35 Burst results for "fifty years"

Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

Latest In Tech News

03:18 min | 1 d ago

Computer scientist, pixel inventor Russell Kirsch dead at 91

"On Russell, Kirsch inventor of the Pixel passed away this week. Bit of sad news rest in peace but In case you're wondering who the inventor of the Pixel was. Now you know computer scientists, Russell AAC Kirsch, the inventor of the Pixel and undisputed pioneer of digital imaging passed away on Tuesday in his Portland home from complications arising from a form of Alzheimer's he was ninety one years old Now, Russell might not be name you immediately recognized his contributions to computer science made digital imaging possible born June twentieth nineteen, twenty nine in New York City demographic parents from Russia. and Hungary I attended Bronx High School than nyu Harvard and eventually mit in nineteen fifty one he joined the National Bureau of standards where he worked for fifty years and helped to invent the Pixel and create the first digital photograph It was a one seventy, two by one, seventy, two pixel image of his son Walden created in nineteen, fifty seven and is now iconic and was named. One of life, Magazine's one hundred photographs that changed the world in two thousand three and we have that image appear on the screen One of the first digital images ever created made from two superimposed scans at different thresholds since each pixel could only show one bit of information that being black or white as DP review points out Kirsch never stopped improving and his most famous invention even after retiring in two thousand and one and a twenty, ten interview on wired, he outlined his attempts to create a system that uses. Variable. Shape pixels instead of the squares that have dominated digital imaging since he invented him in that interview, he called square the logical thing to do. But laments that the decision was something rarely foolish that everyone in the world has been suffering from ever since. So at the right bold age of eighty-one, he began working on a masking system that creates six by six pixel areas and an. intelligently. Divides those areas into the two sections that have the most contrast before refusing to pixels on either side of the seem that idea never caught on but he explained the technology and its benefits in detail in a video below it's the thirteen minute long video if you wanted to watch that. But while the incredible accolades described above certainly gives you the sense of Russia Kirsch the. Engineer. The best personal picture of Kirsch probably comes from a two twenty twelve blocked by ant man named Joel Runyon who encountered him in a coffee shop in Portland after revealing net Romanians Computer and images on it probably wouldn't exist or exist as they are without Christmas contributions to engineering and computer science eighty-three-year-old Kirsch shared the following words I. Guess I've always believed that nothing is withheld from us. What we have conceived to do most people think the opposite that all things are withheld from them, which they have conceived to do, and they end up doing nothing Mr, Kirsch may be gone, but his legacy will live on every day in one of the approximately three point eight billion photos that are currently being captured every single day. May He rest in

Kirsch Russia Kirsch Russell Portland Alzheimer National Bureau Of Standards Nyu Harvard Joel Runyon New York City Engineer Bronx High School Walden Hungary Russia.
You will be with Me in Paradise (Luke 23:43)

Pray the Word with David Platt

04:49 min | 2 d ago

You will be with Me in Paradise (Luke 23:43)

"Chapter Twenty three verse forty-three. Jesus said to him. Truly I say to you. Today you will be with me in paradise. Those, not some of the most beautiful words and all the Bible. Spoken by Jesus as he's hanging on a cross. He's being mocked. Is being murdered in the most cruel form imaginable in that day. And he looks to this criminal hanging beside him who realizes that? Jesus has done nothing wrong realizes and we don't know all the details but. He realizes who Jesus is. In such a way that Jesus says to him, truly I say to you in other words market down. This is guaranteed today you will be with me in paradise. Like today not in the future. But as soon as you breathe your last breath, you're gonNa be with me in paradise this word for heaven this word for the place where we're finally with God free from Sin Experiencing. Eternal life in Darnell. Joy An eternal peace in him today you will be with me in paradise light let that soak in. That for all who trust in Jesus is. And what she has done on the cross. In the moment you die on this earth. That day that moment you will be with Jesus in Paradise. An heaven you will experience the hope of salvation. You will experience freedom from all sin and all suffering and victory over death Jesus, we praise you for this reality. Even as I think about the anniversary of Mind Dad's death just a couple of days ago. And fresh tears. Crazy you. That the moment he breathed his last breath. When he had that sudden heart attack like that moment that day was with you in paradise and today he's with you and for the next ten trillion years, he's going to be with you now based on what he had done based on who you are and what you had done to save him from his sins and for that hope, I have that hope that each one of us has that no matter what happens today or tomorrow or next month or next year. Ten years from now you're fifty years from now whenever it is, we breathe their last breath that in that moment on that day, we will be with you in paradise. All Glory be to your name. Jesus we trust in you with our life we trust in you with our death. And we break a replay for. People who don't know this confidence who don't have this whole people who've never even heard this hope. A reprieve for the Moghal people in Pakistan, we lift our hearts. Our voices together. For them right now all one point three, million of them. No. Moguls who have put their trust in Jesus that we know the. I. Know Moser who died a will be with you in paradise. God We pray for that to change. Got Pray for the Moghal to hear the good news if you're love the. Greatest News. In the world that deaths been defeated and eternal life as possible and you gotta re pray for the spread of that news for the sending of. For the mobilization of Your Church take the Gospel to the Moghal in Pakistan. In God, we pray the help us to share this good news with somebody else today knowing nobody we interact with today is guaranteed tomorrow. So Al Buster made the good news of who Jesus is what Jesus has done known today. Even as they live with this rock solid death to find confidence. That on that day, we will be with you and Baird is. We. Love you Jesus, and we can't wait in a sense for that day to live is Christ and to die is gain. We. Praise you for that reality. Pray these things in your name. Amen.

