. So that landed me in the Masters Program at Iu, I have a masters in bioethics after I graduated. I. Took a position with a bio. Bay That was a nonprofit startup by obey associated with are you and then several years into that role the company. Became more associated with you and I began working for Tatyana Tatiana. You've been on the program before, but for those who might have missed that episode and they should definitely go back injured anyway, you tell us a little bit about yourself, your training of what you do, of course. So many Tatyana, food, I am the chair of the Department of medical and molecular genetics and. And I'm also now the director of the Indian Bio Bank. So I got here through have an undergraduate degree in biology and math I did that in Connecticut at a small liberal arts. College called Fairfield. University. And then I got a master's degree in something called bio mathematics put those two things together. I did that at Ucla and then I got my PhD. In Indiana University and loved it loved what I did and just stayed and never left. So I've been on the faculty now for over twenty five years. So let's strong with just the basics. What what is a bio bank? So I can start with that. So if you take the word apart bio meaning anything biological and Bank we all think of a bank is a place. You put your money. This is a case where this is a place where you put specimens or biological material. So if it was just Just Bank of biological material I. Mean it has some value, but it's really valuable when you link it to information about the individual from whom you got that biological sample. Typically, we do this for all kinds of diseases, but we're going to talk today about in particular people who were Kovic positive and it lets us ask questions about, for example, why did some people die? Why did some people improve after being in the hospital? Why did some people never end up in the hospital? Why do some people have long term complications? Complications and others not and this marrying of biological samples and clinical information lest you ask those questions. So it's a a bio bank I have so many questions about the logistics about it. So what what kind of samples first of do you take an house? One of the things that's really easy to be able to obtain relatively easy is a blood sample. So if you think about a people go to a doctor's office, you get kind of blood drawn for lots of different reasons. So it's a relatively relatively easy thing to. To, be able to collect, but there's lots of different things you can obtain an study from a blood sample. So one of the things that you can obtain from a blood sample is DNA. So that's our cinetic material allows us to ask all kinds of things about genetic people use the word genetic predisposition. Why do some people develop disease and you ask about changes DNA that might contribute to that? If you take that blood sample now and also do some other things to it. So for example, if you're able to. Literally spin a sample you to spin it in a machine that spins it really fast. You can actually get the blood to separate and it comes into these different parts of the blood. One of the things we study is something called plasma. So plasma and and kind of a partner to it, which is serum are really valuable because you can measure things called proteins in and proteins are things that our body has. A lot of people have been talking about like. Like, antibodies and things like that. You can measure antibodies, which lots of US have been hearing about in plasma and serum. So we collect that from individuals that are in the Bio Bay something else that we collect is something called Arnie. Now aren a simply tells us how much of a protein we make. So week study thing called expression, how much do we express it and so some of the things that can be important is if we make a lot. Lot of something or less of it, and could that be controlled by something, for example, in our DNA, those are things that some of the things that we study in our blood. The other thing that we've been studying particularly around cove it is we can take that blood sample and we can actually sort the different kinds of cells that we have in our blood. It's kind of amazing and we can collect one particular one called a Mon- and lots of people. People want to study the different components of our blood because we can also ask do we have more or less of them? Is that affected? For example, by having certain diseases, what it is that those products are able to make. So we've been studying that and the other thing that we've been collecting is not anything related to blood. So we've also been trying to collect urine from individuals who have had covert to try to understand what we can measure. Measure in the urine that might help us understand why some people are having kidney complications and some people are not.

Bio Bank Tatyana Tatiana Brooke Pates Indian Bio Bank Bio Bay Indiana Indiana University Butler University In Biology Ucla Fairfield Kovic Director Department Of Medical Connecticut Partner
"five years" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

02:58 min | 7 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The Frame

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> This <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is Monica Bushman <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> producer on the frame <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and I'm also <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a cryer. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I cry at the movies <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and watching. TV <Speech_Music_Female> shows even <Speech_Female> during some commercials. <Speech_Female> I try not to <Speech_Female> cry at work but <Speech_Female> one of the things that <Speech_Female> I really enjoy about working <Speech_Female> on the frame <Speech_Female> is that John Horn born <Speech_Music_Female> is a prior <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to he <Speech_Female> cries at work and <Speech_Female> he's not at all ashamed <Speech_Music_Female> about it attended <Speech_Female> stands out for me was <Speech_Female> when he was talking with my <Speech_Female> erskine ankle <Speech_Female> there the creators <Speech_Female> and stars <SpeakerChange> of the Hulu. Blue <Speech_Male> Show Penn.. Fifteen <Speech_Male> it's a <Speech_Male> beautiful scene <Speech_Male> but it's <SpeakerChange> really <Speech_Male> I mean it's <Speech_Female> I mean <Laughter> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it's Real <Speech_Female> Jonathan Shift shift <Speech_Female> one or the other producers <Speech_Female> here remember <Speech_Female> this moment from John's <Speech_Female> interview <SpeakerChange> with Randy <Speech_Music_Female> Newman <Music> When she <Music> was <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> I was <Music> <Advertisement> drying tips? <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Male> didn't make <Speech_Male> didn't make <SpeakerChange> throw without <Speech_Female> crying <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> Julia. Paskhin recalled <Speech_Female> this moment from an <Speech_Female> interview. She <SpeakerChange> produced with with <Speech_Music_Male> Mahershala Ali <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> little <Speech_Music_Female> world <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> when he and John <Speech_Female> talked about the powerful <Speech_Male> swimming lessons <Speech_Male> seen <SpeakerChange> from moonlight. <Speech_Male> It's all I can <Speech_Male> do to cry <Speech_Male> Eh <Speech_Male> up so <Speech_Male> much for me. <Speech_Music_Male> It really <SpeakerChange> does <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> John <Speech_Music_Female> Horn. Go ahead <Speech_Music_Female> and shed a tear and <Speech_Music_Female> don't feel bad <SpeakerChange> about it <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and that'll do it. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I want <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to thank everybody. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Who is tuned in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> over the years? I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thank you for listening <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to the frame. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I also want to thank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Colin Campbell. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Who hired us to start <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this show back in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> two thousand fourteen <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and our current program <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> director Sallow <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Curto who <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> guides us now <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and thanks to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the Budo span <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> which supplied our <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> original theme music? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And a Taylor <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> mcferrin who <Speech_Music_Male> wrote our current <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> theme song. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The frame is produced by Darby <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Maloney. Jonathan <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> shiftless <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Monica Bushmen <Speech_Music_Male> and Julia. Paskhin <Speech_Music_Male> our news <Speech_Music_Male> clerk is Andrea <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Gutierrez and our <Speech_Music_Male> intern is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Paul ratliff. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our original regional <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> producers <Speech_Music_Male> are Michelle Lands <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and James Ken <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Edward <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Up. Res- is our <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> engineer. And we <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> say goodbye this month. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> To our longtime <Speech_Music_Male> engineer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Valentino Rivera. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank <Speech_Music_Male> you val <Speech_Music_Male> get some sleep. <Speech_Music_Male> Our senior producer <Speech_Music_Male> is Oscar Garza. <Speech_Music_Male> And I'm <Speech_Music_Male> John Horn <Speech_Music_Male> from the MON broadcast <Speech_Music_Male> center at KPCC. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for being part <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of our frame <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> family. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We'll see you back here for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the daily version of <Speech_Music_Male> the frame on <Music> Monday. <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> KPCC deep <Speech_Female> podcasts are supported <Speech_Female> by Warner <Speech_Female> brothers presenting <Speech_Female> Joker Todd <Speech_Female> Phillips Cinematic <Speech_Female> Vision See <Speech_Female> Joaquin Phoenix <Speech_Female> Golden Globe and screen <Speech_Female> actors guild <Speech_Female> nominated performance hence <Speech_Female> winner of the Venice <Speech_Female> Film. Festival's <Speech_Female> top prize <Speech_Female> and one of the AF <Speech_Female> is top films <Speech_Female> of two thousand Nineteen <Speech_Female> Varieties <Speech_Female> Owen. Gleiberman <Speech_Female> named joker the best <Speech_Female> film of the year <Speech_Female> describing it as <Speech_Female> a movie that can <Speech_Female> and will stand <Speech_Female> the test of time <Speech_Female> for consideration <Speech_Female> in all categories including best picture director and actor.

"five years" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

02:00 min | 7 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The Frame

"This is Philip. Glasses candyman what do you think about that. I was unbelievable anything about that. It's unbelievable another memorable. Moment was when Tanya Saracho creator of the star series Vida demonstrated the vocal talent. She used on her day jobs as her writing career got going. I was for ten years. I was voice in Spanish for Special K and the tag was Special Gate the various interior. Komo to care like you'd still friendly and then ten years for Walgreens Raines is still see mining walgreens with compared to those Nova nine wavy tenure. That's how I was able to write plays and not star in Chicago because I I was doing voices and when Tom Hanks and Clint Eastwood made a movie about the pilot Sully Sullivan Burger. I ask them about what it means to be a hero and to play one onscreen screen Tom. I think the other day gave a definition of of hero that I thought was A spot on it was it to me. It's is somebody who does US something extraordinary and yet he doesn't think it's extraordinary. He may think well I. I was on my game that that week there is this projection objection that is put upon you that because you play these guys. You actually have some of the attributes that that you do and believe me. My skill set is to make it appear as though I have these attributes without having any of the actual attributes that being said the power of the cinema and the power of the heroic visions the guy that Ukraine lie on in in motion. Pictures makes you feel as though you have to be dedicated and you have to. You have to be trained and you have to follow through and if you get that lesson from literature richer from opera from theater from Shakespeare cinema rates as one of those great One of those great art forms and so yes you. You actually do become enlightened in a way by the heroic portrayals big and small this is the frame fifth anniversary special revisiting moments from our first five years on the air..

Sully Sullivan Burger Walgreens Tom Hanks Vida Special Gate Philip Tanya Saracho Chicago Raines Clint Eastwood Ukraine
"five years" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

04:56 min | 7 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The Frame

"Weinstein. The New York Times Reporting Ronan Farrow has written a frankly harrowing account of the Herat. Missed the Weinstein did not invent the casting couch in Hollywood. We're going to need a new Oscar category. This you best actor whose movies we can't watch anymore. Following the Weinstein News. We ran ran numerous segments on multiple aspects of the story from the toxic use of nondisclosure agreements to safety on movie and TV sets. Here's a part of our conversation with the actress and writer Zoe Kazan. I think that the history of our industry of the movie industry is has a history in which women have been sexually harassed raped. Coerced treated like objects treated dispose supposedly treated as if we're not perennials. You know treat it as if every season they need to plant a new crop of bulbs and once you cut those flowers. There's IT's no more use for the plant Like even the fact that we have the concept of a casting couch the people use colloquially is meaningful I had a lot of fear when these allegations came out against Harvey Weinstein that people were going to treat him like the exception instead of the apotheosis of the problem and These women men who come out women and men who've come out since then about other people I think are like real heroes because they are making it impossible for has to say it is just Harvey Weinstein. Emma Thompson also had something to say about this issue John Lasseter who was forced out of his job as the ahead of Pixar and Walt Disney animation over. His Treatment of women was hired by an animation company. That Thomson was going to make a film with. When they hired lassiter her she spoke out thought too old not to walk my own talk? Time is very much shaw's marching on and because I had spoken before when the Weinstein thing blew up and I've always spoken up about this since I was a young woman. I'm there was absolutely no choice. Really and the clever thing about anybody who's going to bully is that they'll do it nor or in front of someone who's going to say you can't do that. They'll do it in secret or in quiet or in private and it's very difficult for instance for someone on who's a runner and who can be replaced in five minutes to say anything bad about someone who it will cost a lot of money to replace. I'm GonNa ask you a favor right now now and this is not part of your letter. That's Pacific disguised. Answer John lasseter. I'm asking me to paragraphs from it because I think it's something that everybody needs to hear. If a man has speen touching women inappropriately for decades. Why would a woman want to work for him? If the only reason he's not touching them inappropriately now is that it says in his contract that he must behave professionally. If a man has made women at his companies feel undervalued and and disrespected for decades. Why should the woman at his new company think that any respect he shows them anything other than an act that he's required it to perform by his coach his therapist and his employment agreement? The message seems to be. I am learning to feel respect for women so please be patient patient while I work on it. It's not easy that was Emma Thompson reading from her letter to Sky Dance Animation about John. LASSETER you're listening listening to the frame fifth anniversary special and we're taking a trip down memory lane like this visit with Jordan Peele when he released get out. This movie movie had to feel cinematic in a way. That only a handful of my favorite or movies pull off a year. We would approach approach this like a an elevated art like it was high art we would try to approach this with Kubrick in Precision and of course fall short but Die Trying unlike Stanley Kubrick. You made the movie a little faster than he typically works. That's right you clearly pay a a lot of attention to music We have some horror. Music Cues lined up for you. I'm going to test to see how much of a horror movie music nerd. You really are you ready to play. Let's it's here the The I q John Carpenter's Halloween. That's the tubular bells from exorcists. Okay one on for one next cue. Carpenter's Halloween I knew it was coming. I knew it was coming. Okay next cue very good three per three and Herman and the last one.

