35 Burst results for "five five years"

Interview With Daniel Kornev Chief Product Officer at DeepPavlov

The Voicebot Podcast

02:07 min | 1 d ago

Interview With Daniel Kornev Chief Product Officer at DeepPavlov

"Daniel gornja. Welcome to the voice. Podcast much brackets and big for me to turn today today. It's my pleasure to have you. This is a long time in the making. We've been i guess chatting on slack for maybe year and a half something. Yeah i think so. I started to read your westport. Insider was fascinated by opportunity to look into your think to on hand Why not took. Yeah that that's that's how it happened. Well the is really perfect. Because we're going to talk about a few things today. Obviously d. Pavlov is a project i've been interested in for at least a year. I don't remember when i first came across it but it might have been might have been. You introduced it to me. Or maybe shortly before that i found out about it but definitely answered that project and then obviously you've been involved recently with the elec surprise social competition. We've had another conversation about that about this. What a perfect time to go a little deeper on that because it is a different way to build bots and so really looking forward to this conversation today. But i'll let you get started. So why don't you tee it up for the The audience right now first and let them know what d- pavlov is before we get deep sure depot is like lab at moscow's physics and technology. That is focused on conversational And neural efforts Officially cool to neural networks in Terrain but Wednesday were standard like full. Five years. ago it's also got to down moniker Because follow fossil famous russian scientists who discover it reflects us in all those things that encouraged scientists researchers to understand how human brace books and we still have a lot of things that we have to uncover. But that's was formed as the name.

Daniel Gornja Pavlov Elec Moscow
There Are Very Few Julie Kellys in the World of Journalism

America First with Sebastian Gorka Podcast

02:01 min | 1 d ago

There Are Very Few Julie Kellys in the World of Journalism

"Sad truth. Is that people of your elk. And i always tell people checkout american greatness love american greatness. We had chris on the editor and founder for for an hour. Just a few days ago people of your ilk this about maybe five of you so people who do the research aren't afraid and publish the truth. That the mainstream legacy lying media will never ever ever ever ever publish even if you put a gun to their head. They wouldn't do it. What makes you do what you do. Total millions of listeners. Why do you do julie. Well i i don't know i'm always surprised when people say thank you for your courage and i think we'll i'm just reporting what's happening. I don't view it as anything but you know back to the old reporting days where you go through the court documents where you actually talk to people who were involved that you listen to the court hearings. I mean that's basically what i've been doing. Although i will say on january six like i said about my grandparents i thought about them and i thought they would be laughing at the thought that this is a huge battle. One of the darkest days in american history. I mean i remember watching an ira. There's some rabble-rousers but the overblown and by ninety percent of the right to and we're talking about friends of ours. Who immediately jumped on the insurrection. Condemning them this is not the mind maybe not friends. Well you're antisocial though you just go through friends and they didn't call it the problem. They're furry so just you would think after everything we've seen. The past five years in russia collusion the covington hoax counteract. The people would pick up on. What we're seeing is not real. This is not actually what's happening And so. I don't know where i was from the beginning. And then just hearing these heartbreaking stories about what's happening to americans

Chris Julie Covington Russia
North Carolina Judges Strike Down State’s Voter ID Law

AP News Radio

00:39 sec | 3 d ago

North Carolina Judges Strike Down State’s Voter ID Law

"North Carolina judges have struck down the state's latest photo voter ID law two of the three trial judges hearing the lawsuit declared that the December twenty eighteen law is unconstitutional the judges barred its enforcement agreeing with minority voters that Republicans rammed through roles tainted by racial bias as a way to remain in power the majority's decision is now likely headed to a state appeals court with two other pending lawsuits it's looking more unlikely that a voter ID mandate for in person absentee balloting will happen in the twenty twenty two elections a previous ID law was struck down five years ago I Shelley Adler

North Carolina Shelley Adler
Clinton-Linked Lawyer Charged for Lying in Trump-Russia Origins Probe

The Charlie Kirk Show

01:39 min | 3 d ago

Clinton-Linked Lawyer Charged for Lying in Trump-Russia Origins Probe

"John durham expected to indict clinton linked attorney involved in russia. Probe this is. Sussman may have lied to top. Fbi lawyer james baker in a meeting on september nineteenth two thousand sixteen in that meeting sussman attempted to tie the trump organization to a russian bank. Alfa bank saying that they were using a secret server to communicate michael sussman. The fbi later dismissed those allegations so did muller and they were totally bogus. How did sussman lie. Durum has discovered discrepancies between susman's congressional testimony and his september two thousand sixteen interview with baker during their discussion. Baker claimed sussman told them he wasn't working on the alpha-bank project for any specific client. This directly contradicted his two thousand seventeen sworn testimony before congress in which he said he was working for an unnamed cybersecurity expert also perkins koi internal billing records which durham has shows that sussman build the hours he spent an alphabetic probe to the hillary clinton two thousand campaign. So here's the take away. The facts seem to show that sussman was intentionally provoking the russian probe on behalf of the former presidential candidate hillary clinton and then lied to obscure it. This was five years ago. Everybody half a decade ago. She want to know what the big takeaway is here. Nothing we've known about this for four years.

Sussman John Durham Alfa Bank Michael Sussman FBI Susman James Baker Durum Clinton Muller Russia Baker Hillary Clinton Perkins Durham Congress
California Wildfires Threaten Famous Giant Sequoia Trees

What A Day

00:52 sec | 4 d ago

California Wildfires Threaten Famous Giant Sequoia Trees

"Wildfires in california are now threatening some of the biggest trees on earth two fires in the sierra nevada mountains have already closed down sequoia national park which is home to giant sequoia trees. Some that are as tallest three hundred feet and hundreds of thousands of years. Old two thirds of all giant sequoia groves acres already burned down and wildfires within the last five years historic drought and heat waves caused by man made climate. Change are to blame for the extreme proliferation of fires in the area. Firefighters are working hard to protect the giants by doing things like robbing them in huge fire-resistant blankets that are usually reserved for protecting buildings. Here's hoping that they're able to save the general sherman tree which fun fact is the largest city in the world by volume it will become the biggest and most vengeful tree goats if we kill it via climate change we cannot let that

Sierra Nevada Mountains Sequoia National Park California Giants
Jessica Chastain Is Riveting in 'The Eyes of Tammy Faye'

Filmspotting

02:06 min | 4 d ago

Jessica Chastain Is Riveting in 'The Eyes of Tammy Faye'

"Mother. This is jim baker. My husband jessica chastain there as tammy faye bakker in the eyes of tammy faye which opens nationwide this weekend. Andrew garfield co stars as jim baker. Tammy's husband who people of a certain age like us josh. Remember as one of the most prominent televangelists of nineteen eighty and nineteen eighty. Nine baker was sentenced to forty five years in prison for fraud. This movie is directed by michael showalter. Who made the very good two. Seventeen rom com. The big sick. The eyes of tammy faye came up a couple of weeks ago. During our fall movie preview. You have seen the movie and as i alluded to. We lived through the eighties. The bakers were inescapable in popular culture. At seem does the movie convinced that there is more there was more to jim. Tammy faye than we remember or what we saw in parodies from the time i mean it had to for me because my only point of reference was jan hooks portraying. Tammy faye bakker. On saturday night. Live visiting the church lady. I think phil hartmann was was jim baker. Actually so i didn't really know much beyond that of the story. I mean would have been a little kid at that time. And so yeah this was interesting to get some of the background info a lot of it drawn from the two thousand or two thousand two documentary of the same name. The eyes of tammy faye haven't seen that one. But from what. I understand both at end this i can attest to very much rehabilitation projects. You know to to say that there was more and of course there was more to to this woman than what we saw on saturday night. Live or in news. Reports jessica chastain as tammy faye is going to make you believe that no matter what. She is the powerhouse force in this film. The reason why i liked it. I think overall as a movie. It's it's a little strange. It's both really obvious like hitting its themes and points very underlying them like she on like her makeup his underlying. You know

Tammy Faye Jim Baker Jessica Chastain Andrew Garfield Michael Showalter Jan Hooks Phil Hartmann Tammy Josh Baker JIM
U.S., Australia and UK Unveil New Security Partnership

Monocle 24: The Briefing

01:55 min | 4 d ago

U.S., Australia and UK Unveil New Security Partnership

"The biden administration's efforts to counter chinese dominance in asia and support allies in the region is gathering steam. This week the us uk and australia agreed a landmark security pact in the indo pacific. The move will see australia. Build nuclear powered submarines for the first time the pack will also cover artificial intelligence cyber and quantum technologies. So what does all this mean for australia. Monaco's contributor in canberra ardebili. Gary sent us. This report the news that ustralia is going to be getting nuclear-powered submarines came out of the blue five years ago. We signed an agreement with the french to provide us with diesel-powered submarines. It has since become clear that these technology would not be adequate to meet security challenges. Plus they wouldn't be delivered for almost twenty years at the same time. Need security partnership between australia. The us and uk was announced called aucas. All of this is pretty big knees. Even if you're not someone to spend a lot of time thinking about submarines the full details haven't yet been announced but it is clear that it's all about sending a strong message to china. Tensions between australia and china has been increasing over the past few years so this deal is all about australia. Proving to beijing that it has big and powerful allies that it can rely on but it will get australia. Offside with other friends new zealand and pacific countries are avowedly anti nuclear. Oh new zealand has already said it won't allow the subs in its waters. Australia is a signatory to the nuclear nonproliferation treaty. So we can expect that e inspectors will be doorsteps wanting access and china has put out a statement. Saying it's irresponsible big questions now. Are this tacitly. Say that his strategy is undoubtedly in a cold war situation with china. And just how much safer will australia. Now be

Australia Biden Administration Indo Pacific Ardebili Ustralia Aucas UK Monaco Canberra Asia Gary China United States New Zealand Beijing
Simone Biles: 'I Blame the System That Enabled Larry Nassar's Abuse'

Up First

01:36 min | 5 d ago

Simone Biles: 'I Blame the System That Enabled Larry Nassar's Abuse'

"Before we begin our next segment. We note that we will be discussing sexual abuse the testimony. On capitol hill yesterday was both angry and anguished for usa gymnastics athletes said law enforcement including the fbi ignored them and lied about them when they said they were abused by former team. Doctor and convicted sex offender. Larry nassar simone. Biles was one of the women who testified to be clear. I blame larry nassar and i also blame an entire system that enabled perpetrated his joining us. Now is marissa witkowski hausky. She's an investigative journalist for usa today. Who began covering the abuse scandal years ago at the indianapolis star. It's been six years since usa gymnastics heard the first allegations. And it's been five years since you and other journalists at the indianapolis star began reporting on this listening to yesterday's testimonies. What stood out to you. What lawmakers heard yesterday was the continued frustration of survivors. Who felt that their allegations against larry nassar had not been taken seriously enough. They had been calling for change in calling for accountability for the failures of usa gymnastics of the us olympic and paralympic committee and of the fbi former olympic gymnast michaela maroney in her testimony directly. Blame the fbi for not acting fast enough to stop by larry nassar. Here's her testimony. What is the point of reporting abuse if our own. Fbi agents are going to take it upon themselves to bury that report in a drawer.