Jesus Paradise Pakistan Darnell Baird Moghal Al Buster Moser
History of the US Income Tax

Planet Money

10:01 min | 2 d ago

History of the US Income Tax

"But our country has this really conflicted history with the income tax. It was not designed by our founding fathers for most of American history there was no income tax at all in the years are brand new government needed some way to raise money, but there was no need to mess around with an income tax. The government had a much simpler way just. Tax The stuff that comes into the ports for a long time really the only way that they raised money was using tariff duties duties on imported goods. This is tax historian Joe, thorndike and tariffs are simple. Right? You send out a tax collector told the major ports ship pulls import us go through the manifests, check the cargo and you add up whatever you WANNA tax sugar guns, books simple. But there's one big problem with tariffs they fail you the one time you really really really need revenue tariff duties are great way to raise money as long as you're not fighting a war yet because someone's blocking airport right or sinking your ships on the way. News Yeah. And that that does tend to depress a little bit. So when in the United States do people start to think and talk about an income tax will you know the earliest? In American history that I know of comes during the war of eighteen twelve when the treasury secretary throws it out there it's it's really kind of a throw away in a report that he sends to Congress. You know, hey, we could consider taxing incomes but this suggestion during the war of eighteen twelve, it goes nowhere an income tax is actually a very complicated thing to pull off successfully there are three big obstacles to getting it. Right. The first obstacle is logistics like how do you make sure people pay a percentage of their income? Oh, it's enormously complicated because it really does come down to. The individual, who's filing this return, and that person we're going to expect them to begin with just to keep track of how much they're earning. Then expect a lot of honesty from them about reporting those records to the government and to make sure that they're actually doing the job you didn't have to create this huge administrative apparatus to go in and enforce it, and you have to give these people the power to dig through the personal financial records of every taxpayer, and that's usually pretty unappealing to tax payers and the government is not going to radically reform the tax code unless it has to. Unless, there's something incredibly expensive it needs to fund. This is how a lot of taxes come out. There's a war, and in fact, fifty years after the idea of the income taxes I floated such a war comes to pass the civil war. This is a very, very, very expensive warm Congress needs money to feed its soldiers by guns, cannon ships. So this time, it's not just one guy. Bringing up the income taxes a suggestion this time. Congress makes it law and even more importantly they come up with a way to enforce it Congress provides for the creation of the Bureau of internal. Revenue this is the first real income tax in the United States, but it doesn't look quite like the one we have today during the civil war only the wealthy had to pay income tax. And the government does this really very clever thing to get rich people to pay it. It makes tax returns public during the civil war anyone could go in and look up your income tax return or at least your report of how much you earn and the idea was that this would help improve compliance because your neighbor would see you driving around on your brand new plow and he'd. Say Wait a minute I that guy get all that money I'm going to see how much he reported on his income tax and they'd go in and they check it out and they could report to the agency and say, Hey, you know I. Don't think that this is the right number. This guy looks like he's living too large for this sort of an income they sort of conscripted. And made the tax collector. So who is living large in? Let's say Washington DC in eighteen, sixty four. Well, we pulled up a copy of the tax assessor sheets for DC, during the civil war and there happens to be a guy here Abraham. Lincoln. Address White House at the White House. Everyone knows where it is it's senator and and the taxes he paid I'm sure people were very interested in this one, thousand, two, hundred, ninety dollars. They're also entries here for restaurant owners for liquor dealers some guy lived on longboat may be in the Potomac River. It's clear from this list that people were paying taxes, the plan worked. Well, some people are paying taxes the north part of the country. Remember this is the civil war, the south. Also attempted an income tax attempted they had a much less effective, a tax system and their income tax was much less effective than the North's version. Is there a case to be made? The civil war was sort of an economic battle in the in the north was better at at that and raising money and and that's one reason at one. Oh, absolutely I mean taxes do have a lot to do with the. North. Winning the war. Not just taxes, but the North's ability to borrow money it. It just had a better economic foundation for fighting a big warlike that you know the income tax worked. So well during the war, you would think that the US government would want to keep it around I. Mean it's Nice to have extra money when you're actually rebuilding from the carnage and such but once the conflict ended, there was this big argument about whether to keep the. Income tax round or not, and now the income tax hits its second obstacle a legal obstacle. Remember how he said the income tax only hits the rich. Well, the rich did not like it and the rich have lawyers in eighteen ninety, five legal challenge to the income tax reaches the US Supreme Court here's economic historian John Steele Gordon. My great great uncle was one of the lead lawyers in that case and guess which side he was on. The trying to shoot down the income then you've got. Cable. He was a Morgan partner at five years later. The argument John Steele Gordon great great uncle made in court was that the income tax violated little document that we'd like to call the US Constitution here Ariba line to you. It says quote direct taxes shall be apportioned among the states according to their respective numbers. I will translate that for you if the federal government wants to raise money directly from people or property, then it has to divide the tax burden up equally Among the states according to their population. So if a state had ten percent of America's population, it should only have to pay about ten percent of the tax and the income tax wasn't taxing according to population it was taxing according to income. So the question before the Supreme Court is and as is often the case it's something kind of knowingly subtle and hard to follow. The question is, is the income tax eight direct tax. I stayed up late last night reading court documents. This is a huge rabbit hole of complicated things, but it comes down to this if any part of this income tax law passed by Congress, if any of the many taxes embedded inside considered a direct tax, then Congress did it wrong? The law is unconstitutional. That is the question that justices had to decide a very interesting thing happened in the Supreme Court. One justice was ill evacuate dying Justice Jackson from Tennessee who was argued before eight justices and they split four four as to whether or not the income tax was a direct tax and therefore unconstitutional. That's why we have an odd number of justices. He can't have a tire. Exactly. was. A four four time. The court decided that the case was simply too important to be tied, and so they haul justice Jackson out of his deathbed. Now odd number of justices and everybody knew that he was in favor of the income tax because he'd said. So publicly, Z. Really Dying Jesse really died two months later. So the lawyers re argue the case Justice Robert Jackson is. In the final days of his life is a pro income tax guy. So he's going to break the tie in favor of the income tax and the tie was broken case was decided five four. But the crazy thing is it was five four the other way it was a five four decision against the income tax. One of the other justices we don't know who switched his vote. and. So the tax was unconstitutional. No income tax. How do people reacted the time to this little intrigue Oh they've there would be a there was a lot of. In the papers about it, but the Supreme Court was silent as it so often is to what the internal workings we really don't know who who, really don't know who it but somebody's which their vote we just don't know. So there's this weird stretch in the middle of American history where the income tax has been ruled unconstitutional but this didn't in anyway settled the argument I mean, if anything the debate over income tax in America grew more heated. This is the time when a lot of big industrialists are getting filthy rich JP Morgan, Rockefeller Carnegie, and at this exact time, the nation has no income tax, the people who are not JP Morgan or Rockefeller Carnegie in the country. A lot of them feel those guys the rich need to bear more of the burden. So nearly twenty years after the income tax is ruled unconstitutional, we get an amendment to the Constitution the sixteen, th amendment ratified in nineteen thirteen a single sentence which begins the Congress shall have the power to lay and collect taxes on incomes just in time for another war World War One. So the income tax has cleared to hurdles so far logistics check legality check. The income tax needs one more thing to bring it into the modern age. One More L. Word Love the income tax of to this point has been a tax on the rich right everyone else was exempt in fact when they bring the income tax back after the constitutional amendment, less than two percent of the population has to pay. All this changes though with World War Two, the government needs more money and now ordinary folks are asked to pay again Joe Thorndike this is a is a real revolution because for most Americans, they've never had this kind of direct tax paying relationship with the federal government. You know they're paying excise taxes on alcohol tobacco or consumer goods but those things are are usually levied somewhere other than like on the consumer you know they're levied at the manufacturer level for the first time. Americans are sort of confronting the federal government as a tax collector and the middle. Class has never paid this tax before they not sure what to do a whole in nineteen forty-three show that one third to one half of people were unclear what