Harvey Weinstein John Lasseter Weinstein News Emma Thompson Stanley Kubrick John Carpenter Ronan Farrow Oscar Zoe Kazan Thomson Herat Jordan Peele Hollywood The New York Times Walt Disney Weinstein. writer Pixar
"five years" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

07:32 min | 7 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The Frame

"I'm Darby Maloney editor of the frame on November tenth two thousand and sixteen the day. After the presidential election Lizardo Lizardo performed on full-frontal with Samantha. B and I was floored. Only they celebrate after that I was determined to get her on the show almost a year later. John and I went out to her studio up a winding road near Dodger Stadium. And that's what I like about the studios that like I feel like I'm in nature. Sure I wanna ask you about something that happened. Almost I think exactly a year ago we are going to get up. Change our pampers brush off our shoulders and push Ashok through together. Please welcome Liz. Oh and you began your performance by singing lift every voice in saying which is also known as the Black National National Anthem insane to let them have marine ring in with the needs of the Birdseye we were on the plane. Flying New York and I was washing the election election on the back of someone's head and I went to sleep woke up in New York and I woke up in a trump presidency and I have been thinking about the whole drive there. And then Samantha came in my dressing room and she asked me she was like crying. She was so devastated and she was like whatever you WanNa do. Would you WANNA they do. And we're GONNA continue to do good as hell because I have a job to do and like part of that job is to uplift people so when I thought of lift every voice I asked her I was like well. Can you see if this cleared. Can I sing this on television. And they just were like. We don't even care if you can't and they did the research and they're like you can and then and I was like okay horns just play this one note and I'll sing over that sing song full of faith that the past Esau. I realize there's two things you can watch history happen or you can choose to be a part of it and and instead of ignoring I chose to engage in it and it worked. That was liz so in two thousand seventeen. You're listening to the frame anniversary special. I'm John Horn. And we're celebrating our fifth year on the air one issue. We've always covered on. The show is equality and inclusion. Especially in Hollywood. Here's Meryl Streep from two thousand and fifteen it's important portent that women's stories and the things that interest them concern them confound them are on our screens. That's important important because it's it will define us. I think it's easy for people to assume that this issue or the broader issue of equality has been resolved. I I suspect a lot of people including yourself have a very different opinion. Yeah I think it's It's a fight that's not over but I I probably shouldn't say a fight. I think it should be an agreement. It should be an agreement within the human family that both sides are important and it seems to be very very difficult to get that agreement. I just think that somehow it's an interior change change in the minds of men. I still when you bring up anything that sort of has the rosy at cast of feminism them to it even the most enlightened men I can even my husband Kinda go. They're exhausted by this subject because because it's not their subject but I wanted to be I wanted to be everyone's I don't want women's rights to be a women's issue. Yeah that was Meryl Streep from our show in two thousand fifteen. You're listening to the frame anniversary special. I'm John Horn and we're celebrating five years. Here's on the air. Let's see if we're on the right place. We're here to see a filmmaker. Eva Juve Rene is a founding member of times up and through her company array. She's a tireless champion for new voices and expanding who gets included in Hollywood. What La Means to me is is it is true educational experience to me Because there's a little bit of everyone here and they have space that's the difference between La and New York. You can be who you are and have the space to be. This is a sprawl and so whether you're in spaces where large Persian community you know. I love driving through behind melrose because I always see beautiful families Orthodox Jewish families walking walking together in then I go a little bit further. And I'm in Korea town and then and it's not just a block like it's a full little city you know what I you mean. People can really put their roots down here and it grows into these beautiful and of flowers of of an array of people. That's what I love about it and and And I grew up in Compton which is was not just a black space Compton Lynwood longbridge southgate. It's black it was black and browns Filipino. Guatemalan Mexican EXA can black American African. And that's that's the kind of city this is it starts to get very modulus when you get into quote unquote Hollywood. But that's it's not really La and hate it when people come here and they go to Beverly Hills and like it's kind of fake like do you didn't go anywhere you went from lax. Like the Beverly Hilton. That's you didn't experience it that was from a visit with director and producer Eva devante earlier this year. Coming up on the frame Fifth Anniversary History Special Emma Thompson. Tom Hanks and Jordan Peele. That's next stay with us. KPCC PODCASTS are supported. By Warner Brothers. Michael B Jordan Jamie Fox and Brie Larson and star in just mercy based on the true story of attorney Brian. Stevenson's heroic fight to save an innocent man's life every generation has its hero made ours this variety raved. Just mercy will shake you to your soul nominated by the screen actors guild for outstanding performance by a male actor in a supporting role for Jamie Foxx walks for consideration in all categories including best picture and best supporting actor from Ramon broadcast all costs. And this is the free daily report on the world of art entertainment and culture. And here's your host John. Thank you Professor Xavier. I'm John Horn. And this is the frame fifth anniversary special. There been a lot of news events over over the frames. I five years but one that has really shaped our coverage with reporting in October of two thousand seventeen about Harvey Weinstein's long history history of alleged sexual abuse and assault to the latest on Harvey.

John Horn Hollywood Meryl Streep New York Samantha Liz La Dodger Stadium Black National National Anthem Darby Maloney Lizardo Lizardo Jamie Foxx Harvey Weinstein Compton Beverly Hilton Eva Juve Rene editor Ashok Warner Brothers
"five years" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

04:13 min | 7 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The Frame

"Breath. KPCC PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting Ford Versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold and starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best best picture of the year. KPCC's supporters include. Fox searchlight presenting Joe Joe Rabbit from writer director. TYCO not included on both AF. Is the National Board reviews ten best pictures of the year and now nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble and best supporting actress. Scarlett Johansson seven in critics choice awards including best picture and best adapted screenplay and the Golden Globe Award for best actor and Best Picture of the year awards eligible in all categories. He's hello it's Bryan Cranston. And you're listening to the frame on eighty eighty nine point three k. PCC and now. Here's John Horn. Thank you Brian. Welcome back to the frame. Fifth Anniversary. Special producing the daily show can sometimes make it hard to get out of the studio but we do it. I'm a cyclist and I've actually done interviews on bicycles. The first one didn't go so well. You know twenty therapist. That was me trying to interview. TV Rider. Tom Smuts in two thousand and fourteen a couple of days later he safely wrote his bike to the MA's probably because I wasn't with him this trip to the L. A. River with filmmaker Karn Kasama went a lot better. Maybe maybe because we were on foot depending on where the light was. When we would scout you could look into the river and just see giant fish? A key scene from her twenty eighteen to call Kidman movie destroyer was shot along the banks of the river. It's a collision of natural troll and human ecosystem and there is something about this like wild green landscape coming up against these like concrete eight slopes that felt. I don't know like we haven't seen much of that yet. That was filmmaker Carin Kusaba on the frame in two thousand eighteen. Another memorable time out of the office was when we went to visit with Mel del Toro he invited us to tour his creative layer. The House is a library every of images a library of sounds on a library of ideas. He calls it bleak house. There's a secret room. Inspired by Disney's haunted had mansion complete with Gargoyles and some ten thousand items. I am the caretaker and like Jack Nicholson in the shining. I've been here forever so so. I pulled the book shelves. I clean I dost and the house is truly truly an installation if you would is not a hoarder. House is not a house where things are out of order they have an order. They have a reason in on and what is important is that it's he speaks intimate legitimate. So do you ever spend the night here again. The first Lord. Yeah the second floor is kind of scary. What does that mean? A there was a there have been stranger noises in the second Florida. And I don't believe in anything but we in Mexico go we have a saying. I don't believe in which is but they're real. Okay now. We're entering one more room. Yeah this is the film will rump film film book room so this is kind of history of general film but in the projection room. I have my favorite filmmakers whereas that room. I'm seeing I have to say. There's a bathtub with a writing desk in the bath. There's there's A. There's actually a desk in front of the toilet. And there's a desk in front of the Tortoise Del Toro thank you so much for your.

Mel del Toro KPCC Christian Bale Fox searchlight Tortoise Del Toro L. A. River Scarlett Johansson Joe Joe Rabbit James Mangold Bryan Cranston TYCO Tom Smuts PCC Fox Matt Damon Jack Nicholson Carin Kusaba John Horn
"five years" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

03:44 min | 7 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The Frame

"I'm John Horn. You're listening to the frames. Fifth Anniversary special on the show were always interested in in how and why artists do what they do especially if they're working a little bit outside the norm like this. Game of thrones sound designer. I'm Paula Fairfield. And I I do all the kind of fantastical stuff on the show. The white walkers the dire wolves mammoths but one of the biggest things. Obviously that I do is dragon. Well the funniest part about this with the purse sounds I hunted and hunted for just the right sound. And while I was was trolling around I found a sound of two giant tortoises having sex and I'm not kidding. And and the Mon from the mail is what I took for for as the basis for the purring of young drove on. And what's funny about it is that I I remember watching people watch it and every time that sound would come up. People would giggle and it was just funny. It was just automatic because it has a prime element still in there so knowing that as I proceeded through the seasons I have actively we looked for Sounds of larger animals. Having that piece was produced by James. Kim Who is one of our original producers. I'm John Horn. And this is the frame. Fifth Anniversary special over the years have shared how the changing political climate has affected their work. One example is the playwright John Robin Bates before the two thousand sixteen election. He wrote a play called the Kunia with a trump like character actor he mounted it in La a year later he launched a revised version in Washington. You know people asked me last night at a talk back here in DC. What's the answer to all this because the play in its epilogue ends with the question now and the answer is numbers and in a weird way I thought I could justified getting back to the play because it brings us together? I'm very corny about what the theater is still and I do believe it's a sort of gathering gathering an a church and a communal act and that it has a deep social relevance and resonance are also. It's nothing nothing and so it brought me back to working on it and and doing it in. DC felt like the right place a year later. Let me ask you about the question in the epilogue. It's what are you doing to prevent this. So why was that the question that you felt needed to be asked in the epilogue. It's the only question I think I live with is. What are you doing to prevent this? What are you doing to counter it? What are you doing to answer it? When will you not remained remain silent? Can you remain silent. And it's time to ask that question all the time. Now you know I have friends and family who are Trans and people of Color and immigrants and they are under under constant threat and so so it's up to people like me and maybe most of our listeners that can be an opposition to it vocally actively.

