35 Burst results for "five five six years"

From ballet dancer to zombie slayer: Cree actor Michael Greyeyes on his prolific career

Unreserved

04:32 min | 5 months ago

From ballet dancer to zombie slayer: Cree actor Michael Greyeyes on his prolific career

"You may have seen my guest today on the small screen and big screens or on the stage. Michael is is a man of many talents. He's a classically trained ballet dancer. Choreographer director playwright and renowned actor over his three decade. Long career michael has appeared in some of the most beloved first nation films like dance me outside and smoke signals. He has taken on challenging roles. Playing indigenous leaders like sitting bull wandering spirit to come see and crazy horse more recently. He's taken the small screen by storm appearing on hit tv shows like fear the walking dead true detective and the soon to be released nbc. Comedy rutherford falls. Michael is net. Oh and a member of the musket lake cremation in sketch. Juan and he joins me now from los angeles. Welcome to the show. Michael falen thank you so much for the invitation. Oh it's so great to have you here so you're in los angeles right now But i wanna go back a bit. Can you tell me about where you grew up. I'm from treaty. Six territory in saskatchewan My mom and dad are from reserves in the middle of saskatchewan. My dad's from moscow. And my mom is from sweet grass and my sister and my family. We lived in a couple of places where in the capelle valley. Of course lebron and then we moved to saskatoon and saskatoon was where i spent my boyhood until i was plucked plucked from the prairies at the age of ten years old to attend canada's national ballet school in toronto and my family and i we moved from treaty six territory to To dish with one spoon territory. So i could pursue dance as as a career potential career and so i wanna talk about your dancing a bit but first i want to know what was it. Like growing up on the prairies. What do you remember What do you remember about growing up on the prairies. So many beautiful things. Obviously that's home. That's that's that's my home. That's where i know about my family. My a my early years. I remember the sunlight of remember the sky. I remember my cousins and all my relatives. And i remember playing just riding my bike with my banana seat all over town. They need to make banana seats again. They're very comfortable. they do they do in los angeles. There's a whole like bike culture. We're fleeing be tricked out bike's banana seats. So you're known primarily as an actor now but as you mentioned you know you got into the entertainment industry in a different way. You started as a dancer as a ballet dancer. So how does a kid growing up in saskatoon and up in the ballet well by accident entirely by axes we were living in saskatoon and my mom was a teacher at the school for the deaf. A very famous School for deaf children in saskatoon and my sister. And i were doing you know little kid things. I was playing hockey of course and my sister was taking dance lessons so mumbai. I we used to week for my sister in the car and i was you know five six years old so i was like a super board super easily so it was like she died. She'd done and i would go up and check on her. I remember the classes at the university of scotch one and it was kind of like this wile experiences little kid i walk in. I'd look for her and then she be dancing with these little girls. In one day. I decided to really kinda pay attention to what they were doing. And i and then. I blurted got ceesay. Teacher overheard me. She said well. Do you think it's easy. Why don't you come on back next week. So i said A will and i told my mom all week. I'm going to dance next week. And she of course you know. I apparently said lots of crazy things as as a boy but as the days got closer. She was like okay he. He's repeating it. He's he's he's he's insistent about this. Why do you think you're going to death sex because the teacher invited me so with my mom and my mom used me. I'm so so sorry. Michael thinks that you've invited him. Smith usually oh yeah yeah yeah come on in. And that's how. It started precocious boy pushing his way into a dance class that he hadn't signed up for.

Saskatoon Rutherford Falls Michael Falen Capelle Valley Los Angeles Saskatchewan Michael National Ballet School NBC Juan School For Deaf Children Lebron Moscow University Of Scotch Toronto Canada Mumbai Hockey Smith
Associate Editor at Game Informer Magazine, Kyle Hilliard, on The State Of VR Right Now

Techmeme Ride Home

05:12 min | 5 months ago

Associate Editor at Game Informer Magazine, Kyle Hilliard, on The State Of VR Right Now

"What is the gaming industry and by that. I mostly mean developers. What what does the industry think about developing and just the market is it clearly a sliver compared to other things. But do they think like. It's maybe on the cusp of being something. That is interesting. Yeah so. I don't. I don't have numbers obviously but like so to get into my background and just in case your listeners. Don't really know me. I wrote for game informer magazine for eight years as there for a long time until i was we had like right when right when the oculus rift came out like we had an issue like vr issue. Right and we. I remember getting test kits into the office and playing early games and stuff like that and at that time we kind of went in with the mindset of like okay. Well this is like a new. This dobie xbox. They'll be nintendo and they'll be oculus that's kind of how we felt about it like it would just be this other competitive corner of video gaming and now all this time later which is a. We're going to maybe like four or five. Six years later feel like it has found its spot and like you said like beat sabre. Which is the fantastic i played. I almost literally played every day. I love beat sabre Has sold gangbusters There's like i think facebook released a blog that said something like thought they had five other. Vr titles at it sold a million copies which was cool. And so where we're at now is it's interesting because it's not what i thought it would be. Where would be like just as competitive as like the switch. You know what i mean. It would just be another platform that you know hardcore gamers like me would have in their home but it's increasingly kind of become this like weird separate thing that even non gamers are kind of getting into like i've i'm like i've heard of people have met people who aren't really big video gamers but they do have a headset. And they like vr because it does have kind of like what you were talking about earlier. It has practical applications beyond video games. You know you can kind of around the world and see things. I use it to work out like. That's my main exercise purpose lately as i tried to play oculus like at least once a day for thirty minutes played exercise games and beat because they're very movement centered so it's it's closer to like the mobile market. I feel like we're there's a lot of disparate things floating around that are trying to find their niche as opposed to like someone like me. Who's like i have an xbox series s x. I have a playstation five and i got my oculus rift like that's not super common. It's almost treated as like you know gamers like it but it's not like it's not it's more than a video game machine you know. It's like ninety percent of video game machine but like that ten percent is really lifting it up and people are finding that way. Well so this is gets into my sort of disappointment with what i what is out there. Obviously this would have been one of the times where. Vr should have had its breakthrough moment like a lot of things including video conferencing of had The pandemic times now. There are apps on their from companies. That are clearly the eight even says. It's like we'll use this to remote work with your teams and you can all meet in a space and you know whiteboard together and you know. Even you know sketch things and and in a three d. environment especially frano architects and things like that. I can see that but none of it's very good that i've sampled like i would think there'd be more of that. There's also there's also a handful of things that are like we'll watch a movie with your friends and you go into a virtual Sort of movie theater and by the way. All of the like netflix and and prime video they all have apps that essentially you can watch anything you want on a virtual big screen which is very nice for lying down in bed and stuff. But i'm wondering if like they missed a trick like there is nothing that was like a breakthrough during pandemic times for just being virtually with other people. Yeah right when the pandemic started. I remember i think it was fun. Mation was selling tickets to go. Watch a cure with an audience in oculus and i love cura is like one of my favorite movies and i like we are but even i was like i look at that mike. I want to do that like yeah. The resolution on the headset just isn't there like it's basically like shoving a like a switch. Well let me take them. It's better than a switch screen. It's like it's a higher resolution switch green but like it. Just can't look as good as your desktop for work or your four k tv in your living room. It's just it's like you have to accept that limitation in order to participate like i saw this Which i had never seen until today. Maybe because you are emailing me about vr. Google is like oh let's send this guy. vr ads but it was like it was like. Yeah what will like. Let's let's have a workspace. You can have as many monitors as you want and you can have a virtual keyboard. Obviously it'll be but there'll be a virtual keyboard and it's like that's a really interesting idea. But i'm not gonna take that resolution downgrade in visuals. I'm not going to be able to see that. Virtual computer monitor. As well as i can't if i'm just looking at my standard computer monitor and it's not worth that dive and

Nintendo Facebook Netflix Cura Mike Google
Making Beautiful Music With Community-Driven Partnerships

Nonprofits Are Messy: Lessons in Leadership | Fundraising | Board Development | Communications

05:35 min | 5 months ago

Making Beautiful Music With Community-Driven Partnerships

"Henry donahue is the executive director of save the music a national nonprofit that helps students schools and communities reach their full potential through the power of making music prior to save the music. Henry was the ceo and head of partnerships at purpose a digital strategy and creative agency that focuses on social impact projects. Notable clients included every town for gun safety the aclu oxfam international. The ford foundation nike. I- kia audi and liverpool f c. Henry has also worked as a media. Executive focused on digital product development is held senior positions at discover conde nast primedia and lendingtree dot com spent most of the nineteen nineties on the road across the usa as a fundraiser for political candidates including us senators. Jay rockefeller from west virginia. And ron wyden from oregon at the same time. He was playing guitar in an indie rock band and running into small independent record label. Henry has an abbey in american history from harvard college and an mba from darden graduate school of business at the university of virginia henry. Great to have you with us. Sharing the story of save the music and the lessons contained within the be here could see joe thanks. Hey i'm delighted to have you. So why don't we start sharing with our listeners. The origin story of save the music. What was the germ of its mission and tell us a little bit about the journey. Yeah i mean safe. The music's mission and vision are the same today as they were back. joni urine. John sykes aretha franklin one. Dvd's categories aretha flying sleep dion and Every student every public schools should be making music as part of their education. I think you had a great overview of why at the intro. We know for decades of research that when schools have music students do better. The school does better. The community does better In normal times. I travel all around the country even in the toughest schools when you get to that band room or that choir room. You know. it's that joy and inspiration and hope for the future and all those things. So i i love going to high schools middle schools elementary schools. I love interacting advanced features van kits. It's amazing the landscape out there. Is that most schools in the. Us do have music as part of their school day. there's a quote for geoffrey canada That i'm sure i'm angling but it's something to the effect of if you wanna see what a quality education looks like. Look what rich people do about. Eighty percent of american schools have music and art as part of their school day And the programs that caught over the years. And we're we do. Most of our work are in schools that serve black students immigrant students and in rural rural students as well. What do you love about your job. Henry donahue because you loved this i love so it you you mentioned. I mean i've worked in politics and advocacy and social impact in various ways for for a long time You know at purpose Which some of your listeners might be familiar with worked on gun safety. We worked on marriage. Equality we worked on A project involving immigrants and You know the fight for the fifteen dollars minimum wage. All of which were were were deeply deeply satisfying. But when chris mccarthy who's the guy runs. mtv now came to me in we had this conversation about the h. one. Save the music which five six years ago you know still had a very solid sort of core group of program team people working there doing amazing work but has sort of been what i call know an orphan corporate asset on. Cbs empire. You know. I was presented with the opportunity to do the thing that i did for my job. Which was you know corporate impact strategy advocacy and combined with the thing that i spent my whole life in love with which which is music. Which by the way you. You don't have the benefit of seeing henry. But i do. And i see a keyboard. And i see a guitar so yeah. This is a music guy. You're a. You're a an advocate Andrew musician and you get to do both in the same job. That's pretty awesome. Yeah i think this is sort of at the core of was eighth. music does Which is i remember myself as a pretty angry and somewhat directionless

Henry Donahue Henry Aclu Oxfam International Kia Audi Conde Nast Primedia Darden Graduate School Of Busi University Of Virginia Henry Joe Thanks John Sykes Aretha Franklin Lendingtree Jay Rockefeller Ford Foundation Ron Wyden Harvard College Liverpool West Virginia Joni Dion Oregon
Nine of the Ten Last Super Bowl Teams Have a Soccer Interest

ABC Perspective

02:45 min | 6 months ago

Nine of the Ten Last Super Bowl Teams Have a Soccer Interest

"Piece about how the nine of the 10 last Super Bowl teams have a soccer interest, meaning they own one or partially own wonder controlling interest. Who else is involved in with that list? In that list. Well, well, you go back to the San Francisco 40 Niners were in the Super Bowl last year against the Chiefs. They actually just this week increase their equity ownership of leads. United from I think it was 15% of 37% spent up over 50 million English pounds Theo to do that. The Atlanta Falcons have been in a Super Bowl against the Patriots. Both of those teams have MLS stakes. The L. A Rams, who lost to the Patriots the following season. Their owner owns Arsenal on if you go further back beyond just the last five years, the Seattle Seahawks their owners own a piece of the MLS. Founders, But that's really the extent of it. It's more the last five. Six years where you've seen this trend before that, it was it was Seattle and the Patriots. The Patriots on the MLS is revolution that play at the same Stadium is the Patriots, and it's a It's not just the football connection. You point out two different multi team ownerships, right? The the owners of the Philadelphia 76 years on Crystal Palace, the team in the English soccer first division, right? And you're seeing this success force you're seeing multi Team ownerships, Uh, enterprises that owned more than just a team in one sport is sport. It's sports become big business. The ownership is crossing Not not just sports sports live boundaries but international boundaries. So, um, we'll probably see a lot more be more and more rare to see teams make the final finals of their sport. Just have that one holding new ownership group that that one team, I guess for. Some of these guys have some of these owners. Obviously you're super wealthy. It's fun. They they love sports. There's a part of that. Um, there are certainly owners who go at it that way. I mean, I think the new owner of the New York Mets see Cohen goes out and looks at it from this is fun. This is something I've always wanted to do. But when you Put together, uh, vast holdings across sports. It's more than just fun. It's a big business. Thanks. Dan Dan Kaplan, Sports business reporter for the athletic Coming up next. Going too far as a cheapskate.

