39 Burst results for "five months"

CDC to passengers and workers: Wear a mask when you are on a plane, train, bus or other public transit

Bloomberg Daybreak

00:17 sec | 4 d ago

CDC to passengers and workers: Wear a mask when you are on a plane, train, bus or other public transit

"The CDC has issued a strong recommendation for mask wearing by both passengers and operators on planes, trains, buses and taxis to prevent the spread of the Corona virus here. Lines began requiring masks more than five months ago and tough into their rules is the pandemic worsened across the U. S.

CDC
Fresh update on "five months" discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP Show

ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP Show

00:32 min | 1 hr ago

Fresh update on "five months" discussed on ESPN Chicago 1000 - WMVP Show

"Dennis outside linebacker, makes the tackle on. Jafar was the running back starting two years ago that that opening with the huge win against Michigan unit with such down since Injuries really pushed him down the down the depth chart the last year and a half trying to find time now behind Kyron Williams and Chris Tyree go today will pump the ball away from inside their own. Five months is away Spiral Turner, who catches it at his own 38 reverse. Runs down here to the near side line, crosses the field and finds a way to keep his feet across the 40 and 50 Yard line pushed out of bounds inside a Notre Dame territory. There is a penalty marker way back at the 30 yard line. We'll check in on that. After a 17 yard return, Turner got tackled, attempted tackled by everybody on that defense for Notre Dame. Search bloc in the back. Well meeting there we wait to hear from Dwayne Height. The referee this afternoon. During the return vehicle, blocking the back number five. Receiving 10 Yard penalty. First down 9 10 left in the game here in.

Spiral Turner Jafar Notre Dame Kyron Williams Dwayne Height Chris Tyree Dennis Michigan
The End of Human Fighter Pilots?

The Pilot Network Podcast

03:23 min | 4 d ago

The End of Human Fighter Pilots?

"Pentagon is or off to pit against human pilots and live fighter trials. All right. So this is from c4isr. The article goes on to discuss a bunch of really unique pieces of Testing that happened in simulated dog fights between an AI algorithm and F-16 pilot and they I think they beat him something like five times five out of five months and they want to say that by 2020 for artificial intelligence could they're going to put that live trial against each other are born and we're going to see what happens and it's the end of the age of the fighter pilot which means and the age for all Pilots blah blah blah. Keep going down that road talk about it. Yeah, and one of the few more interesting things though was the quote the ai's resounding Victory demonstrated the ability of advanced algorithms to outperform humans in virtual dog fights these simulations culminate in a real world competition involving full-scale tactical aircraft in 2024. They go further on to say and I think this is a quote from the article that off. Really like is by Colonel Dan je veux te voir a sec. Hope I'm saying that right, but there are quote. There are a lot of caveats and disclaimers to add in here. That after the test including that the a I had significant information that might not be available in an actual combat scenario and that they're maybe just moving to a bad idea of a loyal wingman setup where a number of systems are controlled by One Pilot or that the way I could take over existing systems making them and optionally humanly piloted platform. I don't know where I stand on all this I guess as a Aviator, I'm not really excited about the idea of fighter pilot buddies in mind losing their jobs and losing that thrill and what they've always wanted to do what they're really really good at. I do understand that. I'm not a Luddite and I get it that if stuff is going to progress we need to be ready to put up with it or kind of died on the vine. I do understand that premise of it and I also am readily willing to admit that there's certain things human beings can't do better than computers. And in the long run off that way I might have the capability to do some of that what I don't understand is I get it that day. I algorithmic algorithms might be able to figure out how to better calculate. She rapidly intercept angles and all that stuff all the fighter pilot stuff that I don't know but what happens if you throw weather into the mix or something that's outside of that case. I mean, I guess with a i learning and I'm not an expert on any of this stuff. I'm not even a novice with a learning in a probably be able to figure all that out, but I don't understand it. I know that there's a lot of you smarty people out there who probably do so I guess my question for you is could you just stop doing it so we can continue to fly airplanes. I know that's nice. Reality, but I figured I'd try to ask the question. Anyways, well

One Pilot Pentagon
Fresh update on "five months" discussed on KCBS Radio Weekend News

KCBS Radio Weekend News

00:35 min | 2 hrs ago

Fresh update on "five months" discussed on KCBS Radio Weekend News

"PayPal. Hey, CBS News Time to 42 turkey farmers Well, these days, they're walking on eggshells. KCBS is Rebecca Corral tells us many of the big producers have worried they may have bread. Too many big birds. This year, Thanksgiving means friends and family gathered around a big table watching their host carve a £24 bird. Well, that's what usually happens is your Thanksgiving is going to be all together different. Smaller family get togethers. We're not going to be serving. You know these huge turkey something huge. Phil Lempert is a food industry analyst and editor of supermarket guru dot com this year because of social distancing, we're gonna have the celebration at Thanksgiving because of people being fearful of going into other people's homes because of wearing mask people who pay attention to science will simply avoid the annual get together so they don't get or spread the virus, opting instead for much smaller dinners. Maybe you and two people in your bubble. The problem goes back four or five months ago because That long for Turkey to grow, and that was early in the pandemic, when most growers probably didn't realize demand would be so low this year. It's bad news for the industry, but it could end up your gain. All those unsold turkeys could lead to low low prices in the days after Thanksgiving. Rebecca Coral KCBS long as there's plenty of stuffing, nothingto worry about covert 19 hits another team and could it impact the Olympics will have more on that coming up in just about 60. Seconds on KCBS Duncan's new wake up Go to mean You.

Phil Lempert Kcbs Turkey Rebecca Corral Rebecca Coral CBS Duncan Olympics Analyst Editor
NYC finds few positive cases as schools open

10 10 WINS 24 Hour News

00:29 sec | 5 d ago

NYC finds few positive cases as schools open

"Schools report a minimal number of positive results after the first round of random tests of more than 10,000 results. Just 18 came back positive. About New Jersey is another story. It reports nearly 1300 new cases yesterday. That's the second highest total in five months. Community spread is being seen throughout the state. But the case load in Monmouth and Ocean County's has nearly doubled in recent weeks, the

New Jersey Ocean County Monmouth
Fresh update on "five months" discussed on Handel On The Law

Handel On The Law

01:00 min | 4 hrs ago

Fresh update on "five months" discussed on Handel On The Law

"I don't know if I have to say the name of the company now you don't have to. Okay. I haven't AH contract. Signed was one of the home warranty insurance. like five months ago. And after three months I ask I call them I. have some problem with. My Dryer and Washer. So they send somebody on, he diagnosed it. And like over. all lauded and. I say we ought to other people living in the home how? Load. We all just. Close, so they send another one. Gone he gives some completely different. different diagnose. Dawson's Dan like almost two months. Yeah. We GonNa have it. We got another parrot. We're GONNA. Do we. Think they're there. Answer was we are waiting for the manufacture Dobro, use this and we repair. and. I guess there. So, that's why I say. Okay Guys I. Don't want. With Throw me I can't tell them icon rock. But still you are in charge of repairing them. So yes. Steve. From them after like. More than two months I have in this. Letter. Saying that Yeah. My accent other month. Maybe we need another month to do it and you have to keep paying but another month okay. Hang on a minute..

Washer Dawson Steve DAN
Biden holds drive-in rally in Michigan, Harris tests negative for COVID-19

News, Traffic and Weather

00:19 sec | 6 d ago

Biden holds drive-in rally in Michigan, Harris tests negative for COVID-19

"Senator Camilla Harris said to return to campaigning tomorrow. She suspended travel this week after an aide tested positive for covert. 19 Harris tested negative. And every man who tried to hire that he killed a woman in a hit and run was sentenced to three years and five months in prison Thomas Michael Rock, pleading guilty earlier this month in

Senator Camilla Harris Thomas Michael Rock
Fresh update on "five months" discussed on Ric Edelman

Ric Edelman

00:36 min | 6 hrs ago

Fresh update on "five months" discussed on Ric Edelman

"The hospital walls. Dr Natan Hat in the University of Utah, Pulmonologist says if try their best to open an additional treatment area. Over the last five months. We have exceeded our ice you capacity. Um and we are in our search capacity, which obviously could significant strain on our healthcare system. There's Katrina, Emery says the isolation is leading to many of her patients having feelings of intense loneliness. Can you imagine? Being in a hospital for 90 days without the touch or hug of your family out of the Senate floor Chuck Schumer this afternoon during a Saturday session, blasting Republicans for trying to ram through the Supreme Court nomination of Amy Cockney Barrett after road blocking President Obama's candidate, Merrick Garland, in 2016 4 years ago. In a Democratic president nominated to justice Republicans profess to care about giving the American people a voice. Not so now. Not when a Republican nominated justice is on the line there. It is expected to be confirmed to the bench before the election. You're listening to ABC News..

Dr Natan Hat Amy Cockney Barrett Chuck Schumer President Trump Merrick Garland President Obama Abc News Katrina University Of Utah Emery Supreme Court Senate
U.S. Industrial Production Fell 0.6% in September

WBBM Evening News

00:16 sec | Last week

U.S. Industrial Production Fell 0.6% in September

"Time. Five months. Federal Reserve says industrial production fell 50.6% in September. That's the weakest showing since a drop of nearly 13% in April during the spring lockdowns of businesses that paralyzed the economy. Production of motor

Federal Reserve
Man who attacked Virginia protesters avoids federal prison

Jeff Katz

00:35 sec | Last week

Man who attacked Virginia protesters avoids federal prison

"To 14 months in prison for attacking anti racism protesters at the White Nationalist Rally and at Ah torch lit march through the campus. The judge Norman Moon today gave 26 year old coal wide credit for seven months. He served in jail after his arrest in five months of home confinement That leaves two more months under house arrest. White was one of four members or associates of a white nationalist group called Rise above movement, who were charged with conspiring to riot at the Unite The right rally in Charlottesville in August. 2017 The federal budget deficit. It's a staggering

Norman Moon White Charlottesville
Retail sales rose 1.9 percent in September

All of It

00:32 sec | Last week

Retail sales rose 1.9 percent in September

"Sales rose 1.9% in September, more than twice the increased forecasters were expecting. Consumer spent Mohr last month on cars, sporting goods and especially clothing, which helped give a lift a long suffering department stores. A separate study from the Federal Reserve shows. The industrial production declined in September for the first time in five months, while factory output has rebounded from its springtime lows, it remains about 6.5% below pre pandemic levels. That's NPR's Scott Horsefly reporting at last check on Wall Street. The Dow was up

Scott Horsefly Federal Reserve Mohr NPR
More than 3,000 new COVID-19 cases in Illinois

WBBM Morning News

00:48 sec | 2 weeks ago

More than 3,000 new COVID-19 cases in Illinois

"Health officials in Illinois reporting more than 3000 New Cove. It cases and the state hasn't seen this many in five months, with the exception of one day in September, when there was a backlog of tests, one big difference between them or than 3000 new covert cases just reported. And the 3000 plus cases in May. The May cases represent far fewer tests just over 17,000 tests, compared to an average daily testing number of just under 60,000 tests. Now the most recent positivity rate in the state of Illinois 3.7% and inching upward Chicago's positivity rate 4.2% staying steady State wide the Department of Public Health is reporting 32 deaths.