John Horn DC John Robin Bates Paula Fairfield Kim Who La James Washington
"five years" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

06:22 min | 7 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The Frame

"KPCC PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated mandated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. KPCC supporters include Fox searchlight presenting. Joe Rabbit nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble. Seven critics choice awards including best picture. The Golden Globe for Best Picture and one of AF is ten best pictures of of the year for consideration in all categories. You have some degree of greater confidence that you belong to something bigger than yourself. You can like watch. History happened or you can choose to be a part of it. I just like that feeling of making people feel. The frame is five years old and today we celebrate. Celebrate that with some of our favorite frame moments we travel back to memorable interviews dynamic guests strange location some tears and a few. There's a bathtub with a writing desk in the bath. Now there's there's a there's a frontal toilet that's the difference between La and New York. You convenient you are and have the space to be on thought who old not to walk tool bad day when that happened it I still feel that page on from the broadcast center at KABC. I'm John Horn today. We celebrate the first five years of the show. What was some of our favorite moments covering the cultural world and spending time with the people who inhabited when we launched the frame? We were doing something for the very first time I had been a print reporter my entire life so we ask our guests for stories when they first succeeded or failed failed. We have a thirty second request so in two weeks everybody who comes on is saying the first thing that something happened hi. I'm Gina Davis and the first time I got cast in a movie was in tootsie on twelve. Few the first job did I failed in actually got fired on was American gangster eastern. I'm John Stewart. The first time I bob on stage funnily enough was the first time I was on stage. For some reason I was absolutely not nervous at all what my first scene was with. Dustin Hoffman in my underwear. What I learned from that was Is Not all about meal and you have to learn how to navigate sometimes as filmmaker The Bitter End New York City. One o'clock in the morning following three doors cover bands. I had a good five minutes prepared about two two minutes into it. The audience realized I might suck at this but the funniest thing was. I didn't know you're only supposed to come on the days that you're working and nobody bothered. Can you tell me for six weeks. I showed up at six and went home when everybody else did. I'd get a chair and put it right next to Sydney Pollack and sit there and bad day they wouldn't have. I still feel that page on field. I walked into the night I thought to myself you know. There are a lot of law schools. I could I could go to them. And our first guest in two thousand fourteen was Christopher Nolan. He was about to release his movie. Interstellar a lot of people are saying that this is your most personal film. How do you respond to that? You take it as a compliment. Do you think they might be right I six. They don't know me. How would they know I? I don't know myself when either mm-hmm there been a lot of real world events that have driven our coverage over the years but the one that coincided with our launch was a Sony Hack today the. US government pointed the finger of blame directly at North Korea for the devastating cyber tech against the only pictures taken down the movie. The interview that poked fund the North Korean dictator whole. They cost a lot of damage. The cyber attack of Sony pictures which allegedly was conducted by North Korea came in response to who a movie it was called the interview. It Starts Seth Rogan and James Franco. It was a crazy story. It evolved every day and in the middle of it. Dan Sterling Elaine. who was the screenwriter of the interview was with us in studio? Hi thanks for having me. It's very rare that a screenwriter is like with us to talk about breaking news news so I guess my breaking news question is what the Hell's going on today. Well I just know what's going on in my email inbox which is an increasing flood of people asking me if I'm okay. Both emotionally physically and financially was your answer. What are you telling you know I was at a party on Saturday? Night where the host was introducing me to everybody buddy at the party as this guy that brought down Sony the first four or five hundred times the joke was made it was funny except The one thing that I know that I'm not happy about is actually the real suffering that is going on at Sony. Not just by the person who green that my I film so bravely but also by all the people affected by the hack quite concerned about them that was screenwriter. Dan Sterling on our show in two thousand fourteen. I'm John Horn and you're listening to the frames fifth anniversary special for music fans. This is one of those days that you will probably always remember. Where are you were when you heard the news that Prince had died? This is Oscar Garza senior producer of the frame. One of the memories that sticks out for me from our first five years is the day we had to report on the death of one of my musical heroes. There have been reports at Prince wasn't well but certainly no indication that he was hooked on opioids so so it was a shock that he was gone but like every day we simply put our heads down and focused on producing the show once. We were done though. I started thinking of The Times that I witnessed his electric live shows and it was incredibly sad to realize that he'd never take the stage again.

Sony New York City John Horn North Korea Christian Bale KPCC Best Ensemble Fox searchlight James Mangold Dan Sterling Prince Joe Rabbit Dustin Hoffman Fox Gina Davis Sydney Pollack Matt Damon Christopher Nolan Ferrari John Stewart
"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

04:13 min | 9 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

"Go there and check your interests too so if a a new group comes up near you geographically. Let's say my interests are javascript. And Ruby will anytime anything touch those two areas that. I'm GonNa get notified defied it. You wouldn't want to just prop up your tent without an audience and no opportunity for discovery. Yeah I mean this could eventually come to a displaced meet up and a lot of respect for. That's not our goal at this point. Even though initially it was like so angry at meet up. Let's create a killer. But that's not how I think like when I'm thinking clear-headedly and I don't see red I think I think practically what can we do for our organization. What can we do for our community? And this is the right scope rate skill tool that. It's GonNa work for them. What's been five years force since we last time five since the inception this is your fifth year anniversary Similar question in the companion podcast. You asked us which was hey. What's what's the next five years like field? What what's the future hold for you are you lack of is near like I am currently or are you visionary and you've got lots of ambition? I have an incredible amount of things. I'd I'd like to do. A lot of it comes down to how much we have in our budget because we don't want to overextend ourselves we're a tiny organization. We WanNa make sure everything we do. We do properly and that we're not spreading ourselves too thin so If we can continue to grow our budget we'd like to do a lot more explanatory journalism and and Explain a lot more about technology and put Tech News in context Through really in-depth Primers We'd like to create a lot more really good first party courses and we'd like to create a lot more interactive curricula. We'd love to be able to figure out a way that we could pay for service of could actually have Lennox Focus Challenges Get focused challenges. All these things that require like foul systems essentially you can only do so much in the browser just You know for example. We're able to do python because Mozilla released a giant library. That's a significant update from like breath on or some of the other browser-based Python tools. What's but we'd really like to be able to actually have full development environment on a server that is showing up on Free Co camp that you yourself have your own little mini compartment on? The server costs a lot of money. Yeah so yeah if we were able to increase the budget. We're going to just keep doing what we do. Those three pillars. We're GONNA keep growing the number of people on the forum and by extension in Ir L. Events and We're also going to just keep creating articles and videos IOS and we're GONNA keep expanding the curriculum even talked about this other publication your Youtube Channel. I mean we're on their theoretically so we do have a youtube channel. Donald timing subscribe the bell. That's right youtubers. Always subscribe and the a Bell Right. Why why did you do that twice? I've never hit the bell was actually. It's Kinda Double Optin. You subscribe because you're interested. What's the bill gave you like? I don't care that much that you know video like all come watch it on my own terms that important. Well that's where the double opt in is they get it from the side. I would love to have the bell for my channel but I don't WANNA have you're bill for my feet. Keep your bell right keep your bell. WHOA Quincy Man? It's it's been. It's been fun watching you over these last five years The numbers speak for themselves. I think the fact that you're you can educate as such a efficient rate makes it total sense for people who are who have have you know the funds and have benefited from Free Code. Gamble people have in that five bucks. Seems like it makes a lot of sense so you know one more time to his to our listeners. If if you appreciate the work they're doing and you want to help. Educate the next generation of coders out there whether they're young whether they're young or old. Or what part of the world there in yeah.

Quincy Man Youtube Mozilla Donald five years
"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