Patriots Super Bowl MLS Soccer Niners Atlanta Falcons Theo Chiefs Seattle Seahawks Rams San Francisco Crystal Palace Seattle Philadelphia Football New York Mets Cohen Dan Dan Kaplan
A Mexican Belonging

Latino Rebels Radio

05:36 min | 6 months ago

A Mexican Belonging

"I get really excited when i have former contributors go and do great things and i wouldn't say this guesses a former contributor because i think we've had some of his writings within the last year. He's in dallas. Do you want to say hello to everyone. Say who you are. hello. I'm on scientists. I'm a professor of history. I was hoping you weren't saying former rebels. I'm still writing for you. Guys i totally was like former not. You still contribute. So you are a professor history. At mountain view college in dallas. You are the author of homeland which is an intellectual study of ethnic mexican belonging. Since one thousand nine hundred. How geeky is that it is. It is pretty geeky but i think it can be interesting. Sometimes i've i've made some revisions to try to get folks to read it all right now. Listen let's get a couple of things out of the way. You are a contributor to latino rebels. You have written for latino usa. I've known you at least online for like who five six years. You've written some great pieces. You have the best twitter handle ever first world chicano. And you really touched me. When i read the introduction of acknowledgments your family raises you right like you thanked everyone and then you thanked me so i wanna thank you for thanking me in your book. It was a nice little surprise. No i definitely wanted to shout you. Julio and hector out hector salamo. Who was a deputy editor for latino rebels. Yeah i heard. You're going to be on the latin ish podcast so i'm already plugging latin is for him. Yeah shamelessly fell promoted. Yup but i had gotten out of graduate school. You know it kind of is now. And i just didn't know what i wanted to do. Things are tough. I wasn't ready to go back to revision. And then i started writing. And you guys didn't care if i came out of harvard or northwesterners something. Oh hell no yeah you can write come right for us and i was like okay and yeah tell us over miami of how powerful writing can be and also helped me as a writer because i stripped a lot of the academic jargon stuff out of this book is an editor publisher before you talk about the book that makes me super happy because when you started pitching me and pitching hector and then. That was one of the things that i told you. It's like just don't be an academic. Bu and you wrote some fantastic pieces and you've also written an amazing book. It's really really accessible and it speaks to. I think a theme that i wouldn't say it's controversial but it is. How do you begin to frame your experiences for this book that drew you to documenting like ethnic mexican and chicano history in this way like what drove you when you write a book you kind of write about yourself even if it is a history and so a lot of became out of family history personal experiences and and one of my favorite stories that i heard growing up was my mom and her family. They've migrated from quiet and they moved help. Paso anna late sixty s in my grandfather used to pick up my mom when she was a little girl and he used to tell her. I heat the mood noblet glass near less by your picking her up and says oh my little girl. You know you're going to be. You're gonna be without a voice because you don't speak english or spanish and that's and to worry about his family gonna belong right. Did he make the right choice into. It was kind of rooted in a family story like that. My dad used to joke. Us from el paso's well used to joke. He didn't know he was mexican till they join the airforce right because they'll pass everyone's mexican mexican americans everyone's the same and then he goes off to the air force. Suddenly he's different. Wow yeah that's a really good way of looking at it. These family stories. You know you get the then growing up to right when i write about the us in the chest these mexicans who have lost their mexican answer. These wannabe americans right. That kind of touched home of folks as you know like you're a little bit of a virtual not there those feelings the wondering about belonging which again i don't think are isolated just to me. I think that's why i've gotten a few tweets folks like. Hey my family this. Yeah this is my story. This is my family. Yeah and so. That's where the idea about belonging came out of end. I thought a lot of different areas right Politics and poetry and so belonging with the concept with an idea but let me look at all the things that i actually want to look at right. 'cause i i like reading poetry like reading literature. I also like politics and policy. This concept helped me look at all those things. And i think kind of unique way yes so talking about belonging. It's probably not the same experience. But it kind of is from puerto rican perspective. Where i kind of say like you know people that live on the island versus people that live on i asked. There's always been that tension. And i was born and raised in puerto rico but now i live in the mainland. So i'm not seen as like purely puerto rican so when you talk about the divide in the early nineteen hundreds that emerged between ethnic mexicans in the us in us. Born mexicans like you mentioned the which was in the you know that type of idea. How has that evolved throughout the years. And what is your book touch upon in that case. That's really interesting with you. Be boring and then your kid. They're gonna i

Mountain View College Hector Salamo Dallas Paso Anna Noblet Julio Hector Harvard Twitter United States Miami Drew El Paso Air Force Puerto Rican Puerto Rico
Building Community for Demand

Digital Conversations with Billy Bateman

05:27 min | 6 months ago

Building Community for Demand

"Alright everyone. I'm here with clinton bets. The ceo of silicon slopes clint. Thanks for joining us. Honored to be here. Billy big fat of chat funnels demand giant jan summit. Two thousand twenty. You know twenty twenty s weird here. We are at an event. And you know. I'm just doing it from this desk. Where i kinda do everything so honored to be here my friend. Well it's an honor to have you clint. So let's get into it. I tell us just a little bit about yourself. I'm a lifelong you. John for what that's worth. I don't know that people care about that too much i sure. Do i have four children. I'm married. I live in southern utah. County i believe utah counties better than salt lake county for those watching. I will a non just getting. I don't care. And yeah. I started my career. I went to Actually owned a deli for while when i was super yang school got a journalism degree. Recommend anyone do that kind of pointless. Degree and i worked at a software development firm with a couple of buddies where we help build startups early stage products and then and then inside of that Software development firm we launched a little blog called beehive startups which became a pretty big community platform. And then You know more recently over the past five six years. I've been the executive director of silicon slopes which is a five one c three nonprofit. And we put that together. After you know behi- startups two guys. Traction and josh james and i started talking and then we started talking to ryan. Smith is to ceo quality and erin stoddard ceo plural. Cy and dave elkton. Who was the ceo of inside sales at the time about what it would mean to bring the community all underneath one umbrella. So here we are in you guys have done a great job with that So tell me about the silken slopes model. Clint while the consults model i believe is a little bit different than other profit models. I think as you look at it. And i think it applies to any business not just nonprofits because i don't know that we run. It necessarily even like a nonprofit to be honest with you although have being a five one. C three is important to us and there are aspects of it. That are very nonprofit. -i the silicon psalms model. I think a lot of people. If you're just a part of the tech scene or you're not part of utah in particular you may view it as like another chamber of commerce almost that kind of advocates for various tech issues Behind closed doors and has kind of these Events that you have to pay to go to and you can only attend if you remember anything like that was actually exact opposite of all of that We want it to be open and accessible to wall Everyone who wants to be a part of the community we believe has every right to be a part in community and should be part of the consultants community and so given that that was a stance that we took early on that we wanted the organization to be open accessible to all we landed on this model. The i believe many of the people who are watching would be interested in in particular as it pertains to how do you build a community around your brand. How do you build a community around a certain topic. And how do you do in a way. That's actually authentic and doesn't come across as though it's authentic but is indeed authentic and so what. We landed on his three buzzwords. To be honest with you billy And so what we say is silicon slopes five one c three nonprofit that empowers utah startup tech community to learn connect and serve. And when you hear learn connect are you likely like most people say those three words who cares right. And you know there's truth to that even but what's behind those for us and what we've built around these three words in these three pillars within our organization is the entire reason why we've seen any success if we seen any at all and i believe it's The way communities should be bill. Just my own opinion. And so i'll go through what each of these Three pillars mean to us as an organization and those watching kind of think about how they could apply at least some of these aspects within their own companies organizations so the first is learnt right And when we say learn silicon slopes what we're talking about is stories and what we're talking about is media and what we're talking about is Letting the community know what's happening and that's critical and i'm gonna talk Probably go pretty deep on stories Here a little bit later but when we say learn it's silicon slopes what we mean. Is we want you to know everything happening within the silicon silicon slopes community. And we want you to have plenty of resources available to you. It's not just news. Although that's that's a very big piece of it it's not just media and it's not just stories but it's also helping and empowering people to learn how to be better within the industry Better within their particular profession

Silicon Slopes Clint Utah Jan Summit Josh James Erin Stoddard Dave Elkton Salt Lake County Clint Billy Clinton CY Ryan John Smith
interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot And Sway podcasts, co-founder Of Recode

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:23 min | 7 months ago

interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot And Sway podcasts, co-founder Of Recode