Illinois New Cove Department Of Public Health Chicago
Arlie Hochschild with Krista Tippett

On Being with Krista Tippett

06:48 min | 2 weeks ago

Arlie Hochschild with Krista Tippett

"High is at Arley. Yes Hi Krista yes good to meet. Thank you so much for doing this and I. so apologize for the delay as we had in this totally unusual and I think it happened twice with you I. Really Apologize. No problem but but what we need to talk about has not. diminished. So here we are. We have construction going on here in our in our studio and so like coming in. itself is very quiet, but there's just hammering as I walk in. For an audio yeah program. So good. Are you? Are they going to I mean I don't hear it so. Where where are you? Right now. Are, you talking to me? Yes. Yeah. I'm in North Gate Hall, which is in. The basement of the journalism department at UC Berkeley Okay Okay Yeah Berkeley. Three blocks from our home. Oh, what a what a wonderful place to live. I think we're pretty good here. I. Don't like to. I. Don't want to start talking about anything substantive until we're really doing it. So yeah, I. Think we're fine. Good and where you KRISTA. Minneapolis. Okay. Yeah. Yeah. It's you'll. You'll understand this I grew up in Oklahoma and kind of went far far far far far away and And that's become more important to me in these recent years that you know that he and and then our studios in Minneapolis has been for a long time and. I've thought across the years about how the show might have been served by being on one of the coasts and. And in these last few years since two thousand sixteen. I'm I'm so glad we're in the middle of the country you know. It's Really important in life giving. So. Good Yeah So, you were the child of a Foreign Service officer. So you sound like you grew up all over the world. Well. Yes to to some degree. Yeah. Starting at age twelve. Yeah it was pivotal. Father was ambassador us. Ambassador to New Zealand. Ghana and Tunisia. Yeah we don't need to go into his rank spread. Yeah. But did you live where those places you lived in I lived in Israel? And from aged twelve to fourteen, very pivotal experience. And then New Zealand Wellington New Zealand. The university. there Victoria University so in New Zealand and then my folks were in Ghana and I spent a summer. Ana But by then I was in college and then they weren't Tunisia and I. Actually spent five months a doing a study on the emancipation of Tunisia and girls so. These French questionnaires. Second Year of Grad School at Berkeley. So. yes. So I was very. Fortunate, really to get to experience all that. Yeah. Yeah was there a religious or spiritual background to your childhood in your family or in those places? Yeah. Yeah. I would say there there was And So. Are we starting your going? Yeah. All right okay. yeah my parents were very religious, unitarian? And So religious in the sense of it being a very important thing to go to church on Sunday and. My brother and I would. Kind of. Wrestle with each other and tickle. In the back seat of her whole sudden Hudson in Silver Spring Maryland and And Go. Drive to all souls UNITARIAN church in Washington DC very important to my father especially and I didn't feel particularly religious. At that point and. But if I look back on it what. the influence of that was is that. There's An important part of one's self to express and to learn to develop and that. For. UNITARIAN inside the message I took away is that it's very big world and we have to learn to. get to know and. Empathize with. People in radically different cultures and that that's a good thing to live in a big world. I think by the time I was. Sixteen. I had that message, but I felt something missing. And I got interested in quakers who? Be Much. More. Okay Gang. So what are we going to do about it? You know view terriers were very talky. Talkers talk talk of the thinkers looked like they were kind of. interesting. They were doers, and so I would say. That that. Connection for me. when I was in high school very informal I didn't become a former quaker anything. But It led me to volunteer on weekends when I was in high school At something we called Neighbourhood House on tenth and L.. Street. was in the middle of the. the back area of Washington

Tunisia New Zealand Berkeley New Zealand Wellington New Zea Washington Minneapolis Ghana Arley Oklahoma North Gate Hall Israel Neighbourhood House Grad School Victoria University Silver Spring Maryland Officer Foreign Service
How to Use Calculators and Quizzes to Skyrocket Leads with Randy Rayess

Marketing School

05:08 min | 2 weeks ago

How to Use Calculators and Quizzes to Skyrocket Leads with Randy Rayess

"Okay everyone today, we've got another special episode of Marketing School where we bring on amazing guests to teach you the things that they know the cool companies out. There are part of an also other cool stuff that they are doing, and our next guest is randy res-, who I've known for years and years. He's got a company called out. One of the CO founders and outgrow is a platform that lets marketers. Launch Interactive calculators that boosts customer engagement and lead to higher conversion I. Firstly used it I love it. I mentioned it a couple of times. Sources also on this podcast as well. Randy is also the CO founder of venture packed. Are you still part of as well? Yeah that's cool. So Randy, I, mean you know it's it's been a very long time have spoken to you for while you've now moved up to the bay area but how are things going man going? Well, it's going well as you know, it's kind of in the middle of the covert situation for the last five months but otherwise, he's been doing our best in Algebra to help the companies that were have been. And to make sure our team members are comfortable with the new from home setup Yup. Cool. So can you tell us a little more about outgrow how it works and also how you guys make money shirt? So what is basically tool focused on helping marketers improve their conversion rates and engagement on their websites, and so the way we help with that is we make it easy for marketers to build a wide range of interactive personally tools. So if someone lands on your page, they instead of just having regular contact us form, you can create more powerful interactive tools like an Roi calculator, a cost savings calculator. Chopped balked and assessment recommendation engine. So all these different tools we make it easy for marketers to build without any technicolor design skill and it helps conversion engagement. And the business itself, how does pricing work if People Wanna get started and then I'd like to know also whatever number you can around the business whether it's growth rates, revenues, whatever you're Oakland to sharing. Sure. So the plans will vary. So our small plan is around fourteen a month and are larger plant and it goes up from there depending on features in needs for people in this podcast. If they go to Algebra dot co forward slash school they get a thirty day trial for the a lot more time to really try out the tool for free without a card required than we can help them on custom plant or one of our standard plants. So really it's going. To start way than if you have a advanced need, we can create a custom planner or you can use one of our larger plants in terms of scale. So we have over five thousand page of businesses that use us, and we have about eight core content types that people will build with our platform. The main ones are calculators, quizzes, chat bots, recommendation engines in essence. Got It. I mean if I were to look at low and five thousand paying customers. So you're probably north of seventy grand monthly recurring revenue something around that range could be probably more because you average it outright something like that. Well. So we have a wide range of the fourteen is the lowest plan, and then we have a higher plans that go up from there so. It'll be like five thousand times. Maybe I don't know you could be at two, hundred, fifty grand are who knows right but I don't need exact number me I just tried to play the guessing game right now out grows has been successful it's been continue to grow I mean, I, think this is maybe five years ago or so could be four years ago you know Randy and I were working out of a we were in downtown Los Angeles. Times. Have Changed Man. So right now because there's one website I can think of the entire website and just calculators right so what context would people be want to use something like outgrow? Why should they be using that over maybe like creating e book or using one of those landing page tools? Yeah. Sure. So I think the way to think about it is, of course, you know financial health and wellness will have lots. Of. calculators quizzes as their core content right you know what's the interest rate on a mortgage? What's The you know your retirement investing health and wellness for like what's up Yoga do the fitness routines those things are examples that everyone knows but there's actually a lot that can be done in other industries as well. So for example, in SAS, whereas company and outgrow, we help people figure out what types of ideas they can build. Using our tool, we have an idea generation tool women are white calculator to help people figure out what are Y of using outgrow based on how many the lead lift that they can get. So companies lied you know salesforce, they'll be marquette they'll use outgrow to help better educate their audience in a much more personalized wait. So instead of just saying Oh, hey, this design software that can help you you try to get A. Sense of what their needs are, and then you specify the specific tool, the specific plan or the specific value to provides that's relevant to them, and so that kind of flow is different from a more static these content that might come through you booker started blocks or anything we complement those. Well, it's not I don't think it has to be one or the other what we've seen as most people do both

Randy Res Marketing School Co Founder Chopped Booker Oakland Los Angeles
Hundreds of Regal, Cineworld movie theaters to close

What A Day

00:45 sec | 2 weeks ago

Hundreds of Regal, Cineworld movie theaters to close

"James Bond has defeated his toughest enemy yet he's a wealthy arms dealer who is transformed by a freak accident into a global movie theater chain sin a world is considering temporarily closing all their theaters in the UK and. Plus hundreds of their regal cinemas theatres in the. US after the makers of the latest James Bond movie announced on Friday that they were delaying their release. The film is called no time to die and it will push nearly five months to April twenty twenty one hopefully by then people will be able to hear the title without hyperventilating and trying to jump through. The projector screen if you're surprised that a large company like cinemark can rely so much on just one movie you're underestimating the size of the Daniel Craig Industrial Complex other tentpole movies like Dune, and Pixar Soul remains scheduled for twenty twenty but those could still get delayed or move streaming platforms.

James Bond Daniel Craig Industrial Comple Cinemark UK Pixar Twenty Twenty
Smaug: Ransomware-as-a-service drag(s)on

The CyberWire

06:27 min | 3 weeks ago

Smaug: Ransomware-as-a-service drag(s)on

"Was caught in our collection and it was sort of identified to be A. Somewhat. Of A new. Grant somewhere as a service that we haven't really seen much of A. Analysis about it you sort of decided to sort of dig deeper into it. That's yellow keen Kennedy, and what we found I was a third of a quicksilver report around the initial panel that has been found as part of its Announcement or advertisement on the dark web but we couldn't find anything around of the malware. How worked thinks that's a now when we actually had a sample. We could actually take the time. To. Find. Out How it operated what it did if they did something different compared to others over ransomware dose south there, and then sort of wanted to go ahead and. Put the whole picture together and do an analysis based on the threat actor was behind it, and where it sort of is announced on the dark web and what they're stalling sort of potential. Customers. Would as we want to say what do you can do with it? Well. Let's go through the research together first of all in terms of the threat actor who do you suppose as behind this? Out Now, that's a very loaded question Sorry. No. Not at all. That's rory gold. Unfortunately, it's quite difficult to really pinned on you know who this person is or where perhaps they come from. The few flags I mean for instance, there was a rather within the original post on the the Russian dark web forum it says that targeting any CIS as in Commonwealth of Independent States is prohibited. Resulted in media ban. So that might make one think okay. You know maybe it's a Russian or it's a Russian speaking actor but to be honest whenever you sort of whenever you dig through the panel and even look at the screen shots that they present you you can see that there's mountain characters hidden within some of the ransom notes. So, to be honest, count, really come off the fence on this one and can't really give it any sort of attribution but you know there are certain things that might make you think. Well and you you suspect that it's a small team behind this. Yeah. We we will be of the opinion that would be a very small team at least two people can't really put a maximum on it but. Wouldn't imagine it would be particularly large team our large effort behind him. Well. Let's go through it together. I mean the story SORTA begins, with, some forum. That you all tracked down take us through the story here. to essentially after you came find sort of some public facing stuff displaying the panel. Displaying the Displaying around somewhere as a service thought, it was for sale I look through some forums that I would know generally used to sell these sorts of items one form in particular a Russian language one. So I went through the forum I search tort and it was easy to find actually. As you can see anybody that looks at the block you can see the original hosting You know it's fairly generic. They give you a link to the tell you all the things does you how can figure it is it gives you the price it gives you the service fee. So Yep. You know as a starting point that was a good space to go with. Yeah, it's interesting to me to see the posts that you share here kind of the salesmanship that that's on display here also, a very good use of English. Yes suspiciously good use of English because obviously this is the this is the initial offering of around somewhere but if you take into the profile. Of the actor, well, we'll just call him coriander because that's what they're using. If you dig into their user history within the forum. I think it was maybe four or five months before the smog offering there was a post looking for a front and. You know they wanted somebody who was fluent in English and they're willing to pay two thousand dollars in Bitcoin. This post itself was written. Rather broken English, which of sort of contrast with small offering which was in perfect English grammatically. Then always. So the the distinction between the two would leave us lead us to believe that there were in fact, at least two different people you know an English speaking from deaf and then somebody else in the shadows as it were. Well, let's dig into the The ransomware offering itself can can you walk us through someone who engage with them? What sort of thing would they find themselves able to use? Unfortunately for businesses and individuals out there it's actually rather easy to do this. And the initial offering. It gives you an onion link to the website that smoke is hosted on. Once you click through to that. Url, and you go to your presented the fairly generic registration you put your email in generate a password confirm your password security code. Once, you do that. You get a confirmation on century mill address pretty quickly. From there, you're given a bitcoin wallet address. Ask you send your point to Bitcoin. So that address I'm once you're there, you know your you're. You're essentially you're good to go from that point. You can immediately go into the dashboard. That the developers created. If anybody looks at the blog. Photos of it it's actually I would argue it's quite a nice Ui. It's pretty clean. Rather. Sparse. Does what it needs to do. and honestly from there, it's just point and click you don't need to program anything. Really don't need to do anything at all you just you know come up with a campaign title. Whatever company you're targeting like the BBC or something you call it BBC. Sedative business model. So it'll it'll in fact all the computers with the not network but only needs one decryption code to release all of them or if you really want to be nasty, you sense it under the regular mode, which means every single computer needs its own decryption key. You can generate around some message saying you ha ha you've been postponed semi to this bitcoin address? and. There you go. You just click the create button I'm not saying you're away.