12:37 min | 9 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

"Okay and You know all those metrics matters so and I kind of a traditional business background in addition to my education background So I can understand the physics of business so to speak and that's really helpful because that gives me some perspective and it's kind of like if you're a jazz musician if you don't know how to play you can just do due chromatic scale play whatever it doesn't sound good but if you do know how to play you know exactly how to break the rules and how to bend the rules to make it sound really cool So that's like to some extent effect on older. I'm you know I'm going to turn forty next year. That gives me a huge edge because of the life experience since I run a lot of organizations before co camp so I knew the people part of it and part of it so I I guess in some respects is one of the reasons I'm more patient is more confident in the state of the world and how things work in fit together and also you know I had my wife who has the patience the job and she had a job with benefits and and we had health insurance for arcade and ourselves. And so I didn't need to run out and buy that Ferrari or whatever is that you know start up people do and they when they exit like free coke will hopefully go on forever and hope hopefully hopefully at least for the rest of my life which I'm hoping to live to be you know ninety one hundred like Hopefully I can continue to be involved in leading. Were helping hoping somebody else lead the Organization for the rest of my life so everything is long-term this is not a problem is going to magically solve itself. You look at how long has taken to get get people to you. Know to even get literacy to the rate it is. Yeah after four Hundred Years Right. This is going to be an ongoing challenge to teach people about technology. We probably have people coming into developer land at a faster rate than the birth rate at this point just a thought a thought exercise. I think sure which ones actually having faster so I think maybe we converted more developers that were burning them at this point so huge massive forward-looking opportunity opportunity as well and impact. So let's do a hard cut to a question before the Harkat. Yes have. Have you gotten offers offers or people venture capital anybody. That's come to you and said Quincy I will buy what you got I would have. You had some like. How often do you get? Say the names but we we've had some companies that like have approached us Akwa Higher. I guess I don't know how it work. I mean this is before we we got a taxi. Some status Once we got that people just left us alone because you can in theory unwind an NGO like if somebody wanted to acquire the Red Red Cross. It'd be like this bureaucratic nightmare so much time. I'm sure it is possible but that's never going to happen here And I'm grateful that those organizations saw value in Free Co camp. But that's not where we're like. We don't want to be Free Co camp by Acme Corporation operation or something like that right. I would imagine the offers are a plentiful and the temptation is is is very. I mean he's not really for me. Maybe I mean for some depends. Yeah I'm just a simple dude. Hang on my kids. I like reading books and going fronts. You know I mean I don't know because I'm in this very fortunate position where I live in a really advanced country with rule of law and order like you get more money. It's almost like an insurance policy right like if I get cancer. I'll be able to pay all my chemotherapy and my radiotherapy or any surgeries necessary right. If my kids get cancer. I'll be able to pay for that. So money at some point just becomes the score a number that In theory are you can dip into if you really need to. I don't think that really applies to me. I'd much rather just be a normal person and have a normal kind of middle class Middle American Life Nathan be cruising around Ferrari in San Francisco or something. Yeah yeah are left okay. Hard left turn so closing closing enclosing. We're going to talk about this topic because you're not busy enough a free coat camp. You decide you know what we WANNA do. We want to disrupt. We want to disrupt meet up with an open source event planning platform for not just for developers for everybody to be able to just set up their own instance with docker container tells about Yeah Chapter Chapter and why you're doing this and How it relates to at least relates to the current into the recent changes in me on the survey was actually inspired by that? If you're already working on it and you're like like Oh this is opportunistic. Tell us the story of Chapter Real Quick. Yeah so was acquired by. We were a couple of years ago. We work as we all. Well no was not worth as much as they said it was pretty disastrous reversal reverse. Yeah it's one for the history books but anyway anyway we work of course As of October when I mean this announcement was a few hours after meet up in announced that they were enacting acting this new policy that they were going to charge everybody a two dollar. RSVP fee whenever they are CPI for an event now free Co camp readily as fortyish meet UPS on meet up. Most of our said groups are organized on facebook because free but some meet ups. We'll pay the twenty dollars a month to have a a meet up page which I think is ridiculous that it cost that much money but it does and people are willing to pay for it so we quickly did some pack of the envelope calculations based on the number of events we had it would cost twenty thousand dollars extra every the year not just us but to our community and aggregate if they were all painting Alexes essentially yours to potentially get donations. So just yeah does your money in their pocket that they shouldn't have to spend rs the organizer. It's yeah people who meet up for the platform the infrastructure. That hasn't changed. The only notable the thing that meet up has done in the past ten years was acquired by we work. They have been active in terms of product in my humble opinion and I say so this is somebody who's been using me to say that as well because there's like I recently as part of this was like I thought I closed my account double checked on it. I did and I was like I'm closed because I thought I did before I think when when required but we work it was just like I never knew they got acquired. I just this was the first I had heard. I mean I just been a grudging meet up user as well just more from. I'm nick and some other stuff too. I can't call web. It was like you know what I you know if I'm if it wasn't like oh I'm canceling you know Meet up from my. It was more like I don't use the platform anymore. I don't find value in it and I'm like wow if I if you leave a profile or at least your data still there so there's still this this Opportunity for them to use you when you've since Ma gone away so my thought was like I'm going to pull my account and not do that anymore. I love all about the open source. Community is like we don't have to put up with that stuff if we don't want to that being said somebody has to step up. Throw them code on the table or a SPEC on the table You you know. That's one of the things you've talked with siege. Bought about what they're doing with the Federated Replacement for the package management Remember the name of it contribute and trump and just the fact that there's like well we could all sit around complain. Hey as people. Who Talk in the microphones? A lot some something that we do is just I to do is to complain implant. We complained quite a bit but in the open source world. It's like hey we can actually also means problems. And that's why I was just impressed by the announcement and you guys at least begins of an effort to you. Say you know what meet up has value these. This is the thing that needs to exist but it's not like it's a replicable replaceable. So yeah we quickly made an announcement like I thought about it really hard. I just decided yes. This is important enough. This is going to make a big enough difference for just us that it is worth having self hosted chapter management tool. I mean that's what it is is for multilateral organizations so we're not trying to boil the ocean and just say okay. We're all events everywhere just like his right. We're just focused on like the YMCA or the boys and Girls Club of America or Rotary Club. Lions club some of these other organizations that have lots of chapters like you just have their own server they can have full control of the data and people can go there and set up events and they can have chapter organizers and then they can have some discovery within their own organization and they just have a little sub domain or sub directory. That's like you know. Ymca Dot com slash chapter women who code dot org slash chapters right So as far as I was coming along I tweeted out this kind of somewhat. Angry tweet by Quincy Larson relatively emotionless tweet standards and a lot of people were like. Yeah that's messed stop. I think it was a tweet of the screen shot of the meet up. There is men. Oh great news everybody right. Yeah this is actually good a slightly reduce. Your cost is an organism past like massive costs onto the community. But anyway a lot of people re tweet it and I had a little link to discord room which dischord is not open source of course but it is pretty convenient for organizing an impromptu thing I've used it for headlines and stuff So every jumped in there and we get like thousand people jump in most of them just discourse promptly lesson forgot about it but some of them stayed and we started brainstorming like what kind of tools renews. What was the user story you know? What are they gonNA look like? Who are the roles and we quickly got a lot of stuff ironed out like Schema got like an API documentation up got an API up So now we're just building a lot of the additional functionality. We need for MVP but soon it'll be up and of course it won't be amazing right off the bat but eventually it'll be they love this of course it won't using there's a theme eventually it'd be great that's right theme for the show eventual greatness. So how do people get involved. aww typical flow like Find Chapter in the show notes and like get involved because this a thing that We all could use and if you could use it and you want to have seems like to me pretty easy entry. low-hanging like collaborator fruit. Like hey here's a pretty open project that is still getting itself figured out. That's the best time to get involved because a huge impact like you can be. You can be a big contributor early on Check out chapter from the Free Camp crew is it. Would you say it's a meet up alternative though well for our purposes as a as an NGO that has lots of chapters around the world. Absolutely Louis. We're not gonNA use me up anymore. I and hopefully the problem you have is is multiplied by many others. Yeah yeah sure but even even if only we used it internally still be as twenty thousand dollars in savings and also the pride of us being able to go in and tweak things and not having user data just be like owned work and they're desperate you know catch squeezing efforts so what about more traditional meet ups so we have the Nebraska jobs goes up it just a very typical javascript. Meet up is chapter. It's not multi chapter. It's just like well. We'd do a meet up every and you can run like a you can run your own instance twenty bucks for whatever five bucks to get it like a tiny little server. That will run it. We're we're trying to like make it as compact as possible like instead of using Elastic search for example. We're just GONNA use post gress queries. So little tweaks that reduced the number of services we have running docker container. Has the idea of federated ever made it into into an. How'd that go on that show? I mean not necessarily from a technological perspective but just like a way that you can opt into being part of chair discovery network right exactly is the main benefit. NFL Meet Up. Yeah exactly right. That's the that's the only and I mean if you if you have your own organization you already have a mailing list of tons of people. Your people no your website. And they're visiting it already then. You don't need to worry as much about discovery but it's it's still a nice thing you still.

Ferrari Quincy Larson developer Akwa Higher facebook Harkat Free Camp Red Red Cross Acme Corporation Lions San Francisco NFL Nathan nick Ma
"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

13:11 min | 9 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

"Historic context with all the other mediums preceded it the other media that preceded like radio cable stuff like that and so that would be kind of like the archetypal like if I was gonNA lead by example. I'd say we should be writing in depth articles like this And there are plenty of other publications that right like New York Times The Wall Street Journal a lot of them will just have really in-depth articles that put things in a historical context. It's not just like this happen. This happen this happen is like this happened in. Here's why that's significant from a historical perspective. Or here's what that means so explanatory technology journalism that's kind of our spiral. One of our goals is to get people to actually come to a Free Rico Camp Dot. Org every day and have something new and exciting that they can learn right now people just blow through the curriculum and they get a job and they're like awesome free cookie away. He's back in two thousand seventeen. I hear that all the time. We're losing a lot of talk about that because it's one thing to you know if your mission is to educate kate as a primary mission and you mentioned the three pillars. It's going to be very difficult to keep a captive audience because of what you said so. It's very easy for people to be transient and given that their goals and their means have been covered and they're gone. Yeah and there's always more stuff than learn like I learned a lot about quantum competing in the past few weeks weeks. I learned a lot about you. Know Micron length semiconductor manufacturing and stuff like that right There's always new stuff. That's it's coming up. Technology by definition is new. So there's always new stuff and just being able to explain how you know you orchestrate with communities or how a docker container works. What's the difference between a docker image? And a you know a docker container. Right or a docker instance. I can't Corolla different terms this article. Do you have You've mentioned a Free Co camp mission but it seems like the roles of these pillars are distinct. So do they have their own agenda that feeds into a sort of main corporate agenda. Like why these three. Yeah so so. We are strong believers in content. I think that One of the biggest tragedies is that so much of their wards of the web have been crewed the platforms that are basically just aggregating other people's content if you look at like facebook right and all these companies they're benefiting from providing the basic infrastructure. You could argue you know. Medium fits that boat Corre They just create the software. Everybody else comes in as the content and people don't care about the infrastructure that much they really were are there. It'd be like you saying like Netflix should accrue one hundred percent of the vote because they created such a great streaming platform and like the Hollywood movie. Companies shouldn't get anything because hey they just created the content spree right or cheap cotton is it. Content is not a commodity really good content is incredibly valuable. And if you look like there's the information for example it's like this news publication charges like hundreds of dollars a year to get a subscription. The economists historically has always charged one hundred and fifty two hundred dollars a year. Right I and I think we're GONNA see more and more of these publications that are like this is really high quality so we're not going to give it away for free at same time that do give it away for free pro PROPUBLICA and You know the Guardian and places like that and that's because they're fully donor support it. They can do that. And free. Co can't of course being fully donor supported by you know. Small individual donors were grassroots organization. We can do that. We can make everything free and we can provide tons of content from our community the and from ourselves like like paid staffers like me who are writing articles and things like that. So let's talk about the donations real quick and then we'll switch gears to. They do want to talk talk about you mentioned platforms so five bucks a month. Let's just say go and sign up for recurring. I'm in like your mission and I got the cash. I'm GonNa give you five bucks a month. The where's that money. Go great question so I we've got some people okay. I let me talk big numbers so so everybody understands. Free Co camps was twenty. Nine thousand budget was three hundred. Seventy three thousand dollars. That may sound like a lot of money but I know developers in Silicon Valley who personally make more money than Matt a year. Sure that is maybe payroll for like three or four people right And we're figuring out a way to like stretch it across seven people and we're also paying you know tens of thousands of dollars a year in servers so the answer is like one hundred percent of that gets consumed by the by what is traditionally called programs when you analyze a nonprofit fundraising there's administration and there's programs and we don't really have we he just that we have Quincy Larson saying please donate to our dump profit please sir. We don't have a PR firm. We don't have a marketing department You you could argue that we could do better and we raise introduce a lot of complexity the organizations and right now everybody who works for Free Co camp came up through free cokie of rain never. You're kidding right. Yeah I get it and I would say like I know a lot of profit. The do the fundraising side. And of course it's akin to like a bootstrapped company getting VC funding. I mean it's an office there but it's different but you could. I mean but the small the hardest way is the individual recurring donations versus having a person on staff. Maybe it's you maybe it's somebody who's really good at going around to the big donors. Maybe that's the reason y you could get like a one million dollar grant. Maybe yeah but as we into those organizations and also like that would kind of spoil us. That's him fighting in the field to earn people's donations regular people. People who are working day jobs have kids feed and paying mortgages. But they're like. Hey Yeah I can spare five bucks for Free Co Kampe month or yeah at the end of the year and I can just give me a thousand bucks for ten thousand bucks. Well about this companies though. They're reaping the the benefits of your work. That's fine it's like you know a positive extra analogy for them right. This consumer surplus from them. But there's uncaptured opportunity there. I mean you could argue the same thing with Wikipedia I mean. How much value do you think? Wikipedia has bestowed upon the world by making it to where I can get good factual information within seconds from a relatively objective. Arbiter of truth. Yeah there's a whole lot of value that he's not captured. That's that's kind of the point. But then they also have to put Jimmy Wales face on Wikipedia for one month every year in bug the dog out of their users when they could just do these other things. Such as some tasteful ads. You know know you know I. There's no wrong with advertising greet model especially for podcast but but also you know like if you if you don't have the invasive ad networks and stuff I think I think an advertising it could be a lot of US decided to go pretty much ad free across the board. I think it's admirable decision that being said we're back. I cut you off. Donations thing like US pretty much. Oh five bucks is going towards programs yes and there's no fluff. There's no there's nothing else it's all right there we were streaming. We're reliving lean I mean we do. We have in depth discussions about whether to like pay for like a twenty dollar a month service. Because it's like really. Yeah I mean things are we just want to operate really efficiently like a lot of my heroes like you know. Sam Walton for example kind of Walmart on this notion of thrift and and you can argue that like Walmart has not been the best employer the best Patron of of different communities. That has been but you. It's hard to argue argue that it hasn't been good for the consumer because they've managed to drive down the prices so many things absolutely insane people an incredible amount of money like especially families. These these are corporations. That could probably make more money But they're choosing to kind of be broader and more resilient to changes in the economy on me and things like that it's true. Yeah it's a trade off with free camp. We're never going to capture all the value we don't even if we can capture like just to give you you and ideal less than point one percent or I'm sorry I it's it's about point. Five percent of our monthly active users. Don't yeah so it's it's just a fraction. If if I can get a little bit better right. You're going to next question. And so let's talk about scale how do you what are the conversations you have with yourself or anyone else on the team about like okay if you sit here. But it was three hundred seventy five thousand a year. Seventy eight seventy this year this year. This year seventy three 373. So when you talk about growth of revenue or income dollars however you describe it profit senses one of the ways in which you you made that number grow. Yeah so we just get more people. Using free go campus. As simple as that more people use Free Co camp a certain percentage of them will go out and get great job. Donate like sometimes we hit like a windfall like I was saying earlier We had somebody who donated ten thousand dollars. John Wong John Wayne He's he's a He went through Co campy. Works at nullify And he had money at the end of the year any one of the to a high impact charity Free Co camp just to put our efficiency our capital efficiency in perspective we have delivered one point. One billion minutes of instruction action this year. That's equal of two thousand years of learning in one year. We've done that for three hundred. Seventy three thousand dollars. That's the equivalent of fifty hours of instruction for every dollar spent night. You're putting in terms. I like to hear five bucks a lot bigger. So you're five bucks. Each each month is essentially paying for an entire classroom of people to learn one thing that is important to note also is that these people are able to do it for free and the the scale that we're operating at you know it's not only self paced in free and fully interactive. It's just incredibly the cheapest like to put that fifty hours per dollar in perspective in the United States. The average cost of having a child in a public school is ten dollars per hour per child so free co campus. Several orders of magnitude more efficient. Yeah then like they're trying to accomplish totally different things. We don't have a class. We don't have a teacher with a student teacher ratio of like seventeen to one or whatever we just do. Instructional design people work at their own pace. But it's because of those concerns decisions that were able to be dramatically more efficient. These are all conscious decisions nations. We made because our ultimate goal is scale. Our ultimate goal is helping as many people as possible for as little money as absolutely necessary. I like the fact that your focus on those two metrics you grow the number of Free Co camp you know I guess interested people users how you describe it and then then obviously impacts the the ratio of donors and you can sort of like grow that one to grow this one or you can grow this one too. I mean like meeting in a few grew the amount from I'm five percent point nine percent that yeah okay ten percent jeeze if you double that number to one percent right I mean so you can sort of focus on those two metrics the grow the total captive audience or grow the yeah the the ratio of donors I like the simplicity of focusing on two things rather than so many to grow to scale. And that's why I'm reluctant to bring in like you know a fundraising expert or you. You know to try to court personally. Fly around and meet with the CEOS of all these different Saving without it. It's obviously better than not have to do that. And it seems like you're on that path so you have these two numbers. The higher leverage one is honestly the percentage. Yeah but You seem to be pretty good at growing the top funnel at this point all these people using you see them very patient. Based on four years ago he talked to you. And you're also A and I don't use word too loosely but you're not greedy eighty right. There's some people that just and maybe it's I don't know really how you describe greed where it's not Egregious or salt like where it's overly agree. Yeah you know like read right. You can have ballistic ambitions and not be greedy in a you seem to. I have a patient is ankeny what I four that I where it's not not everybody has the kind of patients you have managed for profit offic companies for I started go. Cam Is the school director. Essentially like it was a private Intensive English program and I had to make sure that we had like a good Ebay..