"Hey everyone it's carly today. Cara swisher joins me on skimmed from the couch. She has been called. The most feared an well liked journalists in silicon valley cara has been covering the tech world for decades and is also the co founder of the site. Recode she's currently the host of to podcasts. Sway pit cara. Thank you so much for coming on the show. Welcome to skim from the couch. Thank you there's no couch. though that's true well welcome from my kitchen. First question we ask everybody. Skim your resume. I'm really old. You really want my resume okay. I went to georgetown. University went to columbia journalism school. I worked for lots of people in very low level. Jobs like delivering mail at the washington. Post being assistant people return type people. And then i got an internship the washington post which i then got hired from and i were there and then worked at the wall. Street journal wrote a book during the nineties about The beginnings of the internet Which nobody was paying attention to. And then i worked for the journal. For many years doing a wide range of things beat reporting columns and then i started sort of an entrepreneurial activity inside the journal which was a conference and then a new website blog. Essentially i started their first real blog effort which was all things d and then i left and got investments and started recode sold that to vox media and then i now also hosts i started doing podcasting about five six years ago early on and then shifted a lot to that and writing for the new york times and doing a podcast but i also do a pint yesterday new york magazine too so i do podcasting and writing now and events but events now with copen said say you're pretty busy. What if something that people don't know about you that they'd be surprised. I spent a lot of time with my family. I mean i'm really busy. I make a lot of content. I four five podcasts. A week major podcasts. A week and i'll read column every week. And so i work a lot. But i actually spent a lotta time with my family and i just had another child a little girl so i spent a lot more time with my family and i think people would imagine given how much content iming congratulations on the new baby. So before we dive into your career. I want to go back and stand a little bit about where you came from. Which is what was little like the same the same the same the same. I mean. I think i had a very strong personality from the get. Go as a especially as a girl where people want you to shut up. Essentially i didn't shut up very much. I had a nickname tempestuous. My family's italian. Which is i think it's a compliment. They meant as a compliment. But i would always sort of upend things to if i didn't like them. I did very well in grammar school. I was considered very very smart. Read very early. People caught up with me pretty quickly. But i always knew what i wanted. You get that from your parents know. My dad died when i was really little. He was very sweet actually had a very sweet personality. My mom no. I don't think so. I think my mom talks in shades a lot. She doesn't say what she means. A lot of the time. And i was very forthright. I don't wanna make you can't make sort of like italians are loud but we are a very in your face family so we say what we think but i think my mom talks more and as most people do they say things that that's not what they mean and much more. I say exactly what. I mean when i say something so i don't know how i got it i just did. When did you realize he wanted to be a journalist. Not for a while. actually i was. I went to the school. Ford service at georgetown which is for diplomats and spies essentially it. So i wanted to go into the military. My dad was in the military. And i wanted to serve but i wanted to do and everything else that i didn't because i was gay it i it was illegal and that it was. Don't ask don't tell which was even worse in some weird way which is just sort of separate but equal kind of thing though. That was much worse but it still wasn't it was not it was civil rights violation. I think of gay people. So i didn't want to serve by lying like keeping it to myself. I thought that was stupid. And so i never served and by the time they sort of ended. I was too old. I was going to serve in the reserves. But i i just didn't want to just lie and i was like this is ridiculous and so i would have had a career. I suspected military appropriate running the right now but being fired by trump at this moment. But i want it to be in military intelligence or in the cia some in some fashion to be an analyst. And which is what i do. Anyway on a analyze and try to find out information in an opinion about

Cara Swisher Silicon Valley Cara Columbia Journalism School Street Journal Copen Georgetown Cara New York Magazine Washington Post The Journal The New York Times Washington Ford CIA
Interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot and Sway podcasts, co-founder of Recode

Skimm'd from The Couch

04:23 min | 7 months ago

Interview With Kara Swisher, host of Pivot and Sway podcasts, co-founder of Recode

"Hey everyone it's carly today. Cara swisher joins me on skimmed from the couch. She has been called. The most feared an well liked journalists in silicon valley cara has been covering the tech world for decades and is also the co founder of the site. Recode she's currently the host of to podcasts. Sway pit cara. Thank you so much for coming on the show. Welcome to skim from the couch. Thank you there's no couch. though that's true well welcome from my kitchen. First question we ask everybody. Skim your resume. I'm really old. You really want my resume okay. I went to georgetown. University went to columbia journalism school. I worked for lots of people in very low level. Jobs like delivering mail at the washington. Post being assistant people return type people. And then i got an internship the washington post which i then got hired from and i were there and then worked at the wall. Street journal wrote a book during the nineties about The beginnings of the internet Which nobody was paying attention to. And then i worked for the journal. For many years doing a wide range of things beat reporting columns and then i started sort of an entrepreneurial activity inside the journal which was a conference and then a new website blog. Essentially i started their first real blog effort which was all things d and then i left and got investments and started recode sold that to vox media and then i now also hosts i started doing podcasting about five six years ago early on and then shifted a lot to that and writing for the new york times and doing a podcast but i also do a pint yesterday new york magazine too so i do podcasting and writing now and events but events now with copen said say you're pretty busy. What if something that people don't know about you that they'd be surprised. I spent a lot of time with my family. I mean i'm really busy. I make a lot of content. I four five podcasts. A week major podcasts. A week and i'll read column every week. And so i work a lot. But i actually spent a lotta time with my family and i just had another child a little girl so i spent a lot more time with my family and i think people would imagine given how much content iming congratulations on the new baby. So before we dive into your career. I want to go back and stand a little bit about where you came from. Which is what was little like the same the same the same the same. I mean. I think i had a very strong personality from the get. Go as a especially as a girl where people want you to shut up. Essentially i didn't shut up very much. I had a nickname tempestuous. My family's italian. Which is i think it's a compliment. They meant as a compliment. But i would always sort of upend things to if i didn't like them. I did very well in grammar school. I was considered very very smart. Read very early. People caught up with me pretty quickly. But i always knew what i wanted. You get that from your parents know. My dad died when i was really little. He was very sweet actually had a very sweet personality. My mom no. I don't think so. I think my mom talks in shades a lot. She doesn't say what she means. A lot of the time. And i was very forthright. I don't wanna make you can't make sort of like italians are loud but we are a very in your face family so we say what we think but i think my mom talks more and as most people do they say things that that's not what they mean and much more. I say exactly what. I mean when i say something so i don't know how i got it i just did. When did you realize he wanted to be a journalist. Not for a while. actually i was. I went to the school. Ford service at georgetown which is for diplomats and spies essentially it. So i wanted to go into the military. My dad was in the military. And i wanted to serve but i wanted to do and everything else that i didn't because i was gay it i it was illegal and that it was. Don't ask don't tell which was even worse in some weird way which is just sort of separate but equal kind of thing though. That was much worse but it still wasn't it was not it was civil rights violation. I think of gay people. So i didn't want to serve by lying like keeping it to myself. I thought that was stupid. And so i never served and by the time they sort of ended. I was too old. I was going to serve in the reserves. But i i just didn't want to just lie and i was like this is ridiculous and so i would have had a career. I suspected military appropriate running the right now but being fired by trump at this moment. But i want it to be in military intelligence or in the cia some in some fashion to be an analyst. And which is what i do. Anyway on a analyze and try to find out information in an opinion about

Cara Swisher Silicon Valley Cara Columbia Journalism School Street Journal Copen Georgetown Cara New York Magazine Washington Post The Journal The New York Times Washington Ford CIA
Replacing A White Pine

Your Gardening Questions

03:57 min | 7 months ago

Replacing A White Pine

"We also had a An email from kevin to fred plan talk radio dot com and kevin says i cut down white pine. That was dying in my backyard. And i need another tree to plant in its place. Stump has been ground out. Can i put a new tree in the same spot. I was thinking about norway spruce. Well i'm going to say yes men that i had put some qualifiers He doesn't speak to how big this tree was. And then i know the approximate depths of a stump grinder esprit approximate depth. That it goes into the ground now if he starts with a very small norway spruce. I'm sure we're just fine if he wants to stay the five to six. It has a significant ball under it. Then we've gotta go into Either probing and getting all the grits and bark and stuff. Well chips out of that hole so you can set the bowl down in far enough because it the chances are that It's not a fault of them. it's just that they don't usually grind below about six to eight inches deep in the ball on a norway. Spruce can be better bigger than that now. Choices one is to get the pick and and try to dig out more of the stump in the middle of the whole or lay the spruce on its side very carefully at the very bottom. They're generally speaking in a rooted route. Ball plant there won't be much route that is alive and or going to stay alive and complete the plants task of getting started over again so you could. For example if the root ball is is twelve inches deep. You've only got eight inches to get down in there. We're number one. You can plant it high and then mound up around it. Which were we're fine but if you wish you can very carefully with Hand trowel Take off the bottom. Two three. i would think even four inches joust off the very bottom not the sides and then stuff that down in there the occasion for that stumped continue to rot out is very very strong White pine isn't going to be the most resilient would but at the same time you will end up with within the three years that it takes that nutri to get established adelson not enough routes to the side. It probably won't settle much if at all so you you can do this I know one gentleman. And i think every time i get into this he he had a plant in the concrete patio. Inner circle because patio. It died in due time he got a pickax and I think it's called an ads. But whatever it is he's been hooked that stomach because they couldn't get a grinder in there It took in the summer but he planted another. It happened to be an evergreen. He played in. i might have been exclusive. I don't remember now. He planted a tree right smack down in there and it was a little bit higher beginning. It apparently either just settled out a touch or The stump continued to write out below. Whatever but it ended up. Far as i know five six years later he had a successful tree in a spot that was a real murders lead to get do. So yes answer is simply quickly said yes you can do this but try to get it in the ground sufficiently deep and at the same time. I always harp on the fact. You don't want to plant things too deep 'cause they'll get too much water and soak up and and decay the roots so the chances of that happening in this situation are very remote. Do try to get it in the ground somewhere near the level that it grew in in the nursery.

Kevin Norway Stump Fred Adelson
Rena Shah, Head of Business Development at Binance.US - Blockchain and Energy

Bitcoin Radio

03:55 min | 8 months ago

Rena Shah, Head of Business Development at Binance.US - Blockchain and Energy

"Was wondering if you could Speak to you know how you got into blockchain and maybe give any advice for students shooting in totally. I got into block chain crypto from the energy industry Prior to working in crypto iowa's a petroleum engineer with an oil company and basically. What kind drew my attention towards crypto as that people were using oil and gas to do crypto mining and i was kind of thinking so much of the energy we reproducing going towards that sector. I was wondering what bitcoin is. What was a sting they were mining for. You know in my traditional sense. I always thought of mining. Its you know mining for goal drilling for oil things like this in this whole digital currency thing kind of captured. My attention insult. I kind of took it to the far extreme to defend that. I immediately bought quite scheming rigs and thurbers and set up my own mining poll. I would not recommend people to do that directly because it takes a lot of capital and it was maybe not my best decision but you know it was interesting this than i finally got to learn how you set up. How do i drew mine for currency but then how do liquidate it. That was like the whole learning process for me and that really captured eight hundred. There's this alternative market that almost no one knew about five six years ago. Absolutely so yeah. That's so interesting to me. Because actually in our interviews with students A lot of them got their start mining as well A they heard about this bitcoin thing and they set up their own rig so Is that something that you would not recommend. Nowadays it's kind of hard proof of work. It's kind going to be obsolete everything's being approved at stake. If you're going to set up a rig i would start it off on a smaller scale than going all in like i did spending like fifty sixty thousand on like servers and such. But if you're going to do on a smaller scale totally trade out. I think it's kind of worthwhile to see turning on your rig configuring it how you wish and then watching it go to work for you and then senior output of what your earnings. It's a whole different stream of capital that you never saw coming but anything kinda larger than that perhaps. Get some friends or family to help you out along the way because it's just a lot of operational experience that you kind of have to learn to basically run your own business like on day one which i was not prepared for. Yeah that's a good point is you're kind of immediately setting up a business Yeah i did it in a different way so how. I did mine if that i consciously only wanted to use renewable energy for mine especially coming from the traditional power sector. I only wanted to use green energy towards mining. Because i thought it was morally a little. Bit kinda weird to be using oil to mine for crypto because oil should be is more for like human consumption like basic power for people. So when i set my not actually partnered with community solar farm so that all my rigs in service would be housed on their solar farm off the grid. I wasn't basically adding to the grid. Absolutely yeah i've heard people talk about like the best ways if you have some sort of free or cheap or renewable energy sources If you rob if you live with somewhere with water rates you house like running water that is generating electricity or or some other reason like can be really good investment gaia and if you're using green energy in america you actually could get a tax incentive to something to think about.