Larry Nassar Larry Nassar Simone Gymnastics Biles Marissa Witkowski Hausky USA FBI Capitol Hill Indianapolis Usa Today Us Olympic And Paralympic Comm Michaela Maroney Olympic
Oath Keeper Pleads Guilty in Jan. 6 Riot, Will Cooperate

AP News Radio

00:51 sec | 5 d ago

Oath Keeper Pleads Guilty in Jan. 6 Riot, Will Cooperate

"As security is ramped up around the U. S. capitol building a member of the oath keepers militia group is offering to cooperate with authorities authorities in the nation's capital are concerned members of far right extremist groups that storm the U. S. capitol in January we'll be back this coming weekend for a rally in support of those arrested after the deadly insurrection one of those charged forty five year old Jason Dolan of Florida is a member of the oath keepers he's now pleaded guilty to conspiracy and obstruction and has agreed to become a witness for the government the former marine allegedly met up with other oath keepers members on January sixth forcing their way into the capital in military style formation wearing tactical vests and helmets Jackie Quinn Washington

U. S. Capitol Building Oath Keepers Militia Group U. S. Capitol Jason Dolan Florida Government Jackie Quinn Washington
Accusations of Treason Swirl Around Gen. Mark Milley

Mike Gallagher Podcast

02:01 min | 5 d ago

Accusations of Treason Swirl Around Gen. Mark Milley

"Sean hannity during his monologue last night talked about milly either being he should be absolutely fired and tried for treason. If of course the account of bob woodward and bob costas book is correct. Accusations of treason are now swirling around the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff. That would be general mark milley. According to an explosive upcoming book from bob woodward millions accused of conspiring behind the scenes with communist chinese to undermine president trump in the fall of twenty twenty as the washington post details quote in the books account. Millie went so far as to pledge that he would alert his counterpart in the event of the us attack is counterpart being in china. The communist chinese. The book claims that millie had his chinese counterpart quote. Generally you and i have known each other for five years now. And if we're going to attack. I wanna call you ahead of time. It's not going to be a surprise. Okay so what they can attack us. I if this is true general milley would be traded to this country if true he should be fired and tried portrays an immediately given america's enemies heads up before an attack. Well that's the worst possible offense that are member of our military ever commit and there's more according to the same upcoming book and that is the general milley also conspired behind the scenes to neuter the commander in chiefs ability taken duct his constitutional role as commander in chief and conduct military operations. Now this this shouldn't be a right left talking point. I should be able to say to every democrat listening to the show every trumpeter if the chair of the joint chiefs was giving our enemies a heads up in the event of an attack. How is that not treason.

Bob Woodward Mark Milley Milley Bob Costas Sean Hannity Milly Joint Chiefs Of Staff Millie Washington Post United States China Chiefs Joint Chiefs
Becoming Technology Forward and Data Reliant in Marketing with Roku's Sweta Patel

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

02:13 min | 5 d ago

Becoming Technology Forward and Data Reliant in Marketing with Roku's Sweta Patel

"How do you think about driving. Growth within marketing. And what do you feel like has changed over the years And the businesses that you've worked in can i. It's a really really complicated place to be right now to be a marketa it not only. Do you need the traditional side of marketing. But you really need to be technology forward and data the line. I think i think of them in three buckets like the way i look at these. Three levers are just kind of poke into a minute. And i looked at them in every job that i've had but it's just gotten much worse. Not only is is in enough growth to be had but you'll losing resource is having to just become more and more efficient and those three things i tend to focus on. Everything is moving so foster and humans can't keep up with it. I mean you need to be able to mock it and deliver personalized experiences at i. Cool at the speed over tick-tock swipe if you get to the consumer that quickly especially five years from now the relevance of you being around is just is just going to get northern and then with talking about like things like ticked off. The media. Landscape is so fragmented right. Keep her on instagram. In their own take talkin will watching. Tv they're watching multiple devices. And so you warm often channels than we've ever had before people are all over the place and they need to get to them quick us. So that's a challenge at roku the way we're trying to handle these things is we've really started to invest into a crm. And so all go. But before i got here we have channels. You know what they call multichannel marketing. We did that. Everyone's trying to do that and everyone's trying to do on me channel marketing but the way we're focusing about is really trying to now and get the power about platform out and one of my roles here at here. At roku is becoming hyper focused on really building tools automations so that the marches can actually be feeding the systems and and making the systems v. The brains of what we do is all this manual curation and execution that needs to happen.

Roku
Britney Spears and Sam Asghari Are Engaged

Bob and Sheri

01:48 min | 6 d ago

Britney Spears and Sam Asghari Are Engaged

"Brittany spears is free and engaged. Were you surprised No actually i. I think that this moment was waiting for her to be freed from the conservative ship. They've been together five years or more might even be more than that now So and she. He seems good for her. The know he's been with her through some really tough stuff and she seemed very happy with him and Now the engagement picture where. She's kissing him and and flipping the camera off with her. Seventy thousand dollar. Diamond was not the most traditional engagement photo. I've ever seen on instagram but sent the message. But it looks like she's giving the middle finger but it's she's giving the ring finger but it has the same effect There are several photographs She had like four of them and the ring was of course in all of them. i don't i don't know i haven't been following your career like that. I know nothing about the guy. His name is Sam as gari is that. I mean i've never heard anybody say his last name so i don't know he is twenty seven. She is thirty nine. So i guess she started dating him when he was twenty two. He was a young. he's still young guy. I'm gonna hope that that this is wonderful and that this is her happily ever after. Because i'm rooting for her. To have a happily ever after He's he has a great sense of humor The the first thing that every journalist in the world said when this news broke was that she better have a pre-nup and sam Posted on his social media. Thank you everyone is concerned about the prenup. Of course we're getting an ironclad prenup to protect my jeep shoe collection. In case she dumps me one

Brittany Spears Gari Diamond SAM
Cycling Tours Are Latest Trend in Chernobyl

AP News Radio

00:56 sec | Last week

Cycling Tours Are Latest Trend in Chernobyl

"There is a new type of tourism for the exclusion zone thirty five years after the world's worst nuclear disaster I have on the bike store in Chernobyl area Chernobyl is not a place that springs to mind when choosing a scenic cycling routes the area is still dangerous guide Natalie to look says this group is checked for radiation levels we should follow the rules for visitors for example close should cover all your body also we can't deviate from the route for the riders like Iowa but do not it's worth the risk it's second time here and the man purpose for me to come to come here to see the nature how developed sort of face thirty years after the trade people are forbidden from eating and drinking around the zone in Chernobyl and are not allowed to travel in or out by themselves as they finish their tour the cyclists are checked for radiation levels before they leave the zone I'm a Donahue

Chernobyl Natalie Iowa
Alabama Once Again Claims Top Spot in Latest AP Top 25

Mornings with Keyshawn, Jorge & LZ

00:25 sec | Last week

Alabama Once Again Claims Top Spot in Latest AP Top 25

"Oregon in iowa enter top five eight people ranked fourth and fifth in the latest poll. Both schools had road wins over top ten opponents this past week alabama main number one. Of course georgia state at number two. N- oklahoma rose to number three. Arkansas was rewarded for its home. Opening win over the texans over texas with its first appearance in the. Ap top twenty five in five years coming in at number twenty.

Iowa Oregon Alabama Georgia Oklahoma Arkansas Texas
Britney Spears and Boyfriend Sam Asghari Are Engaged

Elvis Duran Presents: Celebrity Buzz

00:21 sec | Last week

Britney Spears and Boyfriend Sam Asghari Are Engaged

"Breaking story at the top of the show brittany spears and her boyfriend. Sam are engaged after nearly five years of dating sam's manager. Confirm this in a statement as page six saying the following quite britney spears and sam made their longstanding relationship official today and a deeply touched by the support dedication and love expressed to

Brittany Spears SAM Britney Spears
Britney Spears, Sam Asghari Announce They're Getting Married

Naughty But Nice with Rob Shuter

01:39 min | Last week

Britney Spears, Sam Asghari Announce They're Getting Married

"Breaking story at the top of the show. Britney spears and her boyfriend. Sam are engaged after nearly five years of dating sam's manager. Confirm this in a statement as page six saying the following. Britney spears and sam made their long standing relationship official today and a deeply touched by the support dedication and love expressed to them. Then the manager added a very odd statement telling us who the rings designed by seems like a little bit of a product placement. Garrett felt like i was watching the bachelorette or bachelor or something the press release confirming engagement. Just say confirmed together. They're really happy but then they went on to say or roman mellon v. I think i'm pronouncing that correct from new york. City is the ring designer. He couldn't be more happy to be involved in this one of a kind ring. So there's actually a statement from the designer the we just very strange to think sam's rep also represents the ring designer. There's something that's not quite right here. Here's a thing ruptured or something like this when the when britney's team and the ring designer putting out statements in what reality of everyone listening. Maybe there's a good what one to two percent of people that could maybe possibly come close to affording some some ring like this one of the kind ring like why even give mention of getting a ten percent discount. It's elliot while you just hit the nail on the head coach. I would predict. I know this is just speculation. I would predict the ring is free and it was given on the condition of publicity celebrities. Do this all the

Britney Spears SAM Garrett New York Britney Elliot
NFL Week 1 With Alex Smith

ESPN Daily

01:01 min | Last week

NFL Week 1 With Alex Smith

"Alex smith. Man you were. I mean first off your ties loosened. Let's start there. You've just spend your first sunday as my teammate. now at espn. You were last. Season's nfl comeback player of the year. We all know that incredible story. But i believe this was the first time in twenty five years you have not been playing football or rehabbing for football. So how did it all feel for you personally. Just being out there and not being out there. Yes you're right. It's been twenty five years. This fall that i haven't been doing football some fashion or another been in training camp incredibly different but Awesome i had a lot of people reach out to me a lot of like stanley france. You know this last week in mackay. We're thinking about you. How are you doing. And as honestly i. I'm so at peace with the way my career ended obviously grateful that i ever was able to make it back in to be doing what i'm doing and you know still be around the game in some other capacity. I still had butterflies this morning. So that was amazing and looking forward to this challenge. It's it's it's fun

Football Alex Smith Espn NFL Mackay France
What Makes a Rookie of the Year?

Chad Ford's NBA Big Board

01:59 min | Last week

What Makes a Rookie of the Year?