BBC Commonwealth Of Independent St A. Analysis Kennedy Rory Gold
Students return to campus in the UK

The Wonkhe Show - the higher education podcast

05:17 min | 3 weeks ago

Students return to campus in the UK

"Are packing their bags and moving into accommodation returning to campus. The term is getting up and running. The government is nowhere to be seen off on looking from your perspective. Oh, well, I've tried to keep my head down on it. Actually we've had it's been a you know, you as you can imagine an enormously busy time. We've been playing for this moment for four or five months. We have to keep adjusting the plans. We keep having, you know review government policy and advice that's coming in and local advice from northamptonshire. And I I find a lot of the media a distraction actually. I mean I did I did listening to you and yours that you were on earlier in the week marks. I thought would be really interesting to get the the perspective of parents families and students from all over the country and it was interesting but I think I found that the kind of the torrid frenzied pace of the media wasn't really helping a sink clearly through the issues where we had to take responsibility for things and make you know, birth. Decisions with a huge amount of uncertainty and lots of independent variables. So I'm really pleased to see if students come back onto campus. We've had teaching this week. It's been long distance that many students or staff indeed wandering around the campus in between times, but the rooms have been occupied and at that means I think that as far as I can tell all the plan to put in place for our lenders face-to-face and online teaching are going as well as we could hope at this point. We are we are dealing with high Flex that she may want to talk about cuz I know Jim came by Flex earlier, I think a few months ago, but we couldn't work out another way to do that where we had students who had to be off site and students who had to be on site and we didn't have enough rest and resource to teach them separately. So we are at the office trying to teach them synchronously and that's obviously challenging technically and and pedagogically course and you mentioned you and yours the thing that struck me about that and this thing into lots of popular dog. Pictures of the last week or so is that kind of cuz the concern of parents starting to cut through and and they're calling into radio for their writing to their MPS and that they're certainly making making Making Waves and I guess the government is has noticed that input really found a way of responding yet. But I've noticed that and that was that was kind of my take away from that. Are you seeing are you seeing kind of anxious parents as wage dropping effect of their children? Are they kind of talking to the university? I'm not getting it directly actually one of the things I find interesting about that you're you and your Christmas what I thought was actually rather infantilizing a month and the the presenter kept referring to you know, did you let your children do this and she kept correcting herself, but you know, obviously it's a very difficult time because I've got a seventeen-year-old and talk talking to a lot of parents and I do you know, I I fully appreciate what an anxious time is but my, you know, my my daughter says I said to her would you go and she was like, yeah, I'd really want to get started. Want to get stuck in and I I think I think one of the things we've we've done wrong actually in the whole representation of this is to treat it, you know Planet campus if it's different from the rest of the world and I think well, you know students been in they've been coping with all the things that would happen in the last five months six months. They don't expect University, you know to suddenly be this completely different world wear masks don't have to be worn or you know, there is some social distancing and I don't think we should compare this year necessarily to previous years as if we could wind the clock back cuz we can't wind the clock back. All we can do is make this here. It's good as it can be and I really think we're doing that simplifies to the parent who said there's an academic as well. And he said what we're doing is really hard. We're doing the best we can it's really important we do it properly and I totally agree with that. Yeah. Yeah, Joe. How're things on here Thursday. This week so our students were arriving this week. So all the majority of the undergraduate surviving this week. So could have lots of fingers crossed that it goes well, but just to kind of taught to transport with the past six months off. Of preparation that's been I've never seen anything like it in in higher education. We forget six months ago. We were working out how to do assessments online. So we could finish the last that could be Academic Year and then those kind of cheese contingency plans will be putting in place of have been meant that people work incredibly hard both are the teaching side of the learning technology side, but also on the operational side in terms of wage accommodation making sure that the the campuses can be as secure as possible putting testing and and tracing operations in place in short. So I think they're kind of paying for the office hoping for the best approach. Hopefully that that that will get us through I think just for talk to the point in terms of the student experience. I think we just have to do the very best we can for students to get the best education and birth experience that they can get under these circumstances. And as a Shaun said isn't isn't normal circumstances. We can't we can't pretend to teach but I think for these eighteen-year-old starting University now dead. I mean they've had a pretty challenging few months themselves with the with the results Fiasco, but also they've been locked down at home. They haven't been socializing with their the school friends. And in the same way that they would want to in the last year of school. So I think if I were a teen I'd be wanting to get to University irrespective of the of the circumstances.

Government Northamptonshire Starting University Academic Year Shaun JIM JOE
Coronavirus Deaths Pass One Million Worldwide

World News Tonight with David Muir

02:04 min | 3 weeks ago

Coronavirus Deaths Pass One Million Worldwide

"We turn to the coronavirus pandemic here in the US, the virus now taking more than a million lives worldwide and. One fifth of those lives right here in the US more than two hundred, five, thousand American lives lost now a new study tonight finding cases in children rising from two percent to ten percent since the spring and as New York City children go back to school for the first time the alarming rise in cases right here in this city threatening to close the schools again ABC's Eva pilgrim tonight from new. York. Just as New York City. Elementary students went back to the classroom schools already at risk of closing the city reporting Koba positivity rate taking up above three percent for the first time since June new clusters traced to nine zip coats if the schools are not safe. I'm not going to allow them to operate. Period. The city to close schools as early as next week if that number stays above three percent, the potential setback coming as Cova cases in children have risen from two percent to ten percent nationwide over the last five months. One of those cases twelve year old Elizabeth mcnew from Atlantic Beach Florida who passed away after A. Battle with the virus Elizabeth came to me and said. I'm not breathing right mummy tonight a new report from the New York Times says over the summer white. House. Officials tried to pressure the CDC to play down the risks of sending children back to School Olympia, troy of aid to the vice president sat in on Task Force meetings it was. People within the White House specifically tasking more junior level staff to try to find alternate data data that the narrative that they wanted, which was it only affects you know people above the age of seventy five and it doesn't effect younger school children. It was all part of the narrative of we need to open up the schools. And the White House pushing back on that New York Times reporting saying that the task force brings together experts with different expertise and views

New York City New York Times United States White House Elizabeth Mcnew York Eva Pilgrim ABC Cova Vice President School Olympia CDC Atlantic Beach Florida A. Battle
Chicago Celebrating The Sox And Cubs During The Playoffs, And During The Pandemic

All Things Considered

03:02 min | 3 weeks ago

Chicago Celebrating The Sox And Cubs During The Playoffs, And During The Pandemic

"Season no fans no fans at ballparks. at ballparks. Major Major League League Baseball Baseball playoffs playoffs are underway, are underway, and this and year this year there is there something is something else unusual. else unusual. Both Both Chicago Chicago teams teams are playing are playing in the postseason. in the postseason. It's just It's the just third the third time time the Cubs the Cubs and and the White the Sox White Sox reached reached the playoffs the playoffs in the same in the same year, year, NPR's NPR's David David Shaper Shaper reports. reports. If you were hanging around outside of Wrigley Field the day before a playoff game in a normal year, the neighborhood would be buzzing trucks delivering food and beer to the ballpark. Street vendors hawking souvenirs. And hundreds of fans creating an electric atmosphere. But in 2020 not so much, it's obviously wait quieter. It's It's definitely weird with her mask on 54 year old Chicago and Colleen getting sitting with friends at a table space far apart from the others. In the beer garden at Bernie's across the street from Wrigley, Watching the Cubs play the crosstown rival white socks over the final weekend of the season. It's definitely different is definitely weird. But the diehards are out and we love the sport. It's only a few diehard fans that air in this place, which would normally be packed shoulder to shoulder 42 year old Cubs fan Paul Schmitz doesn't mind. This the first time we've seen the game together this year, Schmitz is watching with his friend Steve Nick, who's a Sox fan? Yeah, I mean, it's it does not being able to go to games. But it's nice being able to just go on an outdoor area like this, and it's been really refreshing. After you know, for five months and nothing White Sox fans and Cubs fans rarely see eye to eye on many here in Chicago are thrilled that both teams are in the playoffs. That's only happened twice before, in 2008 and Way way back in 1906. But the White Sox beat the Cubs in the World Series in a normal season. Lifelong Sox fans, even Daven would take his family to a few games that he'd often watch others with friends at a bar and while that is now possible on a limited basis, Yeah, Verne is taking in the strangely wonderful season from his couch with a cold beer in his hand. I can't think better distraction, especially in a town like Chicago That certainly is bruised from 2020 for a bunch of different reasons. Rivals for more than a century, Davern says. Having both the Cubs and the White Sox in the playoffs gives the entire city something to cheer about a family party. Should involve some kind of a Disagreement about the Cubs in the socks and it's it's It's the greatest Chicago discussion and I think it's accidentally uniting in some ways, and in the year like 2020 or everything. Is this so Divisive, Of course, the dream matchup Here's for the Cubs and the socks to play each other in the World Series. As unlikely as that may be. The cruel joke of 2020 is That no matter who wins in the playoffs, the World Series will be in a neutral ballpark in Texas, and fans won't be there. David Shaper. NPR NEWS

Cubs SOX Chicago White Sox David David Shaper Shaper Wrigley Field David Shaper Major League League NPR Paul Schmitz Bernie Daven Davern Colleen Steve Nick Texas Verne
As schools reopen, new study shows increase of COVID-19 in children

WBZ Midday News

00:42 sec | 3 weeks ago

As schools reopen, new study shows increase of COVID-19 in children

"Let's talk about covert right now. The death toll from the pandemic globally has now topped one million lives. Concern is rising about the spread of this virus among Children. ABC is even Pilgrim, with more on that new study on kids and Kobe looking at just how many Children have tested positive with the virus, the American Academy of Pediatrics and Children's Hospital Association looking at a five month period. From April to September, finding a dramatic increase in the number of diagnosed cases among Children. The data showing pediatric open cases rose from 2.2% of all cases reported nationwide in April. 2 10% in September. This as students have been going back to school.