Free Rico Camp Dot US Wikipedia Free Co Kampe Free Co Walmart New York Times Micron Co kate facebook Netflix Ebay Jimmy Wales PROPUBLICA Sam Walton Quincy Larson Matt The Wall Street Journal
"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

12:35 min | 9 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

"Security and quality assurance. So we're going to add four additional python ones. That will be either at the end of that or we'll be we'll kind the break up those but we're adding We're adding scientific competing with python. We're adding data analysis We're adding information security with python and we are adding machine learning using tensor flow carries and potentially second learned so we're adding in lots of tools but these are not tools that are like groundbreaking Lee new. These are things that makes an practitioners in the field have been using for years. What about things like the small things like I think of the job description tax and the updates to the language I mean the Nice thing about web development is mostly additive like new technologies out on top of HTML CSS with trends and javascript? I think the the big change between callback to promises to sink away like those are things that do get outdated dated. You just like churn it out and keep it updated or do you not fight those battles. What do you do there so we we just update like if if one thing like for example see assist variables Probably GonNa rip out our section at this point because he is getting so many of the core features that like those processes and they're taking sass out. Yeah it's about all the time and we have we have section but probably just gonNA teach flex box and grid and stuff like that so so we do go through through an update in like like you just asked specifically as new features are added to Essex or es twenty nineteen or whatever they're calling it this year We'll just go up to the individual essence and we kind of update them in situ and add additional lessons if necessary. The entire curriculum is about about to become completely project-oriented. This is something we started at the beginning of the year where we writing our lessons to all be building projects so instead of learn Java script ripped and here are two hundred lessons that are tangentially related go through them learn Oscar by building a role playing game. Yeah tonight so you'll build like run game you learn basic javascript from that you'll learn typography from building a USDA nutrition label. You know you'll you'll learn all these different things through projects addicts and currently the curriculum is like thirty certification projects in almond lessons soon. It'll be thirty certification projects and also also a whole bunch of practice projects like thirty or forty practice projects so those all be interactive with tests the entire time. And you'll build the projects one line at a time and one passing tests at a time. It's so much easier to learn when you have some sort of like concrete expectation or visual in mind mind in La giving somebody a goal and not just abstract thoughts of like. Oh here's you know as you said. Two hundred different tenja lessons on javascript a script. It's more like here's what we're learning in order to build something like this that you've seen the real world you maybe even used in real world nutrition labels for example was that one for that was tables else Learning typography by your yeah like visual hierarchy. Yeah any sense. Yeah so we've got. I mean this is all of course open source. It's only get up so if you WANNA on CDs our curriculum is coming along. You can check it out And we're GONNA keep plugging away at it. Like I said Chris Christopher Koishikawa and Bo kearns horns are working on this basically full time doing instructional design. They're both trained classroom teachers who've also learned Development on their own through free go camp over the years and through are the resources so should be really really solid and even if it's not totally solid when it launches that's the great thing about open source. It'll gradually really accrue a whole bunch of improvements and eventually it will be great eventually great eventual COSC- exactly tackle rightness so an addition to refresh the curriculum. You also launched a brand new refresh to the learning platform. You're Buzzword compliant because you're on the jam stack talk about some of the new infra and code and what you're doing there absolutely so Jam Stacked off-script. API's markup is what James techstars seems for my friend Matt bilman over it Netla Fi coined that term in a bar at some point. I don't remember these X. Ray but He the He's been a big proponent of just like the security in the performance boost that you can get from just you know doing everything bill time and then just serving like the static files essentially right so now free coq if you go to free cooking at Oregon you go into learn APP Pretty much everything is pre repackaged and you get the entire application It just loads and work off line. It won't work off perfectly right now but we're working on getting it to be the off line first APP so there are a lot of advantages and a lot of those advantages has to do with the fact that we don't have awesome. That little threw me on text message. Okay a lot of those advantages. Just have to do the fact that we want to spend as much money on servers. Yeah we can cash ben like a substantial difference. I mean it's been like five thousand bucks a month servers. What are you spend now that you're on jam? I think we're spending like four thousand but we're still doing optimization Wilma gradually it'll reduce yeah eventual greatness eventual greatness curious. Why in if you have such a massive global audience why and this is just the the the partnership personality becomes out like why you wouldn't reach out to someone in that business to establish some sort of partnership and make that zero or very low so if anybody is listening who's like in a position to grant a hole on her credits or Yeah we'll take a we. We use all that we can get from Amazon. It was on Azure. Google cloud like we use all the credits we we. We just need a lot. Are you Picky on platform pick as long as it's reliable so as you're is where a lot of our stuff is hosted digital oceans. Were some of his hosted. We have to be very mindful about what services we look at. Where like how critical? So far as you're in my experience has been incredibly reliable and paid us really reliable to But we decided intellect locate most of our database and our servers in Azure. Because they gave the most generous credits candidly they give. They give every nonprofit like three thousand five hundred four thousand dollars a year in credits and that's a big big head start and so we we locate everything in the same data center every uses latency So if we had like a significant offer over of credits we might be able to relocate the entire stack for learn over to a different place. But we'd want to. We wouldn't want to do a piecemeal just because the the introduction of latency and national security risks and stuff like that but either way with the new stack. You've definitely been able to shrink said budget. So there's just like this is the very beginning of the point of jam stack as you do it when you well you said most of your stack is we still have like servers that like are they looking like. API's yeah I wonder if you've completed whenever you complete damn lesson for example that writes back and if we can establish a connection with server stores Stores in like local memory or local stories. What we use and then when it raised I was commissioned then pushes so we're building all that kind of redundancy tenancy in in Turkishness right very cool so any drawbacks on the jam stack so far like things that are like? Oh we didn't see this coming in cash allegation is always challenging like you you push a bunch of changes in cashed on cloudflare NETLA FIS. CDN Or something and you just have to wait till it propagates or they try refreshing and we're working on figuring figuring out a way to do that so we don't have to tell people try doing hard refresh your web developers least favorite phrase try refreshing because we hate saying that turn it off and on again right. It's kind of like the I kind of fail at the cache invalidation part hardly fresh these people. How hard refresh versus regular refresh? I've been there. Yeah done that. So that's that's been the biggest drawback but I mean whole and like like I think nullify was like under like Adidas attack the other day we had some some APPTIME issues with that but again like they're doing the best they can. They're pretty small organization compared to like the aws the world we just WANNA be there to support them and We're just grateful that nullify discourse whole lot of other organizations have given us in kind and sponsorship and this is not giving us money but they are giving it servers and services that makes a difference. Yeah so the third third pillar of what you're up to have talked about the learning platform the forums. We touched on at the very beginning. We haven't talked much about the publication. Yeah yeah this is a big a big part of Free Co camp is we have free coq dot org slash news and we have hundreds of authors who are publishing articles there every week not not like act. We don't get hundreds of articles every we're going for quality over quantity it's not an open publishing platform where you can just like sign in its are publishing with With the publication. You have to apply and we're really selective. I think we had five percent selectivity so most people will submit a whole bunch of writing samples samples will force them to read our guide and all that stuff make him jump through all the hoops if they want to badly enough then we'll give them a conditional account contributor account and then they can write drafts and we can look at those and if the the moment we see one of the drafts that were like. Yeah this is ready to go. This is solid. We do a little bit of editing publish it and then we give them full access to our google analytics so they can see exactly who's reading their articles like basically everything Google analytics tracks and we've got a bunch of additional custom filters and stuff and he really simple mm for them That's the only tracking us by the way We use Google because at this point it's the server side. Analytics are great. But you just don't have enough information for the authors to be able to understand the readership this This process of collaboration or lack thereof. If there isn't any on on the edit process how do you handle that do you have sort of baked in processes is where you're giving them feedback and suggesting edits or do you make the edits and say this. This is how it is. How does that? How does that relationship we make the edits for them And then we tell them what we may generally If usually that are seemingly seemingly unimportant but actually really important like the headline is by far the most important thing to the point that I'm practically the phone I was Gonna read the headlines for you because like that's all all ninety percent of the people see especially in the like apple news and read it and all these aggregate. There's people screw scroll through headlines. And that's their news like very few people actually click through. Do you actually say anything anyway. headline is as a suggestion from them. And it is in your hands at the end. What they write may actually become the headline? I am but it's actually just as clear that like essentially they're writing and to save a whole bunch of back and forth and much communication overhead that slows things down we just apply the editor ourselves. Yeah and people understand that they appreciate it because they understand that we care a lot about quality and we you Wanna get their article read by as many people as possible the way we do that of course is after they publish it We publicize it through our twitter account. which I don't know how many followers dollars it has a lot? Is it like a high level engagement. Let's let's say that like generally when we tweet something retweeted like tend of sometimes one hundred times and we also also Have a huge alumni network and we get like two million impressions a month just off like ten posting things Lincoln so and then of course my email blast I send eh and I've got like a mailing list of two point five million people so a lot of people through read those articles that I choose for email blast so it's worth we're we're giving them a megaphone to reach a whole lot of people into really raise their profile in the developer community and they take that opportunity seriously..