Us Supreme Court Congress United States Federal Government Joe Thorndike John Steele Gordon Potomac River Washington Jp Morgan Justice Robert Jackson White House Senator Lincoln Tennessee Justice Jackson
Global warming threatens Atlantic puffin recovery in Maine

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 4 d ago

Global warming threatens Atlantic puffin recovery in Maine

"Europeans first arrived in. North. America. And landed puffins were common on islands and the Gulf of Maine. But hunters killed many of the birds for food or for feathers to adorn ladies hats by the eighteen hundreds. The population in Maine had plummeted. Puffins were almost completely lost. That's Don Lions of the Audubon Seabird Institute. He says it about fifty years ago. Conservationist started bringing puffing chicks from Canada and hand raising them on the main islands. When those birds reached adulthood, they came back to the islands where they were raised and begin nesting themselves. Now, the puffins colony in Maine has recovered to more than a thousand nesting pairs, but global warming threatens to undo some of that progress. The Gulf of Maine has actually now one of the most rapidly warming water bodies on the planet. That's driving many fish to cooler waters. So the puffiness are forced to fly farther or dive deeper to catch enough food. The most intense warm years during the last decade have made it very difficult for Puffins, stories, chicks, because of the additional work involved in finding food for them. So reducing global warming can help means beloved toughens survive.

Maine Don Lions Audubon Seabird Institute Canada America
When Will Victoria's Death Count Stop Rising?

Coronacast

02:36 min | 4 d ago

When Will Victoria's Death Count Stop Rising?

"Victoria is starting to look like a success story that number is starting to drop. Well, it's starting to live a little bit down there, which Norman is exactly what you predicted last week. I'll look out later thing coming down myself, I, mean we're recording this before eventually. Choose these figures. But yeah, I'd like to thank for coming down, but I'm not going to be arrogant are une humble about my prediction. You'd never you would never noticed a couple of people in twitter asking me to hang on Thursday before take a lap of owner. Happy for Victorians that it's not going up again and does look if it's turning the corner. I guess it is heartening that the cases seem to be trending downwards. The new daily seem to be trending downwards in Victoria, but it is cyber saying that the daily deaths US still increasing unfortunately, that's the case and what you're seeing here is the result of those very high days a couple of weeks ago, seven, hundred, five, hundred, six, hundred cases a day and. And what happens with covid nineteen said before on Krona cast is that if you're gonNA, get seriously ill you get seriously ill in the second week of the illness and that's what you're seeing now is you just see people coming through and some Yankee to thirty year olds fifty year olds dying, and this is what happened two weeks ago in the course of the The owners and as the lower number started flow through the system, you'll start to see a lower number of deaths, but you're probably going to see increases in deaths for the next few days and won't be until the beginning of next week that will start to turn ride. I. Think will not to trivialize it, but you did make a prediction about the daily case. Case numbers, and it seems hopefully to be to be holding forth. Do you have any idea about when we might to see this? This death rights start to drop news probably going to be a week ten days behind behind the turnaround in numbers because you've just got this effect and the other problem with deaths is that people are sick for a long time. It's not as if you get really sick and die very quickly in the second week, is some people get very seeking many of them will get better over time and they're very seek for sometimes weeks on end and our intensive care for maybe a month. This is not a short lived illness, and sometimes they lose the battle ray sadly, and you're not necessarily going to see a reliable click through of deaths in relation to. To the curve and the epidemic curve will be roughly equivalent that. But only roughly because of that long tail of days that go into people who are seriously ill, some of whom will get better many of them fact, and some of them