Bitcoin Iowa America
Chevron CEO says company is embracing, investing in a lower carbon energy system

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

08:40 min | 8 months ago

Chevron CEO says company is embracing, investing in a lower carbon energy system

"What's best performing sector since election day. You'll never believe it energy and we talked about energy. I mean fossil fuels with multiple co vaccines. Right around the corner. The economy will soon be able to reopen which means more demand for oil and gas ray of yours. No i'm not a fan of this industry anymore. I think the long-term press but posthumous have gotten grimmer but there are two fossil fuel stocks that i still consider investable one of them is chevron the big integrated the king of the oils the best of the best chevrons held up surprising well during the pandemic. And it's got a powerful safe dividend of five point seven percent. The only problem the stock is now thirty five percent in the last six weeks. So kennedy keep climbing. Let's take a closer look with mike. He's the chairman ceo of chevron corporation. Get clear picture of the industry and his company said mr. Moore's welcome demand money jim. It's good to be with you all right so you got to solve this for me. As long as i've been in the business always one company that was the best and it wasn't as yours. It was a company called back son. There are a lot of others that were doing. Well now they're chevron and there really is everybody else everybody else being companies. I'm worried about the dividend that article in production. That aren't conservative. What happened to chevron at the other guy should have listened to well jim. Different companies have made different choices as As we came into this and as as we've gone through this so have changed their dividend policies. Some of changed their strategy. Some of change their financial priorities. We haven't our dividend to secure as you mentioned are balance is strong our strategies are intact and there's no they can count on us so we were we were well prepared as As we went through the cycle. And i think that people realize that we've been constant at a time when many others have changed. Now you'll have when it's necessary been aggressive for instance. You were very aggressive in the gulf of mexico drilling wells that are going to produce oil for year. They don't run out those wells. I mean that's just something that you did. Everybody else went away from it. How did she have the dish do that. Jim it's a long term business. Demand for energy in the world is enormous seven and a half billion people on the planet today. By twenty forty there will be nine billion in all of them deserve the things that affordable reliable energy can provide. so we've got to take a long view on investments and at the same time you've got to take a short view in terms of being prepared for markets that are very volatile and unpredictable. So it's an and world actually have to do both. We have to look out the front window. Twenty years down the road and we look out the window of the house today and see what's going on the world today and manage our way through both of those. Let go out twenty years. You bought a company called no one. None well terrific. I visited leviathan. It's an incredible field in metro. Train off the coast of israel. I could see a visionary saying you know what it's time to disenfranchise gas prom company bringing its gas to the west and make it. So there's a pipeline from israel all the way up through central europe and that could be something that's a twenty five year project pie in the sky. Well that's certainly one of the opportunities to commercialise. What is a large gas resource in the waters of the eastern mediterranean office. Real right now at feeds markets in israel egypt and jordan their opportunities to take liquefied natural gas to other markets and certainly longer term. These types of resources often lend themselves to infrastructure developments to feed market. Europe is not not far away so those are all options to commercially develop that resource and supply markets in an affordable reliable manner. So that that's the type of thing that our company does really well and it's a long term view that we have to have to sustain our company at the same time. I've noticed that you need to be able to have common ground with whoever's in the white house. I'm not going to try to say you have to do this do that. Because you're reasonable person. Have come up with it. But if you have a really aggressive. Climate change president and team. Is it perhaps possible that they make it. So that you that you're not able to enjoy your own properties. Well jim we've been in business for over one hundred forty years we've worked with republican administrations with democrat administrations with split government with unified government. And we always start with common ground. Government wants economic development and prosperity for its people and governments want a cleaner environment We look for the common ground and there's always common ground because we're critical part of the economy. We may not agree. One hundred percent with any given administration on everything. But there's usually much more we're aligned on than we're different have different views on and then we sit down at the table and we work our way through those things. We've got different points of view and that's exactly what we expect to do. with this administration and every other one that follows but mike how do you sit down with fund. Managers younger financials. You say you know what we're about trying to be carbon neutral even make it so carbon negative so to speak so chevron can never be a holding embarrassed and better. How much do you think that works good. And they have great dividend policy. We can own what happens if too many managers start thinking that way. Well jim what managers really want out of our industry and out of our company. It's better returns and boil our strategy down to four simple words. Higher returns lower carbon. And we need to do both. And we need to find ways to invest in things that are good for shareholders and also good for the environment if we do just just invest and things are good for the shareholders and ignore the environment. That's not sustainable. And if all we do is invest in things that have an environmental case and they don't create value and returns for shareholders. That's not sustainable. Either so we sit down with portfolio managers of all ages and all levels of experience and talk about how to deliver higher returns and lower carbon That's what people. I think that's been investors are looking for well. How about another way to look at it. Some people feel jim. Do not see the future. Do you not see tesla. Do you not see the hydrogen fuel cells. Judah there's no room in portfolio because it's going to happen fast than you think you think the demands big al twenty thirty years. Probably the way. I too but they feel no mike they feel. It's gone away. Fashion than you. And i think and that has caused me to pull in my horns about a group i really like. Would you have we embrace a lower carbon future. We expect lower carbon energy system. In fact the energy systems always been moving towards lower carbon hundred. And fifty years ago cole came along a displaced would eat and then you had oil and gas and then you had nuclear hydro wind solar hydrogen now. The energy systems always been in transition. And we're investing today in. I'll give you an example renewable natural gas if you've ever driven by dairy farm or a feed lot. There's there's a certain aroma that you you may recall We're actually capturing the waste products from dairy farms now fermenting the those products to create the natural gas product cleaning it up moving it into a pipeline so it can displace fossil fuels so we reduce methane emissions and we create a salable renewable product. So we're investing in things like that. We're investing in nuclear fusion. we're investing in hydrogen. We're investing technologies that can scale and make a real difference and be part of a carbon energy system. This is the history of our company. And i believe it's the future of putting a hydrogen fuel cells all of your incredible gas stations. How about making that statement saying to the rest of the industry and all the espn enthusiasts. Look we are doing something right now. That's economic but it is gonna kill it in the five six years you could do that. Might your this and you've got the balance what we're working on these kinds of things. Jim we come back to. It's an world we've got to have higher returns and lower carbon and so we've gotta find things that work for shareholders and work for the environment and that's exactly what we're working on so i think i think you're going to see our company and you'll see others in our industry that continue to find solutions and this is a challenge that is too big for any one company anyone industry or anyone one country in the world to completely address We're gonna work in partnership with others and continue to advance the you know the state of the energy system which will only grow. Well mike. you've always been the you've been the voice of reason. Your company's been the scientific company all along people should know that chevron has always had the most scientists and engineers at the top might worth chairman. Ceo of chevron sir.

Chevron JIM Israel Mike Gulf Of Mexico Kennedy Moore MR Mediterranean Egypt Jordan White House Europe Tesla Judah
Vasek Pospisil on the mission of the PTPA

The Tennis.com Podcast

05:36 min | 8 months ago

Vasek Pospisil on the mission of the PTPA

"Everyone welcome to an episode of tennis dot com podcast but special guests vasek pospisil. I'm nina pantic your host and i'll be joined by irena family coney. Varsha is fresh from a final run in sofia to wrap up his twenty twenty season which saw him get up to number sixty one in the rankings. The thirty year old canadian has been ranked as high as number twenty four back in twenty fourteen. Which happens to be the year he won. The wimbledon doubles title with jack sock. We talk about how his back surgery and time off actually changed his career for the better and how he got involved in the mushroom supplement called hickory and most of all we talk about the p. t. p. a. the professional tennis players association. It's something that he has. Founded with novak djokovic an has been in the headlines a lot so we get to hear vaujour's perspective how it started why it started wyatt's important how it interacts with the player. Cancel and what the future is for. The p. t. p. a. all right let's hear from boscq fashek. Welcome to the show. Thanks for joining us. How you doing. I'm doing good. Thanks for having me excited to be on. So where are you right now. I see your hotel room. Yeah i'm I'm actually in grade right now. Waiting for my two week There's this two week window where you can't be in a in a red zone country before you can go back into the state so i'm have like one day left and i'm heading Back to florida on tomorrow actually. So is it technically quarantine quarantine but it's it's just the one the you know The new rules that the us customs house where you can't be in a in a red zone country for two weeks before you can enter unless you have like a special waiver exemption which i don't have so i'm waiting for that two week period to kind of run out. I'll be able to go back. That's nuts. I mean i knew that. Non citizens and non green card holders couldn't just come back and forth the us. But i didn't know about the non red zone option so belgrade. Serbia was chosen because Because there was a short drive from via and it was an easy drive you to need any any. Thinks cross into serbia. Then it was. It's one of the few one of the few places that's not a red zone On the in europe so Y'all just came here one of my one of my friends here and just Hanging out adding poxy. So are you officially done with the season. We can assume that sophia was the last one did phenomenal. Congratulations by the way making finals. Unbelievable performance. How'd you feel out there. Thanks. yeah yeah a season's done so It was a great week. Great way to ended Safiya played really well and not a good feeling about turn it right from my first hit on center court which is were financial microdosing. I gotta make sure this is on my schedule. Every year i love love the conditions era and then and then i almost lost the first round. I was just a couple of points away. My point is served for the match in the house. Down for love thirds of breaker and then i just came back and then had a had a good run and and was close to the taken it but obviously A huge talent knows it was a tough match. But you know thrilled to have made the finals week. So obviously you're shutting it down and twenty twenty as we know has been very strange and you probably haven't played a whole lot of tennis. What does the end of twenty twenty look like for you. I know that australia's kind of up in the air at the moment. But are you going back to the us. Or are you going to canada. Bahamas options yeah. I'm i'm actually Going back to. I'm going to to the us to its brain. The academy. and i'll be there. I'll do the training. And then i'll probably head back to europe to do some training and then And then i'll see. I mean i have no idea what the schedule is gonna look like but it looks like i'll be flying australia. Yeah on the first. We heard that there's no flying in during the month of december. So yeah i to be honest. I don't even know what i'm gonna do it so it's a tough situation. It's been a really weird year but year ranked number sixty one right now. You've got to feel good. Given how short the season was that. You've managed to do so much to finals this year and that fourth on the us open was huge right. Yeah it was a great year from a great great year on court. Great season Considering there were few quite few i mean. We didn't really play that much tennis. The so yeah but to finals And the fourth round. Us open. Yeah was it was. It was great. I mean i'm playing. Well i'm feeling good You know mentally america. Good spot and physically Feeling great i mean. I haven't had any back issues since since surgery. Which which has been amazing and kind of didn't even realize how how How how it felt to be You know feeling this. Good on the court Physically for weeks on end. I remember bad things last like five six years. I'd always be able to go for like three or four weeks without some kind of issue back with blowout or something you know and i just took that as like normal. Part of the sport is okay. Well you know everyone's dealing with this kind of stuff and then yeah. It wasn't until i had my surgery. Thousand nineteen recovered By knock on. Every time. I sit but but a my body's been really holding up well few nichols Along the way but but Feeling great physically mentally and playing. Well

Vasek Pospisil Nina Pantic Varsha Jack Sock Professional Tennis Players As Vaujour Boscq Fashek Irena Tennis Safiya Novak Djokovic America Sofia Wyatt Belgrade Serbia Europe Sophia Florida
The greatest passport is my camera