American Academy Of Pediatrics ABC Kobe Pilgrim
Uber gets 18-month London license after winning court appeal

The Paul W. Smith Show

05:58 min | 3 weeks ago

Uber gets 18-month London license after winning court appeal

"Quarter uber lost $1.8 billion because of the covert pandemic. I mean, think about it. How often have you called up an uber or a lift? To catch a ride since the pandemic hit. I mean, I know personally, we used these uber and our family quite a bit a couple times a month between the five of us now we probably haven't used it twice. In four or five months. The company is trying Teo, you know, survive and come back and part of that involves expanding and having rideshare all around the world, including London, where Uber was able to get their license back after winning the court challenge and join us on the phone Now to talk about this is Simon Oh, and Fox News correspondent Welcome to the Bobby Smith Show. My morning, Kevin. So sort of walk us through this. What is what has been the history of uber in London? And then where do we stand today? Why's this ruling so important? That is a troubled history. But this is certainly a crucial victory for uber the taxi service that, as you say, spread all over the world in in recent years, But that rapid expansion as bean bumpy at times on DH no less so than here in the British capital on who ended up being stripped of its license to operate here last year. There's bean a Serie of skirmishes with the transport authority before that, on DH Uber was then told last November that that was it. It was being banned for what transport for London said with a pattern of failings, including summit said that puts passengers at risk well. Uber appealed that ruling. Went across it apologize. It was contrite. It accepted there had bean flaws in the past, but it said it had changed, but it has put things right on DH. Now A judge has sided with the company and the magistrate who heard this case. 10 a crime, said that while Uber wass guilty of historic failings, he said, its record Was improving on that he was satisfied that it is now in the words they used fit and proper to hold a license. So whoever is back it is very happy. London today particularly lucrative market it count 3.5 million regular customers here, so those 3.5 million people can continue to use. That the service transport regulator says it will be watching you that very closely. Yes. So you know here in the states, uber had a bumpy start here is well, And the biggest concern, of course, was people safety and there would be a report here and then a report there and and all of a sudden people were very concerned about how safe they were getting in a car with a stranger. But uber seemed to put together quite a lengthy list of Of things that they that they go through to make sure that the rider's air safe the background checks and being able to identify that driver actually is a driver. The biggest problem after they started went through their their safety checks was, you know, making sure customers got in the right car that they were supposed to be getting in more than anything else? I have had They done that in London. Do they have the same safety procedures? Do they? They make sure that they do background checks on all of that on the drivers, and they do checks on the cars. You know, At first, there were there were not Checks on the actual fitness of the automobiles, But they changed that as well. The car's all have to go in and get checked out before somebody can become another driver. Well, I mean, it's certainly change from the kind of it's almost quite loose seeming ride, hailing service that it used to be way you accepted that it was just going to be a stranger, perhaps rolling up in their car, making a few dollars on the side and taking you around now it's very much much more like a taxi company on duty, said that it'd have increased its safety precautions that said that this verdict is a recognition of its commitment to safety and that it will continue to work constructively. With the regulator. But transport for London laid out a series of floors that it that I had identified last year and perhaps the most car racing complaint from the regulator. It's said that there was a florin uber systems that was allowing unauthorized drivers to upload their photos to another drivers accounts essentially borrow the accounts and make some money. For themselves, and so uber had Bean saying, You know, we've got this sorted. We're doing background checks on the drivers. They've overto have accounted their photos on. And then it turned out there was this huge loophole in the system that meant that wasn't really a promise that was worth more than the paper. It was. It was written in because transport for London said that those uninsured rides involving an unauthorized drivers It says that they carried out more than 14,000 rides before uber fixed this floor so pretty kind of damning indictment from the regulator now at the same time Stream, a half million regular customers. That's a lot. That's a significant proportion of London's population. And so I think this is probably quite helpful for the transport regulator and the mayor of London as well because they had officially kicked to browse and got rid of it. Then you would have some Customer to kind of got attached to ever much cheaper than traditional black cabs here. And so this perhaps works for both sides that the Duke said it has tightened up its safety precautions on for the regulator. It's able to keep you were operating and keep happy that the three million Londoners who use it

London Uber Bean Kevin TEO Fox News Simon Oh Bobby Smith
The CDC Doesn't Know Enough About Coronavirus In Tribal Nations

Short Wave

09:53 min | 3 weeks ago

The CDC Doesn't Know Enough About Coronavirus In Tribal Nations

"In August more than five months into the pandemic Jordan. Bennett. was about to see some data she'd waiting for for a long time. Yeah. No a truly I was really excited because there hasn't been any data on American Indians or Alaska natives since the start of the pandemic from the CDC that's right. Until last month while universities had released a good bit of data about Covid and its effect on some. Native, American and Alaskan natives. The CDC really hadn't Jordan would know she's a reporter and editor with the Public Media News organization Indian country today she's also a citizen of the Navajo nation and she's been covering the pandemic since the beginning as well as a twenty twenty census and all of Indian, country no big deal just all of Indian country Yeah. The whole. That data that she'd been waiting to? was released by the government as part of a weekly CDC report in mid August the title of the top red. COVID nineteen among American Indian and Alaska Native Persons in twenty three states and when i read it, it was Kinda already something that I knew and a lot of native public health experts already knew and what I was really looking for is you know what is new that they gave to us the report said because of existing inequities, native Americans and Alaskan natives are three point five times more likely to get the corona virus than white people but anyone who'd been looking at tribal nations as closely as Jordan had could have told you that they were. Being hit especially hard for example, at one point earlier this year, the Navajo nation, which spans parts of Arizona New Mexico and Utah The nation's now reporting nearly four thousand in nineteen cases in a population of one hundred, seventy, five thousand had an infection rate greater the New York State. Eight PM curfews on weekdays and on weekends a fifty seven hour lockdown, not even the gas stations are open. That was just one tribal nation that got a lot of attention. Many others had infection rates that were also higher than the hard hit states in the northeast like the Colorado River Indian tribes in Arizona and California the Yakima in Washington state or the White Mountain Apache tribe in Arizona. And data from the states where many of those reservations are located weren't included in the CDC report, which gets it a larger problem. If there's data had you know where the impact is, how do you know where you could send testing to where there's a lack testing? You have to have that data in order to create policies into also figured out how to distribute vaccines. This episode was the CDC does and doesn't know about Covid in native American and Alaskan. Native tribal nations and how Jordan is working to get more data to the people who need it most I mattie Safai and you're listening to shortwave from NPR. This report from the CDC which linked to in our episode notes does say two important things. The fact that native Americans and Alaskan natives are more likely to get the virus. That's one. The second thing is that compared to white people young folks in those communities people under eighteen tested positive at higher rates. When it comes to these findings, the CDC did make one thing clear. Here's one of the researchers on the study, Sarah Hatcher it really important that the. This disproportionate impact. Likely driven by versus stinks social and economic inequity not because of some biological or genetic. Persisting social and economic inequities we're talking about access to healthy food housing income levels, stuff like that. Here's Jordan again the and other just like public health infrastructure or in like the lack of investment in the public health infrastructures in native communities and you have over credit households, anders a number of inequities that this pandemic is bringing out. More on that in a bit. But first Jordan says that the CDC report is notable for what it does not include this report did leave out tons of cases right now it only looked at twenty three states and it didn't include Arizona. Is One of the hot spots in Indian country. And they account for at least a third of all the cove nineteen cases according to the report. They also left out states like Oklahoma Washington. California Colorado thousands and thousands of cases. And researchers from the CDC were up front about leaving all that data out. Here's Sara Hatcher. Again, our announcement is really not generalize beyond those twenty three state overall. And we're not really able to speculate whether we expect the overall rate to be higher or lower we. The reason some states got left out was because the they recorded about race and ethnicity including that for native, American, and Alaskan Native Cova Cases was incomplete and that was really at least surprising to me because. I like how can you not capture this data right here you have Arizona where you know again, the Salt River Pima, Maricopa Indian community Healer River, ending community, White Mountain Apache their cases are thousands You had the tone, nation and Navajo Nation and the possibly Yawkey tribe. There's just thousands of cases in this one St. So many gaps like in this data as well. I think just points to how the CDC doesn't really know tribal communities and know that Indian health system and how it's built instead up. So, let's talk about that. Now. It's much more complicated than this. But basically, when tribal nation signed treaties giving up their land, the federal government promised to provide them with healthcare and set up the Indian Health Service, a government funded network of hospitals and clinics. To deliver adequate healthcare to tribal nations but that's not what's happening right now and what the pandemic is very much highlighting. For years the IHS has been way underfunded per person the federal government spends about half the amount of money on the IHS. Medicaid. And that's part of the reason a lot of tribes over time have step to establish their own privately run tribal health clinics. So throw history. They all IHS. But then tribes wanted to you know take hold and own and operate their own healthcare. So that's how these tribal health clinics came about. At this point, the large majority of healthcare facilities are operated by tribes about eighty percent in those facilities are encouraged but not required to share data that they collect on the virus but Jordan says, that's something a lot of them do not want to do not with the federal government or even with reporters like her even now as a Navajo WOM-. In as a Navajo reporter, it's also difficult for me to try to get the data. Because then I understand that like I grew up around my background is in health and so I I know you know it's because of settler colonialism but also research to a lot of times and medical research you have researchers going in parachuting in parachuting out and they don't give back that data it at least from everything that I've seen the past several months trust is like the main factor in this That's one thing trust. There's also the reality that doctors can get race or ethnicity wrong in California where it's pretty prevalent from what sources tell me some doctors will just check a box on native people because of their surname, their surnames, more likely to be coming from like a Hispanic or line next or origin like Dominguez or Garcia or you know today's assumed there Um Latin x but they're not, and if those people wind up dying that seem incorrect data can wind up on their death certificate right? You don't know what's going on or the pact of the pandemic if you don't have that data if you don't know what the person died from. How are you going to prevent it and prevent more from dying from it? These factors lack of trust underfunded public health infrastructure, racial classification all add up to a picture of the pandemic that isn't complete. For example, there's an alarming lack of covid hospitalizations data for native American or Alaskan native folks stuff like if somebody was admitted to the hospital, the ICU or even died compared to white people, CDC only has about a third of that information for Alaskan natives and native Americans and I think that's just again it just goes back to how well you know the state health department or even like the CDC or the public health experts they're not these tribal communities

CDC Jordan Arizona Federal Government California Alaska Covid Reporter Indian Health Service American Indian Colorado River Indian Bennett. Sarah Hatcher White Mountain Apache Tribe Oklahoma Sara Hatcher
"five months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

05:37 min | 2 months ago

"five months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The true full effect of these of the increase in gun sales for several more months or years reporting on suicides tends to lag several months or or or even more in some cases. And so we we might not know the full effect of of this big increase in gun sales for some time. But you know even taking suicides sort of and putting that. Aside, we are seeing increases not only in homicides, but also just in in in everyday gun violence on that's attributed attributable. Partly, to pandemic stresses that people are feeling partly to stresses and perhaps fear of the social unrest that's happening around people. And certainly just with the increased availability of firearms I mean there's a lot of research to show that you know in any area in a household in neighborhood as the percentage of people who own guns increase the percentages of firearm violence increases in those places, and so the the prevalence or the more people that own guns the research is pretty. Clear that that does increase gun violence both both both on the suicide in interpersonal levels. The NRA has been struggling for a while now in terms of its internal politics in terms of investigations that have been lobbed against it and I'm wondering how we I mean we just you mentioned earlier that both Harrison Biden have very low ranking, thin the NRA with. Their voters don't have a real issue with if you will but tell us a little bit about the investigation and how strong you suspect or not strong. You suspect the NRA will be able to be into sort of counter some of this The ads that you mentioned for example, that might be coming from every town USA Yeah I would think they would certainly be muted this year I'm you know it's funny you mentioned that the voters perhaps would mind so much biden, her Harris had fs from the NRA innings in some campaign speeches..