"I did some research looking into what really makes a rookie of the year and really three things really came stood out to me. One is opportunity right. You have to actually have minutes significant minutes in a significant role on your team. And if you look over the last couple of years for the rookie of the year race you're going to see that at twenty seven minutes a game seems to be the the threshold that we're looking at for players right now. Two thousand nineteen. It was twenty seven. Point eight doesn't eighteen was thirty minutes a game. And so the first thing that we're we're scouring is is this player going to get significant like starter minutes and a great role on their teams very difficult to crack rookie of the year. No matter how talented you are without those minutes the second key metric is really points per game so in two thousand eighteen. The top three scored. I think sixteen point three points per game two dozen nineteen top three vote-getters for rookie of the year had fifteen point. Three points a game. Twenty twenty was only thirteen points. A game But that was in part because thirty points a game was the third highest gray mark for any rookie about season. And so if you look at the past eight years the winner is was in the top three and usually the top two and scorn for rookies of the year. So not only. Is it going to be minutes but the opportunity to actually score the basketball and does the player have the ability to be a big time scored sort of the next thing that we're gonna look at at it also found that If you go back and sort of look at some of the work that kevin pelton is done at espn Fr- almost every season. The combined averages of points rebounds assists per game when you add those averages together. That's the player that's going to win the ward and then finally You know look when you're looking at rookie of the year. You're not actually talking about the player. That's gonna be the best player in five years if you go back and look at past winters. That's often just not the case. It's it's the player that's can have the most opportunity. I'm to really hit those metrics of scoring Minutes per game and then the sort of combined stats together. That's going to win work the year. And so that's going to change to me. The draft order a little bit about who we're going to handicap again for rookie of the

Kevin Pelton Basketball Espn
"five  years" Discussed on Free Cookies

Free Cookies

05:38 min | 4 months ago

"five years" Discussed on Free Cookies

"On december teeth. Twenty twenty-five she wakes up in her normalized and thinks that must have all been some crazy dream and then four and a half years go by and she meets the man who was in that our with her. And everything sort of starts to like both unraveling rebel together unravel unravel i like it. Sounds like that's an elevator like that is a synopsis. You might have been asked to do once or twice before in your life. You've got that w so. Let's we're obviously going to a touch base on this specific in five years again. But i want to broaden our horizons. Because i saw that you live both in. La and new york. Is that still true. I don't anymore. I so i did for many years. The true thing that. I did for many years for about five years. Well i lived in new york for twelve years. Five of those years. I was back and forth between la new york. But i was mostly in new york. Okay i'm in my head. I was mostly in newark. I wasn't ready to admit yet now. I live in los angeles fulltime here honestly to a short term going overboard. I saw you time. I saw you full time in new york. I don't know this was five years in the future. And i saw it. I thought you full time in new york rebecca. No i would never gonna leave new york. I thought never really. I mean number one..

twelve years newark los angeles five years four and a half years Twenty twenty-five Five twice both new york about five years december once new york rebecca La la years one
"five  years" Discussed on The All New Suze Orman's Women and Money

The All New Suze Orman's Women and Money

02:38 min | 5 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The All New Suze Orman's Women and Money

"You need to know when you're five year clock starts and how it works. It is true that you could take a conversion. You can take your traditional ira and convert it and put that money into the same account. That your contributory. Roth is with but for bookkeeping purposes. It is kept separate on the books so you do not have to have one roth that you may contributions to every year another off. That was a converted roth and other raw that was converted because you took your 401k and converted it to a roth. Ira no all you need. Is one roth ira. And whether it's a contributory roth. Were you contribute money to it or you are converting money from a traditional ira or rollover into it. It can just be one account and it is recorded as to where the money came from and when the time clock starts so you don't have to have all these different accounts but you do need to keep track and you need to know that if you do a roth. Conversion that conversion has its own time clock and is not dictated by the time clock. The five year time clock. When you started your contributory roth got that everybody now. Even if you have a roth for a one k. Listen to me closely and that money has been in your roth for a one k. For five years or longer. And now you leave that place of employment or whatever and you want to convert or you wanna take that 401k money and convert it to a roth and you are thinking while because it's been in a roth 401k for five years or longer and i convert it to a roth. Ira i have the five year. Time clock met. no you don't when you convert it. That time clock starts all over again. You need to know that so. There are all kinds of rules and regulations about this time clock but essentially you need to understand that when it comes to convert it account has its own five year time clock..

five years one account five year one roth 401k one k.
"five  years" Discussed on The All New Suze Orman's Women and Money

The All New Suze Orman's Women and Money

05:55 min | 5 months ago

"five years" Discussed on The All New Suze Orman's Women and Money

"They're not going to get what's in there. 'cause they're going to have to pay ordinary income tax on that money. So therefore you need to have roth retirement account. It is no joke anymore. Everybody you can see in many way. How tax brackets are absolutely starting to go up. You can see how many of the tax deduction such as the step up in basis capital. Get all of that is possibly going to go away. Not just for those who are really wealthy but eventually may be for everybody. So can you just get yourself in a situation where your money is in a tax free situation for you when you go to withdraw as well as your beneficiaries. Leave it to them. There are two things that affect a roth. Ira the very first one is income tax. The second one is a percent penalty. And just because you have a roth. Retirement account doesn't mean that you don't have to pay income tax on it or the ten percents penalty. It just means if you follow the rules you won't have to pay it but if you don't you absolutely will so let's understand what those rules are when you have money in a roth. Ira when you've contributed money to a roth ira and the money that you originally contribute can be withdrawn anytime without taxes or penalties regardless of your age or how long that money has been in the account. So it's not your contributions ever worried about. I worry about the money that your contributions happen to earn. So let's say you put in seven thousand dollars this year. Seven thousand next seven thousand the year after that you have put in twenty one thousand dollars and it's grown to be twenty five thousand dollars and they account only been open three years. You can withdraw anything up to that. Twenty one thousand dollars without taxes or penalties regardless of how old you are or the account has been opened. it's the additional four thousand dollars the earnings that has to stay in that account until you are at least fifty nine and a half years of age and that account has got to have been open for at least five years. Oh there's the first time i'm saying five. It's known as the five year rule. You cannot take earnings out of a contributory roth without a ten percent penalty and ordinary income tax. Unless you are fifty nine and a half years of age and the account has been open for at least five years if it meets both of those qualifications. Then you can make what's called a qualified withdrawal and a qualified withdrawal means it qualifies that withdrawal to not have to pay penalties or taxes. If you are not fifty nine and a half years of age and you're taking out the earnings of a tributary roth and the account has not been open for at least five years. You are going to pay a ten percents penalty tax an ordinary income tax. So here is what i want you to do. Obviously if you don't currently have a contributory roth. Ira i want you tomorrow. First thing to open one.

seven thousand dollars twenty five thousand dollars Twenty one thousand dollars twenty one thousand dollars five three years five year tomorrow ten percent fifty nine and a half years Seven thousand four thousand dollars first time two things seven thousand this year least fifty nine and a half ye second one first one both
"five  years" Discussed on Liminal Podcast

Liminal Podcast

05:37 min | 6 months ago

"five years" Discussed on Liminal Podcast

"Help. Just.

"five  years" Discussed on Liminal Podcast

Liminal Podcast

07:27 min | 6 months ago

"five years" Discussed on Liminal Podcast

"No no august thing that she did this heated this but you already Installed with you'd swear everything then start place on my journey. Couple of years ago. I started to understand that i'm not bad. News on has cut reminds me mindanao status. Such confidence is not buried in my body. Because i don't want anybody to to harm anybody leaving lying because they get bigger bigger. Bigger than controllable soils way imaz. Just be honest and he saw that trying to anybody else. And i a really found myself a soul really found another myself. I felt the To the degree that they do if strangers can give me such good feedback now on memories. They can see what i call then. I must be good. Must be laughing. So i started to really wacky companies loving me survey strange feeding it. Frees you a real sense of freedom. The gordon committee fantasy Feel so good enjoying what you try. You will just feel Secured side light. Live has a reason that you'll hear in a new enjoying everything stage. I've got to win against us. Like comes in you all share it. So i'm sharing it with as many people come into contact with they retain some of the energy. The i give some but it just all south loves taos and what time to do that in a pandemic. When you can't really do much better. I'm sure you probably had a lot of people who have been on. Very big swing of open downs on i think Ahead probably been on. Not probably last year russo on a golden shot if you on the podcast recently Abyss of discovery again and know opening those doors. Shut down for a while. It's such a big man selects. This is But i think how you coming out with the lockdown konica into that positive mindset. You singing in the people you out with is kind of a bit of a shift so we still kind of polarized in full price right now. Seven dana's they started. Might also because the beginning if you remember this. Tom year Now what was happening. Very scary we if it was rushing around trying to toilet paper But it was. It was a real unpredictable time and instead predictable in my opinion i actually lost business. I'm i recently to cape mantle. We separate Enough sivy separates the assists Had sent the A long time ago but the commercial property was ready to dial in attendance. When in the restaurant ball he was a trade. The ran Bill when it should start picking up for me because my life. It just didn't and accidents k. united so the end of the wild pointing tied around my coaching. The people on coaching not really in this country in because of the trust in half within Divulge she they up. They are all quite high. Stay to says in this respect to the high thirties. Next professional football special rests on its special may find an officially box. Very classically acclaimed evil. Nothing the reason. I am to stop them is because i understand the journey that they have to go through to get to the level they get a level they get. That is almost line. They don't want to accept that did that and you would think that. Why wouldn't you keeping on this scion of fighting to get the top of the new talk. Why would you and Mind west we don't. We will miss become so accustomed to the struggle. That may do win. Very good at giving also patch with the bat in also with the famous food enough success he attract the wrong kind people. Sometimes and then you don't understand why people trying to advance to show us haslett life and understanding to differentiation. Good and bad people. It's the lion encompass a safe so so they not do things face to face because they're not be in mind or manage which is lost same solicit clean Sitting on a street sign also in cushing as many times as i should just fax refinanced game but the positive saar. I decided i would start the new laws which modules that. She came to stay with me beginning than she ended. Up gang mona. I've seen a lot of things. Changing also stood still is trying to say things talked for. My chris will then i decided to end to this thing and i found myself accountability. All a nice launch to the ball so my books after being published at the moment it will be anonymous Is amazing bowl thinking much about life. How can i put. It could be central books. So i decided ri- south Which is called matthew knife Lives the life of your dreams which covers many how to make money all the questions that you would say. What do i do this. Mutt and self love because i understand have lives another relationship with family and france. Not just with your pa on how you can deal with family. The agreed with you will people Toxic you're around. I did about health because health discern culture to listen to the old dry stand the kinda coffeehouse in we consume media is what we all say while we did a special extra bonus section on Cooking with And how if you wacky from sings of change silage feed that getting getting the regional guessing up running for the train running to the bustle driving Than now why from high dining table doubles up as a whack space. How do they differentiate half today. Separate move face for students as long as stuck in one room. Getting out listen to latch is not even able to socialize. Senate body said is literally full. Wools that stuck in such a confined space that they could roll out at silva tests log in or not lock in this case may be i feel like chief not in the pandemic and i always say that speech writing i want to now be on more platforms enough about mine. Cools off few Passionate about.

last year Abyss of discovery today Senate thirties Couple of years ago k. united one room Tom year Bill Seven dana france chris cape mantle shot half sivy august
"five  years" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