Victoria Norman Twitter
Blockchain & Digitising Trade Finance  Insights from Contour

Insureblocks

05:38 min | 5 d ago

Blockchain & Digitising Trade Finance Insights from Contour

"Call. Thank you for joining us today. Could you please give us a quick introduction on yourself thank you lead and thank you for the opportunity to be here. Introduction of myself. I guess away sometimes they usually introduce myself as I've been SORTA DOING FINTECH for thirty years all in Asia. So I grew up in the states but came out to Asian in college and then stayed out here but. Thirty. Years of Fintech. So I've done about twenty years of thin. So I've been in in worked at various. Banks Bank of Boston Standard Charter deutchebanks on transaction banking trade finance and cash management, and then ten years of tax. So I've worked at I left banking a few times I left in two thousand during the DOT com days to work for a company called trade card, which later became gt nexus and set up the Asia operations and then I. Left. Banking again in in in two thousand sixteen to to work for for our three and and helped set up a lot of Asian operations for them and my my third startup now is is contour which started seven months ago. So yeah about thirty years of of Finn INTECH. Extensive. Indeed of an anti corporate and start up world. You've got it all. So Call as it is customary here at blogs could you please explain to our listeners? What is blockchain and how does it work? What is blockchain? Well, I I think I'll I'll go to the the level below and distributed ledger technology and really disturb alleged technology is is is an opportunity for instead of managing your data in one central database actually everyone having their data in their own database and so just to be ledger instead of breaking it up and and it's goes back to the way our three and quarter talk about it. Is You, know we we all should should own our own data. And then we there should be a protocol to share it and you shouldn't share it with everyone. And sharing with everyone is is traditional blockchain which be the broadcast method of of consensus, but instead a quarter. On distributed ledger technology basis manages data by having them Even everyone has a note everyone has their own database, but there's a protocol, the sheriff, and that's how. Quarter works, and that's actually what contours built on. And Great and I think it's important. You know the point you just made about. It was blockchain near sharing with everyone in whiz these legend technology you only sharing with the relevant parties because that's sometimes it's something that is misunderstood too often by people who are introduced to this world though thank you for that. They usually sort of say has also is is when I talk about traditional blockchain, Mus the broadcast method and I do it in in Taiwan to Taiwan fifty years ago you when you got when you got married, you didn't need to register to to get married. You you you just had a big dinner. You had a big new invited everyone in the village. To. Front of everyone the village said I'm marrying this woman and therefore everyone knew you're married you didn't have to register anything but the fact is that everyone knew it and then it became a fact and that actually sort of this is a consensus method in in in an old version. Indeed indeed. Thank you for that The. World Trade Organization estimates that between eighty percent and ninety percent of global trade relies on trade finance. Yet, there is a one point five, trillion dollar gap between the market demand and supply for trade finance something, which I'm sure was co Vina's has probably increased US instead. And KYC and am. L. Requirements remain the most cited barrier was high transaction fees and low credit ratings running up the top three SME's remain disproportionately affected by these and other bears experiencing a forty five percents rejection rate on proposals, which is much larger than than seventeen percent seen by multinational organizations. What are your views on these challenges? Again International Trade. It started out of minutes it's been going on for a long time. You always have this distrust deficit when you have a buyer and seller in in far off countries now that trust deficit is a little bit easier to manage now because you have the Internet and you can see people online and you can skype them and talk to them and Imagine what it was like when you you had to put money down for shipment that would come three months later and you didn't even know the person you only known by a letter right so obviously, it's gotten a lot better with with communications nowadays but I'm in the challenge is really for for SME's is is related to data right because a bank. Bank as a as a lender right as a facilitator of of credit. Is. Looking. To to not make a mistake banks don't really have to. A. Lot of banks goals is is not necessarily to make money but don't lose it. Right and they'll make mistakes on credit and it's very hard for SME's to have A. To have enough information or the information that they have is not sufficient to tick the boxes on a traditional credit scoring sheet, which which the banks us

Fintech SME United States Asia World Trade Organization Banks Bank Taiwan International Trade Finn Intech Boston Standard Charter A. To
Time captured in a capsule