NRA Harrison Biden USA Harris
"five months" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

04:17 min | 2 months ago

"five months" Discussed on The Takeaway

"The New York Attorney General is investigating the trump organization and the trump family is dragging their feet. Every step of the way with the trump organization has learned over the years dating back way before trump became president is that it pays to stonewall in court cases I'm Tansy Nevada and today on the takeaway for Tuesday August twenty fifth look at the steps the Attorney General is taking and what it could mean in the lead up to November. Also, we'll look at how Democrats are approaching gun violence in this election cycle in terms of differences between. Harrison Biden there's really very little but of course when you compare either one or both of them to president trump or or vice president Mike Pence there's there's a pretty big Gulf there. But I on Brianna Taylor's case the public pressure to take action against the police officers who killed her let's get started. Those are protesters chanting Brianna Taylor's name in downtown Louisville Kentucky. It's been more than five months since Louisville police served a no knock warrant at Taylor's home shot the twenty six old emt to death. The officers involved in her killing have yet to face charges and only one has been fired. The incident was an example of a pattern of systemic racism and police violence that have spurred protests.

trump Brianna Taylor president Democrats Attorney vice president Louisville Tansy Nevada Mike Pence Harrison Biden New York Kentucky
"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

07:58 min | 2 months ago

"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

"I I mean at new stuff and. I. I do wish there was a real audience to gauge on like I just can't. I can't tell if people the people that are watching resume shows are people that listen to my podcast. So there may be predisposed to liking what I say or disliking it on an a and I feel like I'm not getting real test on material in front of light kind of the neutral audience that wandered in on groupon. Five. Dollars show thing. So You know I I. Am Not hundred percent confident in stuff. I'd written necessarily feel like I. Don't feel like it's been vetted properly. In front of Crowns for sure. So in June your mom attracted covid nineteen and I am so sorry for your loss and it seems right away. You're you're tweeting about it and you know when you're your dad was dying of cancer also made jokes through that experience. You eventually filmed a special with that material. You wrote a book about the grieving process so I can't imagine. There was as much patient just because this is like you're like this you knew what it was gonna be like but do you remember deciding to tweet jokes or what was the impulse sort of when when it started I? Think it started my mom was diagnosed on the on the eleventh of June. I think I, didn't know what I was GonNa do I just couldn't I couldn't believe it. It was just it it. It's it's It was so a look she had done everything necessary to avoid getting it and. I think I was in shock because I thought California was good. I didn't know where about it like she was part of the first wave of Oh we're not good not good at all. It's really bad. And then maybe maybe I mentioned it. At. After seeing some coke covert is a hoax tweet or something like that, and then I was like fuck this shit, it's not and then I kind of maybe started from a place of anger at that point. If I remember your first tweet was sort of like straightforward but I think by your second tweet, you joked tweaking the setup of my if Cova so contagious. Don't have it. I'm glad I have material that work with I. I had some stuff to start with I didn't have to start cold on my mom I was are already headed there. And so what was it like? What was the sort of responses you're getting throughout the her sort of battle with it? And Nestle get responses. Knowing, knowing tweeted to me directly that I was a monster but I, I don't know if people think privately. Would you do jokes about it? I know you're on zoom shows. Yeah. I had a couple of shows while she was. Dying. At A. Darts again. It was so easy. Just started to my bedroom and tell a few jokes and go back to. Watching her die on my IPAD. Denounce yes. Yes. It's particularly I. Yeah. It's even easier because it's like you didn't have to go to a club or had the tweets but also like, oh, now I can sort of do it to an audit into I. Don't know how they're feeling about this. Yeah. Sure. I mean if it was much more convenient, my dad's death so I to thank her for that. Was Her Eddie Joe, can you remember the particularly proud of? You just like a lot. I guess the one that's still working is my mom was a trump supporter and she died from Kobe Bryant and as a result, the coroner ruled her death a suicide. That was the joke I wrote down. That's my though that was also the job. This is amazing. That might work for a long time that might be a long time working joke. We talked about the first time on but you are a joke writers joke writer like what goes how does it? How does your brain make a connection for something like that? Like do you remember? What the impulse was and sort of how it sort of followed it just sort of like. So perfectly crafted. That was Everett. They're really quickly right before I was GONNA. Do that on zoom they didn't have any new stuff, but I mean it's just something that's percolating. White One reason I wanted her to the conscious for a second I wanted her to admit she'd made a mistake in term of mistake I never got her to admit it was a mistake to vote for trump in out by the time she was diagnosed with Kovic. She was unconscious unable to respond to things so I feel cheated because I I know. I know like I. Fuck at one that argument. It and you're not here to admit but I want it. You want the worst way. Possible. Truly to it, but it is a no it's like a it's a perfect Ross joke in that a combined sort of to failings of person. For an twisted around it. It's just like. You know what? What did it mean to you to have comedy is a way to express yourself as a way to sort of connect people during that time. It was very grateful to have twitter to to projects out there for you know I, mean. I I. Guess I'd I'd already read a ton about Kobe. I've been kind of pretty obsessed with it. You know and It was all. Heartfelt Shit, which is good Alleanza I just felt like all right. We'll won't be so heartfelt even though it has hurt though that's how my heart feels. Feels feels it feels through comedy. You know but yeah. I think I. Yeah. I think that's true. Right. There was. It people are having a hard time to forgot how to make jokes about it and I think it was partly like so many people are dying. As a real like how to do it, but there is something like well, this is my personal experience and no one was going to be like how dare you people are dying? You're like I'm well aware. Oh yeah I know I got this freedom that only say, maybe Pete Davidson feels about nine eleven lake I can make any Jenky can't take that. You can't take that away from me. However I am uncertain that they think Nicos Santos's. Stepfather or stepmother away from Cobra to like I'm certain, there will be more of us. Qualify to really make the jokes jokes about jokes about this, and so you're as you said, you're still doing some that at least joker doing are you still doing jokes are used to working on material around it oh? Yeah. Yes. Yeah. Yeah I mean. Yes. I. Yes I am. It's IT'S A it's a burgeoning chunk. So that's it. Is there anything that you are pull bound? You know there's this Mandy Slab it and he basically keeps saying almost every day if the entire country shut down for like maybe a month or two, we could we could end this for everybody. You know and maybe at some point, people will listen to that I. Don't know it it. There's a way to stop this. You know you don't have to wait for an act seen. We don't have to wait for better treatment for people to get really bad verge co bed. We could just everyone just stop for two months at the most and then everyone's like case go back to school they start sports starts back up again like you you have everything fucking one again if he could just. Tampa down for two. Months..

groupon Kobe Bryant Cova Tampa twitter California Mandy Slab Eddie Joe Nicos Santos A. Darts writer Kovic Everett Ross Pete Davidson Cobra Jenky
"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

06:37 min | 2 months ago

"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

"This is just a quarantine comedy show and they set the tone for me and. After that, I did thirty five to forty five minutes of Newman tyrone quarantine and pilot to jokes pre quarantine, and from there I was hearing digital labs. I would throw it out there and it will go through the Wifi, go they speakers, and then they here and then they come back and what was interesting about it was that nobody's they're not in the same. Room they're on the same but not in the same room. So I get here and keep laughing at another person that person left that makes them laugh. So you had this ripple effect and I was like this is a wave right? Like, Oh, this is cool like I'm and the digitize. It's just like I the texture of it was just attractive to me so. From. Nair. I am getting the same satisfaction from when I do on stage and also it's working and and I'm giving joy to my fans or whoever clicks on the link and time is going faster. So did I did a couple shows in April and May, and then I hit up my label my albums before to way a blonde medicine to like, Hey, man, I want I think I have a couple of bits that could put together make an album and he was a young man I is crazy said because. This comic does not WanNa. Do a zoom or they're supposed to record their album and they were on the verge of figuring out how to route. And yet, nor you would be the crazy motherfucker to do this. So this let's do it. So because you record each track audience member differently. So even there is like a baby crying or even dogs barking, you could take their laugh out and then you still have a complete show. So we I I. I did a couple more shows the comedy, try outs through May, and then recorded a week after Jewish Floyd. was murdered and that was the that was the Friday. 'cause. That's Saturday was the uprise in New York City. So that's when the temperature changed again I stand up like we have this window of Li-. Hey, we wanna laugh when quarantine and then after like uprising personally, I won't let Nick, we've got the fight right so so it came in a great time like the universe. Hooked it up with the timing of and got that recording, and then after that was just post and then to the uprising. So that was that was the process. How did you approach it sort of album sort of conceptually of what he wants to do, and then also sort of practically how did you build material? Was it like how you built material? Anyway. Yes it definitely was writing and also I I do fifty fifty writing on paper. No Pat, and then writing on stage. So I was riding on zoom to wear like what are the are the members reacting to with what am I getting a digital laugh too, and then I also want to like what's the theme of this album like let's let's bring it back to like. In the beginning what we thought and that observation, and then also my twist on it of shopping and lining up and ESPN TV binge watching. So I wanted to give like a time capsule of like this is what we been through. Because it's like this year twenty, twenty things change. So fucking fast like we forgot like Kobe passed away. Man. I'm still more than that like I sometimes I remind myself that yeah. That did happen this year like we lost him. Straight going. So that's what I wanted to be where people can. Yeah. That was like that was like that because we just don't know in these hectic times we forget where we came from. What we've been through what we with so That's how I started, and then it just started shaping together of giving people that remembrance that reference of like Oh man I remember that. Yeah that all Larry but then having my twist on and then building from there, how did you adapt your performance style for Zoom Audience? The thing that I noticed as the laugh rhythm is different. How you ride a laugher them as different because it's not pops it's sort of like her it's cut its you you commenting on their last and you could you could feel you finding a different rhythm. What was that like? That that was it was a coaster man and it was it was beautiful because these people did not even like put hands on but they press the link to come and I, feel like acknowledging laugh, their laughs is this is all not normal none of this shit is normal but doing that makes it more normal uncomfortable for them to express themselves. So It was really definitely figure out the timing I had to definitely teach myself how to let them laugh because if I do another joke, they even laugh at the day then finish the other was already I'm fucking myself out I don't know if our curse on A. I'm fucking myself up. It's just like I had to keep telling myself like pace yourself to where like in the comedy clubs you could just ride that wave. You know that you can see the energy of what they're doing. They're especially resume. You have to feel that like I tell people I felt like Rachel, performance standup my it was all all hearing I had because even if I look. At, the screen it to them, it looks like I'm looking up so they're not even engaged. So it's really like performing. Into camera and I'm hearing him laugh and I'm like I let left out. DID EVERYBODY GET OUT Next one. Then, and from there cat riding and not to say like. There was a many times on zoom meetings I bombed like I thought Oh my wife is working. What Yeah? Did you stand? I stand yeah. You had the Mike I had the can't laptop backed up and I was standing. So all they saw just like you see here it's like showed up and I was performing I was doing. Which I love doing smart. That's my shit and bringing that live standup atmosphere to them on their laptop is is crucial because of I'm sitting down then I feel like it's more of a monologue and it doesn't give the essence of Standup I. Mean I'm not a cosby that's just not my style. I feel like if I can give not a storyteller. Yes storytelling Oh man don't. Use His name because he's notorious..