Not So Standard Deviations

09:39 min | 1 year ago

"five years" Discussed on Not So Standard Deviations

"So. Yeah. Do you WanNa talk about data signs? All like thrown. Debugging Hell. I've actually been through a bit of debugging myself today because. I have office our teaching, my class now out. The homework tomorrow and so office hours was predictably busy. How's it going? How is teaching? You can update our listeners it's a you know it's. It's going I would say you know I think. The students seem to be taking it quite reasonably under the circumstances they're doing. The doing the work and I actually I think. The office hours over zoom is like I might keep that actually. because. It's way better to do screen sharing. Than it is to be leaning over someone shoulder you know. Yeah. Unless you set up I, mean in your office though I feel like you had set up kind of a paring station. Yeah. But you still you know the the biggest problem I have with that is that like I'm looking at these like tiny like twelve inch screens with their like. Six Point Fonts and I just kit kit. Kit So but when they screen share that it's like whatever you're the resolution is way better for me and you have the thing where you can like annotate their screen share. That's really good. Oh Yeah. I don't really do that but I think slack has that automatically regan like activate a little pen and then be like what about right here. But also with like get hub in stuff having just the line counts is usually helpful enough to be like, oh, jumped to line one, sixty, five. Yeah I mean at this level I mean most of the time I look at their code for like a second it's like I. See what's wrong you know it's not like. I mean it's an introductory class. It's not like some advanced class so. Usually. But like to be district, get to the point where I could look at their code is actually more of a hassle elected person I did I think it is a resume. Yeah. So that's kind of Nice what else do you think in general? What do you think our habits? You'll keep from this era. That's probably it. I liked to lecture I prefer to lecture but I'm not doing it for this class this year because it's just too many people too many time zones in to any assist too much. Notice that many of the students took advantage of that by taking a class that meets at the same time out finally which I mean yes smart right. But yeah, generally, I prefer to like to lecture so if we can, I would do that. Hopefully a year from now I'll be doing that. Be I. I'm going to list like Hopkins People in general for the vaccine. By two six people I little list now that usually you can like speak. Usually. How often have you done it? I just saw that the clinicians got the flu vaccine early every year will they have to get it right and that's like a thing right so I never like got it at the same time but I I always assumed I could or something. I don't know. It whatever they say like is available. So It's available. Now have you gotten your flu vaccine? Just like your normal flu? No well, I I haven't gotten it yet because I usually get it through hopkins like they just have like a free. You know they just set up a free thing where they just give you the vaccine. So I'm just like waiting for that email the show up. I'm waiting I I could go get it at the doctor's office but I looked at their times and they're not nothing you know. It's weird 'cause I. Keep hearing. You should get your flu vaccine this year. That I've like wait but I'm not I'm not like near anyone just matter interactive that he lives. Yeah. Like I'm still like pretty quarantined compared to I think like most of America. Yeah like I do not interact like I don't go to the grocery I, go to like an outdoor coffee shop like I haven't even been inside a restaurant like I haven't done anything inside going to get a vaccine would be the most dangerous thing you do. Yeah exactly. So Maybe I shouldn't I. Don't know. You probably should guessing I keep thinking I should, but then it's probably won't till after the election. Well that's a different story. Yeah. Anything else like anything your personal. Your home life or your. Grocery, life I don't know what what are you asking me if anything's changed yeah I can't say that anything has radically changed. In the last. Six months really. We did go out to dinner actually for the first time. This week. Inside outside outside. Okay. That's. Different Yeah. I. Mean there's not going to be a lot of outdoor dying like left as maybe a few more weeks before it gets too cold I. think. I mean I think my tolerance for sitting outside and the cold is probably a little bit higher. I tolerate the cold better than like for example, the other members of my family So but yeah, it's it will just be too cold and there will be an eating outside. So I am. Guessing. They've changed I mean I do I actually kind of like working remotely so I feel like that's on the table in a way it never was before although there are downsides. It's kind of hard to identify the downsides I know it's hard to explain. Yeah. The downsides would you start to I feel for me Just, be clear. This is not my preference. Obviously. I'll do it because but like I would prefer to do this under normal circumstances but I think when when I talk about like what the downsides Har I agree they're hard to articulate and when you do try to articulate you kind of sound a little silly. I feel like it's just but for me, it's just like kind of all the little things. That are part of the job, but you know they are associated with the job you know. Yeah. Now it is. It's a million little things and but it's hard for me to say what the net impact is 'cause they're things. I, really like about like I, like studying way more time with my cab even though yesterday she was like a terrorist. Choose not happy I. I could not. I spent all day trying to figure I could not figure it out but she was not happy with me probably food related it was definitely food relate like I tried to give her every type of food that I have and she was like rejecting I. Think she really felt bankers I think when they feel sick, they get angry. Until they don't feel sick anymore. So I don't know because I don side she searches like eating any plant that was available to her. Yeah. So anyway. Sometimes I like it, and then I I like not having the commute you now. Like there's things I really like about it. So I haven't it's an odd it's an odd situation. I don't know like I like being in my home like I like my home I like how I decorate it. I like my stuff you know. But yeah, there's also just a weird feeling about it. Yeah, I. Said I feel like I understand what you're saying, but I also can't. Articulated exactly. At the biggest thing for me to are like. Call Him with my family. We just never I think a lot of families already do that but we never did it before and then the way. I like grocery shops leaked. Changed. I'm like I order from this thing in the bay area called good eggs. It's like grocery delivery, but it's not like instant art style it's aboard like. Employees who deliver and then I also like when I go into the grocery. I'm just like buying a ton of stuff. So like I I think the smoothies me a lot of fruit and I'll by like five bags of I'm just like, okay. This is my once every three months trip to the grocery. stocked up forever so. Yeah I'm sure there's other things too that I'm not thinking of, but yeah, workwise I'm not totally sure but. I'm sure it'll be more clear when I try to go back in twenty years. Don't say that. I see in my when my son he's doing a they're doing like distance learning now. And I see like you saw I don't really know what goes on when he's at school like I'm not there right and it's not like he tells me so. But I could see that like you know if he were in the classroom. There's all these like little bits downtime like inbetween like when he's finished doing something or you know and the teachers like still waiting for the kids to the kids to finish or whatever and. Here They're his desk to enough. Yeah. Just staring. Yeah. Whereas in the classroom you might be like he could be like. Talking to a friend early. Walking around or anything else literally. But here he's just like staring at the wall. So it's just like I could see like their little things like that. That, you don't have at home. Did you see the video like a kindergarten teacher teaching like? It was some Tiktok they've been put on twitter. She had so much energy and she had made these little signs for like when you're on mute that she is like I think you're on mute and like like a little lake she..

flu vaccine flu twitter slack America
"five  years" Discussed on The Bugle

The Bugle

01:56 min | 1 year ago

"five years" Discussed on The Bugle

"Don't speak your own language, but that means people who do some ing leading Capetian. Sport, now, and the Kobe the Middle Shit is for sport to go crowd little sparsely beforehandbut sports have manifold ways to stay alive non more or less those in the world refusal championships which takes place this week in in Berlin after twelve other cities declined to host the final. So USA versus South Africa final and Team USA OARS finds out to call them team USA. Night? vice-skipper ordeal arousal winch of the Boston vetoes they're gonNA lead off in the mixed doubles rebuff with. Crack pairing of punishable Kwalik delicious labs, Berry standing resentment between those two should help them along the way as they take on the block box star pairing of scrap van, the Hell Housing and Biggie. Anna fromage who've not been seeing eye to eye to a decade at the highest level. Now in the singles travel winch and Jehan Twelfth Yard could have their work cut out as they try to out demure respectively druggies loud shit and Van. Bridget Koksal. Ot W of course, coming up with disappointing quarterfinal loss at last week us. Open when he he lost out Russia's you have give any CA splash nick off after carelessly accepting piece of chewing gum from his opponent at a chain events. The final is set to end with a long-awaited head to head reject off between America's okay. Billions from the New York, Knicks and bloemfontain snub veteran Ken Peanut who famously the Josephine trophy facilitator white back in two thousand eight by declining to lift the wheelbarrow full of bricks trapped shins of Francis. Partouche who of course received a lifetime ban for accepting medical assistance during that sensational climax exclusive coverage. Live on the Bugle for the rest of the time. Well that concludes the Bugle for for this week tiffany's now.

Bugle Jehan Twelfth Yard Team USA OARS Anna fromage Berlin Bridget Koksal USA Van Knicks Boston Ken Peanut tiffany Kwalik Russia South Africa America New York Berry USA. Francis
"five  years" Discussed on The Bugle

The Bugle

04:06 min | 1 year ago

"five years" Discussed on The Bugle

"Covid News Now and Pretty Patel home secretary despite overwhelming evidence that she shouldn't be home secretary has attempted to ban the ancient British tradition of mingling Ming Ming Mingling She's trying to ban mingling. And encourage people to snitch on neighbors. Who will this I mean this year is as we keep saying generated sentences that you never anticipated would have to be said, I'm from Pretty Patella Home Secretary, which is a collection of five words. Should never occur. Without an awful number parentheses between them and audio book full of other words I mean, there was no there's no real legal basis for Art Griffith the Minister for Public Confusion and fear hailed Patel's intervention. Impressively, ill-informed and legally baseless further signs at this government is committed to delivering on its election promises to avoid competence good sense and respect for the law at all times and I mean the snitching thing is I mean, are you I don't know when that naturally a nation of of of snatches the government itself as as proved it doesn't really like the other being snitched on by for example, a parliamentary investigation into the influence of Russia on British politics and all that kind of snitching and. Bizarre situation where if your neighbors gather up all of five devil worshipping Neck Romances to sacrifice a supermarket Charlie full of puppies. That's fine. But seven nuns trying to rescue an injured puffing from allege that is now illegal Yes. The great puffins problem of two, thousand, nine, twenty. On. Mingling is bad. How are we going to make cocktails? Guys, guys. It does feel medieval. You might as well bring about the skulls bridal. That's what is kind of like cyber out. Loud. I Have Justin is what the scolds widely, but it was originally owned by Scottish. Clergy for women who spoke too much and gossiped and You'd have to walk around this piece of iron in your mouth and across your face maybe bell ringing. Like the Chamber Again Yeah Yeah. So Christie Patel Ortiz correct name. Dolores umbrage at said, if she saw families like talking to each other and they were more than six people, she would report them and Lewd scriven said in the House of Lords for the first time since the thirteen hundred's mingling is an offence under English law. And the Home Secretary confirmed she saw two families of full on the street and stopped to say, hello, how're you? They would be mingling and carrying out an offense now to be fair to talk to strangers has been an offense in London for a very long time. So I think is going to be mainly northerners He will suffer the most for actually trying to greet people they don't know but I think London is going to be a k. but this is all stuff we have to bear in mind. This is after win. We now call Bingo we've got this rule of six. This is off the being actively encouraged into this out to help house game, which involves mingling with twenty thirty people in a restaurant. But yet you call me your entire family and I have. Like a small conspiracy theory on the to help out there is just it's it's primarily a publicity campaign for pizza. Express. So everyone will forget is Prince Andrew's favorite restaurant. And the snitching is so. So big. Vetik to. Someone for mingling imagine that call even like hello. Yes I've seen a mingling in progress started out as a casual how do you do but it's definitely shifted to mingle and I'm worried if no one intervenes some noodling might breakout. The worst part for me is that people who aren't in relationships now legally have to say that there are single and ready to stay that way for a depressing time. Seeing your neighbors is horrible signatures get stitches been.