True Mysteries of the Pacific Northwest

04:56 min | Last week

Time captured in a capsule

"Welcome to catch Miss Mysteries I'm your host kid crumb today despite the fact that we have so many things going on with the corona virus, the economy just around the world kind of an upheaval I thought it would be interesting to look back at how people thought. This might look at long ago and will address time capsules according to the International Time Capsule Society Around fifteen thousand time capsules worldwide a time capsule could be a box, a bottle, literally a metal capsule, as often as time capsules contain letters and newspaper. Clippings about significant events, they also may contain letters and pictures created by children. Often school will bury a time capsule students ideas about what the future will be like some time capsules are meant to be opened fifty years but most have notes on the outside of the container asking that adopt be opened until a specific date. The oldest time capsule in the United. States was created by Paul Revere and Samuel Adams and is believed to have been buried in seventeen ninety five making the oldest known time capsule in the United. States. Time capsules have been discovered, but most have been purposefully dug up and open to time capsules out of Japan contain remnants survivors many time capsules are simply intended to show what was going on when they were buried in an area of Germany where German SS were trained time capsules beneath the floor refilled with Nazi Paraphernalia, including pictures of Hitler and two copies of his book Mein Kampf. Then there was a surprise time capsule discovered in plain sight at the American Legion post seventy six that had been sitting in. The lobby when they decided to fasten it down for safety sake, they discovered that it was possible time capsule from nineteen, thirty four but someone else have discovered earlier and left a note that stated simply thanks for the brandy note was tucked inside an empty brandy bottle many schools created time capsules usually elementary grades usually with the idea that in fifty years, most of the children are still in the area would appreciate the contents when the capsule was open fifty years later in the nineteen fifties, most children wrote about flying. And rocket ships by the nineteen sixties letters are about pollution becoming president demolition crews Albuquerque New Mexico, discovered a time capsule from Nineteen Sixty eight nearer former elementary school. Most of the children wrote about their favourite TV show but Greg Lee young men left a different kind of note, I'm dead. I. Go to Montgomery School that is the old school name I was born nineteen hundred you auto and I'm reading this directly. That's why it sounds kind of funny auto now no, I'm dead my favorite subject is spooking the police I play the guitar case you don't know what it is. It is supported with strings on him I am ten years old seal later savages. Greg Hat Morbid nature the most unusual time capsule. Now, certainly concerned a prophecy came true the capsule was a metal ammo box pulled from the foundation of a building all it was left of burned out logs ghost town of climax located in the southern Cascade Mountain range the child's printing dated nineteen forty eight described a town on British Columbia's North Coast that would boom in nineteen seventy nine with over a thousand residents but would become completely deserted by nineteen eighty two in the note he stated that the town would be as modern. As any community of that decade he ended with a comment that even after the town was completely deserted, it would still have electricity for thirty years underneath the date you printed his his name Philip Simon follow by grade three, Mrs Sims class for decades. The notes from the time capsule found climax collected dust in a police archive. The department hired a new officer who was given the assignment cleaning out the back room including the archives when he came to the letters from the time capsule, he page through them until he came to fill. The officer had grown up in Khazal. And had vivid memories of his family moving out of the town in nineteen eighty search on the station's computer revealed that indeed Kissel had ended up deserted by nineteen eighty two yet retained power lines for thirty years when officers searched the Internet for the author Philip Simon was not to be found nor could he locate any school in the area that was around in nineteen forty eight with a teacher with the last name of Sims.

International Time Capsule Soc Philip Simon Paul Revere Montgomery School Officer Greg Lee American Legion Greg Hat Cascade Mountain Mein Kampf Samuel Adams Germany Kissel Albuquerque Mrs Sims Khazal New Mexico Japan North Coast
Flying Circus Airshow - Not Cancelled

Uncontrolled Airspace: General Aviation Podcast

04:06 min | Last week

Flying Circus Airshow - Not Cancelled

"In the twenty twenty pandemic cancellation of the week. We have the The Flying Circus as I think it's canceled right David. You put this on the list. Yeah. They cancelled it. Why is you put this on the list because they were doing their fiftieth season starting says there they were to reopen last Saturday the twelfth. Yeah. Okay. Okay. So it's not a canceled See we're coming out the far side of this. You gotta read the fine print do I don't This is Virginia which is not. I don't like. So for starters here. So let's go back a couple of steps here. What is the Flying Circus here? Show I. Don't know if I've ever heard of this never heard flying circus. It built in. Virginia. It's been going on forever. Charlie fifty years or something like that. They were supposed to start their fiftieth season this past weekend It's a Sunday. Afternoon tradition. Their. Suburban D. and it's a real barnstorming show. Circa the nineteen thirties. With by planes and wing walkers and aerobatics and. Drunk drunken farmer. act. In. Shirt. It all that stuff. That's an act. Drunken farmers and act. Man All right. All Right Santa, Claus will will straighten out later on in the year. This sounds very reminiscent of the What's the one in upstate new? York rhinebeck writing rhinebeck sounds. Now. You know I lived in DC area thirty years and I knew Bilton was out there i. knew the show was there. I never went and I I know I know it's just it's crazy. We'll have to put it on our post covid activities list to. Go and failed to record an episode while we're there last time we did. Okay. Yeah that was a city. In seven years that I was working out, of DC, area only went twice. And both times that was with fringe of mind from the FAA. who were like man? We're going to built in this week and then we're going to go to this party. It did so and so's place man to come out for this and it's like. On a Sunday with a nothing better to do it was an automatic Ohio yeah. Yeah. So I mean it sounds like now now let's see. So wh- and I miss took this when I started out by saying it was canceled it Sir surely according to this has not been canceled. Is Literally what they say on their home pages. We are currently putting in place additional safety and social distancing. To help ensure the health and safety of guests staff like so many things are adjusting how they. How they space the crowd out how space parking and all this stuff and You know it's just. Common sense like. Wearing a mask when you go out in public. Yup. Yup So. what was it like David? Went some time ago. But what was it like? A just like the the description says I mean we got treated to an afternoon of of flying clowns and wing walkers and A. Drunken farmer routine as some really Nice era. So typically in the older airplanes and. And it was. Fortunately, one of those Nice Sunny Days It wasn't oppressively hot for the Potomac Basin and we just. We just had a great time we drug out the folding chairs and set a long flight line and You know in whooped and cheered and oh my gosh. Did you see that with the rest of the crowd and it was a it was a good crowd that

Faa. The Flying Circus Virginia David Potomac Basin Bilton Charlie Claus Ohio York WH
Kansas voters overwhelmingly pick Navajo woman for House seat