WanNa Newman Mike I New York City ESPN Li Rachel cosby Nick Kobe Pat Floyd. Larry
"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

05:17 min | 2 months ago

"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

"Because I. didn't realize this in starting in comedy. The audience is so nervous for you and can't believe you're about to do what you're doing and they just want you to be okay and so like. Outside of Covid that's all you're trying to do up there. You're going to need to be funny to be a comedian. I'm serious like I've just you can be successful if you just look comfortable there because the audience is so freaked out, they're putting themselves in your shoes and how uncomfortable they would be. If you look comfortable up there, you can. You don't even have to tell jokes got people will have a good time. And like you said on top of that with the t the discomfort of what's in the air literally and metaphorically. They're on edge and it's the elephant in the room. You can't address it because you don't WanNa dwell on it too much. I. Mean You want to address it, but you also don't. That's what people are trying to escape by going out and laughing. So that is the weird thing is mitigating how much to talk about it or it? If you talk about anything else does it seem? Trivial. At this point that was, that's the heart with comedy talking about it. You don't want to talk about because you're trying to get away from it but not talking about it seems like how could you not talk about it? Yeah. So and then. Dredging up old material I I was talking to. It was nice because I was talking to just namedrop David, spade was working the same club after made in salt? Lake and we were discussing and I was so happy to hear from him to that he was struggling remembering bits and he'd be in the middle of a joke and I was talking to him like going. Used to be like when I would go into a bit that I was like it's eighty percent they're like it has room for improvement and I'll mess with it but I'm like it's a killer joke. You're just Kinda like it's like you're on a road trip and you've got the Cruise control set and it's open roads and I haven't felt this way ever maybe even when I start comedy because when I first started comedy I was going just liner jokes so I didn't have to white knuckle entire bit. This is why this is driving in a snowstorm with not tread on your tires just like home. I got that is what every single bit felt like just trying to remember it and I would remember like. If I. Had Twenty Punch Lines in one bit. Think would be maybe around the amount that I would have been like A. Three minute thing I would remember like eleven of them in the other ones are lost forever because to get them back, I'd have to listen to old recordings of myself, which I I literally can't do. So I'm just starting from scratch. What was CA- sound of laughter through masks like It was exactly lake. The first. It was like doing comedy for the first time again, because it reminded me of clubs where at open mics they don't they don't see people with any kind of. Thought towards the comedian what would make for a great show it's so funny because. The things that make comedy clubs work close close. Proximity to the other tables, really just tightly packed as close to the stage as you can get low ceilings and and. That's what works for comedy clubs like the best rooms, low ceilings, basements, cellars, and people just cramped in a place best best conditions for comedy show. So now we are operating the world worth those things can't happen anymore. So you're it's been removed to have the best show possible. So what it felt like was an open mic were just like free seating and people are not there to see anyone not definitely not there to see you it was it was like doing comedy the first five years, ten years, twelve years of my career where people showed up at the club just like we like comedy, go the club like no one was there to see me I've been lucky to even People to perform comedy in a world where people came to see me I'm just grateful that I ever got a chance to. Perform in a sold out theater like. It it took me so long to achieve that. But there are a lot of people that are just I just feel for comics who are on the way up now and may never get get that I'm sorry to be so. Pessimistic but that might not be a reality for the next. Few. Years. And it's like even if they what whatever these sort of. If this ends in any capacity. Then you have to get people being comfortable with the idea after not doing it for three years. Yeah. We're like a decade away from that the way it was feeling that comfortable in that close of spaces unless you're down in the Ozark stewing shows I think they're still fine packed down there. But like there's certain places, you can go maybe to get that feeling again but. It's I we lived in a bygone era. It's just like I'm I really come back to this thing. I think so many people are what no matter what you do for a living or what your circumstance is like. We're all morning lake, the death of of life. Before cove it where we didn't even know this kind of thing was possible I mean life wipe go back to normal but we're always going to be on edge that this could happen again and we didn't use to have to live that way because we didn't know that this could happen i..

morning lake CA David spade
"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

05:35 min | 2 months ago

"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

"Like our so the. Associate, doing standup like the COMEDIANS. So trained for a certain interaction and certain feeling from what what it feels like for a set to go. Well. So to remove that, it allowed you to be like, what am I, what what is this for? Yes I don't need this. This isn't fulfilling whatever standup was giving me this ain't doing it and that's exactly right I. Mean I as much compulsion to do it the. And it was just about like trying to keep up and compete with everyone else. STANDUP is like you get that hit from the from the crowd interaction feeding off of them, and it's just there's Laughter over Zoom is just so disappointing and it's just not as good and I've done some live shows with people wearing masks, and that's also just not as fun and coming from a place. It was humbling because it just reminded me of the early days of doing standup. I was talking to some other comics that had been performing at clubs I've just done Salt Lake City. Can you talk a little bit about deciding to do it and what? What the experience? Yeah that was hard. I have I only did it because I saw other comics that weren't like. The comments I look up to in comics who I feel are my peers were accepting gigs like, Oh, if they do it, I can do it. So I did local shows in Saint Louis at a club ear that I never have worked helium because as soon as they open, they lake couldn't afford me. I was making a joke like I never thought I'd have to work at this club because I was better than it and now performing at the Galleria Mall next to a build a bear and I'm getting van mowed my paycheck and like things have changed. So I, I accepted the gigs locally just to get on stage and. and. Just to have my friend come open for me. Again, get to hang out with the comic and stuff like that. Just to see if I could do it and it was weird it wasn't satisfying. I didn't get a high from it like I usually do it's just not it's not the same and. because. There are fewer people in the audience because the audience felt like they didn't know what they should do risking everything to go out and do this thing you feel like you're doing my friend Emil Joaquin who opened for me was making a joke that it feels like being in a gay bar in the nineteen twenties or something like but not as fun because you actually. Feel bad about what you're doing and you know that what you're doing is probably wrong as opposed to you know that experience but it did feel like it felt naughty way that wasn't a fun naughty like I like breaking the rules when I know what I'm doing, it's not really harmful to anyone this felt like the rules and not really knowing for sure that what I was. Doing wasn't going to harm someone every the staff and my agents everyone is so worried about my safety I'm not worried about catching it because I trust myself to be safe as much as I was worried about my audience being put in a situation where you get inside and then the tables aren't as far away as they promised, they were going to be or there are people. That aren't wearing masks and once you get in environment we've all been there where you go socially distance barbecue or birthday party, and you get there and people are not respecting the six feet they're talking without their masks they're hugging they're shaking your hand and you can do it. You shake their hand you hug people that you don't want to because there's this weird peer pressure that. You just fall into so I didn't want my audience to ever feel like they had to stay they bought a ticket. So when I went to Salt Lake City eventually that was the first one I've traveled for because I just drove down the street to do St Louis shows so didn't feel Like. I was putting anyone at risk. Right before I went to. Salt Lake City which I was already like on the fence about but I was assured by Bert Kreischer who had traveled and done so many clubs in so many different things he was like they're doing it right and they truly worth there's any club Dakota right now that room is huge their spacing people out more than they even need to everyone has to wear a mask. I mean they're doing it the right way but I was alarmed because I took a flight there that was oversold and people were not good about wearing masks and I was like am I bringing. Corona virus to Salt Lake City I mean I was way far away from the audience even if I was like. You. Know Gallagher. Ring. My Spit, they wouldn't have. been able to reach them but I, still felt like I do test positive in two weeks because of this fucking flight I took. Then I'm going to have to Bryan callen and do a little testimonial video of anyone who came to my show and. Didn't. WanNa I. DIDN'T WANNA. Have to make that statement and then I was just scared of getting canceled to be honest with of like what if a bunch of people that went to my show die? and. So that I did the shows 'cause I was. By the time I started having these panics I already landed in Salt Lake, and I just wanted to support the club clubs are going under and I just I did it but then I canceled the rest of my my tour that I kind of had planned because I was like I don't I don't need a society so I'm just no no more stand up. Unless it's I'm doing drive INS coming up though so it's In Salt. Lake. City. Can you describe the feel like 'cause when I imagine it? How do you describe it? It's like in any comedy show, there's an amount of tension because like this person has to make us laugh out of nothing and and that's part of what is fun about going to see a comedy but it seems like the tension of everything is so immense like if you could break but it seems like it's impossible to break because this thing is. Hanging over us. That's so true. I mean. First of all, that's always what I say to people who are. Who Want any advice on comedy and or public speaking?.

Salt Lake City Salt Lake Bryan callen Galleria Mall Emil Joaquin Bert Kreischer Saint Louis Gallagher van St Louis Dakota
"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

05:31 min | 2 months ago

"five months" Discussed on Good One: A Podcast About Jokes

"Having such a good year this money I don't have kids I don't have anything to spend it on I was like you deserve apartment that has an elevator that opens out in as your front door. I know I know Wrong Tom apartment like, yes that was my life. It was just like a dream apartment something I never saw myself achieving and although now with watching I'll be gone in the dark. Definitely. Want a door that you here open because before your murdered by someone breaking in Your House, you don't WanNa hear Ding and like footsteps what here like some kind of struggle door. So now I'm like, Oh, I'm glad I never lived there but. I've never set foot in that apartment. I'm still paying for it and I didn't want to go back to New York because I didn't have any furniture in the apartment because it was being decorated at the time I only had a bed and all my boxes of stuff. So I, my parents were actually in La with me during that week of all those crazy TV shows because my mom was going to be on the Kelly Clarkson show with me. 'cause they were doing a mother's Day like episode. So they flew her out from Saint Louis. My mom doesn't go anywhere without my dad because they're codependent and he also loves cone and I was doing Conan that week. So I was like I'll fly out to. So they were already with me, and so I already felt that sense of like Mommy and daddy and I don't want you to go to Saint Louis and I'm scared to go to New York's. Just keeping the go to saint. Louis and and just wait this out and then. Here I am. Almost five months later still here and I thought it was gonna be like a week or. So. Did you in perform at all do any digital shows like you had at that point had an hour material like what was your plan? How did you sort of go through those first couple months of like trying to do something? Yeah. Well, I did I knew like our twenty minutes I was out on the road with and I can tell you right now I don't remember even like ten minutes of it like I I remember some of the themes but I don't really write down material long forum in any. Way just remember I know Marc Maron has a similar process. So it makes me feel not as crazy, but it's all in my head and I write down like bullet points phone. But if you do it every night, you don't need to write anything down you just have it memorized when you take your special, you can just dump it out of your head and then it's gone. And it's almost like my last performance was a special because if I don't do it every night, it's GonNa get lost and but the problem is the last performance wasn't a special. Yes. I have recorded my phone. So I have it to listen to if I want to remember it but I never even as soon as this went down I was like by by material your irrelevant like, yes there were some things I was talking about that. Almost, like were prophetic in the sense that I was talking a lot about the end of the world being in a bunker, what my life would look like. Michael ups and wanting to find a man to to to live with so that because I know the the world's about to get weird not wanting to have kids 'cause I. Don't know how to homeschool or cook or all these things that kind of. Dabbling in these ideas, which is wild, my friends who are on the road with Mir like your material was like preparing us for this and I was like it didn't prepare me enough for I thought I had a couple of years to work through this stuff. So when it initially shutdown. I was not that sad I think a lot of stand ups for like how do I live without doing stand up every night this has helped me realize that I don't need standup as like therapy or a form of expressing can find other ways I miss it, and I do look forward to putting more stuff out there but I feel like I was addicted to stand up and I hate to be like I needed to realize that and I'm glad corona virus happened. So I realized that my addiction to stand up but it was it as soon as A. I'll say this because everyone else can't do it. I'm not doing it So much of my compulsion to do stand up is to keep up with the Joneses into just make sure that I'm as good as everyone else and so when everyone else can't do it, I'm kind of like. To do it but then I started seeing people do zoom shows and I was like I guess I gotTa do this. So I did a couple zoom sets, but it was more about me working on material that was going to do on Conan and on Bill Maher I've done some appearances since living at my parents house the zoom and I wanted to work out that material for those shows. So that's why it took those zoom shows they're weird they're not ideal. My joke. Is that like I did zoom show and I went into it being like this is going to be like. Terrible why I'm doing this and then you do it and you're like how? It's awful. It's not like. It's there's there's no like I thought. There's GonNa be another side of it like it's not so bad. It was it's not fun. There's a lag of laughter. There is no laughter and when you're done, you shut your laptop and your alone in your dad's home. Office you don't get to go in the Green Room and hang out with friends so much standup so social and I really miss about it. Is just hanging out with comedians. The only good thing that's happened in this is that some comedians have been canceled and that's really brought the comedy community together like reconnected with comic friends as being like let's talk about this like I haven't talked to comics three months and then people got cancelled and. All my friends are reaching out to see how I'm doing and I'm like, do you really want to check it on me or? So it seems like and this is what I've heard. It's like these.