Google Lee Oregon Oscar USDA twitter apple cloudflare Adidas La James techstars Wilma Chris Christopher Koishikawa Free Co Amazon editor Matt bilman Turkishness
"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

13:11 min | 9 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

"So figuring out the financials is one aspect of sustainability. Another aspect is making. The Quincy doesn't have to do all the work and surely you have a team at this point and lots of people contributing so like to hear the different roles who's involved in the and then as a follow up to that how you inspire them to get involved in frequent transmission absolutely. Yeah so free Co camp. Currently we have a lot of active contributors I'm extremely grateful for all of them. And we're getting ready to move by the time this episode goes live we'll have our top hop contributors for twenty nine thousand nine. We've got some really nice backpacks that we're going to ship them to recognize their efforts. Say Twenty nineteen top contributor instead of Free Co Camp Logo and and these are the same backpacks that we sold a few months ago. We're actually running a second Rana those two since we're going to bring some of these terms but there are seven people who work for Free Co camp fulltime including myself and they are all generalists in the sense that they all wear a lot of hats. everybody comes up through free Co camp as contributors after years of contributing if they seem to be particularly capable or Particularly passionate then and we have the resources Then we will bring them on and so. Currently the team is again me doing just everything like I do support and I also do I'm overseeing a couple different projects within than we have bow kearns who is running the free cocaine youtube channel which recently became came. I think the biggest programming channel on Youtube got one point four million subscribers. Now there's a channel called the new Boston that hasn't been updated like four or five years and they they have more subscribers than we do but other than them I think. We're the biggest Saburo runs that he creates a lot of the videos. He does a lot of the editing for our contributors and Bo also is working with a curriculum suppo- worked as a teacher for I think five or six years prior to joining freak. Oh camp a public schoolteacher up in Michigan we have abby Abigail Renan Meyer. She is based in Portland and she worked as a archaeologist before she has like a totally different background but that she had been editing thousands of articles for the free cocaine publication. And she kept doing it and I was like. Hey you WanNa do this full-time time. So she's been doing that. She also runs the podcast. So if you've listened to the frequent podcast is the chance you've heard her interviewing people and Then we we have Ahmed Adilson hub. He's in Turkey. A recently emigrated to Turkey And he is doing some exciting things over there He does a lot of the design when we overhauled free co camps visual design He did a lot of that work and he also does a lot of just like the day the in and out of code maintenance Then we have ragache Ma tre who who is in Benghazi were Bangalore and he does pretty much everything regarding the core code base and like all the servers and he he He's the person we call if something catastrophic happens and and we have Christopher Queasy Guy Wa who's in South Korea and he was working as a teacher for the last six years and started contributing a whole lot to our To our interview prep section and so we brought him on so he and Bo are working together on the updated curriculum. Which I can talk about a minute and then we also have Mea Lou do who is based in Hong Joe in China and she's running the free cocaine China team and we basically have like a completely parallel organization in China. And we've got chinese-language Forum chinese-language publication and Chinese language curriculum. And that's you know hundreds of thousands of people using that so think I got everybody. It is hard to always remember spot. Yeah as we experienced recently as well. Well so that's amazing. You have a parallel organization in China. Just curious in terms of the Free Code Camp Allom or even just the users I mean your. Your team is spread abroad. And so where's your biggest audience like the foothold in India India and the United States are like neck and neck. Sometimes India. It gets there are more people in India sometimes more people in the US And then Nigeria's third and China And then based on just visits is this or how do you. How do you use the news like Tom? Onsite right. Chinese translation have translation into other languages. As wow yeah great question. What we're trying to do is just really? Make sure that we have everything. rock-solid in Chinese Chinese is bigger than most also the other world languages combined It's second only the English if you look at like wikipedia usage and this is what we used for metrics like to plan internationalization. We looked at how wikipedia was being used and and we looked at the world language usage for different translations of Wikipedia And then we looked at the total number of speakers of those languages that we're using the Internet actively China is just exploding in terms of people adopting technology and they're very enthusiastic about it And a lot of them are getting great jobs. And there's a lot of money going into Just just a lot of different aspects of like Artificial intelligence like machine learning essentially the real machine learning and also the if and then statements and stuff like that and then also there is a whole lot of expertise in China India. A lot of the great Indian engineers stay here in a lot of the Chinese engineers go back to China and Craig companies. So you know I'm trying to think of of some Some names of famous engineers who've left like Google or left like teaching at Stanford who've gone back to China but there are a lot of really promising companies over there so we wanted to China. I I personally maybe Bias because I lived in China for like five years my wife Chinese and I'm just very optimistic about the future China. They've over the course of the past thirty years. They've taken hundreds birds of millions of people from subsistence agriculture and they've transformed into a manufacturing center of the world and now the transforming into much more services and creative based economy and learning to code is going to be a big part of that for sure. He's speech to the the need for native language curriculum. Like specifically with what I've heard at least with China is that there's this desire obviously a massive amount of people people there but most of the documentation a lot of the books tend to be are more likely to be in English. Can you speak to the need for native language curriculum. Yeah well it's always easiest to learn in your native language is one less thing you need to worry about a lot of people more than a billion have Chinese is. They're they're mainland. Yeah Yeah I mean if you include include like written Chinese like there are a lot of right spoken dialect arth six point five seven billion people here behind take seven half and someone pin up into the stats stats machine here. Okay Eh. But the point is is that that's quite a lot of people I mean. That's a mass of my people. It's like what have facebook facebook. But he's we're five billion by crazy. Yeah what makes sense to it. It's interesting to to hear sites on the choice to use a a massive global site like Wikipedia as an example to say smart. You know why did you choose. What did you choose? I under what circumstances because in a lot of ways what you're doing is creating a wikipedia like a better terms for software developers. Curriculum is very much like that wikipedia India's when a huge influence on us of course we compete you shirt. He's mostly open source as well and they're also a nonprofit so in many ways of Wikipedia hadn't proved out the concept that you could have have a donor supported Commons of learning material in their case. More encyclopedic in our case. More procedural skill focused On learning free. Probably we wouldn't have attempted it because we needed that proof of concept. I'm not the kind of person who's GONNA throw their entire livelihood Behind like a totally while. Guess but I sensed I guess correctly. In retrospect that there would be demand there and that people would be people were graduating from free. Co Camping. Going out and getting these jobs would turn around and donate back to the organization it would be sustainable. DC somebody utilizing free code campaign then maybe a boot camp as well or some sort of intensive Azzurri's Ersan where it's only free co camp and now you're not trying to do that because you very community minded and oriented did but is the is the intention to be free co Campbell loners. It's sort of like a companion to other learning opportunities so I've always preko. Camp is a core curriculum. If if you will and a lot of coding bootcamp sees co Camp as either part of their curriculum or they'll use it as their pre coursework and we have a really good relationship with a lot of coding boot camps. And I'm very excited about the the future of cutting boot camps really anything that can drive down. The cost of adult education. Universities are the hardest part about that too is is curriculum development. Yeah I like if you have to start from scratch every time you want to start up another bootcamp opportunity in your neck of the woods whether it's here in the states or elsewhere abroad if you can shrink that time from. I'm in a desire to teach teaching. It's a leg up on on Opportunity I would agree. It's the hardest part but it's not the most important part the most important important part is the the interpersonal relationships that you know. A teacher professor has with their students and the students have with one another and You the counselors that help you prepare for the job search and all the other things that university or coding bootcamp or Any sort of adult education program can Adler the value added the curriculum itself. Really if you think about it very few people actually designed curriculum since that most universities have textbooks right right and like everybody ECON one and everybody. Has You know the texbook regardless which university you're sitting at For the most part so yeah free. Free Co camp can be a free interactive textbook that these organizations can use and of course it can be used on. Its own just like I could go to a library and crack open. Expo can and learn economics. Learn you know programming just from a textbook or from some sort of static resource the the main advantage is with Rico. Camp of course is experiential project focused and things stick a lot better. When you're actually building how do you keep it fresh? How do you keep it? Relevant elephant current. And maybe the naysayers Santo your curriculums not current enough or it doesn't is not idiomatic enough. How do you how how do you push back? The haters. Basically we just focus on fundamentals. We're not going to be covering bleeding edge tools for the most part like I believe that everybody needs you. Just get really strong foundation. I and most of what constitutes foundational knowledge is a developer stuff that was figured out and like the sixties and seventies and in the case as a mathematics sometimes hundreds of years ago thousands of years ago right so what we're teaching is just the most ubiquitous tools that are the most generally applicable the GS is to a large extent one kind of the web server war if you will and javascript is useful for pretty much. which any kind of web development We're getting ready to introduce python as well as a core part of the curriculum. So currently it's six certifications. Each certification requires you to build five projects and get all their test passing. So we're adding four additional python focused certifications Right now our certification just for people who aren't where Front End Specific we have the responsive web responsive web design..

China co Camp cocaine Free Co Camp Logo Youtube wikipedia India Bo Turkey Quincy China India kearns Portland India India facebook Ahmed Adilson Michigan United States abby Abigail Renan Meyer
"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