Native America Calling

03:52 min | Last week

Kansas voters overwhelmingly pick Navajo woman for House seat

"This? Is National Native News Antonio Gonzalez voters in. Tuesday's Kansas primary elected a Navajo woman for the Democratic nomination for the Kansas State House of Representatives district ten Rondo of Aldo has more Christina has would twenty six years old is set to become the third native American and youngest member in the Kansas legislature as the race will be uncontested in the general election three other. Native women and Kansas all won their primaries. Tuesday has what graduated from both Haskell Indian nations university and the University of Kansas and felt her presence was needed to represent everyone in Douglas County which includes Lawrence Kansas a lot of these issues that happen at our level. The people don't really experience this particularly like me I've grown up in not the best neighborhoods I've grown up on like wick in section eight housing reduced lunch programs, even tribal clothing from nation living here, and I don't really hear that much stories of like like that this wasn't like fifty years ago. This is pretty recent And just seeing that type. I WANNA see that type of representation statehouse and And I I believe I'm qualified to do this. Believe our voices I'm voice that you know a lot of us feel like that wasn't her being heard of and I hope I can bring that to the State House. has would one unofficially with two thousand, two, hundred, thirty, nine votes compared to Brandon Holland five, hundred, five votes and AJ Stevens. Four hundred fifty, five votes. This is Rhonda Nevada for National Native News. Native American US congresswoman cherise. David's was unopposed for the Democratic nomination for the Kansas Third District seat. She'll face Amanda Adkins November who in the Republican race Tuesday. The American Indian Graduate Center has received a twenty million dollar donation from writer Mackenzie Scott ex wife of Amazon's at CEO Christine Trudeau reports the American Indian Graduate Center or AIG see received an unprecedented twenty million dollar individual donation of unrestricted funds from Mackenzie Scott. Scott. said in a recent announcement tweet that the contributions following up on a commitment she made last year to give away a majority of her wealth in her lifetime she continued in opposed to be a medium that of the nonprofits elected that quote every one of them is telling complex challenges that will require sustained effort over many years while simultaneously addressing consequences of the Covid nineteen pandemic AFDC Executive Director Angelique Albert we are just a mess like. To be a recipient of this incredible generosity really honored that she's just trusting us to do the work that promotes equity and justice in our in our society. At the time she says, students were hit hard last spring enough for the organization to create a designated Student Emergency Fund that started in. March. So far the additional fund has distributed over two hundred thousand dollars to Aggie students emergency needs because of the pandemic. Cova fill impacting our communities and our students have a hard time. They still are having a hard time. So going back to school has created additional challenges because some universities are doing remote but some are not heading into the fall semester. Albert says funds will address student needs covering housing utility bill, and household item costs along with technology access. Scott's donation is the largest individual donor gift in unrestricted funds over Aig sees fifty year history the solutions journalism network who funds this reporting was also included in Scott's nonprofit donations. I'm Christine Trudeau and demand Honiara

Kansas Mackenzie Scott Lawrence Kansas Christine Trudeau State House. Kansas State House Of Represen AIG Angelique Albert American Indian Graduate Cente Kansas Third District Christina Antonio Gonzalez University Of Kansas Haskell Indian Nations Univers Student Emergency Fund Aldo Amanda Adkins United States Rhonda Nevada Douglas County
"fifty years" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

06:14 min | 2 weeks ago

"fifty years" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"The transformers. David vs warriors. That's why this is deleted streaming, they used to Hasbro name but. That's probably it. Might. Be Right. Please robot toy please take. Robot card. Whatever he freaks out honor and she like he's I can't do all this by myself. You're pushing too hard. She loses it. She's a fucking. Anyway, there is some insane details in here though like she's rummaging through this box shit, and she's like Oh David Look at. That one fourth of July. You remember that oh? Of course, Scott loved all holidays and then she's like Oh and here you go. David Scott would've wanted you to have this? It's his Christmas stocking. Ladies fucking Jewish. What is he going to do with a Christmas stocking? Brought to this House David. I'll tell you what to do with that Christmas stocking. You put it on your door in college when you got away Oh. Yeah. There you go. All this is going into garbage. Meanwhile. Brandon has to get this interview with David. Silver. That's kind of the thrust of the second half of the episode. He's trying to he's trying to. Again like you don't need this, you really don't like just. Like Andrea again, always talking about it looks like it's the fucking post going out. It's a fucking. Brandon, I'm thinking about putting your article about Scott Right next to what we're going to get for lunch. The next week. Do you think the best place for it. Brandon of winning the story. Next to the fucking cafeteria menu scandal story we have going. So like there's a lot of David. Blows. Up On don at least twice. Treats her like shit in this episode, and she's just like she finally snaps back like Hey, I know you're going through some shit, but I'm the only one that is the cares about you and like really Blah Blah Blah I. got everyone of that party what the fuck is a yeah I. Guess you're right. And then he winds up watching a video of Scott that he took which is cut a devastating to look at. It's horrible I think. Like. There's a sequence where David is walking down the hallway. Any stopped like every second by somebody and one of them is this teacher vice principal whatever this fucking dude is. WHO's like? Hey, man. I got sort of volunteer to edit this footage. We need this shit from the fucking time capsule ceremony like cut and ready to go, and he's like, no, no. No, you know. I'll do it or whatever. So then yeah, he's in the fucking computer lab like where their friendship blossomed in highschool where he met Dylan McKay. Just. Looking through all this footage David is throwing himself into his work. That's the right move. Just. One thing after the end of when he blows up. Mrs Scanlon when she's like take his fucking Christmas stocking and his transformers he goes. Scott accidentally shot himself in the stomach because he liked to play with guns and she liked fucking loses it and runs out of the whole thing and The best part about is the end of the scene where he's like a scanlon business scanlon come. They're still in the same house music scaling get back here. Returns around and he like picks up Scott's bed and shakes it angrily like that was the MU. I do. Quite a way that was the first time that bet ever shook. Fish. Well, the only time before they'd even came close was the vibration of the gun shot. Do you think they still got that gun the well, what a tragedy we lost our beloved, Scotty? We still have you MR nine millimeter. I think fucking Connie took that with the out to the coast duties, GonNa fucking. Incident well, it took. I saw it can take me in Casey can't find vittles on a night. You know he can hold somebody up with. Always living in the woods. Yeah. Yeah. Of course. In Society, if you do such a thing instead of saying like took my beloved Sunny Villa to my beloved bullet. wasted. Bullets called around pad. dammit. Ham. It's expensive. Okay. It's almost two dollars. Let's are going up in value. So. Like, yeah. It's kind of we're getting towards the end here and Brandon's been fucking harping on this article. He kind of sort of makes Andrea 'cause, he goes up to Andrea and he's like, Hey, what are you so upset about and she's like halfway crying, she's like I just watch again with her. It's just so so difficult, but he's a we're friends. We're going to be Fred Sir ever. She's like, okay, that's that's awesome. It's kind of fucking hilarious that they make the editor of the school newspapers say that. Because Emily's. noodling with Brandon, she doesn't like feeling like quote. Yesterday's news yes. That's nice. That's too. It's one thing you know you wanNA fuck and get a hand job that poor kids house. That's fine. You can't be like baking out in front of your friend at the school paper like you know what I mean like. It's just you know what this girl's up to your being a dickhead. Yup. You can keep it inside for a little bit So like they kind of make but he less to get this article. So he goes to confront David. Not. Confront David. Go Ask for this article. In the deejay booth and it's great because he's a that don't really have time right now. David gets the deadline dude. What do you want me to do i? Don't know fucking blow it out your ass and how about that? How `Bout Fuck you. But instead he just this is what he like. It's the big big monologue he gets and like a Christian said last night, he doesn't quite get there. He does not there. He doesn't have it now. It's. It's close though it's not that bad. It's not totally off I. think he gets if you don't have the camera on him, it's better when getting shots of like, Stupa. That guy sounds pissed. I might like him. Like stuff like that. It works when he's on camera, it's not great..