Photography Daily

05:25 min | 8 months ago

The greatest passport is my camera

"Promise last week when i introduced charlene's first story edition. I talked to the absolute joy of finding what i thought of as a a street on her blog and blogs by the way aspect within our chats in a moment this on the you'll doing right now as photographer you may not thought about as something that could be precious to the way that you work and the message. Is you give on your website. Here's some food for thought. There's a raft of research out there that suggests we remember things that we see and even touch more than what we hear but we trust what we hear more than what we say. I was reading about a research group split into two groups. Same size groups. Twenty people watched the documentary one room and then twenty. People listened to the same documentary without pitches in an adjacent room. The results well. There was a sense of belief noticeably. More pronounced when the sense of sight was removed. Some suggested a fake news is almost trained out senses to the point where we no longer trust out is some of the research following. The session revealed sentences and feedback like well. It's so easy to manipulate. Picked these days and camera angles But it wasn't a toll that in real life yet. The palpable sense of dismissal was not nearly so pronounced in the audio only room. I find that fascinating that someone who's dedicated a great proportion of his life to sound. But now i'm a photographer. Anima filmmakers to mean a lot. Personally it'd be making kind of supercharged. Slide shows where the audio texture of what was actually happening at the time. I pressed the shutter and both commercially. And personally it's provides a great sense of satisfaction when presenting my stories but we can't all make or even wished to make films even slight says neal i he even when i can't really he still sensing what you'll say to me even imagining your voice to a degree really genuinely so. I was absolutely excited when i visited today's guests. Website moreover blog first time round to hear her talking to me many sites have a way of inserting audio. And if they don't you can always embed sound using services like soundcloud. Perhaps we should do an episode or even film about that at some stage is probably five six years since i visited a landscape photographers website. And please. i wish. I could remember the name of that talented shooter who played out the sound of the countryside. That was the soundtrack to each picture. Honestly i really labored over that site so it makes it all the morning embarrassing. I can't recall the name. It's likely that will come to me at three. Am in the morning so expect to post one day. So i want to ask you. How could you talk to those. Who view your pictures may not be suitable for every application short. But i i bet there's a story you shoot where it would add a version while somebody is digesting. You incredible pitches so to charlene winfred then for the second part in her mini series. We're going to talk a little more today about her. Nomadic life is a photographer and how having a camera making street pictures means. She investigates studies and a muscle and travel. But let me. I return to that blog. Post where i i actually meant charlene and i use that word advisedly. I'd read the about page ad. Spent time looking at the pictures. But this is where i believe i. I met her talking about making pictures. Spring into action. You make it frame. And then another and another and another the minutes took by the wolf aids from a blush to a bruise on the cusp of evenings dusty hugh streetlamps snap on and the night is gone you feel for a moment. The lament of that poet of lost boys and country lanes grieving for the fall of paradise. You drag yourself in your fifteen. Nothing frames home and hope that one of them carries the magic and day that demon that has been summarily banished. I'll leave a link to the whole piece own. Today's charlotte's my guest is charlene winfred. I looked at your site. Charlene for dot com on. I found immediately a posting your journal. That drew me in mainly. Because i don't think i've ever ever visited a photographer site to be treated to poetry and annot you don't call it poetry but that's what it appeared to sound like to me Your moment post evenly just posted. Actually it's fabulous. Fabulous is not going to become something you do more often. That's missing would you do it more often. I love that. That post was really was really just that it was an instagram post end. I've been neglecting my blog. Davor instagram simply. Because i can post on instagram. From wherever eminent only tend to post on instagram. Live out on the train and the bus waiting for something off in the middle of something. Which i don't do with my blog but honestly that spoken piece was just me trying a voiceover set out because i do. I do a little bit. Of course what fault. Phone my job and i just need a. We'd figure out how to how to bake a clean recording in. So i thought i'll just try to stop being david attenborough reading random things that i've written. Well i

Charlene Charlene Winfred Neal Aids Davor Instagram Charlotte David Attenborough
Sell Almost Anything You Can Dream Of with Russell Brunson

Entrepreneur on FIRE

06:35 min | 8 months ago

Sell Almost Anything You Can Dream Of with Russell Brunson

"Russell. Say what's up to fire nation and sheer something interesting about yourself. That most people don't new what's a fire nation All right the first thing. I can think of the people probably know about me. Is that like i am. Deathly scared of cats have not touched the cat in over twenty years The last time. I touched a cat and mice will shut for three days and i have not touched. A cat said the my in-laws are cat people. So i literally go their house and i stand there and don't touch it. Well i can tell you. Can kate sorry. It was actually a campus and she was growing up. Her family always had one or two times. And i was the opposite. I was always a dog person. Springer spaniels my whole life and finally during quarantine because we used to travel all the time. In fact you. And i are supposed to be out in fiji recently. We weren't able to do that and we had a bunch of trips are ozzy cancelled. So i finally able to convince kate to get a dog with me so we now we have got him when he was two months old. But now we have a seven month old golden doodle. His name is gas and one reason why you'll love him russell's because he's hypoallergenic no shedding which was what i needed. Not because i was allergic to anything but just like. That's the one thing i don't like about. Dogs is the shedding. So gus is the perfect dog. I love him to death and follow me on instagram. If you want to see. Some great dog gussied dog video so russell as i t's earlier during the introduction. We're talking today about how to sell almost anything that you can flip in dream of and you have helped so many people do just that for so many years. I've been an avid click. Finals promoter and user for years and years and years now multiple to calm clever wars. All the nine yards. I mean i absolutely love. Click finals. I wanted to bring you back on. Because you've done something recently that again you just stay out of the curve. You continue to revolutionize stuff for so long like webinars were just boring like slides and then they have a talking head from time to time. There's an like and then you came out with this webinar. It's so spectacular because it's not lake. It's like this. Unbelievably new groundbreaking knowledge. I mean it's such important fundamental knowledge that you need to know fire nation. But it's how he delivers it with the stories and then the cartoons and the videos in the mix and the mismatch like i literally russell went back and watched one of my webinars and i hate it now. Like i hate my webinar. Because you so. I'm gonna follow your lead. My man and i'm going to mix up fire nation. Ill fire dot com slash. Click webinar just go over there. Watch this webinars free. It's amazing will up your game and it will help your business for the content but also for the presentation style you fire dot com slash click webinar and the title is the weird almost backwards. Funnel secret that is currently being used by underground group of entrepreneurs including myself to sell almost anything you can of so russell. Break that down for us. Yeah definitely so the group of entrepreneurs these are like my tribe. My people right. We call ourselves funnel hackers and a lot of people like don't turn means initially and for us. It's like all about trying to reinvent the wheel and figure things out from the beginning. It's like let's look and see what's working currently right and so looking at other people's funnel people's businesses and looking at as a model then create something new and unique outlook and i think that When i got started in business online. I thought i had to figure everything out. I was trying to be creative all the time and it really really struggled until i said that there's people who've been doing this for a long time and they're just trying to reinvent the will let me see what they're doing and what are the tweaks and changes. I can get my product or my service into the structure that they've proven his work and you know this is well anyone in in the online business like the art and the science right in the science doesn't change the framework. It's like the frame of a house right like that's that that doesn't change and so it was figuring what what's the framework. What's the funnel the things that we know work in the process that works the price points at work and then on top of that we. We've in our own art. Our own products our own messaging. And when you figure out how to do that we call funnel hacking. That's the that's the secret and now we've had people doing this. We have over one hundred hundred and twenty one hundred thirty thousand active members and click finals right now. We see it happening in every market in the world which has been so cool because it was kind of a new concept you know five or six years ago now. We're seeing it happen everywhere now. Literally i mean. I lost entrepreneurs on fire eight years ago and that didn't exist and i remember you coming and bringing of this phrase this term. You know this lifestyle back five six years ago. And i've washed it you know. Do it has done over the past five or six years. It's been absolutely amazing and fire nation. What we're doing next. We're going to go through the three main themes that russell talks about throughout the webinar. Now of course we're not gonna go into super depth on these because you're gonna watch the webinar for that and it's free and it's visual and it's beautiful and it's breathtaking at times like you need to watch for that reason but russell let's start with funnel hacking and how to ethically steel over a million dollars worth of funnel hacks from your competitor for under a hundred dollars. That's one benjamin taken away. Yes so this is something. I the concept i the principal i learn. Issue tony robbins. Who's a friend of both of ours. And tony said if you want to be successful in life you need to model those who are already successful and all parts of life. I like in in sports in business and everything and And so for me. I remember i was at an event and i heard this guy Showing one of his finals one time to talk about what they did how they did it and like all the money they spent all this stuff and i remember looking at that and i was like i'm never going to figure those things out and then for moment i stop and say what a minute. What if what. If i if i just looked at what he did and it looked like he had a product here and there was up selling the down so this was the process took someone to where if i took that again that framework and then i just weaved in my own product mountings into it and so i was kind of the idea. We'd have a name for back then. I would call frontal hiking today. But i i use that. And so i. This is before click funds probably seven or eight years ago is launching supplement at because i love supplements supplement. I know how to do it. So i found somebody who had to supplement funnel i looked at the structure. They'd proven would work to sell supplements. And i took that structure. I built my own supplement. You know put my own copy. My own words mount phrase by us use. There's is kind of a model like a business model. This is what we need to do and And we launched it and it blew up and we got huge and what was cool about it was. i didn't have to go and do tons of market researcher. All these things. All i had to do is literally go to the person's funnel and buy their product like put my credit card on my wallet spent a hundred bucks. I bought the product. And i was able to see everything right what we see some his website or a page. And it's like the tip of the iceberg but by paying buying the person's product and bunnell hacking him as able to see oh after they after someone buys a product sell them with this and they down so at this and this is the process. After i saw the process look like as the model that for my supplement. And that's how we were up to grow supplement company

Russell Ozzy Springer Fiji Instagram Kate Tony Robbins Benjamin Tony Bunnell
It's Our Holiday Gift Guide

Breaking Beauty Podcast

05:07 min | 9 months ago

It's Our Holiday Gift Guide

"Okay gel so. I think we better start with a nod ben calendar. I mean. it's the most classical gift you could give somebody. I mean i just love this trend that started probably like five six years ago but the beauty advent calendar. So there's so many out there. I just want to highlight one. Though that i think is really good value for your money and that is from the body shop. It's the make it real together advent calendar. Sixty-nine dollars in it's worth one hundred and thirty seven dollars on the outside. It looks like a house like an a frame house in it's purple kind of cardboard packaging. So i like that because it's actually paper so at the end you can recycle it. It's not going to be a ton of waste very beautiful illustrations on the inside and there are twenty four. Little doors that are filled with mini goodies. Yes so i like that you get the full twenty four door experience. Spot is on a lot of bulk and it's not a lot of waste. Yeah so you get everything in there from their lip. Bader is to scented lotions handcream. Shower gels body scrubs. And i like the little extras that they've done. They have a festive nail file. They have hairclips. They have a bath. Lilly in there and bath gloves so these are just like the little things that are like. Oh yeah. I do need a new house. And they've included them in this particular thing so i think it's great bang for your buck and we're spending so much time at home might as well have something to open every day while you have your coffee. Yeah hell yod surprise and delight me every day. You know but. I love the body shop around the holidays because it's great for all ages. It's just so giftable and it doesn't break the bank. So i think that was a grapevine gel. Now i'm really excited to tell everybody about my fine from sephora like i said i crunched all the numbers i put my lake analytics hat on and the winner was the first aid beauty. All that fab five piece holiday sat so this is forty nine dollars. Us with a hundred and twenty seven dollar values. So they're seventy eight dollars in savings. So i know that's a lot of numbers. I just threw out you but basically you're saving more than what you paid for the box. So that's pretty aussie. That's awesome math. It's going to be sixty four dollars. Canadian with hundred and sixty seven dollar value. One thing that i really like about this five piece set is that four out of the five pieces are full-sized. They're not just many. So that's great because you hear a great value. You think it's just going to be the travel size and then has every step of your routine as well. So it's got a cleanser moisturizer cream lip product and exfoliating toning pads. So it really. Has you like completely taken care of all season long. And i'm a fan of i aid beauty anyway because it's great for sensitive skin you know. They don't add a lot of the product. It's been dermatologist tested. I think even if you don't have sensitive skin going into the winter you need that like bare your repair and they have all of these ingredients. That are going to help with that. They've got glycerin to hydrate. Nyah cinema. that's going to help with texture and tone as well colloidal oatmeal. That's going to help to soothe irritated skin and then in the exfoliating toning pads at scott. Aj's going to give you that gentle expoliation. This is a kit. That's great for all genders. All ages all skin types. You know it's just basically like soothing. Brightening doing everything you could ask for mainly hydration so this is a win for me joe. Yeah and no hate no shade to first aid beauty. They're not necessarily sexy looking packaging or products. But they've dressed them up right on this package. I have it right here too. So kind of like an art deco vibe on the front of it is really fun. Ads like silver and gold and black with celestial stuff on it. I mean anybody wanna open this for the holiday awesome levitt. If you guys are on a budget you know when you're not willing to pay the the triple figure price tag. I know you found a kit that was like sitting right around twenty five dollars with some products that we also love right. Yes so this is from bioscience. It's their lives glow kit. It's twenty five. Us dollars with a sixty two dollar value. That's thirty three canadian. Seventy nine canadian value so this includes two products. The scaling and lactic acid resurfacing nights serum plus the scaling and vitamin c rose oil. These are both like smaller. They're not full sized. Get the full experience using these products and for me that squealing and lactic acid. Resurfacing night serum. It's one of my favorite products. I've tried in all of two thousand twenty and the reason is you put it on before you go to bed. You wake up. You're so glowing. It's insane you get those instant results. But there's no irritation and then the vitamin c rose. Oil smells amazing. And it's not greasy at all and it really. I think is a great product to use in tandem with that exfoliating. Yeah i love a face oil. When i'm using heavy duty exfoliating because my skin just got so dry and it just feels like It needs that like give me that oil. After you know so i love this little combo. It even has the gift box like you. Just write. someone's name on the top. You don't even need to give perfect perfect. Yeah love