04:50 min | 9 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

"Every company's becoming offer company with a lot more competition to work at the a software company right they need developers because they develop software for living but a lot of companies that just need one or two people and maybe their bars a little bit lower. The competition is going to be less. Maybe you have a friend who works there like. There's just lots of those. Would you make concern nontraditional software opportunities where it's like well may they're not software offer company but they have software needs. I bet you can pitch in there. Maybe even more so than you could at the place that has one hundred developers already if getting job Travis hard does that mean that it's got something broken in the system so if it's hard to get a job with it's somewhat of an indicator that there's is a broken system yeah broken processes. Something's broken what makes it so difficult. It's hard here in the US again. I have lots the friends in China and India and places like that where I think has comparatively easy not in every city in those countries but in a lot of markets is just much easier to go out and get a job in the US we have a combination of like benefits like the legal framework and all these things make hiring and firing very difficult perfect so because it's difficult to bring some. It's causing a mistake. Yeah so that makes employers really risk averse even in a field where there's so much demand and also employers to some extent are operating under pattern recognition. So they're like Oh. This person has worked at this company right. That's like the biggest indicator of of your likelihood of success whom have you worked for and do they have similarly stringent hiring requirements. So if you've worked at Google there's a very good chance that you're going to be a good employee at Xyz Corp as well so I and these are things that I think. There's a a great. She writes a lot of articles for publication as well Alien Learner. She does interviewing I O. And she's written a ton of articles that are much more data the driven on this but I wouldn't say hiring is broken. That's kind of a strong word but I would say there are very clear ways and was thinking it'd be approved without having having to completely overhaul you know the way that we handle labor in the United States for example Just pair programming doing more take home assignments rather than doing whiteboard Challenges Challenges would be one. I think fairly obvious improvement because that is heavily biased towards recent college graduates who just spent a whole bunch of time. Basically going ad nauseam through through Algorithms for tests and stuff like that. I it doesn't work as well when you're hiring somebody who's who's been out of the job market for a while. They just had a kid or somebody who has just been working for a long time but hasn't interviewed for jobs recently. Your mission isn't to get people hired. It's to educate. Would you say that. Would you agree with that or is it kind of part besides so are you. Don't really help place so you're not. It's sort of part of its. It's implied by lie. Your efforts so our official mission is just to help as many people as possible Verna Code. I think it's written at the bottom of every single page in our footer. That's our official NGOs mission. That said virtually everybody who uses free kokatay dreams of one day becoming more technical. Now whether that's actually being a software engineer near Or just you know being a designer who can code or marketer who can code or Somebody who who wants to build like a cool interface for their drone that they're flying around as a hobby. Yeah somebody who wants to build an Alexa APP just to impress their kids. You know there are so many any different use cases for programming knowledge. But it's all a net positive. I like to say that back in the sixteen sixteen hundreds. You didn't need to be able to read to go out and work right. But the people who did sit down and take the time to learn to read were infinitely not infinitely but they were dramatically. Better off same thing in the nineteen twenties. If you learn how to drive a car. Suddenly you had all these new opportunities open to you and more recently like the one thousand nine hundred really learn how to use spreadsheets. The learned how to use word processors The learn how to use like these slide bass tools like powerpoint and that opened up so many opportunities for people. So yeah you can get by without it. You could be you know. A Congress Person Congress person in two thousand nine hundred who doesn't know how to type and just relies on the secretary to do the typing for the right but real life like you're better off just gathering in those additional skills and I think that Soon will awake into the fact that being.

United States official Travis Google Alexa Congress software engineer China Xyz Corp Verna Code secretary India one day
"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

11:49 min | 9 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

"Ability to project out budget and for an organization organization like us like we just need to be able to budget. We're not trying to make huge. Fixed cost investments. We're just paying for servers. We're paying for people working off. Rico Kim fulltime let me throw a number as she here. This comes from your five years Free Code Camp Post which is on change news also in the show notes for those who missed it more than forty thousand free code. Camp graduates are now working in tech companies like Apple. Google Microsoft Amazon on spotify Shirley many other companies as yeah well. That's an astronomical number forty thousand those are people who've been certified through the program many of them have gone certifications that includes everybody who's in our linked ten on the network which is like sixty thousand ish. People who are working now in technical roles Not Everybody ultimately he got the certification. Because if you get a job like your graduate graduation certification ends to our means to an end I really really my FCC certification right a lot of people get the job and then they'll come and try to finish it was that not that CC in case of his thinking like what. Yeah when were you. FCC's audio this is the airwaves. The Internet areas. That's right. Yeah okay so but still I mean forty thousand people that is to me a huge amount. I mean what does that feel like. Do you feel numbers. They get so big at a certain point that it's kind of like another drop in the bucket. I mean some some numbers are hard to actually like. I Dunno like refi in your mind. Well I'm extremely blessed and I just feel incredibly grateful that there are so many people out there who bother you know e mailing me or tweeting at me or sharing these stories of their transitions. Sion's from working in counting being trucker working in manufacturing All these different fields that they've gone from to doing software development them and. Yeah so that's interesting it contextualized as those numbers. When you're getting practically every day I get an email from somebody saying? Hey I just was able to do this. You know thanks again and and then I'm able to follow up and say oh. Yeah can you tell me a little bit more about how you You made the transition. Where can you post on the form? Because a whole lot of people are in the process of trying to uh-huh yeah and so the number is an abstract. I mean it's obstructed. Is that large. But I have so many concrete examples of that every day the drive home to me and so for me you know. It's just a dream come true. I never would have imagined that we would have anywhere near the scale of people being able to accomplish things and you know provide for their families and new ways and actualize themselves and be creative. Inoue's so yeah it's just a huge honor and a huge blessing. So one of the challenges that we've seen people facing coming out of nontraditional education background grounds. Such as I have a Free Code Cam certification or some other boot camp or himself taught. Is that that hiring process is difficult for them them for lots of reasons. One of the reasons that companies and organizations aren't always on board with hiring more people are looking for senior developers than junior developers developers and People who are going through recode camp sounds like they're having success getting hired. Do you help them on that side of things or is there like a community unity support. I'm wondering like if there's like tips and tricks. or how are people having that level of success. Yeah I got through the program and I got a job because like you said the job is what most of us are drafter and so. I'm just curious if there's like if the community helps on the job side or just once you're through the program you just are competent enough to get yourself. A job has has a question. We've kind of made a neutrality setup where we don't we don't specifically guide people to specific companies We we we we thought about. We built out of a job board and we were going to have it to where people could apply for jobs directly through free cope. We just thought about like you know if somebody has a negative experience variance or if there are people out there who are you know you read about a lot of these silicon valley companies that basically. Just pretend that they've got all these funding in and things like that. And then the funding never materialized and these people have moved to this expensive city and basically it. stepped on on their paycheck You know we didn't want to be you associated with any sort of like project like that so we just decided you know we're not gonNA WE'RE GONNA leave the job board stuff and the recruitment stuff to to the experts and we're just going to focus on training people now. We do have interview preparation section. That has hundreds of additional out with him challenges We've got like we've updated a lot of the project. Oil Problems. Rosetta Code problems that made them interactive with like tests that you can in writing the browser instead of having to You know the old interface for whether was it's like a twenty year old website But it's just like you enter a number Berg and it tells you whether you're right or wrong it doesn't give you any more feedback than that and it. It just takes a long time to enter it So rather than having to do all that coding locally and then go and paper number into a web form if you're right We just modernized made an interactive experience. But so we've got lots of interview preparation stuff. We've also got this point. Probably hundreds of I got a job type posts on the form and we've got lots of articles from people who transition successfully from other fields into tech who successfully got jobs at Amazon or Google or other places like that telling how they went through that process like especially the thing that people underestimate the most is just the sheer numbers game that the modern job The modern developer job application occasion process constitutes is quite often for somebody. WHO's finished Rico? Camp or somebody who's going to boot camp to have to apply to hundreds jobs and then they'll start to get interviews and they'll start to get offers but we just try to instill in people the notion that this is hard uh-huh this is not easy. Anybody who tells you it's easy to go out and get a developer job. They're probably trying to sell you something because it's not easy that's right so we have all these resources and we have a supportive community. WHO's there to share and your accomplishments and you can just read lots of anecdotes that realized realized the statistics that we all know that there are tremendous number of developer jobs at all different levels Certainly there are a lot of middle tier in and senior jobs in the senior ones are the ones with the recruiters most actively go out and aggressively trying to recruit people but there are definitely tons of small medium level businesses. They just need some. You know the church or the Local Food Bank or the other organizations that want to have a nice website or just need somebody to help set up like a facebook group or configure. Like a wickes website. Or something like that from your vantage point. Can you see trends there. In in terms of Gideon by no means it easy but are we. Is it trending up in terms of the entry level opportunities in your opinion or just kind of been like a steady churn learn. Obviously this would be from your vantage point now like it's like based on numbers but so I could look at the numbers and we do have quite a bit of data that we've made public public we for the last three years. We didn't do it this year just because we already done it so many times already so much. Data is a lot of work We we do. What's called the new coder survey and it shows like how many u s about fifty questions? We like thirty thousand respondents. Says Really Nice huge day to set. Yeah significant significant from statistical standpoint And if you dig into that you can see like how many months of experience people had before they you know asserted applying for jobs or how long they working in for jobs and you can. You can sort of play with the numbers and figure that out. I don't have like a really well informed answer on that a lot of what I hear here is just at the street level. People like saying that they got a job where people saying they haven't gotten a job yet. in reality messy every employer is different every country's different too. Do they know European. I say European. That's really like a collection of city states right and then you know you go to India you go to China in a you know these other countries where free cooking big and and the markets completely different I've been to startups in Shanghai Where I walk in the room and half the people people working in the developable pin our free cocaine grads right so so there are definitely jobs out there For people. It's just a question of what those jobs look like. And how many applications you have to make in. How many people are competing for the same jobs? I will say this though getting a job. I think a lot of people think it's all about your skills but it's really about three things in my opinion. It's about your skills. It's about your reputation and it's about your network whom you know if you know the right people you can get in even with subpar skills subpar radiation. If you have have a great reputation you may not be the best developer but rankle know who you are from your blog posts or from your youtube channel for your podcast. Were or just from your open source projects that you've contributed to. Everyone was saying applies to de risk a choice right and the Rey de risk choices by some sort of assurance or certainty. If you have a decent reputation can kind of Beth. Decent Person De risking is exactly what I think employers are trying to ensure they're just trying to make the catastrophic choice that results in them having to terminate terminate somebody pay severance and then go through the entire job all over again yeah. It's it's costly. It's funny that Who you know come so it makes sense but we try to be in a world where it's not about who you know because it's it's almost seems unfair and yet it totally still is the facts except right right? That's what I mean like so if you don't know the right kind of people you can't build your reputation properly or at least maybe add to an area where you have less reputation you have somebody vouching for you evatt for lack of better terms if you have a network to some degree associated with you. They're they're they're therefore adding reputation the trustworthy you're right somebody worth betting on or taking a risk on and this is why like the local markets are so important people focus so much on silicon valley in like a hyper competitive like trying to get a job offer from Google facebook Amazon. But if you go to a lot of communities like we're here in Houston right and I live in. I live in the Dallas Metropolitan Poyton area and Jerry lives up in Omaha like these are all completely different tech ecosystem with different employers different hiring cultures Different circles of people that meet together for talks and Events and Different professional groups. I mean like if you learn your local Meta and if your content to stay in the city you're you are in. Currently there won't necessarily be like a clear road map for you to get to that job but if you pound the pavement and if you get to meet people I think that things will work out for you because you already doing a lot more work than most any job like you said Many companies. That aren't aren't traditional software. Companies need software people. And so as you know. The old saying goes offer eating the world..

developer Google Rico Kim Amazon FCC Apple spotify Gideon Inoue Sion facebook Omaha Microsoft Berg Houston Dallas Metropolitan Poyton Local Food Bank youtube
"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