Home Secretary Pretty Patel Lewd scriven Secretary Christie Patel Ortiz London Patel Russia Art Griffith Charlie Dolores umbrage House of Lords Justin Bingo Prince Andrew
"five  years" Discussed on The Bugle

The Bugle

05:24 min | 1 year ago

"five years" Discussed on The Bugle

"Right that is when people are terrified. That's when they run the fastest. That's when they scream the loudest. So I do think it is a powerful motivator but the. The Republicans are now working from just. I guess a position of being fully. To Messenger and Horny for nihilism, which I think is also when you The whole void that is the proper motivator. Just GonNa. Fill up that void with my. Nihilism. That's Ishaq dirty by the. Way Safe would was. I feel like. You don't believe in safe words if you die you die. So, trust the future of justice for the next decades to a single PRE president I'll get it might have made just a bass mention of sense. Back, in the long distant past when you could reasonably expect the president to have a better than fifty percent chance of not being a psychotic balanced but those days. A sadly gone and like I said, it's difficult on a statins outside all bit we in Britain are more more trying to emulate, and even at times surpassed the craven twitter of you off of colonial colleagues in America. Basically all the ways America loves to undermine itself democratically whether it's your pay brained electro system day facto theoretical legalization of all crime that is the presidential pardon, the gangrenous plutocracy, rancid corporate parasite Tis, and whatever whatever bogus validations are wheeled out to justify. Everything the appointment of Supreme Court justice be right up there with the most politically corrosive. Is it time for America just. Get its constitution, stick it through a shredder and start with a blank sheet of payments. I reckon we can have another crack at this. I look, I certainly think we've got to we've gotTA do some amending. I. Don't know if I trust the people in charge, they may just shredded and leave it shredded. Donald Trump's business seem like fighting. A paper shredder. When when you tell Donald trump shred the papers, he says how small He's done. Yeah. You want him to shred the constitution. He'll. He'll burn it. He'll find some way to to cover up that ever happened but I do the Supreme Court is there are so many the Senate the Supreme Court kind of weirdly undemocratic institutions having nine people decide your fate forever would be like appointing a Boston Red Sox for life and just having them play every game no matter how decrepit and close to death they are until they decide that they want to retire and that is a terrifying proposition even as bad as the red sox have been in this cova truncated season. So that that's their six weeks to go in one of the all time. Classic. Set canarian onset. Classes. Reminiscent of some of the classic Polit Bureau Karaoke back in the late Brezhnev era. What what's your expectation of this stage Joe Biden clearly is not the ideal candidate, but then much of America would gladly taken uncontrollably shitting dog running on the ticket with an incumbent Penguin terrapin donkey crossbreed as VP nomination. So how's it going to Pan Out? I? Think, oh, I hesitate to make any. A predictions because Donald Trump is on when you say shitting dog, he's just the shed right? You don't even get the benefit of the dog Donald Trump. It's just he's kind of diarrhea animated to life and Joe Biden. His campaign is kind of like a floyd mayweather type campaign in that he's mostly playing defense. He's not taking a lot of big swings and he's been accused of misconduct by numerous women so like. Situation But I. If I had to bet. If I if I were if I were a betting man. I would prefer to be the house in the situation. Take the beds no matter what. But as a human being with skin in the game again, I on I'll say my prediction is the fastest running the loudest screaming that we've seen in a long time. And the role that the Christian right is is continually baffling in the trump era. Every stage where I. think that if if Jesus Christ himself with to make his long awaited comeback and announced that he was standing for the Democrats, the Christian right would still not only back trump but also found his campaign attack adverse accusing Jesus of being soft on welfare. The soft on crime kind of a socialist. From the Middle East that's a dog missile right were. They would go. I think there is probably a section of the Christian rate who is Less excited for the return of Christ than Kid rock's next come back out. So It's kind of set of circumstances. Kid Rock was briefly Jesus nickname of course of. A. Seen..

Donald Trump Joe Biden America Boston Red Sox Supreme Court president Kid Rock Middle East Polit Bureau Karaoke Britain diarrhea floyd mayweather Senate VP
"five  years" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

02:58 min | 1 year ago

"five years" Discussed on The Frame

"<Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> <Music> This <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> is Monica Bushman <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> producer on the frame <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and I'm also <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> a cryer. <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> I cry at the movies <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> and watching. TV <Speech_Music_Female> shows even <Speech_Female> during some commercials. <Speech_Female> I try not to <Speech_Female> cry at work but <Speech_Female> one of the things that <Speech_Female> I really enjoy about working <Speech_Female> on the frame <Speech_Female> is that John Horn born <Speech_Music_Female> is a prior <Speech_Music_Female> <Advertisement> to he <Speech_Female> cries at work and <Speech_Female> he's not at all ashamed <Speech_Music_Female> about it attended <Speech_Female> stands out for me was <Speech_Female> when he was talking with my <Speech_Female> erskine ankle <Speech_Female> there the creators <Speech_Female> and stars <SpeakerChange> of the Hulu. Blue <Speech_Male> Show Penn.. Fifteen <Speech_Male> it's a <Speech_Male> beautiful scene <Speech_Male> but it's <SpeakerChange> really <Speech_Male> I mean it's <Speech_Female> I mean <Laughter> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Male> <Speech_Male> it's Real <Speech_Female> Jonathan Shift shift <Speech_Female> one or the other producers <Speech_Female> here remember <Speech_Female> this moment from John's <Speech_Female> interview <SpeakerChange> with Randy <Speech_Music_Female> Newman <Music> When she <Music> was <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> I was <Music> <Advertisement> drying tips? <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> I <Speech_Male> didn't make <Speech_Male> didn't make <SpeakerChange> throw without <Speech_Female> crying <Speech_Female> and <Speech_Female> Julia. Paskhin recalled <Speech_Female> this moment from an <Speech_Female> interview. She <SpeakerChange> produced with with <Speech_Music_Male> Mahershala Ali <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> little <Speech_Music_Female> world <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> when he and John <Speech_Female> talked about the powerful <Speech_Male> swimming lessons <Speech_Male> seen <SpeakerChange> from moonlight. <Speech_Male> It's all I can <Speech_Male> do to cry <Speech_Male> Eh <Speech_Male> up so <Speech_Male> much for me. <Speech_Music_Male> It really <SpeakerChange> does <Music> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> <Speech_Music_Female> John <Speech_Music_Female> Horn. Go ahead <Speech_Music_Female> and shed a tear and <Speech_Music_Female> don't feel bad <SpeakerChange> about it <Music> <Music> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and that'll do it. <Music> <Advertisement> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I want <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> to thank everybody. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Who is tuned in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> over the years? I <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> thank you for listening <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> to the frame. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> I also want to thank <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Colin Campbell. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Who hired us to start <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> this show back in <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> two thousand fourteen <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and our current program <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> director Sallow <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Curto who <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> guides us now <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and thanks to <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the Budo span <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> which supplied our <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> original theme music? <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> And a Taylor <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> mcferrin who <Speech_Music_Male> wrote our current <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> theme song. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> The frame is produced by Darby <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Maloney. Jonathan <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> shiftless <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Monica Bushmen <Speech_Music_Male> and Julia. Paskhin <Speech_Music_Male> our news <Speech_Music_Male> clerk is Andrea <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Gutierrez and our <Speech_Music_Male> intern is <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Paul ratliff. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Our original regional <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> producers <Speech_Music_Male> are Michelle Lands <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> and James Ken <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Edward <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> Up. Res- is our <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> engineer. And we <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> say goodbye this month. <Speech_Male> <Advertisement> To our longtime <Speech_Music_Male> engineer <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Valentino Rivera. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thank <Speech_Music_Male> you val <Speech_Music_Male> get some sleep. <Speech_Music_Male> Our senior producer <Speech_Music_Male> is Oscar Garza. <Speech_Music_Male> And I'm <Speech_Music_Male> John Horn <Speech_Music_Male> from the MON broadcast <Speech_Music_Male> center at KPCC. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> Thanks <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> for being part <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> of our frame <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> family. <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> We'll see you back here for <Speech_Music_Male> <Advertisement> the daily version of <Speech_Music_Male> the frame on <Music> Monday. <Music> <SpeakerChange> <Speech_Female> <Speech_Female> KPCC deep <Speech_Female> podcasts are supported <Speech_Female> by Warner <Speech_Female> brothers presenting <Speech_Female> Joker Todd <Speech_Female> Phillips Cinematic <Speech_Female> Vision See <Speech_Female> Joaquin Phoenix <Speech_Female> Golden Globe and screen <Speech_Female> actors guild <Speech_Female> nominated performance hence <Speech_Female> winner of the Venice <Speech_Female> Film. 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"five  years" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

02:00 min | 1 year ago

"five years" Discussed on The Frame

"This is Philip. Glasses candyman what do you think about that. I was unbelievable anything about that. It's unbelievable another memorable. Moment was when Tanya Saracho creator of the star series Vida demonstrated the vocal talent. She used on her day jobs as her writing career got going. I was for ten years. I was voice in Spanish for Special K and the tag was Special Gate the various interior. Komo to care like you'd still friendly and then ten years for Walgreens Raines is still see mining walgreens with compared to those Nova nine wavy tenure. That's how I was able to write plays and not star in Chicago because I I was doing voices and when Tom Hanks and Clint Eastwood made a movie about the pilot Sully Sullivan Burger. I ask them about what it means to be a hero and to play one onscreen screen Tom. I think the other day gave a definition of of hero that I thought was A spot on it was it to me. It's is somebody who does US something extraordinary and yet he doesn't think it's extraordinary. He may think well I. I was on my game that that week there is this projection objection that is put upon you that because you play these guys. You actually have some of the attributes that that you do and believe me. My skill set is to make it appear as though I have these attributes without having any of the actual attributes that being said the power of the cinema and the power of the heroic visions the guy that Ukraine lie on in in motion. Pictures makes you feel as though you have to be dedicated and you have to. You have to be trained and you have to follow through and if you get that lesson from literature richer from opera from theater from Shakespeare cinema rates as one of those great One of those great art forms and so yes you. You actually do become enlightened in a way by the heroic portrayals big and small this is the frame fifth anniversary special revisiting moments from our first five years on the air..

Sully Sullivan Burger Walgreens Tom Hanks Vida Special Gate Philip Tanya Saracho Chicago Raines Clint Eastwood Ukraine
"five  years" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

03:44 min | 1 year ago

"five years" Discussed on The Frame

"I'm John Horn. You're listening to the frames. Fifth Anniversary special on the show were always interested in in how and why artists do what they do especially if they're working a little bit outside the norm like this. Game of thrones sound designer. I'm Paula Fairfield. And I I do all the kind of fantastical stuff on the show. The white walkers the dire wolves mammoths but one of the biggest things. Obviously that I do is dragon. Well the funniest part about this with the purse sounds I hunted and hunted for just the right sound. And while I was was trolling around I found a sound of two giant tortoises having sex and I'm not kidding. And and the Mon from the mail is what I took for for as the basis for the purring of young drove on. And what's funny about it is that I I remember watching people watch it and every time that sound would come up. People would giggle and it was just funny. It was just automatic because it has a prime element still in there so knowing that as I proceeded through the seasons I have actively we looked for Sounds of larger animals. Having that piece was produced by James. Kim Who is one of our original producers. I'm John Horn. And this is the frame. Fifth Anniversary special over the years have shared how the changing political climate has affected their work. One example is the playwright John Robin Bates before the two thousand sixteen election. He wrote a play called the Kunia with a trump like character actor he mounted it in La a year later he launched a revised version in Washington. You know people asked me last night at a talk back here in DC. What's the answer to all this because the play in its epilogue ends with the question now and the answer is numbers and in a weird way I thought I could justified getting back to the play because it brings us together? I'm very corny about what the theater is still and I do believe it's a sort of gathering gathering an a church and a communal act and that it has a deep social relevance and resonance are also. It's nothing nothing and so it brought me back to working on it and and doing it in. DC felt like the right place a year later. Let me ask you about the question in the epilogue. It's what are you doing to prevent this. So why was that the question that you felt needed to be asked in the epilogue. It's the only question I think I live with is. What are you doing to prevent this? What are you doing to counter it? What are you doing to answer it? When will you not remained remain silent? Can you remain silent. And it's time to ask that question all the time. Now you know I have friends and family who are Trans and people of Color and immigrants and they are under under constant threat and so so it's up to people like me and maybe most of our listeners that can be an opposition to it vocally actively.