Bader Sephora Lilly Spot AJ United States Levitt Scott JOE
Your Signature (MM #3498)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 10 months ago

Your Signature (MM #3498)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation my wife and I went out in early voted last Thursday here in Tennessee. I love the early voting because I hate standing in line. We own a stand in line for about twenty five minutes, which wasn't bad. I'm not complaining at all. But the one thing I keep reading about online is about signature matching from your voter card to your driver's license to the piece of paper you have to sign in front of them. But what's amazing to me is how people can expect your signature to be the exact same thing. Now my voter registration card is probably five six years old now and that card is only so small my driver's license which has a signature which was signed probably fifteen years ago when I got my tennis need his license is about the size. So it's probably smaller than a fingernail. So how can you match that signature to the signature on the card now, the signature is similar my signature pretty much looks the same depending upon where I'm signing it, but some people have a hard time matching their signature from one day to the next it's very sad, and there's got to be a better system. Is it time for a fingerprint match with all the technology we have there's got to be a better system. I'm voted. I think it went through and everything's good least. I hope so long

Kevin Nation Tennessee Tennis
Your Signature (MM #3498)

The Mason Minute

01:00 min | 10 months ago

Your Signature (MM #3498)

"The Maisonette with Kevin Nation my wife and I went out in early voted last Thursday here in Tennessee. I love the early voting because I hate standing in line. We own a stand in line for about twenty five minutes, which wasn't bad. I'm not complaining at all. But the one thing I keep reading about online is about signature matching from your voter card to your driver's license to the piece of paper you have to sign in front of them. But what's amazing to me is how people can expect your signature to be the exact same thing. Now my voter registration card is probably five six years old now and that card is only so small my driver's license which has a signature which was signed probably fifteen years ago when I got my tennis need his license is about the size. So it's probably smaller than a fingernail. So how can you match that signature to the signature on the card now, the signature is similar my signature pretty much looks the same depending upon where I'm signing it, but some people have a hard time matching their signature from one day to the next it's very sad, and there's got to be a better system. Is it time for a fingerprint match with all the technology we have there's got to be a better system. I'm voted. I think it went through and everything's good least. I hope so long

Kevin Nation Tennessee Tennis
Sigma Prime with Mehdi Zerouali

The Bitcoin Podcast

05:59 min | 10 months ago

Sigma Prime with Mehdi Zerouali

"Hey everyone my name's Matty I'm a CO founder and director of Sigma Prime We are an information security consultancy mostly based out of Australia being hiring a bunch of people all over the world lately. We've been around for about full years providing security assessment services to a lot of blockchain projects working. Almost exclusively lately on. Iridium. Providing security assessment on smart contracts on a lot of protocol. Layer developments. And I guess we are here to talk about Easter 'cause we are also the founders and maintainers of light hops arrest implementation of the. Two point plano specification thanks for having. A real quick. What would you say the? Technical advantage or differentiator lighthouse has over other there to. Invitations. a question question it. We that quite often we because of of the the company we're in information security consultancy we take security very seriously. We'd like to think that we've incorporated security into our development lifecycle very early on. So would like to think that our clients is probably one of the hopefully safest was secure clients out there it's written in Ross Ross is particularly fast. So the focus has also been on the fullness speeds and as I mentioned security So that's probably what differentiates from the rest of the other teams. Get a moment to pitch chill out to private the process of lighthouses. Good nells offended A. that. The approach here is the kind of. Break down the concept of theorem to what's going on and what users can expect so. I'm not exactly sure how I want to do this the the conversations going to naturally evolve I think but like if you had to give the. Highest of high. Level overviews of the transition from ethylene S to. Or just say. Okay. Let's have this. So, F one is the proof of work chain that we all love us and as you all probably know, the plan was always to transition to approve of stay consensus mechanism. So namely. Casper, if g so the research team has been working on this. If your foundation research you had been working on this for the past four, five, six years and mentors have been developing the. Specification, turning it into actual usable software. For the past two and a half years. The main difference as mentioned is the consensus mechanism. So moving away from proof of work, which is a quite a west full way of coming to consensus if you ask me. I know this can be quite polarizing community, but this is basically how Paul my co founder got started on Lighthouse I think ethereal currently uses as much electricity as Costa. Rica, if I'm not mistaken. And we think sigma prime. That is so. Much. Better ways of coming to consensus. And kost perfect is one of them. So super excited about the environmental impact of the transition from steak and this transition will happen gradually. we'll be shipping if to in various phases. So phase zero is the first phase that will be introduced hopefully a few weeks I a couple months. The latest set ladies year is what we're aiming for. and. This introduces consensus change. Right is introduces the proof of stake consensus mechanism Gasparilla Gene, and we essentially call these chain, the beacon chain, and you can see as this orchestrate. That gives the pulse of the network to Valley daters, giving them tasks, rewarding them when they do their job correctly. Penalizing them when they don't etc, etc.. That's phase zero. That's what I guess. All client teams are working on at the moment and. Phase One will hopefully come shortly up and phase one introduces shards, the concept of shod. So Ethier two point Oh will be shotted blockchain meaning that will have. Sixty four sub block changing see them as sort of independent blockchain's that are all linked and tides with each other through five that consensus mechanism in the beacon. Check. So. Once we have that will be effectively using those shards just as dot availability layers we won't. Have State transitions or users of smart contracts or transactions as we are all familiar with in if one that will come in light up so talks about phase one point five, which hopefully will. Get one into each to and have that as a separate dedicated shot. In face to. Will introduce I, guess proper state execution and smart contracts, and this is when will actually have a blockchain usable blockchain developers as we all relative with them when you hear him on. That makes sense.

Costa Ross Ross Iridium Matty Co Founder Australia Casper Sigma Ethier A. Director Paul
"five  six years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

Newsradio 1200 WOAI

02:52 min | 1 year ago

"five six years" Discussed on Newsradio 1200 WOAI

"With Devon hunter his websites are all linked up already it coast to coast AM dot com Sir go take a look and we'll be talking about his newly released work called the modern which spells recipes and workings when will America go back to business we really need to and as a matter of fact Friday they're gonna release unemployment figures and they will be sky high in states like New York and California the lockdowns could last for who knows how long now newsmax TV is conducting a very urgent national poll asking if you agree with the lockdowns all around the country the newsmax poll asks you what president trump should also do so once you let your voice be heard vote in the newsmax poll the president does look at these polls and it's really simple approach just text the word river the thirty nine seven forty seven that's a river the thirty nine seven forty seven AM vote instantly letting president trump Congress and the media know your opinion I don't forget to watch newsmax TV it's got great coverage great I watch it it's good people newsmax TV on direct TV three forty nine dish to sixteen Xfinity eleven fifteen the spectral optimum one oh two U. verse twelve twenty file six fifteen **** Suddenlink one oh two while Armstrong and more so what should tune into newsmax TV and don't forget to vote in their poll on the lockdowns and the president just text the word revert to thirty nine seven forty seven that's river the thirty nine seven forty seven I've got this tax bill for Sharpay rescue dogs okay another shar pei the one who is I have stuck with the dyna light on my goodness probably five six years people remark really how well my dog what do you hold close they hi tell me they get a regular diet of dynamite with every meal is it trash and all I have to do is say dog food pandemonium they can be half asleep and they're thrilled you don't need to wait until the problem it's far better to keep the dog happy and healthy at all dynamite for life we'll be right I tell I get my Dino from V. I. T. dot com news radio twelve hundred W. O. a high and welcome back to coast to.

America New York California trump president Congress Armstrong newsmax Suddenlink Sharpay
"five  six years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

KNBR The Sports Leader

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on KNBR The Sports Leader

"About five six years but impatience six once the twelve years now the guy's a great athlete and then he's got a great mind for for whatever he does in sports and he's he's he's got four pitches that are working for now you know the the eye sight lines are changing for the hitters he he he's got the fastball but at the top of his own he then he comes down with a slight are low in a way he's he's he's I think he's more of a pitcher now that he's ever been when he just could go out there and swing the fastball and get by with it with a with a couple breaking pitches he's thinking a lot more out there it doesn't quite have the stuff that he used to have but it's been impressive to watch I mean you can talk about spin rate and and what he's been doing all you want but you have to do it on the field and what he did yesterday I mean that the the Phillies just went completely quiet you know everything about you little bit your your story today was terrific he came into the dugout singing a captain and Tennille song from us he was definitely singing you could really hear me there was one was over double what what what what was that you were singing there the captain and Tennille I mean this is this is a that's an old school moment there and in every way but you know that's not a bad not a bad tune but a that was going through his head needed mind you don't share it with us you know what's funny about him of course he's going to be a hall of fame manager but the way the managerial tree is going the young managers are taking over the game and not only does he become a hall of fame manager but he sort of fits the role because our name one left like him yeah well that and that's really a shame.

Phillies Tennille five six years twelve years
"five  six years" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

The Paul Finebaum Show

02:15 min | 2 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on The Paul Finebaum Show

"About, you know, five six years ago for this Thursday, and quote hooked way, all from my mouth is you know, I can't take him with right until run out in the hell is chemotherapy. So right. You know, but they're doing what I'm doing where on I'm tolerating is. It's a mile does I had to go ever thought for ever third week to set the fragrant, but undoing well, I'm glad to hear. Thank you for sharing that information with us and best wishes as you continue. Oh, okay. I don't think fully recovers if I send for a wind up advantage been a real fan on they fly things. What's the opening day of phone paying Quicken's? So thinking through the covers of I sent for Williams and everything we do for Ville is just so how new offense accord, maybe so, but I I know why I just wanted to let you know. I think he's a all The other. other. And they ought to all people is vice him, Danny? You continue the fight. And we thank you for joining us today. All our best. Thank you. So thank you very much. Great to have you on listening to the Paul finebaum show podcast March lie by joining us. We just showed his way too early. Mark great w on the big story here, of course, is Jalen hurts and oak, the Homa tell us about the decision to move Oklahoma from outside the college football playoff projection. Of course inside. I mean, it call it really came down to Oklahoma Ohio State inside a little bit more confident confidence than Jalen hurts than than just in the fields at this point urges twenty six to a starter. I think he got better as a passer last year, he surrounded by some some really good skill players on offense at Oklahoma Lincoln Riley, proven the last couple years, obviously that they can take a transfer and tournament to a really good quarterback in his system. And you know, I think the I think the jury's still out a little bit on Justin fields..