Saint Louis Conan New York Ding Marc Maron Kelly Clarkson Michael ups Joneses Green Room La Mir Bill Maher
"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

02:56 min | 1 year ago

"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

"So you don't have to get ready, staying ready. So you don't have to get ready. I heard a young event say that one day, and I was like. So fortunately, I happen to be ready. I didn't have to get ready. It was just a matter of crossing the TS dotting is, and now that you're at your new firm, you told me you've been working long hours, what's your new job until and what's different about it than your previous firm, which was at a much larger situation? Well, yes. So, you know, to go from a firm that has three hundred thousand employees under their umbrella to affirm that has less than one hundred employees under its rela. It's awesome for person, like me, who, like say likes to be able to be creative, and flexible like our CEO's offices next to mind. Our chief compliance officers office is next to mind. So if I want to get an answer to a question and know whether I'm in the lines, it takes thirty seconds, that is beautiful for somebody like me. But then, you know separately from that. So my job before he sensually it was fifty percent managing the clients at relationships that I already had. The other fifty percent creating new opportunities and bring in new client relationships. Now it's probably a third third third between those other two and then the, the second third piece third third is developing other newer associates, and junior planners to able to take on some of that, low, because essentially, there's more activity happening in like I said that independent advisor world than there is inside the larger traditional brokerage firms. So we'll twelve hour days. Here for a while. Right. Indeed. Indeed. Well, I wanna thank you for sharing that amazing story with our audience. I want you guys know he was trying to be all conservative about it. And then he wrote the show, and then he was saying more than I had wrote by nature. I am a pretty button. Yes, you are surprised when you didn't have time when you walked in the day. All the time gone. Goodness, I got on Thai TV Lee that go ahead. That's a great difference. Right. So, I to firms if you don't have a tie on, when you come in the door, they ask you, if you're not to do, that's a serious. I saw that happen twice new firm. I'm the only person that wears a tie, right? I make everybody else on comfortable because it's just that much ingrained in, like, what I do you know so that is funny that you say that, that really is a thing that's we'll bring this out to the close on that one. We want to remind you that we have that are coming up for you. If you're a podcast, listen there, and for those who wants to show on TV were always thankful that you watch wanna remind you catch past episodes of the show on apple podcasts. Soundcloud Stitcher Google play. Spotify, an all kinds of different platforms. Just search.

Spotify apple CEO advisor Lee fifty percent thirty seconds twelve hour one day
"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

01:58 min | 1 year ago

"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

"All the time, how the industry, the way it's designed at those larger brokerage firms have now worked at two of the four largest ones, it's not designed for you and I and the folks younger than us, they don't care about us because we don't have enough money yet to keep the lights on. So for me, it's like I can operate in that world. I can manage the millions of dollars because I have clients that are twice my age, basically that have had the time to build up those assets, and I can speak that language, but there's also obviously need for the folks who are in our lane who need this information, vice too. So for me, this outlet allows me to feel like I'm doing something meaningful to get to those folks. Get the information those folks have those conversations to, but then also in the morning, I'm going to go to the office and work with my clients that actually, you know, the ability to pay the bills and keep the lights on. So I knew one. Day. It was gonna come a time when one was going to have to, you know, I was going to have to go on one direction or the other. It's just you never really know when that is gonna come. Right. But I will say the most important part is, I mentioned to you. I said half jokingly probably not even have that. I am the talent. I think when that day does come you have to be willing to bet on yourself because otherwise you're always going to be wondering what if I did go left at that work in the road instead of going, right? And actually pursue that passion. That was my side hustle. My side hustle started making enough money that it was like, wait a minute. I might have something here if you get cold feet and decide, you know. Yeah I'm going to play it safe. Normal is always going to be waiting for you right around the corner. No matter where you are in life. Twenty years old forty years old. Sixty years old normal is always going to be waiting for you right there on the corner. So, you know, you gotta take your shot points, that we pull from the experience of, and that's directly connected to what Bob, just said, stand confident that you can always leverage experiencing.

Bob Twenty years Sixty years forty years
"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

03:06 min | 1 year ago

"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

"And we realize there's a lot about professionalized learn and share with our church of them. So you can take it into which will. But okay, so in all seriousness recovered from the scripture indicating we'll, we'll bring it back for a second. We talked about sort of my side of all of it. I mean, that was a tenth probably of all of the back and forth, that went on that. You know, you were privy to most of it, what was happening in your world in your brain as all of this is, is happening, right? I'm calling you saying I'm being. So we've got a shut it down. I'm being told we've gotta pull our. Entire presence from interwebs wherever that all those kind of things was happening on in your mind. It was two items. I think for me like I mentioned before it was a welcome break store, just what we were dealing with at home continue to do little more management out at it, but also entertaining because for for for me for someone who created this. I remember literally still remember the moment when I had idea that was managed money for a four on Bank. One of the top four banks to be threatening. You know, someone who's part of the project Andrew part of the project saying you need to cease and desist. I was just tickled because I might I didn't really good job of helping to create this thing that now the compliance department feels is such a threat to the entire banking organization. I was take I was very entertained. I really didn't have too many worries. And I knew also. For professional standpoint that you had always had dreams of doing what you're doing now which is moving in a more independent direction, how year doing your financial management personal finance career. So it's interesting to that, all of the folks who we've had conversations with sort of in the background about partnerships and all that kind of stuff. I can't say all, but the majority of those folks are some Bank. So it's interesting that in, in a space where the full to wanna be down to speak our competitors of the horse and buggy in them, it's just interesting to me that, that those folks. See it differently. And that speaks more to actually a whole nother issue. Why don't you share a little bit with us about? You mentioned. You're the most people who are in your position as a personal finance expert CFP, or whatever the acronym is CFP Elizabeth morning crew. But I know what I was trying to see us p p and then also managing a portfolio of dollars most people like in their sixties, maybe fifty. What does that say experienced tell you about the financial services industry at large that a show about money that the podcast and the TV show like a threat to department, that's responsible for making sure everyone's complying with the rules of the firm?.

Andrew
"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

03:24 min | 1 year ago

"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

"I'm you know, so I, I had already gotten to a point, while was like anybody coming to see you Otis on the talent. So it kinda if nothing else was just that last push that you need to say, you know, if not now then when right as certainly. We'll talk a little bit about your new gig. But it is interesting because of the compliance apartment essentially moved us in a place and more, so you in particular for professional professional sense, and for now, the freedom of what we do now with the show, and there were things that we couldn't do didn't do because you were at the firm you were at we didn't want to raise too many alarms didn't want to get in the way of, you know, getting our paychecks every two weeks. But I think it's important for me to eliminate a few things for Y B M audience will add like you to please insert Borgen's behind me here. In the bible, and turn to the book of care. Please Malcolm turned. Yes, my favorite artists behind usher. Drake that will always have the all time position right now. Drake is like right now my bed, you were onto something in abrupt. I just wanted the world to know that drinking usher, your favorite artists, somehow that that was five probably. Oh, I want you to turn to I number one and take care lines to three when you have it. Same. Still, and I'll be hearing this stuff. You say jealousy is love and hate. What we. Own department was very concerned with. So concerned, I've been to say, Malcolm's case with the most interesting thing department has trained in years is not ever. They will ask. Episode. A man only is force a mug. Take us off to set. Lightening strike here in the middle of our set that was him. Was not me interrupting because I need to make sure that the scripture in the blaspheme last is on your side of the death. Okay. Out of this clear in the compliance department that was really probably. If they will repeat back. We said that we have forgotten in shows past our show back and forth, but the job. Love and hate at the same time just like. Grant's older, but I came here today about going back and forth with the compliance department in Yellowknife. Okay. Stay courage, caliber minds us. They will always try to get away. Don't it? I came here to tell you the day. Remind you not to hang your head when day. Isn't that is never? Amen. I come here today to say you don't need to hang your head.

Drake Malcolm Otis Borgen Yellowknife Grant two weeks
"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

02:47 min | 1 year ago

"five months" Discussed on Manage Your Damn Money: The Podcast

"Those who are listening for the first time you might not know this show airs television show and as a podcast on the last time anyone heard from EM was back in February of twenty nineteen that was the last podcast episode of this show posted. And our last recording was even earlier that with five or six months, maybe four months, I can't recall behind us with our show and social counts, going dark, because, Malcolm only tweets occasionally many might assume that been Malcolm may have just flamed out taking care of triplets, and getting married, where on anyone, but the truth about our absences, much more intriguing than triplets, or planning for wedding. We start season four manager damn money by explaining why we were gone for so long. Malcolm reveal sure we kind of teased it online a little bit here. And there we put up a little. On the website. So we've tease it enough is the time has come. It's pretty much an open secret considering we already did post something on our website, but what happened. Why are we going for so long? I think you have some explaining to actually more than not. In short in store, and then we'll be man was trying to keep us. Oh man. Now that is the you know, like you mentioned. So, for example, my social media going, dark. It's amazing to me that people actually noticed. Okay. So you criticize my tweets about, you know, randomly watching basketball games talking trash to Kevin Durant whatever else, but people actually will like asking me, if everything was okay because I hadn't been engaging my nonsense with them on Twitter. Right. But also just, you know, I won't talk about them by name my Old Firm who shall remain nameless? I don't want them to show up a horse and buggy to show up here in the studio. Somebody all of a sudden, you know, try to have beef with us, but I will say they're one of the four largest banks in the world. And, and just to clarify my talking about where he used to work where I used to work old financial firm. Financial services firm. So apparently we little in y diem. Have become bigger than I thought we had become because I finally got to a point where we became competition. Oh, interesting. So it's kinda one of those things where like your side, chick is getting way too much attention in your main chick takes notice, and it has something to say about daddy sensually was was. My main chick came to me and said. She got to go. That, that he is. You know my best analogy..

Malcolm Kevin Durant Twitter basketball four months six months
"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

Confessions of a Marketer

04:02 min | 2 years ago

"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

"So we we even seeing in Brazil, they starting to talk about similar type legislation set starting to happen on a larger scale, and and I think as the benefits of GDP L, become clearer. I think we'll see more countries at a federal and national level outside of the EU. Adopt similar kind of privacy legislation and privacy acts. Do you think there are industry groups and companies by themselves that might just say, well, let's look at GDP are and the, you know, California consumer Privacy Act. Maybe what's going on in Brazil or elsewhere, and synthesize that so that there is kind of a standard for for companies to adhere to in the absence of legislation. Industry. Buddies are definitely getting involved in. I I know the, you know, the DM as getting involved the is getting involved yet in the US a lot of the industry buddies off trying to lean in especially in California legislation was proposed. They, you know, there was a real concerted effort and in speaking to some of the quite interesting outside of the normal industry. Buddies, a lot of the technology companies in the system all getting together and saying hang on. Let's start self-regulating start self imposing certain things here to make sure that we can drive this positive way. And again, I think this is all positive for the industry. I think digital grew so quickly and it fragmented the market in an opened up so much data as a consequence that there's a little bit of a consolidation process and a little bit of a maturing of the industry, and I think that's that's again. That's that's positive for everybody. Yeah. I mean, you make the point about, you know, the growth of data and. Kind of coming out of nowhere in the last twenty years or so, and it's in the these companies live on their data. So having good practices around. It seems to make solid business sense doesn't it? Completely completely. You know, there was a there was a beautifully published article about a year or so ago and economist that referred to today's the new oil an unofficial that. But that analogy, you know, kind of stuck with me, and you know, if it is the new oil than the last thing, we want is, you know. Oil spills every way, I think that's what's been happening to use that analogy. So how do we mole animal safe and more environmentally friendly way mind, the oil refining, the oil and distribute clean fuel? Right. I think at the moment load O'neil we having a whole lot of data spills. I you know, what happened with Facebook equifax and whole lot of the others, but we're also not necessarily refining distributing that oil, and in the most safest and cleanest way that we possibly can. So so I think the whole industry is starting to acknowledge that this this mobile to be done yet. And an and we weren't in this position eighteen months ago, even twelve months ago, I'd say I guess the only difference is that in fifty sixty seventy years we're going to run out of oil. Data is going to be here. Forever going to determine people's lifestyles. It's going to determine pretty much every aspect of your life. Right. Absolutely. Absolutely. It's it's like the brief absolutely while Jacques as always thanks for joining me here on confessions of a market. It was a pleasure having year. Likewise. Thank you so much oldest. Thanks for being here. As I noted next time shock, and I will dissect Amazon, Apple and Google points of view in all the chatter about privacy. Stay with us. This episode of confessions of a market was written produced edited by yours. Truly t Jordan of A-Class productions wrote the theme music. Confessions of a marketer is a trademark of read Edwards globally. Incan? This episode is copyright twenty eighteen. I'm Mark Rita. Cenex..