John Horn DC John Robin Bates Paula Fairfield Kim Who La James Washington
"five  years" Discussed on The Frame

The Frame

06:22 min | 1 year ago

"five years" Discussed on The Frame

"KPCC PODCASTS are supported by twentieth century. Fox presenting forward versus Ferrari directed by James Mangold starring Christian. Bale and Matt Damon now nominated mandated for a Golden Globe for best actor Christian Bale and five critic's choice nominations including best picture of the year. KPCC supporters include Fox searchlight presenting. Joe Rabbit nominated for the Sag Award for Best Ensemble. Seven critics choice awards including best picture. The Golden Globe for Best Picture and one of AF is ten best pictures of of the year for consideration in all categories. You have some degree of greater confidence that you belong to something bigger than yourself. You can like watch. History happened or you can choose to be a part of it. I just like that feeling of making people feel. The frame is five years old and today we celebrate. Celebrate that with some of our favorite frame moments we travel back to memorable interviews dynamic guests strange location some tears and a few. There's a bathtub with a writing desk in the bath. Now there's there's a there's a frontal toilet that's the difference between La and New York. You convenient you are and have the space to be on thought who old not to walk tool bad day when that happened it I still feel that page on from the broadcast center at KABC. I'm John Horn today. We celebrate the first five years of the show. What was some of our favorite moments covering the cultural world and spending time with the people who inhabited when we launched the frame? We were doing something for the very first time I had been a print reporter my entire life so we ask our guests for stories when they first succeeded or failed failed. We have a thirty second request so in two weeks everybody who comes on is saying the first thing that something happened hi. I'm Gina Davis and the first time I got cast in a movie was in tootsie on twelve. Few the first job did I failed in actually got fired on was American gangster eastern. I'm John Stewart. The first time I bob on stage funnily enough was the first time I was on stage. For some reason I was absolutely not nervous at all what my first scene was with. Dustin Hoffman in my underwear. What I learned from that was Is Not all about meal and you have to learn how to navigate sometimes as filmmaker The Bitter End New York City. One o'clock in the morning following three doors cover bands. I had a good five minutes prepared about two two minutes into it. The audience realized I might suck at this but the funniest thing was. I didn't know you're only supposed to come on the days that you're working and nobody bothered. Can you tell me for six weeks. I showed up at six and went home when everybody else did. I'd get a chair and put it right next to Sydney Pollack and sit there and bad day they wouldn't have. I still feel that page on field. I walked into the night I thought to myself you know. There are a lot of law schools. I could I could go to them. And our first guest in two thousand fourteen was Christopher Nolan. He was about to release his movie. Interstellar a lot of people are saying that this is your most personal film. How do you respond to that? You take it as a compliment. Do you think they might be right I six. They don't know me. How would they know I? I don't know myself when either mm-hmm there been a lot of real world events that have driven our coverage over the years but the one that coincided with our launch was a Sony Hack today the. US government pointed the finger of blame directly at North Korea for the devastating cyber tech against the only pictures taken down the movie. The interview that poked fund the North Korean dictator whole. They cost a lot of damage. The cyber attack of Sony pictures which allegedly was conducted by North Korea came in response to who a movie it was called the interview. It Starts Seth Rogan and James Franco. It was a crazy story. It evolved every day and in the middle of it. Dan Sterling Elaine. who was the screenwriter of the interview was with us in studio? Hi thanks for having me. It's very rare that a screenwriter is like with us to talk about breaking news news so I guess my breaking news question is what the Hell's going on today. Well I just know what's going on in my email inbox which is an increasing flood of people asking me if I'm okay. Both emotionally physically and financially was your answer. What are you telling you know I was at a party on Saturday? Night where the host was introducing me to everybody buddy at the party as this guy that brought down Sony the first four or five hundred times the joke was made it was funny except The one thing that I know that I'm not happy about is actually the real suffering that is going on at Sony. Not just by the person who green that my I film so bravely but also by all the people affected by the hack quite concerned about them that was screenwriter. Dan Sterling on our show in two thousand fourteen. I'm John Horn and you're listening to the frames fifth anniversary special for music fans. This is one of those days that you will probably always remember. Where are you were when you heard the news that Prince had died? This is Oscar Garza senior producer of the frame. One of the memories that sticks out for me from our first five years is the day we had to report on the death of one of my musical heroes. There have been reports at Prince wasn't well but certainly no indication that he was hooked on opioids so so it was a shock that he was gone but like every day we simply put our heads down and focused on producing the show once. We were done though. I started thinking of The Times that I witnessed his electric live shows and it was incredibly sad to realize that he'd never take the stage again.

Sony New York City John Horn North Korea Christian Bale KPCC Best Ensemble Fox searchlight James Mangold Dan Sterling Prince Joe Rabbit Dustin Hoffman Fox Gina Davis Sydney Pollack Matt Damon Christopher Nolan Ferrari John Stewart
"five  years" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

04:13 min | 2 years ago

"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

"Go there and check your interests too so if a a new group comes up near you geographically. Let's say my interests are javascript. And Ruby will anytime anything touch those two areas that. I'm GonNa get notified defied it. You wouldn't want to just prop up your tent without an audience and no opportunity for discovery. Yeah I mean this could eventually come to a displaced meet up and a lot of respect for. That's not our goal at this point. Even though initially it was like so angry at meet up. Let's create a killer. But that's not how I think like when I'm thinking clear-headedly and I don't see red I think I think practically what can we do for our organization. What can we do for our community? And this is the right scope rate skill tool that. It's GonNa work for them. What's been five years force since we last time five since the inception this is your fifth year anniversary Similar question in the companion podcast. You asked us which was hey. What's what's the next five years like field? What what's the future hold for you are you lack of is near like I am currently or are you visionary and you've got lots of ambition? I have an incredible amount of things. I'd I'd like to do. A lot of it comes down to how much we have in our budget because we don't want to overextend ourselves we're a tiny organization. We WanNa make sure everything we do. We do properly and that we're not spreading ourselves too thin so If we can continue to grow our budget we'd like to do a lot more explanatory journalism and and Explain a lot more about technology and put Tech News in context Through really in-depth Primers We'd like to create a lot more really good first party courses and we'd like to create a lot more interactive curricula. We'd love to be able to figure out a way that we could pay for service of could actually have Lennox Focus Challenges Get focused challenges. All these things that require like foul systems essentially you can only do so much in the browser just You know for example. We're able to do python because Mozilla released a giant library. That's a significant update from like breath on or some of the other browser-based Python tools. What's but we'd really like to be able to actually have full development environment on a server that is showing up on Free Co camp that you yourself have your own little mini compartment on? The server costs a lot of money. Yeah so yeah if we were able to increase the budget. We're going to just keep doing what we do. Those three pillars. We're GONNA keep growing the number of people on the forum and by extension in Ir L. Events and We're also going to just keep creating articles and videos IOS and we're GONNA keep expanding the curriculum even talked about this other publication your Youtube Channel. I mean we're on their theoretically so we do have a youtube channel. Donald timing subscribe the bell. That's right youtubers. Always subscribe and the a Bell Right. Why why did you do that twice? I've never hit the bell was actually. It's Kinda Double Optin. You subscribe because you're interested. What's the bill gave you like? I don't care that much that you know video like all come watch it on my own terms that important. Well that's where the double opt in is they get it from the side. I would love to have the bell for my channel but I don't WANNA have you're bill for my feet. Keep your bell right keep your bell. WHOA Quincy Man? It's it's been. It's been fun watching you over these last five years The numbers speak for themselves. I think the fact that you're you can educate as such a efficient rate makes it total sense for people who are who have have you know the funds and have benefited from Free Code. Gamble people have in that five bucks. Seems like it makes a lot of sense so you know one more time to his to our listeners. If if you appreciate the work they're doing and you want to help. Educate the next generation of coders out there whether they're young whether they're young or old. Or what part of the world there in yeah.

Quincy Man Youtube Mozilla Donald five years
"five  years" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