Jalen Oklahoma Ville Paul finebaum Justin fields Quicken Lincoln Riley Williams Ohio football Danny five six years
"five  six years" Discussed on The Working Experience

The Working Experience

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on The Working Experience

"If you finish. No, I'm not joking around five six years old. He would come over and smack on the back of the hit. Talking about like light little tap like if you had food in your mouth, you would spit it out that would be the velocity of his hand against your. And I remember it was an upward swing. I mean, honestly had yet practice. So he come by. He wouldn't do it to my sister. But he'd due to my my brother he come by upward swing. Am right in the back of the head? And you know, it didn't. To say that it it hurt. It didn't hurt. But I definitely felt. Yeah. You know what? I mean, it wasn't like he punched me in the face right rushing me face who would have been in appropriate. This was like, you know, if I was standing up he might smack me on the, but but I was sitting down. So my head was the only option, but that was you know, that was socially acceptable did not scar me any way, shape or form a today. Like if we were sitting around the table in one of my sons didn't finish their food. And my dad walked over him and smack them on the back of the head. Literally the record would stop. Yeah. Just my wife would have a problem. I would have probably at. Yeah. Yeah. But it's it's it's different. Now. It's like and also to it's like, I'm not advocating that we should go back to hitting children. I'm just saying that it's kids today. Superior that, you know, the parenting style is very, you know, Netflix, you know, very trying to shield them from the hard realities of life. When when in fact, and we all know this when they get out of the Coon life is not going to be a warm hug, you know, warm hug and kiss on the cheek not to say that you shouldn't do this. Parents you should love your kids. You shouldn't hit them. I'm just saying it's making a point that you're you're gonna face obstacles. And you know, and you have to overcome them if you con. Currently teach your child that you're always gonna get a medal or everything's always gonna be. Okay. It's not that's not how things are gonna gonna roll off in life. Well, you know, I hesitate to say no for a fact, but you know, I've taught for long enough to come to the realization that you always you always know for I know for a fact, I know it prevents your less. That kids. Do they kinda crave they seem to crave somebody who will tell them like yes to this. No to that. Like, this is how you do this. This is how you don't. And you know, I student said that to me one time she, you know, she was asking me about this in that high school kid, and I said well now, that's you know, whatever it was kind of forget what it was. It was not something about school. It was something about I don't know driver's license or something I civilians concert. And she said, you know, I just don't like she's I don't get the impression she gets real answers from her parents like she indicated that and you know, I mean, I don't have any personal stake in it. But I do get the impression that kids. Do you know they kind of want somebody to say like I'm kid. I don't know what to do. I need somebody to tell me..

Netflix five six years
"five  six years" Discussed on Acquired

Acquired

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on Acquired

"We figured, you know what better way to start our brand than a physical manifestation of what we were about. By the way, it was also a bootstrapping mechanism. So we actually bootstrapped our company for the first five years with very little of the capital that I saved that Goldman to get this company off the ground, either the action pads journals were a big part of that as long as well as these conferences. And the first book that I wrote, there were various ways we're trying to bootstrap the company, but it was always it was. It was a somewhat medium agnostic, but mission Centric approach to building the begins brand. Both you were getting awareness in distribution if you will for be hands, but also non dilutive capital. That is true. And I think that is a big factor we want to get into it. But I mean, we'll we'll get there but with the acquisition, a big part of the math was the fact that we had not really diluted ourselves much. We'd raised one real round of third party capitol five, six years into the business, which really was very, very significant for us. Well, it's interesting having a revenue stream that you don't think is going to be your ultimate product to help boost dropped the company. I think it's a pattern that most people don't explore because when they're setting out to start a startup, they often want to venture backed right away. And so they wanna get right into the core business. But you know, it reminds me of one other business that sold something to make money along the way. And that was those Airbnb with Syria. Imagine if they were selling airbeds or something that was actually like very aligned with raising awareness for their product in their community itself. You know, you're gonna do inter. View job? Yeah, one of the co founders for the messing middle for the new book. And I'm talking about sort of those early days. I mean, they were. They went through some real fits and starts, and they had multiple iterations in in the first two didn't really hit it like the third one dead. The serial was like a. It was also like a coach role element of the team and how they operated and how they work together. There was something significant even though the cereal wasn't necessarily related to the end product, but it was all about like kind of this fun experience and community and that sort of thing. Yeah. So you're bootstrapping you're selling action journals. You're doing conferences your first book, and then you also had a ninety nine percent, right? Which was essentially ninety nine or ninety nine. Sorry actually you both are right. It was ninety nine percent until the whole Wall Street movement happened where there was like the ninety, nine percent thing..

Goldman Airbnb Syria ninety nine percent nine percent five years six years
"five  six years" Discussed on Mere Mortals Unite

Mere Mortals Unite

04:26 min | 3 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on Mere Mortals Unite

"Not have mentors they don't they're they're typically younger people who are looking for somebody to guide them are absolutely in so what you're able to do is say okay let's take that natural hunger that they have which we all have frankly we all would love somebody put an arm around us and say you know you're julianne you're just a wonderful speaker you're wonderful podcast to your went in we all want to let me show you how to be better right i remember when in fact because i was in pittsburgh into a school there in i was an athlete good little athlete in third grade i had a friend of mine who's dad was an all of whose grandfather was in all american football player at the university of pittsburgh in like nineteen nineteen through nineteen twenty one in his grandson was not as athletic i was remember afterwards this man used to walk up put his arm romance kevin you are phenomenal young athlete on you're just a good kid and he spoken to my life i was that i remember that right that far yeah i know exactly what you mean in so these these this is what it means to care in beginning a lot has how do we create the conversation so this toured purpose statement tool which is such a simple little tool but it's it's a sort of thing we sit down somebody's so what did you give your purpose statement you know you've got celebrating life what does that mean to you wanted is how did you choose that what's going on some will you have a meaningful life conversation which is not which is hush i say it's it's not business base but it comes back to being business base searchable harassment it's not you know equal opportunity you know it's just caring life because want in the legal world in the the political economic legal world that would tell us you don't engage with people because it's scary and your lower to get a lawsuit while the truth is you need to be able to life together in the workplace in the home and so on and so forth and so this is one of those ways that you can have a real conversation that isn't just superficial like sports or how the job or going on vacation not anything wrong with his conversations but the real depth getting to know who somebody is in how you when you care about somebody where they are in their life and they know that you care therefore you have a business cares absolutely an interesting i just went to conference last week and you know we started off with wellness programs like about nah maybe five six years ago and and they would talk about work life balance which i always thought was an oxymoron because i don't think there's a balance because there's not a separation and i was at this conference last week and they called it work life harmony and i really liked that because that's really what it is when i work with businesses i always say you know there are skills that you can teach your workforce that will not only help them on the job it will help them with change at home let's say i'm doing change management it'll help them with change that happens in their home that could be a dog dying or it could be a broken washing machine changes change and you use the same skills in both more obviously when you're losing a dog or a relative or whatever then you are when you're a broken washing machine but it's those little changes that that give you the opportunity to practice those skills so when those other incidents happen your brain already knows oh i have a skill for that and you're really doing the same thing with being on purpose is people have another thought process they can go to right it's it's another i always say it's like we have tool belts right life skill tool belts and the more we have in those tool belts the more we can do when things come up and none of us should wait for tragedy to figure out we need those skills and the other part of this is really important as all of this can be taught all of this can be learned.

five six years
"five  six years" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

KKOB 770 AM

01:57 min | 3 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on KKOB 770 AM

"The us would need as many as five thousand judges to catch up with the backlog of cases involving undocumented persons the us it'd that elaborate as part of his justification in calling for instant deportation at the same time the president's happy he signed the order ending children being separated president trump saying in the oval office he does not regret signing the executive order last wednesday ending separating adults and children arrested for crossing into the ucla legally as for his tweets about near instant deportation with no due process for migrants mr trump thinks it meshes with keeping families together a nice simple system that works you know mexico halls people for four hours for five hours for two hours and we have people for four five six years and they never leave says in twenty eleven mexico changed its immigration laws giving some due process rights to illegal immigrants before that deportation could be swift bob costantini washington harley davidson facing rising costs from new tariffs to begin shifting production of motorcycles heading for europe from the us to factories overseas harley sees it europe is a critical market for the company you look at last year it did fifteen percent of its business their forty thousand motorcycles were sold so for now harley is basically going to eat the higher tariff costs the company says it's going to take a hit of thirty million to forty five million dollars for the rest of the year and if you look at the full year the impact could be as high as one hundred million dollars correspondent alison kasich well this'll be very hot week in albuquerque but we could see a break in the weather by the weekend national weather service meteorologist roger smith says it could be hint that the monsoons aren't far off large for high that's gonna give us a hot weather through thursdays going to start to slide east late thursday and by friday we could see some moisture move up from northern mexico smith says whenever we see moisture moving up from the south in late june or early july it's an encouraging sign that the monsoons.

us president ucla mexico harley davidson europe harley roger smith executive mr trump bob costantini alison kasich albuquerque one hundred million dollars forty five million dollars four five six years fifteen percent five hours four hours
"five  six years" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

02:18 min | 3 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on Q: The Podcast from CBC Radio

"I started to do some research looking for new movie ideas probably about five six years ago and i you know looking for something with you know nova scotia story grew up with a book called helen helen creighton's blue knows ghosts and it was kind of the bible on every family in cape breton nova scotia cape on especially we have very strong supernatural love their bruno's ghosh's terrifying i mean this folklore creighton traveled to these small communities all over nova scotia collecting go stories and she compiled them in a book and this book would keep you up at night and i know was getting i knew i wanna make a horror movie because my dad was such a big hoorah about who trained me to love or movies i said it should be nova scotia story that's one thing i haven't seen all the scary movies i've seen from around the world and we've got our own creepy folklore right here in this province i i should mention that this isn't a a horror dramatization of the ideal maternity home though is not of the butter box babies right yes that's right yeah so tell me a little bit about how you manage to use that as the sort of a plot arc from what you ended up doing sure will there's ton of material available in line i think in one in one essay i read liley young's daughter the the real proprietors midwife of the ideal maternity home i think i'd rather daughter tried to open it as a country in after it shut down due to all the lawsuits lila was never never convicted of anything and i thought i wrote myself great idea for scary movie a haunted house story in a country in an then it it's sort of came together very quickly when i decided to put my attention to it in spring of two thousand fifteen three people in a country in said this this can be you know the shining needs rosemary's baby in the orphanage the great gear modell toro film and it's something we could do on the but it's we have enough scotia we we we had a really terrible time does fifteen the first version of this film was was sunk do.

helen helen creighton bruno cape breton nova five six years
"five  six years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