Brazil California EU US Facebook equifax Mark Rita Edwards Jacques Amazon Google Apple fifty sixty seventy years eighteen months twelve months twenty years
"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

Confessions of a Marketer

04:36 min | 2 years ago

"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

"And just speaking to my team over the last couple of weeks. We we are definitely seeing an increase in requests for proposals out in the market clients all looking to customer data platforms accustomed gauge platforms as a way to invest in an manage. They first party data across channels to take them all Omni channel view because they realizing they can't be overly dependent on digital quality based channels. I think about everything they own estate their own apps. Right. The own whole Saint is the own web sites. So again, I think that's that's a very positive development for the marketplace. One thing that occurs to me is Brexit going to effect GDP are will Great Britain conform to GDP are is there any understanding in that area. That's a good question. So at the moment fall, intents and purposes, the United Kingdom's still abiding by GDP, the example, I gave you was the ICO. Which is the British enforcement agency for Judy pill is actually proactively influencing in taking a position that. Yeah navy. They will one of the leading lights and helping shape and develop GDP L A. So, you know, so Fennell it seen as part of the GDP all kind of block and process. If you like I'm wondering whether back in the spring when we said that there's a way to look at GDP are as positive maybe where we overly optimistic review had clients that look at this as a win. Maybe we were maybe it's because it was early spring as I recall was a beautiful city. I think it's a bit early to call victory. But with that said, we all seem kind of meaningful progress, you know, the points I made above about how the whole value chain specific you on the technology in the media and the data side is starting to clean itself out. But we all seeing market is putting a real focus on the first party data. But specifically about data ownership who owns the data. How does that impact my customer relationship with my customer experience? How do I apply a to and a bit more meaningful way, you know? So I think there's this real notion that if you really think about customer experience and customer design you have to put data in front of friends and saints as part of that process. You know, it's. If you want to really deliver personal and mole Uman sainted marketing people by small if you will people based marketing needs people base data, and I think the smart marketers have always known that. And they sing GDP and privacy by design is a full two to support that SPA shin. Right. So we we all seem plans taking that position. So I think it's it's it's meaningful progress is at victory not quite yet. Because I think we're only a couple of months post the summer went on the full, and I think between now and maybe a euro. So I I think the landscape will look significantly different given some of the points of shade earlier. Okay. Let's let's move to the US where we are right now. It's actually a sunny fall day here in the US where I am. And there is a bit of action going on with California's consumer Privacy Act, and maybe even some some hints that maybe something at the federal level unclear. But how do you think that could shape up? How would that affect marketers in the girl US avai? I spoke with our chief privacy officer, Rachel Lhasa about this. And in all of you is as marketers and people in the industry, it will be very hard for us to manage that protection for fifty different states. And I think it'll be very confusing for the public and the real challenge for businesses and marketers at large to to understand and comply. So in a maybe a federal legislation will be more beneficial to both market is end in consumers in the public, but one standard in let's say, the California process an education goes through that would be the highest standard and by default people would almost have to ply that. Right. And you know, the awesome nuance in difference between what is being proposed in California versus GDP. Oh, and I think that's fair sell. It's getting difficult for marketers. And we don't one Marcus in the industry at large to kind of just lose kind of faith in the whole prices because it becomes so fragmented and so complex sure because ultimately this is trying to protect the public, and I think that's a positive thing..

US California Brexit chief privacy officer ICO Judy pill mole Uman United Kingdom Fennell Great Britain Marcus Rachel Lhasa
"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

Confessions of a Marketer

03:57 min | 2 years ago

"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

"Advertising. Ken go horribly wrong. So I think there's a sadly a quick kind of default to contextual advertising as a just a quick means to get campaigns out into attempt personalization. But I do think fortunately, some very brave is, you know, all. Really deepening. The efforts around first party data at a thinking about the two mystic data sources, and realizing that if you get on top of it. It's actually easier to maintain consent wherever you have a direct relationship with with the customer and ultimately have direct relationship. It's it's a bit away to drive value, and and be closer to your customers and not be this into mediated. Which which I think is the way market is need to think of GDP. So what changes have you seen on the marketing landscape after GDP are, what's what's changed? Yes. So as a data guy, you know, I'm going to have to bring some data points to this conversation. Well, it's so that's why I have you here. Yes. I think the first thing we've seen this is a very interesting, but of research that came out of the Reuters institute for the study of journalism is that we've seen over twenty two percent drop in third party, cookie. Use across European pages. That's pretty dramatic. You know, just under a quarter. I think that number's going to gradually increase of time. So for market is this means that an overdependence on third party cookies as part of your marketing optional is going to be a problem. So how do you do personalization without being Sodhi dependence on third party cookies, which gets back some back to my contextual marketing point tried and then one which I didn't see coming. And this is from Neiman labs was that over a thousand US new sites are unavailable to European read is two months off the GDP. Oh, and then some of these are pretty substantial publications than. The LA times and Boston Globe as an example. So for marketed kind of limits. A especially if you're a global market of trying to do any kind of Joe targeting or trying to target expect traits all trying to understand people across specific publications regard itself way, they base that limits your each so so I think that's making it a little bit harder in the in the Neo Thome full marketers. And then another shakeout we seeing which we end -ticipant it. But I really think it's it's better. You know, it's been a massive rise in programmatic media basic at auction based buying and selling of auto knee media invention content. But also, the the data and the customers that come with that content, and we are seeing a lot of the demand side platforms taking quite a stance on the supply side or the sell side pet foles an I trying to make sure that isn't this long string of people reselling other people's content. Right. So there's this notion of only one will maximum two hops in. The process, and I think anybody in media in publishing I think that's a that's a good development. And there's also a lot less manipulation of of the media auction process taking place, and again, I think that's very positive. So I've had horrible stories of people selling media inventory as I as a broker reseller to a site that doesn't even run video as an example. Right. Just to get that highest CPM. So I think all those things are being flushed out, and it's one of those unintended, but positive consequences of GDP is at the whole ad tech ecosystem Israeli taken a long hard look at itself, which actually goes broader than just the initial intentions of GDP in my opinion. And again, I think that's positive, and then we sing many of the major Ed tech players will kind of marketing cloud type solutions a working very hard to comply and making it easier for clients to to manage permission..

Ken Reuters Neiman labs LA US Boston Globe Joe twenty two percent two months
"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

Confessions of a Marketer

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

"Each at the end of September involving fifty million customers. So the big headline is will they potentially? I'll be fined under GDP. Aw. And if so people estimated that could be up to one point six billion. Oh, so that's really that's a real number. That's a real number. And it is that going to happen. I don't know. It's this is the interesting one for us to keep an eye on. But to your first question, what is this meaningful the market is and I say on the ground floor kind of away from the headlights and the headlines of the world gardens. I think it's more a case of partly sunny than than partly cloudy. I'd say sunny in that. You know, many of are using this as an opportunity to spring clean the and get their house in order. I'd say the is a bit of cloud around because what we've seen practically is happening is almost a two tier reality playing out for marketers summer so cautious and Philly so behind on really having a good handle on they first party in the customer data that they will sadly in my opinion. They ought defaulting multi contextual advertising. So listen to contextual is basically using content triggers. As a way to personalize your marketing or your your marketing campaign or your credit for your content, and that's not necessarily the best proxy in my opinion. Full personalization, troop, customization old great customer experience and an offer context..

Philly
"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

Confessions of a Marketer

04:24 min | 2 years ago

"five months" Discussed on Confessions of a Marketer

"On episode thirty five of confessions for market. We're revisiting GDP with jock van Niekerk. Talking back to confessions of a marketer. I'm Marguerite Edwards today. We have Jacques one Niekerk wonderman data CEO on to talk about the effects of GDP are on marketers. That's today in the first part of our interview next time, we'll dissect Amazon, Apple and Google points of view in all the chatter about privacy. So we'll get to part one of that chant in just a moment. We've got episodes on conversational marketing doing a rebrand telling stories with data along with the collaboration. I'm undertaking on innovation. We might launch a separate podcast for chats about that. We'll have a pilot sometime in November or December thought maybe we could get it. Launched sooner schedules are tough this time of year with thanksgiving just around the corner believe it or not here in the US. So stay tuned onto Jacques Fandi Kirk Junkin. I I chat at last may about GDP are and what we could expect now about five months out from GDP. I thought it would make sense to checking with him to see what the effects of been shock is CEO wonderman data very firm that pretty much invented direct marketing. So he speaks from experience and a broad client roster. This chat was so interesting. And there was so much talk about in the news. I asked him back for a part to chat about all that. But here's part one first let's get to it. Jack, welcome back to the podcast. How was your summer Baker? Thank you, busy. But that's the way I like it. And it's really good to be back on the show. GDP are was what five six months ago twenty fifth of may. And you know, it happened in the world still here. I've still got a pulse. You know, how have marketers fared over the last five or so months? That's right. I remember I remember United is the world going to end notes not gonna end, but I will say let me get onto the market is an Sekine. But because I think is a couple of quick kind of baselining of what's happened since the twenty fifth. That's probably going to be really important. I think what we've seen is the complaints. Should it spike? And I would say the regulators already ching fully find books. I think that's really what's happened. But but the world will hasn't ended. But we've seen some interesting things in the United Kingdom when GDP all came into effect. This first couple of weeks, the regulators there it's called the ICO at one hundred sixty percent increase in in the first few weeks in excess requests, and and many of the other egg laters have been receiving a lot of requests it trying to figure out, you know, exactly what is the jets which are the ones that they really need to focus on on. That's why at some level. It's not like there's been a plethora of of enforcements taking place, but it's not like complaints have not been filed. But we all to make you believe in force until go with a complaint soul and early on that tends to be against the big walled gardens or the larger platforms that most of the attention. And I think has unite talked about a little bit. The last time, you know, all the attention that Facebook had a checked it to yourself and Google ten extent. Even prior to GDP. You know, they've they've already been on notice before this happened and wave of this kind of any Joe political political campaigning associated with the platforms. You know, for example, the crimson hexagon, Cambridge energetic positions that Facebook found themselves, and I think that's still going to play out because most recently, the icier ICO in the UK has formally taken JD pill enforcement against a Canadian company called A I Q, and you know, they've been seen to kind of us commercial behavioral targeting full political campaigning as part of the Brexit campaign in the UK. So it's quite interesting that that was one of the first bits of enforcement that's taking place, but I think equally in this vein equifax and Facebook both paid fines of about a half a million pounds under the previous data Protection Act, which preceded GDP all, but I think you would have seen it in the press Facebook at another day to..

Facebook CEO Google Jacques Fandi Kirk Junkin Marguerite Edwards Jacques ICO Amazon UK equifax United Kingdom US Jack Joe Cambridge Apple twenty fifth one hundred sixty percent five six months