13:11 min | 2 years ago

"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

"Historic context with all the other mediums preceded it the other media that preceded like radio cable stuff like that and so that would be kind of like the archetypal like if I was gonNA lead by example. I'd say we should be writing in depth articles like this And there are plenty of other publications that right like New York Times The Wall Street Journal a lot of them will just have really in-depth articles that put things in a historical context. It's not just like this happen. This happen this happen is like this happened in. Here's why that's significant from a historical perspective. Or here's what that means so explanatory technology journalism that's kind of our spiral. One of our goals is to get people to actually come to a Free Rico Camp Dot. Org every day and have something new and exciting that they can learn right now people just blow through the curriculum and they get a job and they're like awesome free cookie away. He's back in two thousand seventeen. I hear that all the time. We're losing a lot of talk about that because it's one thing to you know if your mission is to educate kate as a primary mission and you mentioned the three pillars. It's going to be very difficult to keep a captive audience because of what you said so. It's very easy for people to be transient and given that their goals and their means have been covered and they're gone. Yeah and there's always more stuff than learn like I learned a lot about quantum competing in the past few weeks weeks. I learned a lot about you. Know Micron length semiconductor manufacturing and stuff like that right There's always new stuff. That's it's coming up. Technology by definition is new. So there's always new stuff and just being able to explain how you know you orchestrate with communities or how a docker container works. What's the difference between a docker image? And a you know a docker container. Right or a docker instance. I can't Corolla different terms this article. Do you have You've mentioned a Free Co camp mission but it seems like the roles of these pillars are distinct. So do they have their own agenda that feeds into a sort of main corporate agenda. Like why these three. Yeah so so. We are strong believers in content. I think that One of the biggest tragedies is that so much of their wards of the web have been crewed the platforms that are basically just aggregating other people's content if you look at like facebook right and all these companies they're benefiting from providing the basic infrastructure. You could argue you know. Medium fits that boat Corre They just create the software. Everybody else comes in as the content and people don't care about the infrastructure that much they really were are there. It'd be like you saying like Netflix should accrue one hundred percent of the vote because they created such a great streaming platform and like the Hollywood movie. Companies shouldn't get anything because hey they just created the content spree right or cheap cotton is it. Content is not a commodity really good content is incredibly valuable. And if you look like there's the information for example it's like this news publication charges like hundreds of dollars a year to get a subscription. The economists historically has always charged one hundred and fifty two hundred dollars a year. Right I and I think we're GONNA see more and more of these publications that are like this is really high quality so we're not going to give it away for free at same time that do give it away for free pro PROPUBLICA and You know the Guardian and places like that and that's because they're fully donor support it. They can do that. And free. Co can't of course being fully donor supported by you know. Small individual donors were grassroots organization. We can do that. We can make everything free and we can provide tons of content from our community the and from ourselves like like paid staffers like me who are writing articles and things like that. So let's talk about the donations real quick and then we'll switch gears to. They do want to talk talk about you mentioned platforms so five bucks a month. Let's just say go and sign up for recurring. I'm in like your mission and I got the cash. I'm GonNa give you five bucks a month. The where's that money. Go great question so I we've got some people okay. I let me talk big numbers so so everybody understands. Free Co camps was twenty. Nine thousand budget was three hundred. Seventy three thousand dollars. That may sound like a lot of money but I know developers in Silicon Valley who personally make more money than Matt a year. Sure that is maybe payroll for like three or four people right And we're figuring out a way to like stretch it across seven people and we're also paying you know tens of thousands of dollars a year in servers so the answer is like one hundred percent of that gets consumed by the by what is traditionally called programs when you analyze a nonprofit fundraising there's administration and there's programs and we don't really have we he just that we have Quincy Larson saying please donate to our dump profit please sir. We don't have a PR firm. We don't have a marketing department You you could argue that we could do better and we raise introduce a lot of complexity the organizations and right now everybody who works for Free Co camp came up through free cokie of rain never. You're kidding right. Yeah I get it and I would say like I know a lot of profit. The do the fundraising side. And of course it's akin to like a bootstrapped company getting VC funding. I mean it's an office there but it's different but you could. I mean but the small the hardest way is the individual recurring donations versus having a person on staff. Maybe it's you maybe it's somebody who's really good at going around to the big donors. Maybe that's the reason y you could get like a one million dollar grant. Maybe yeah but as we into those organizations and also like that would kind of spoil us. That's him fighting in the field to earn people's donations regular people. People who are working day jobs have kids feed and paying mortgages. But they're like. Hey Yeah I can spare five bucks for Free Co Kampe month or yeah at the end of the year and I can just give me a thousand bucks for ten thousand bucks. Well about this companies though. They're reaping the the benefits of your work. That's fine it's like you know a positive extra analogy for them right. This consumer surplus from them. But there's uncaptured opportunity there. I mean you could argue the same thing with Wikipedia I mean. How much value do you think? Wikipedia has bestowed upon the world by making it to where I can get good factual information within seconds from a relatively objective. Arbiter of truth. Yeah there's a whole lot of value that he's not captured. That's that's kind of the point. But then they also have to put Jimmy Wales face on Wikipedia for one month every year in bug the dog out of their users when they could just do these other things. Such as some tasteful ads. You know know you know I. There's no wrong with advertising greet model especially for podcast but but also you know like if you if you don't have the invasive ad networks and stuff I think I think an advertising it could be a lot of US decided to go pretty much ad free across the board. I think it's admirable decision that being said we're back. I cut you off. Donations thing like US pretty much. Oh five bucks is going towards programs yes and there's no fluff. There's no there's nothing else it's all right there we were streaming. We're reliving lean I mean we do. We have in depth discussions about whether to like pay for like a twenty dollar a month service. Because it's like really. Yeah I mean things are we just want to operate really efficiently like a lot of my heroes like you know. Sam Walton for example kind of Walmart on this notion of thrift and and you can argue that like Walmart has not been the best employer the best Patron of of different communities. That has been but you. It's hard to argue argue that it hasn't been good for the consumer because they've managed to drive down the prices so many things absolutely insane people an incredible amount of money like especially families. These these are corporations. That could probably make more money But they're choosing to kind of be broader and more resilient to changes in the economy on me and things like that it's true. Yeah it's a trade off with free camp. We're never going to capture all the value we don't even if we can capture like just to give you you and ideal less than point one percent or I'm sorry I it's it's about point. Five percent of our monthly active users. Don't yeah so it's it's just a fraction. If if I can get a little bit better right. You're going to next question. And so let's talk about scale how do you what are the conversations you have with yourself or anyone else on the team about like okay if you sit here. But it was three hundred seventy five thousand a year. Seventy eight seventy this year this year. This year seventy three 373. So when you talk about growth of revenue or income dollars however you describe it profit senses one of the ways in which you you made that number grow. Yeah so we just get more people. Using free go campus. As simple as that more people use Free Co camp a certain percentage of them will go out and get great job. Donate like sometimes we hit like a windfall like I was saying earlier We had somebody who donated ten thousand dollars. John Wong John Wayne He's he's a He went through Co campy. Works at nullify And he had money at the end of the year any one of the to a high impact charity Free Co camp just to put our efficiency our capital efficiency in perspective we have delivered one point. One billion minutes of instruction action this year. That's equal of two thousand years of learning in one year. We've done that for three hundred. Seventy three thousand dollars. That's the equivalent of fifty hours of instruction for every dollar spent night. You're putting in terms. I like to hear five bucks a lot bigger. So you're five bucks. Each each month is essentially paying for an entire classroom of people to learn one thing that is important to note also is that these people are able to do it for free and the the scale that we're operating at you know it's not only self paced in free and fully interactive. It's just incredibly the cheapest like to put that fifty hours per dollar in perspective in the United States. The average cost of having a child in a public school is ten dollars per hour per child so free co campus. Several orders of magnitude more efficient. Yeah then like they're trying to accomplish totally different things. We don't have a class. We don't have a teacher with a student teacher ratio of like seventeen to one or whatever we just do. Instructional design people work at their own pace. But it's because of those concerns decisions that were able to be dramatically more efficient. These are all conscious decisions nations. We made because our ultimate goal is scale. Our ultimate goal is helping as many people as possible for as little money as absolutely necessary. I like the fact that your focus on those two metrics you grow the number of Free Co camp you know I guess interested people users how you describe it and then then obviously impacts the the ratio of donors and you can sort of like grow that one to grow this one or you can grow this one too. I mean like meeting in a few grew the amount from I'm five percent point nine percent that yeah okay ten percent jeeze if you double that number to one percent right I mean so you can sort of focus on those two metrics the grow the total captive audience or grow the yeah the the ratio of donors I like the simplicity of focusing on two things rather than so many to grow to scale. And that's why I'm reluctant to bring in like you know a fundraising expert or you. You know to try to court personally. Fly around and meet with the CEOS of all these different Saving without it. It's obviously better than not have to do that. And it seems like you're on that path so you have these two numbers. The higher leverage one is honestly the percentage. Yeah but You seem to be pretty good at growing the top funnel at this point all these people using you see them very patient. Based on four years ago he talked to you. And you're also A and I don't use word too loosely but you're not greedy eighty right. There's some people that just and maybe it's I don't know really how you describe greed where it's not Egregious or salt like where it's overly agree. Yeah you know like read right. You can have ballistic ambitions and not be greedy in a you seem to. I have a patient is ankeny what I four that I where it's not not everybody has the kind of patients you have managed for profit offic companies for I started go. Cam Is the school director. Essentially like it was a private Intensive English program and I had to make sure that we had like a good Ebay..

Free Rico Camp Dot US Wikipedia Free Co Kampe Free Co Walmart New York Times Micron Co kate facebook Netflix Ebay Jimmy Wales PROPUBLICA Sam Walton Quincy Larson Matt The Wall Street Journal
"five  years" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

13:11 min | 2 years ago

"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

"So figuring out the financials is one aspect of sustainability. Another aspect is making. The Quincy doesn't have to do all the work and surely you have a team at this point and lots of people contributing so like to hear the different roles who's involved in the and then as a follow up to that how you inspire them to get involved in frequent transmission absolutely. Yeah so free Co camp. Currently we have a lot of active contributors I'm extremely grateful for all of them. And we're getting ready to move by the time this episode goes live we'll have our top hop contributors for twenty nine thousand nine. We've got some really nice backpacks that we're going to ship them to recognize their efforts. Say Twenty nineteen top contributor instead of Free Co Camp Logo and and these are the same backpacks that we sold a few months ago. We're actually running a second Rana those two since we're going to bring some of these terms but there are seven people who work for Free Co camp fulltime including myself and they are all generalists in the sense that they all wear a lot of hats. everybody comes up through free Co camp as contributors after years of contributing if they seem to be particularly capable or Particularly passionate then and we have the resources Then we will bring them on and so. Currently the team is again me doing just everything like I do support and I also do I'm overseeing a couple different projects within than we have bow kearns who is running the free cocaine youtube channel which recently became came. I think the biggest programming channel on Youtube got one point four million subscribers. Now there's a channel called the new Boston that hasn't been updated like four or five years and they they have more subscribers than we do but other than them I think. We're the biggest Saburo runs that he creates a lot of the videos. He does a lot of the editing for our contributors and Bo also is working with a curriculum suppo- worked as a teacher for I think five or six years prior to joining freak. Oh camp a public schoolteacher up in Michigan we have abby Abigail Renan Meyer. She is based in Portland and she worked as a archaeologist before she has like a totally different background but that she had been editing thousands of articles for the free cocaine publication. And she kept doing it and I was like. Hey you WanNa do this full-time time. So she's been doing that. She also runs the podcast. So if you've listened to the frequent podcast is the chance you've heard her interviewing people and Then we we have Ahmed Adilson hub. He's in Turkey. A recently emigrated to Turkey And he is doing some exciting things over there He does a lot of the design when we overhauled free co camps visual design He did a lot of that work and he also does a lot of just like the day the in and out of code maintenance Then we have ragache Ma tre who who is in Benghazi were Bangalore and he does pretty much everything regarding the core code base and like all the servers and he he He's the person we call if something catastrophic happens and and we have Christopher Queasy Guy Wa who's in South Korea and he was working as a teacher for the last six years and started contributing a whole lot to our To our interview prep section and so we brought him on so he and Bo are working together on the updated curriculum. Which I can talk about a minute and then we also have Mea Lou do who is based in Hong Joe in China and she's running the free cocaine China team and we basically have like a completely parallel organization in China. And we've got chinese-language Forum chinese-language publication and Chinese language curriculum. And that's you know hundreds of thousands of people using that so think I got everybody. It is hard to always remember spot. Yeah as we experienced recently as well. Well so that's amazing. You have a parallel organization in China. Just curious in terms of the Free Code Camp Allom or even just the users I mean your. Your team is spread abroad. And so where's your biggest audience like the foothold in India India and the United States are like neck and neck. Sometimes India. It gets there are more people in India sometimes more people in the US And then Nigeria's third and China And then based on just visits is this or how do you. How do you use the news like Tom? Onsite right. Chinese translation have translation into other languages. As wow yeah great question. What we're trying to do is just really? Make sure that we have everything. rock-solid in Chinese Chinese is bigger than most also the other world languages combined It's second only the English if you look at like wikipedia usage and this is what we used for metrics like to plan internationalization. We looked at how wikipedia was being used and and we looked at the world language usage for different translations of Wikipedia And then we looked at the total number of speakers of those languages that we're using the Internet actively China is just exploding in terms of people adopting technology and they're very enthusiastic about it And a lot of them are getting great jobs. And there's a lot of money going into Just just a lot of different aspects of like Artificial intelligence like machine learning essentially the real machine learning and also the if and then statements and stuff like that and then also there is a whole lot of expertise in China India. A lot of the great Indian engineers stay here in a lot of the Chinese engineers go back to China and Craig companies. So you know I'm trying to think of of some Some names of famous engineers who've left like Google or left like teaching at Stanford who've gone back to China but there are a lot of really promising companies over there so we wanted to China. I I personally maybe Bias because I lived in China for like five years my wife Chinese and I'm just very optimistic about the future China. They've over the course of the past thirty years. They've taken hundreds birds of millions of people from subsistence agriculture and they've transformed into a manufacturing center of the world and now the transforming into much more services and creative based economy and learning to code is going to be a big part of that for sure. He's speech to the the need for native language curriculum. Like specifically with what I've heard at least with China is that there's this desire obviously a massive amount of people people there but most of the documentation a lot of the books tend to be are more likely to be in English. Can you speak to the need for native language curriculum. Yeah well it's always easiest to learn in your native language is one less thing you need to worry about a lot of people more than a billion have Chinese is. They're they're mainland. Yeah Yeah I mean if you include include like written Chinese like there are a lot of right spoken dialect arth six point five seven billion people here behind take seven half and someone pin up into the stats stats machine here. Okay Eh. But the point is is that that's quite a lot of people I mean. That's a mass of my people. It's like what have facebook facebook. But he's we're five billion by crazy. Yeah what makes sense to it. It's interesting to to hear sites on the choice to use a a massive global site like Wikipedia as an example to say smart. You know why did you choose. What did you choose? I under what circumstances because in a lot of ways what you're doing is creating a wikipedia like a better terms for software developers. Curriculum is very much like that wikipedia India's when a huge influence on us of course we compete you shirt. He's mostly open source as well and they're also a nonprofit so in many ways of Wikipedia hadn't proved out the concept that you could have have a donor supported Commons of learning material in their case. More encyclopedic in our case. More procedural skill focused On learning free. Probably we wouldn't have attempted it because we needed that proof of concept. I'm not the kind of person who's GONNA throw their entire livelihood Behind like a totally while. Guess but I sensed I guess correctly. In retrospect that there would be demand there and that people would be people were graduating from free. Co Camping. Going out and getting these jobs would turn around and donate back to the organization it would be sustainable. DC somebody utilizing free code campaign then maybe a boot camp as well or some sort of intensive Azzurri's Ersan where it's only free co camp and now you're not trying to do that because you very community minded and oriented did but is the is the intention to be free co Campbell loners. It's sort of like a companion to other learning opportunities so I've always preko. Camp is a core curriculum. If if you will and a lot of coding bootcamp sees co Camp as either part of their curriculum or they'll use it as their pre coursework and we have a really good relationship with a lot of coding boot camps. And I'm very excited about the the future of cutting boot camps really anything that can drive down. The cost of adult education. Universities are the hardest part about that too is is curriculum development. Yeah I like if you have to start from scratch every time you want to start up another bootcamp opportunity in your neck of the woods whether it's here in the states or elsewhere abroad if you can shrink that time from. I'm in a desire to teach teaching. It's a leg up on on Opportunity I would agree. It's the hardest part but it's not the most important part the most important important part is the the interpersonal relationships that you know. A teacher professor has with their students and the students have with one another and You the counselors that help you prepare for the job search and all the other things that university or coding bootcamp or Any sort of adult education program can Adler the value added the curriculum itself. Really if you think about it very few people actually designed curriculum since that most universities have textbooks right right and like everybody ECON one and everybody. Has You know the texbook regardless which university you're sitting at For the most part so yeah free. Free Co camp can be a free interactive textbook that these organizations can use and of course it can be used on. Its own just like I could go to a library and crack open. Expo can and learn economics. Learn you know programming just from a textbook or from some sort of static resource the the main advantage is with Rico. Camp of course is experiential project focused and things stick a lot better. When you're actually building how do you keep it fresh? How do you keep it? Relevant elephant current. And maybe the naysayers Santo your curriculums not current enough or it doesn't is not idiomatic enough. How do you how how do you push back? The haters. Basically we just focus on fundamentals. We're not going to be covering bleeding edge tools for the most part like I believe that everybody needs you. Just get really strong foundation. I and most of what constitutes foundational knowledge is a developer stuff that was figured out and like the sixties and seventies and in the case as a mathematics sometimes hundreds of years ago thousands of years ago right so what we're teaching is just the most ubiquitous tools that are the most generally applicable the GS is to a large extent one kind of the web server war if you will and javascript is useful for pretty much. which any kind of web development We're getting ready to introduce python as well as a core part of the curriculum. So currently it's six certifications. Each certification requires you to build five projects and get all their test passing. So we're adding four additional python focused certifications Right now our certification just for people who aren't where Front End Specific we have the responsive web responsive web design..