Progressive Talk 1350 AM

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on Progressive Talk 1350 AM

"It's got to be a lot smaller now with the internet but the question is when you buy stuff over the internet from a company that's physically in a in a state far away from you and they don't have a physical presence in your state they take the position these retailers that they don't have to collect sales tax for you and they say oh look how difficult it is my god look at all the taxing jurisdictions and counties and special districts anyway they they seem to have forgotten this computer software out there anyway we've got a really interesting senior legal analyst time and it involves baseball no it does because it's not like the supreme court brought it up but when i was looking at this case yesterday from the supreme court there was this there's another case that popped into my mind and it has to be discussed and it's about baseball it really really is and speaking about baseball i have a confession and an apology just before we get into the guts of what's going on today four weeks ago four weeks go i said that we would start a new feature at thirty three minutes into our first hour on wednesdays and here we are wednesdays and we're into our first hour now last week i had planned and i had announced and we had made a date we've made an appointment that at thirty three minutes into the first our last wednesday i would tell you the back story of this clip before but give that give my opinion well that's the longer version because the long versions a minute twenty four and there's a hilarious story behind it about five six years ago i played this told.

baseball supreme court analyst thirty three minutes four weeks five six years
"five  six years" Discussed on Are You Real

Are You Real

02:14 min | 3 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on Are You Real

"I love that i love how you're even specifically touching on what some of god's heart is in the original intended he has for that nation what is it about the government mountain that makes you come alive you know that's a real interesting question because i didn't care about government for the longest time you know i don't know why just is one of those things that when i was younger the it was the spiritual is more important than anything now in so just ignorant to that fact and then really about five six years ago just started developing a passion in a hard for politics and started paying attention what was happening in the us and then really start paying attention to what's happening in in africa on the different nations and i just believe that god really wants to move government because he wants to he wants to show art of its heart rue the leadership accu wants himself expressed who that and i think that's fascinating in in in we all god or a lot of people will you got as as this distant authority who really cares for himself with god is not distant he cares for people tunities of government to express that more than anything else or god is close in cares about people really good so as a true kingdom statesman yourself i would love for you to weigh in on one or two of my attributes of a true kingdom statesman teaching that i do which includes character development kingdom understanding inherited wisdom favor expectancy prophetic skill emotional intelligence and self awareness as kind of the seven pillars are traits that you really need to develop an own as a truth william statesmen perhaps weigh in on on which one has proved to be the most valuable to you and which one has been the hardest to develop.

us africa five six years
"five  six years" Discussed on The Interchange

The Interchange

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on The Interchange

"The bad news is that were still a long way from emission reductions it'll keep global temperatures below two degrees c and if you look at the past five six years we've been reducing the carbon intensity of global energy supply by about half a percent a year and 2016 we probably reduced it by almost one percent a year to keep global temperatures below two degrees we need to reduce the carbon intensity of global energy supply by two to three percent every year for uh for the next add next thirty years so there's a lot for a lot of work christoph to do going to be going a lot faster by you know but climate risk is not by an area and the first few tonnes that you reduce deliver some of the most significant benefits in terms of improved outcomes for for for uh for human beings and for the planet and and the progress that we made over the past decade is is is nothing sneeze at trevor hauser is a partner with the rhodium group he was formerly hillary clinton's energy policy adviser he is a former senior adviser to the state department on international energy and environmental issues and his analysis at the rome group group is fantastic we will of course provide links to allow the studies that we discussed in the podcast in the show notes right therefore you to access trevor thank you so much for coming on the show we really enjoy this effects from young guys i pressure that's going to do it for this week's show folks if you like these conversations please share them around send a link to your colleagues are your friends you can also go into apple podcast and give us a rating in review that is always very much appreciated you can find us anywhere you get podcasts if you're not in the apple ecosystem who will play stitcher tune in soundcloud wherever just download us.

global temperatures energy supply christoph partner hillary clinton senior adviser trevor rome group apple two degrees five six years three percent thirty years one percent
"five  six years" Discussed on Exponent

Exponent

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on Exponent

"And it was it was so prescient not just in a it was right but in a perfectly articulating that the way that the paradigm had change to now in iphone was a was a computer and rim did make computers the computer company is going to be the phone company and you don't for him it was the right moment right time right guy right perspective just holy nailed it had the luxury of protective kind of strolling in answer to the tail end of that and saying let's put a ball around this and understand what what have we learned over the last five years was the reality of this market and what is it sort of mean going forward it's crazy i mean and now you look at the market in it feels very mature it feels like everybody has that place and we understand but there was still some pretty divergent opinions even back in 2013 six what's that five six years after the whole thing kicked off with the iphone and the the extent to which you right like people were still talking about samsung versus apple and like how this was going to play out and it hadn't shaken out and it's one of those things so where you didn't even realize that it kinda happened until you look back and it's like 2013 twentyfour attained ikea eight this iphone thing it's not going away there's going to be a division of the market and here the reasons why right well let me i would say that's what i did that was kind of the from if there is a broad the eyebrow it's hardest it's harder to like distill it to one thinks i were about all kinds of stuff you know the first your every year every day i read the bible church of writing everyday i'm uncovering a whole range of topics but if you sort it takes or the 50000 foot view.

iphone apple samsung five six years 50000 foot five years
"five  six years" Discussed on Exponent

Exponent

01:35 min | 4 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on Exponent

"And it was it was so prescient not just in a it was right but in a perfectly articulating that the way that the paradigm had change to now in iphone was a was a computer and rim did make computers the computer company is going to be the phone company and you don't for him it was the right moment right time right guy right perspective just holy nailed it had the luxury of protective kind of strolling in answer to the tail end of that and saying let's put a ball around this and understand what what have we learned over the last five years was the reality of this market and what is it sort of mean going forward it's crazy i mean and now you look at the market in it feels very mature it feels like everybody has that place and we understand but there was still some pretty divergent opinions even back in 2013 six what's that five six years after the whole thing kicked off with the iphone and the the extent to which you right like people were still talking about samsung versus apple and like how this was going to play out and it hadn't shaken out and it's one of those things so where you didn't even realize that it kinda happened until you look back and it's like 2013 twentyfour attained ikea eight this iphone thing it's not going away there's going to be a division of the market and here the reasons why right well let me i would say that's what i did that was kind of the from if there is a broad the eyebrow it's hardest it's harder to like distill it to one thinks i were about all kinds of stuff you know the first your every year every day i read the bible church of writing everyday i'm uncovering a whole range of topics but if you sort it takes or the 50000 foot view.

iphone apple samsung five six years 50000 foot five years
"five  six years" Discussed on WGN Radio

WGN Radio

01:56 min | 4 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on WGN Radio

"You five six years from now is not going to be where are you going to be able to do this in know with jimmy butler so i think pay i'm not i'm not usually a rebuilding advocate but i think for this franchise given the run that they have had you know have been made the playoffs whatever i not know honey when he cares about over the last ten or twelve years probably among the top five teams in the league as far as playoff appearances you were just stuck now and there was no great it was no real legitimate pair that that was realistic that you were going to be able to get back in contention you might not be able to now but this is a path to it you didn't have a path to it before which jimmy because you could only get you know this kind of pay off if you trade it jim it you couldn't keep jimmy and get these kind of players with what you had on the roster because you've been drafting out of the lottery for the last ten years angered you've always say well they may italy's mistakes they should pick this guy that guy you know might go back to the '90s and when the bulls were drafted out of the lottery and see what they picked it hugh those ten guys were you jerry krause whose in all fame now no one to executive at a year awards mark randall does ten draft x tell me how you were going to build a team out of that well you could make the argument those and that you could have had carmelo 'cause you pay greek date got him to the thunder so then you could add carmelo rondo jimmy ties you could abroad back that team is probably i dunno fourth seed in the in the eastern conference so well now you couldn't have credit card melo how could you had come out he he he he could have come here a couple of years ago he wouldn't you know when it when it clear he could have he had to trap has no trade pick a place he did not want to come to chicago then that.

jimmy butler italy bulls jerry krause mark randall melo executive carmelo rondo chicago five six years twelve years ten years
"five  six years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

KDWN 720AM

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on KDWN 720AM

"Next six seventy five six years whatever however long it lasts so there is that advantage to it it can be it has to do with taxes and timing of the deduction and not necessarily having the charity identified today that's what they really come in handy i've seen him used for estate planning purposes were an individual had a fairly large estate and they want to teach their kids especially even after their goal on nothing kids are gone the parents are going to be charitable with the you know the wealth that was there and so they're setting up a charitable donate a a fund and they're making gifts to it now because they're taking that exhibition but they're basically destructing the kids to make gifts of x amount of those rex percent of the fund every year after they're gone other kids don't have access to the money but they have to make the gifts and so force them to be charitable in some respects so there's different things in different disadvantage you don't have the same direct contact with the charity necessarily there are some fees involved other than you know it's a fund you're paying somebody to do something for you we're all you're doing is making gifts of stock you know you've got less fees so right how would you know what percentage would be for if you do uh i'm sure that they're not they're not huge huge huge huge fees any other mutual fund a little newbie to slightly more and they range it depends it depends on the size of the gift if you're making a 20billiondollar donor advise fund verse can you give your or versus the two thousand dollars of donor advice well you know i'm sure that the fees are going to be different in that respect to you can shop it around see there's different ones out there because i'm currently with merrill lynch craig now and whether i hit or are trying to go at one of the.

merrill lynch six seventy five six years two thousand dollars 20billiondollar
"five  six years" Discussed on KFC Radio

KFC Radio

01:45 min | 4 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on KFC Radio

"Oh you to blow job of the night with me over 50 can have a an arab baby thirty years let's do this we gotta get through like yet i can knock out a week no problem i hope amendment one of fifty pickup gonna i don't know about that lesbians or virgins pick your pick took to tickets lesbian could choice virgins are weird prisons are with her guy uh so i've been living with my girlfriend berg ottomar now i know dark let me don't want come i felt quite yet by i might be getting there uh anyway we live in a twobedroom apartment obviously i'm rooming with my girl and then the two people rooming in the room across is uh the ride being couple so for the past laura uh department couple by the way has been dating for about five six years and uh i've noticed that when one of them has gone the other one we'll have a guy over now it sounds like they're batting uh for like a better word when i come home and that's what they're doing uh in in the ruins but it sounds like and actually both girls are doing this one of the other is that out doing whatever now uh uh very pretty damn good at this to get away with it every turn on the any way that they're going to get cot uh i want to ask you is there any with anything i can do to uh have this thing exploding in front of my eyes of think it's going to be hilarious uh guys let me know.

twobedroom five six years thirty years
"five  six years" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

The Dave Ramsey Show

01:57 min | 4 years ago

"five six years" Discussed on The Dave Ramsey Show

"Okay what's your household income um combined together lear uh let's see i make 45000 he or she makes off fifty five ooh schoombee long slog in the kyoto it is i know i already have no hope while i want you to have hope but it's going to be a distant uh light over the horizon them in you got mathematical issues here with a hundred grim towards three hundred grand i mean if i do sixty year year out of your 100 and put your own beans and rice that into three hundred that's like what in the five years or uh you got a tough five six years ahead of you and that's if you really really dial it back and no you don't need a by hell street clean this mess up labour i shouldn't say right now what i think probably awsat the out there question additives to their uh the now but you won't be able quit working stay home oh no no no i i've never won it couldn't get asked okay i mean kids you can have kids and and they're not that expensive than i mean you you know they eat what you it usually for smart once again pass the early stages anyway but uh get kids don't break you but um that you know you don't have an extra thirty thousand bucks to save up and put down on a house while you've got three hundred thirty eight thousand dollars a student loan debt making a hundred grand yeah and we're we're in an apartment we're we're gonna at i told him who need to stay there until we knocked down yeah you need to get some progress on it before you even move to a rental house but um yeah i think you're gonna it's gonna take you a while so you're going to have to live somewhat of a life but you know you you don't need a plan on vacations and you don't need to plan on expensive car purchases or anything else you you've got a.

car purchases three hundred thirty eight tho five six years five years sixty year