10:49 min | 9 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

"Four years ago four years ago talk to you and since then you have literally blown up in many ways happy literally blew up exploded has got some four now. Okay figuratively literally. Jared's always Miami. Technically you're right can mean the exact right. Well it depends on what dictionary right in this case blown up meaning to start over again guys. How digging that flow? Yeah I will keep it keep it keep it but seriously four years ago you had a conversation with you much different free cocaine today then four years ago. What are you doing that so great? What are you doing so well? That has gotten to where you're at not just you but the rest of everyone that contributes tributaries pretty skeptical. Where we're not? I mean we tend to be at times. Skeptical paid to be yeah. We're paying the base skeptical. Well there's lots of stuff that comes out and writings last. I think we're talking about that earlier. In the show by the way kind of a companion podcast going on right here so definitely listen to the other one as well links will be cross posted. Its right soon as chicken out. I mentioned and lots of stuff. It's our radar and some things last and other things don't and I know one of the things we're talking about. Then or years ago now links in the show notes to the original Quincy Larson episode appalled. By the way it's been four years. I get you back. It should have been much faster. Yeah we usually have to be back sooner. You're still here you've blown up. You did not fail to sustain sales and that you agree with you blew up. Do Okay. Good deal well. I think the difference if I'm guessing is that then was just one pillar right now. You've got many anymore. How's that work? Yes so two thousand fourteen almost exactly five years ago. We launched just the curriculum itself itself. We had a chat room and So people would come into Free Co camp and they work through the curriculum and they would ask questions in a chat room which was originally originally hip chat and then it was slack and then it was later we saw us get her but now the main thing is the forum so the curriculum was the the original pillar of free go camping now. Now we have the second pillar which is the form which is growing really rapidly? And we've got a lot of exciting things going on there that I can talk about and then the third pillar is the publication location Free cocaine dot org slash news You Find it interesting. That forums are cool again. They're always cool ish rush. I mean to some degree Shirley essential community of the Internet to a certain degree. Yes but then you have social networks and you've got groups within those has networks. It's like you know what is truly a form. So you're saying in this case a little forum hosted place where people can have threaded discussions right right over long periods of time that's index by Google. That has its own search tools. That has accounts That has moderator tools. All of those things where the the organization WHO's hosting that forum has control play control yet if you contrast this with like you know a suburb it or if you contrast this with a facebook group forum gives a lot more organization a lot more power to the organization also means that data stays on that server with that organization. It's not being used for advertising. Curious how you host it what do you do. Yeah we use discourse which is really popular form tool created by Jeff Atwood and is is a partner. Sam I can't remember last night's Afrin Safran thank you and they are really solid developers. They also know a lot about unlike communities stack overflow being one of the big ones so a lot of the same defaults that they bring to the table are what we use. Yeah what about literal hosting though do you host it yourself. What do you? What's your which architecture w ass or yes so it's it's a docker image and we just we have on digital ocean? Okay Gotcha. So He's a lot we publish this whole organization like visualization of Ricco Camps Architecture and the discourse supports our instant so that eighty bucks a month I say for Cross to have hosted digital ocean. I was asking because discourse discourse does have like a service version right. Yes so you're not hosted by them yesterday but he's got support well in the sense that like we every six months also. There's some huge thing I start on their own medicines course like. Hey Yeah exactly. Yeah and we have as Jackson's but if something catastrophic you you know we can ask them to go. Click flip the switches right so the buck doesn't stop at you in terms of the U. Host. It but you gotta help well Free Co camp. The the form is one of the bigger ones. I think there are probably some like I know blizzard and describe big so we're getting about five million views a month on the nice and big eyes and there's a lot of recurring active you. I mean there's lots of conversations form hit. Some people are just googling. They find a solution in a form. But there's a lot of people are actually like actively part of the community posting answers posing questions on the daily at any given time there might be sixty eight hundred people logged in using the form. Let me go back and clarify the skepticism. Because it wasn't that we were kept the goal of the concept or the idea free code camp. It was really just like the will continue to last. Because you're nonprofit there's lots of startups that are also on profits. They're just they don't want to be nonprofits but they are. But we talked about the sustainability of like you viewpoint yourself into this. We didn't know it was pretty new at the time all you had was curriculum and he was like. How is this going to be around five putting time into and it seemed like a lot of work and anytime you see those those things? It's just a recipe for maybe yeah for burnout or or goat farming in the right. But you're still here. You're still standing. So I guess that's maybe the question is denny's thriving fair enough striving. What have you found what's working what? How did you get to this point so you know you have a probably a team you have lots of people? So what'd you figure out that way. Yeah well last time. I was on Youtube. We're both asking. Lots of have very similar questions about sustainability. Because we do. Yeah and you. Since you've had the whole request commits series which is phenomenal. I recommend recommend everybody. Check it out and listen to that and not all Mike Rogers and That was really helpful for me as well. Just thinking about open source and sustainability Since I visited we finally got five a one. C three status which is the. US government's Tax Exempt ramped satis code. It's the same one that like Doctors Without Borders and the Red Cross and all these big NGOs have right so now if you donate the Free Co camp you can deduct it from your taxes and we ourselves don't have to pay taxes. which is a huge savings? Yeah it makes a big difference so we were able all to shift from just selling merchandise. which was the only way we were sustaining? Free Co camp. which you know spoiler alert? It was barely covering even the servers. Let alone the payroll and other things and I put a lot of my savings INTO IT I put about one hundred fifty thousand dollars in Free Co camp which Q.. Mine I was a teacher in the school director. That's like I was basically saving a half of everything I earned for like ten years. That was the money that I had. We were GONNA use that to get a house or a down payment on on a house in California But they keep you up nights like we're used were you. Were you confident. You're gonNA find that that thing that works or their nights where you're like you know and what. I'm just wasting my savings away so I wasn't. I never thought it was wasted because people were benefiting tremendously but I was worried that I it was not going to work out and I was going to have to go get a job but really. That's like that's a very nice first world problem to have. Oh my gosh if this fails then get. These jobs are suffering right right but I mean ten years of your savings gone is beyond that what he's saying is that that that doesn't outweigh the risk of loss and I guess to some degree the belief in what you were doing enough to keep going what you've done him a nice though that kind of risk that kind of kind of any fear anything like were you really twitching. Oh yeah it was a long in. I had my first child about what here in gets deeper So you know that was we were living in A. We were living in the bay area in a one bedroom apartment. It was like seven hundred square feet and we had a baby in there and I was just on my laptop all day long everyday the day's crunching Trying to reassure my wife That we would pull through and everything would be okay now. She had a job at a company doing the accounting and she as a result we had health insurance so our position was already better than a lot of Americans and we. We both had lots of options. So I just want to emphasize that like we were coming from a position of great flexibility and privilege that a lot of people do not enjoy so I don't want to sound sound like at all Because really I mean worst case scenario I'd like standing offers from different companies. That would probably hired me and all those things. Thanks but free coca was doing great people using it people loved it and I knew that we can make it work. Where there's use there's usefulness? Yeah so what what financially made it work. Finally like it's working now right. We're break even essentially so what we did was Soon as it became clear that we were GonNa get our tax exempt status. Not that we actually got it quite yet but before that we had always been just shifting if you want to support free cocaine okay pure donate money instead to women who code or donate money to heck club or donate money to hacker joe or some of these other nonprofits. That are helping thing because we really wanted to make sure that people are able to duck things in in. The money was going to proper nonprofit so once we got the nonprofit status this retroactively all all the donations to us were tax deductible and I remember just holding my newborn son and holding up the the certification in that I got from the US government and that was kind of the light at the end of the tunnel and from there. We just worked really hard to get a whole lot of people doing monthly recurring donations to us. which is beneficial? Not only because a lot of people can afford you know five twenty even twenty five dollars a few people getting like two hundred fifty dollars a month. A lot of people can afford that and It says it's monthly. It gives us the.

cocaine Free Co US Jared facebook Jeff Atwood Google Miami Quincy Larson Youtube Mike Rogers California Ricco Camps Architecture U. Host Afrin Safran Sam Jackson
"five years" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

02:18 min | 1 year ago

"five years" Discussed on Reveal

"This is reveal a mallet we've been hearing about the children's stucco. Now rue the tiny island nation in the South Pacific, the refugees asylum seekers who tried to reach Australia by boat, but that country didn't want them and instead sent them to an immigrant attention camp on now rue Olivia Rousse originally reported this story for the Australian Broadcasting Corporation show background briefing their partners on today's episode. Olivia neru is an independent country. So why did it take on all of these refugees from Australia? What's amazing is that? Now rue was once one of the world's richest countries in terms of GDP per capita. But all that money came from one resource phosphate from thousands of years of accumulated guano, basically bird poo from seabirds make guess what happened there. All the bird poop ran out. Yeah. Pretty much strip mining left their whole island environmentally ravaged and broke. Okay. So now, this island has no resources need some way to bring in money. That's exactly right. And a stray Leah pays. Now rue about fifteen hundred dollars per person per month in visa faze alone. That's more than ten million dollars just in the last financial year, which is close to ten percent of the country's GDP. So Australia's been paying now rude to keep hundreds of families in this detention camp for five years in a Livia you've been reporting on how the kids who have almost nothing to do. And no clear future can start to just shut down. Yeah. They do a number of children's stopped eating and drinking and talking and just as one of the doctors on the island, right? Like hold up in a fetal position hidden under blankets in dark rooms unresponsive to anyone they weren't in. A coma. But they may as well have been it's cold resignation syndrome. That is a really horrible name. Just the idea of kids giving up being resigned to their fates. It is and it's one of the most persistent mental health conditions for children on now rue because their situation off is the perfect storm of conditions for it to take hold. They've got histories that marked by trauma. And now this offering from.

Australia Olivia neru Olivia Rousse Australian Broadcasting Corpor South Pacific Leah coma Livia fifteen hundred dollars ten million dollars ten percent five years
"five years" Discussed on Reveal

Reveal

03:40 min | 1 year ago

"five years" Discussed on Reveal

"Now rue all the refugees on now rue tried to reach Australia by boat to claim asylum, but both liberal and conservative politicians in Estrella wanted to stop them. What's really strange is that most asylum seekers come to a strategy by plane, and those people aren't being targeted the fates of just a few thousand people he came by boat have taken over the whole immigration debate here in a stray Ilya kind of like the wall has here in the US. Right. We can't have a wall. Here. We have sixteen thousand miles of coastline. So stopping the boats is how our politicians talk about securing our border. They also claim that they're trying to avoid people dying at sea. Boats sink. So for the past five and a half years ustralia has had a hard line position. No asylum seekers coming by boat will ever be allowed to settle here. Even if they're found to be genuine refugees and most are they fleeing war and political persecution. Instead, they sent a to Pacific islands now. Rue and Mana silent in Papua, New Guinea Australia, Coles as sites offshore processing facilities. There was a moment. Where it seemed like many of these refugees might actually be resettled in the US. Yeah, that's right. In two thousand sixteen US President Barack Obama struck a deal with a stray in prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull, the prime minister, Malcolm Turnbull, has announced a one off deal to resettle refugees from Madison and narrow in the United States. It is a one of agreement. It will not be repeated up to two thousand refugees was supposed to go to America. But the process hadn't even begun by the time president, Donna. Trump took office. The president is on a Twitter spree this morning, and he is not mincing words diplomacy in one hundred and forty characters or less tweeting. Do you believe it? The Obama administration agreed to take thousands of illegal immigrants from Australia. Why I will study this dumb deal that deal aiming to resettle refugees, not undocumented immigrants from to Pacific islands into the US. After just a week in office. Trump issued abroad executive order that had a huge impact on that deal. Dozens of people remain in detention at airports across America this morning over how US president Donald Trump's order bang entry. Trump's 2017 travel ban targeted citizens of seven majority Muslim countries. And it changed everything for the people on now. Rue around the third of the refugees there were from Iran, and that door largely closed for them as it did for the Somalis, the Syrians the Iraqis and Sudanese people on the island, meaning Australia won't take them. And now the US won't honored steel so kids like Maya are stuck exactly in. Now rue that final rejection was like a trigger that set off this contagion of despair the children in the camp responded in a surreal way. I started to hear from advocates about kids not eighteen or drinking not even responding to voices and falling into these almost catatonic state Olivia. Your story is going to take us inside the laws of these kids and their families. So I want to let listeners know that parts of the story will be tough to. Here. I also should say that Livia originally reported the story with your Augusta Broadcasting Corporation and its show background briefing their partners on this episode. So Livia can you start off telling us how you were able to connect with these kids on now rue sure in August last year..

United States New Guinea Australia Rue Donald Trump president Malcolm Turnbull Livia America Ilya Barack Obama prime minister Obama administration Pacific islands Estrella ustralia Papua Augusta Broadcasting Corporati Twitter Coles