China co Camp cocaine Free Co Camp Logo Youtube wikipedia India Bo Turkey Quincy China India kearns Portland India India facebook Ahmed Adilson Michigan United States abby Abigail Renan Meyer
"five  years" Discussed on The Changelog

The Changelog

11:49 min | 2 years ago

"five years" Discussed on The Changelog

"Ability to project out budget and for an organization organization like us like we just need to be able to budget. We're not trying to make huge. Fixed cost investments. We're just paying for servers. We're paying for people working off. Rico Kim fulltime let me throw a number as she here. This comes from your five years Free Code Camp Post which is on change news also in the show notes for those who missed it more than forty thousand free code. Camp graduates are now working in tech companies like Apple. Google Microsoft Amazon on spotify Shirley many other companies as yeah well. That's an astronomical number forty thousand those are people who've been certified through the program many of them have gone certifications that includes everybody who's in our linked ten on the network which is like sixty thousand ish. People who are working now in technical roles Not Everybody ultimately he got the certification. Because if you get a job like your graduate graduation certification ends to our means to an end I really really my FCC certification right a lot of people get the job and then they'll come and try to finish it was that not that CC in case of his thinking like what. Yeah when were you. FCC's audio this is the airwaves. The Internet areas. That's right. Yeah okay so but still I mean forty thousand people that is to me a huge amount. I mean what does that feel like. Do you feel numbers. They get so big at a certain point that it's kind of like another drop in the bucket. I mean some some numbers are hard to actually like. I Dunno like refi in your mind. Well I'm extremely blessed and I just feel incredibly grateful that there are so many people out there who bother you know e mailing me or tweeting at me or sharing these stories of their transitions. Sion's from working in counting being trucker working in manufacturing All these different fields that they've gone from to doing software development them and. Yeah so that's interesting it contextualized as those numbers. When you're getting practically every day I get an email from somebody saying? Hey I just was able to do this. You know thanks again and and then I'm able to follow up and say oh. Yeah can you tell me a little bit more about how you You made the transition. Where can you post on the form? Because a whole lot of people are in the process of trying to uh-huh yeah and so the number is an abstract. I mean it's obstructed. Is that large. But I have so many concrete examples of that every day the drive home to me and so for me you know. It's just a dream come true. I never would have imagined that we would have anywhere near the scale of people being able to accomplish things and you know provide for their families and new ways and actualize themselves and be creative. Inoue's so yeah it's just a huge honor and a huge blessing. So one of the challenges that we've seen people facing coming out of nontraditional education background grounds. Such as I have a Free Code Cam certification or some other boot camp or himself taught. Is that that hiring process is difficult for them them for lots of reasons. One of the reasons that companies and organizations aren't always on board with hiring more people are looking for senior developers than junior developers developers and People who are going through recode camp sounds like they're having success getting hired. Do you help them on that side of things or is there like a community unity support. I'm wondering like if there's like tips and tricks. or how are people having that level of success. Yeah I got through the program and I got a job because like you said the job is what most of us are drafter and so. I'm just curious if there's like if the community helps on the job side or just once you're through the program you just are competent enough to get yourself. A job has has a question. We've kind of made a neutrality setup where we don't we don't specifically guide people to specific companies We we we we thought about. We built out of a job board and we were going to have it to where people could apply for jobs directly through free cope. We just thought about like you know if somebody has a negative experience variance or if there are people out there who are you know you read about a lot of these silicon valley companies that basically. Just pretend that they've got all these funding in and things like that. And then the funding never materialized and these people have moved to this expensive city and basically it. stepped on on their paycheck You know we didn't want to be you associated with any sort of like project like that so we just decided you know we're not gonNA WE'RE GONNA leave the job board stuff and the recruitment stuff to to the experts and we're just going to focus on training people now. We do have interview preparation section. That has hundreds of additional out with him challenges We've got like we've updated a lot of the project. Oil Problems. Rosetta Code problems that made them interactive with like tests that you can in writing the browser instead of having to You know the old interface for whether was it's like a twenty year old website But it's just like you enter a number Berg and it tells you whether you're right or wrong it doesn't give you any more feedback than that and it. It just takes a long time to enter it So rather than having to do all that coding locally and then go and paper number into a web form if you're right We just modernized made an interactive experience. But so we've got lots of interview preparation stuff. We've also got this point. Probably hundreds of I got a job type posts on the form and we've got lots of articles from people who transition successfully from other fields into tech who successfully got jobs at Amazon or Google or other places like that telling how they went through that process like especially the thing that people underestimate the most is just the sheer numbers game that the modern job The modern developer job application occasion process constitutes is quite often for somebody. WHO's finished Rico? Camp or somebody who's going to boot camp to have to apply to hundreds jobs and then they'll start to get interviews and they'll start to get offers but we just try to instill in people the notion that this is hard uh-huh this is not easy. Anybody who tells you it's easy to go out and get a developer job. They're probably trying to sell you something because it's not easy that's right so we have all these resources and we have a supportive community. WHO's there to share and your accomplishments and you can just read lots of anecdotes that realized realized the statistics that we all know that there are tremendous number of developer jobs at all different levels Certainly there are a lot of middle tier in and senior jobs in the senior ones are the ones with the recruiters most actively go out and aggressively trying to recruit people but there are definitely tons of small medium level businesses. They just need some. You know the church or the Local Food Bank or the other organizations that want to have a nice website or just need somebody to help set up like a facebook group or configure. Like a wickes website. Or something like that from your vantage point. Can you see trends there. In in terms of Gideon by no means it easy but are we. Is it trending up in terms of the entry level opportunities in your opinion or just kind of been like a steady churn learn. Obviously this would be from your vantage point now like it's like based on numbers but so I could look at the numbers and we do have quite a bit of data that we've made public public we for the last three years. We didn't do it this year just because we already done it so many times already so much. Data is a lot of work We we do. What's called the new coder survey and it shows like how many u s about fifty questions? We like thirty thousand respondents. Says Really Nice huge day to set. Yeah significant significant from statistical standpoint And if you dig into that you can see like how many months of experience people had before they you know asserted applying for jobs or how long they working in for jobs and you can. You can sort of play with the numbers and figure that out. I don't have like a really well informed answer on that a lot of what I hear here is just at the street level. People like saying that they got a job where people saying they haven't gotten a job yet. in reality messy every employer is different every country's different too. Do they know European. I say European. That's really like a collection of city states right and then you know you go to India you go to China in a you know these other countries where free cooking big and and the markets completely different I've been to startups in Shanghai Where I walk in the room and half the people people working in the developable pin our free cocaine grads right so so there are definitely jobs out there For people. It's just a question of what those jobs look like. And how many applications you have to make in. How many people are competing for the same jobs? I will say this though getting a job. I think a lot of people think it's all about your skills but it's really about three things in my opinion. It's about your skills. It's about your reputation and it's about your network whom you know if you know the right people you can get in even with subpar skills subpar radiation. If you have have a great reputation you may not be the best developer but rankle know who you are from your blog posts or from your youtube channel for your podcast. Were or just from your open source projects that you've contributed to. Everyone was saying applies to de risk a choice right and the Rey de risk choices by some sort of assurance or certainty. If you have a decent reputation can kind of Beth. Decent Person De risking is exactly what I think employers are trying to ensure they're just trying to make the catastrophic choice that results in them having to terminate terminate somebody pay severance and then go through the entire job all over again yeah. It's it's costly. It's funny that Who you know come so it makes sense but we try to be in a world where it's not about who you know because it's it's almost seems unfair and yet it totally still is the facts except right right? That's what I mean like so if you don't know the right kind of people you can't build your reputation properly or at least maybe add to an area where you have less reputation you have somebody vouching for you evatt for lack of better terms if you have a network to some degree associated with you. They're they're they're therefore adding reputation the trustworthy you're right somebody worth betting on or taking a risk on and this is why like the local markets are so important people focus so much on silicon valley in like a hyper competitive like trying to get a job offer from Google facebook Amazon. But if you go to a lot of communities like we're here in Houston right and I live in. I live in the Dallas Metropolitan Poyton area and Jerry lives up in Omaha like these are all completely different tech ecosystem with different employers different hiring cultures Different circles of people that meet together for talks and Events and Different professional groups. I mean like if you learn your local Meta and if your content to stay in the city you're you are in. Currently there won't necessarily be like a clear road map for you to get to that job but if you pound the pavement and if you get to meet people I think that things will work out for you because you already doing a lot more work than most any job like you said Many companies. That aren't aren't traditional software. Companies need software people. And so as you know. The old saying goes offer eating the world..

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