David David Scott Brandon David Look Andrea Hasbro warriors Mrs Scanlon Sunny Villa Dylan McKay principal Scotty Connie Casey Fred Sir editor Emily's.
"fifty years" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

07:44 min | 2 weeks ago

"fifty years" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"Maybe maybe Steve Sanders, they gotta go to quit Tarantino's house. Where we're his clothes. So that's that we cut immediately to the memorial service, which is. School the second time. In this episode, we're having a fucking sing along in the quad by the way of and do you think they were like Oh fuck. We're supposed to open the time capsule but kids dead Shit. Put his whole body in their. Great. Great. Now, we gotta wait another fifty years. Thanks to Scott. Scandal accidental suicide there. There are so many disappointed calendar people. I mean this. This is just rampant like this. You would never ending pushbacks of. Yeah. It's. It's my favorite line of the whole episode. kind of watching everybody. Everyone's really sad and it's a very sad moment you cut to dylan and Brenda. Hebron I don't want to sound like good, jerk. Which one was Scott instance funny. Looking Memorial, Dude. INTRES- with him? It is fucking. To for though because it's It is really incredible because she is like Dylan. You fucking had technology with that guy last year. He's like a thought that guy over there was discussions like, no, he was in your class blond kid, and then he just goes oh my God that. Dylan's burst appearance on this fucking show was coming out of the shadows to bend. Scott absolutely parents. It's interesting. Remainder. Scott. Scanlon. Meanwhile, his mother is right behind him. You know what I mean like it's it's memorial for someone like if you have that question, you ask it before you ask it after you do that. Yup. Just you know what? Do your best to try to do some silent detective work, and if by the end of the dead person's memorial, use still can't figure it out. Maybe quietly ask someone off to the side. Wait wait wait. Scott wasn't a guy who was dating Kelly rose you. Sure Your. Closest friends, Steve, ZANDER's. Right next to you. Oh. No Scott stead. WHO's GONNA. Run the peach pit. Aska. Dylan. That's that. Oh my God Scott's Dead Hey David. Sorry about your girlfriend now. That's Donna. Martin. Oh. Right. John I thought you said the blown one. Jeez brand. You're acting pretty good for your father Scott to be died. Brunner on everything? No. No. No. That's the friend from technaglass is I never met him, but he's surfing on the river sticks known. ACT This memorial service. We kinda get a little more. And Brandon's well, we're going to have to put out a very special issue of the blaze dedicated to Scott and they have this kind of back and forth about Andrea is. Typical brand is, why are you trying to politicize this event? Cut Killed By this fucking WWL. Billy. Barrett's time to politicize it. Now's not the time to talk about gun violence. Love for ten years, and then there'll be another shooting, and then we'll grieve another ten more. Now, the thing that's weird though is they're also arguing over which one of them was going to cover the funeral, really weird do. School newspaper You can just write your little thing about. Scott. Without having descended the fake teen. Junior to the fucking funeral over this child fucking new school newspaper covering this Kid's death that reminds me. I just re listened to I. Think it's the nineteen eighty. No respect. Rodney dangerfield album. Aligning. Your move to such a bad neighborhood, you know at the local school, the school newspaper's got obituaries. High. You heard of it. Oh. Wow. You. See that Scott. Scanlon. He checked down early. The right idea was just waiting for a shot. Oh Yeah. They're fine. They're fighting about this and there's more like. And the see the thing is who's going to cover the funeral aid. I. Agree. Really stupid. Question nobody is and like Brennan you should do it and then emily's I don't think it's right if you do it because his mom's GonNa. Freak out after we got kicked out of that party is why would you kick out of the Party? Well, we were kind of making out and emily knows what's going on here too by the way she's Oh. Wonder flag on flagging ground. Yeah. We were fucking on. We were getting their dude. Totally. She could smell, would Andrea's put So then Andrea Rotten's off and a half and Brandon, what is her problem? But? He wants. He winds covered covering the funeral. Anyway. There is this we cut to the funeral and you know the demo and here's the thing mel silver. You need to put some distance between your son and this woman that is your job as a parent like he's You don't see him yet. He's only in later in the episode, but like David Like Oh. Yeah. And she's like, well, you have to sit with the family, but my dad is here, data data, and like once that happens you need to go listen lady just greedy your own way. My Son's GonNa grieve his way. It's going to be what it is. And instead she's just like Scotts memory will be kept alive by those. Who loved him? This is David Silver. Scott's bestest bestest friend in the whole world. She says, bestest. bestest. Like six times and he's meeting white aunts and uncles, and fucking. He haw billy cousins from this fucking family. If it's a teenager, you have to give him like a good weeks. Notice before he can write and say something at a funeral courses fucking child. You can't just be a couple hours. Hey, why don't you? Just you know take all your feelings all that angst and pour it out in front of two hundred people. Exactly. Well, seventeen year old. David Silver, of course, fucking certified grief counselor. Why don't you say words? It's insane. I do like about this episode is David's Arc with him being confronted by everyone at school acting like he's going to be super devastated, and he's it's almost. It's almost tragic because he's almost like, I don't even like Scott. And that that's it's like it's a, it's a fascinating thing with his character be wrestling with because he's like he is sad that Scott is dead, but then he's also super guilty because he's like. fucking friends anymore. But he's and he's like thrust into this position of like Oh. Yeah. Everything was just like it was when you were in the fifth grade. That's the way Mrs. Scanlon thinks everything was going down and it's like devastating, watching him being pushing poll kind of a thing with his brain. I remember back in kindergarten when we were first become a friends and Mrs scanlon would just hang out in the front of school behind trees waiting come out. That all the time. Notably absent from this funeral Conrad Scanlon. Oh. Yeah. You know what's going on there? We talk and involuntary manslaughter charges. He's. He's looking for the Big Rock Candy Mountain night. Thanks. I think he's on the trails. He's heading out West Y do. Get I. Guess He Now I think he fucking wants to go surfing with Dylan. Dylan's going to be like, Hey, Mister scanlon make sure to put the safety thing around your ankle..

Scott stead Conrad Scanlon Dylan David Silver Steve Sanders Mrs scanlon Andrea Rotten Brandon Rodney dangerfield Tarantino Hebron INTRES involuntary manslaughter John I Brunner Billy Donna emily mel silver
"fifty years" Discussed on We Hate Movies

We Hate Movies

07:21 min | 2 weeks ago

"fifty years" Discussed on We Hate Movies

"Hello, and welcome to the finale episode of Melrose to know the season finale, not the series finale A. Quarantine side show. Yeah. Wherein we talk about Beverly Hills Dunno. To End Melrose Place You know we have this We were supposed to do another episode about Brandon's getting a girlfriend is a TV star. Totally. But then in my backyard, I found this cool little pipe. You WanNa go y'all want to walk on through it Fuck Yeah Dude, I love going pipes. Here we go. Here we are where it's Scott's fucking death episode. Shit. We're in season two. It looks great Mrs. Skeleton. And he's thrown a shell at me. In, song sounds better. It does all that kind of. Stuff going to be a supersized episode I'm guessing. This. Is the next fifty years. Original air date. November. Seventh Nineteen ninety-one by the way Bush's term almost over guys. Don't worry about it. Mother Fuck. The voices you're hearing mine is Stephen Sadek. I. Am joined, of course by my best fucking friends in the world. Do I haven't seen in five fucking months? Chris, Cabin. I Eric, Ceska, how partner and? Andrew? Japan you. So yeah, this is we kind of decided like. I didn't want and just end on a wet Fart, nine, hundred hundred episode and we wanted to, we've teasing this fucking March. We should just get to it. What kind of far does this bloody? By. Oh let's not with the bloody parts. Why not? Because that's a horrible image and it sounds terrible to the ear. Oh, you to Taco Bell and now you have blood effort. Just like. This episode is a learning moment. Don't eat that. Much. TACO. Bell, you'll have bloody farts. May. I think Dylan would remember a bloody far or then he remembered Scott. That is a series high point for that, oh? I was chuckling and I have to say see by the way. We, the two of US met in the fall of the year, two, thousand and two and we were fast friends, but I distinctly remember in the fall of two, thousand, two US talking about this episode. Wasn't until today, June or July, the twenty, four, th thousand, twenty, I finally sat down and actually watched it and good gravy. This is something that's always stuck with me because it's such a bizarre episode It's also scrubbed from apologies to everybody. You know you've got a really play fucking TV detected defined this thing and I don't know why I truly do not know why exactly I mean it's not like I could see something you know with modern audiences if it was like a school shooting or something. But like first of all those hadn't been invented yet. Capacity that we have them. Now that is you know what? I mean. I don't understand what's going on well I. Do know why? Actually by the way? Yeah Yeah Yeah you see it is directed by Lars von Career. They had wanted a criterion option to be on the BLU ray of Dogville when they. Wanted to save for that, they don't want to be having it they on CBS to be happening. Why was the most expensive episode of Oh to announce the finance, the boat trip from Europe? Dame. Dana. You're right. Chris. The everyone is it's an ugly world. That everybody hates everything. It is fantastic. It is Yeah. Be this whole second season I don't know what's going on with the rights like it's. It's because look at it on on Hulu end CBS Alexis and it's really scattershot. Not This episode is missing. Episodes like the color me bad episode. Make sense to cut because like they're in the episode and you obviously have the music rights problem, etcetera etcetera. But like this one. Yeah, it's a totally just a, it's a, it's a message episode like, Hey, man fucking maybe don't have guns around. You have like eighteen fucking redneck kids running around. Christ if you have a gaggle of children following you around little baby ducks, maybe a fucking desk-drawer handgun is not the best idea minister scan, win looking what kind of dirty lead deals. He needs a Mug a gun at his desk. seriously. So it's GonNa. fucking come in and try to take out over some oil deal. I gotta get. OUTTA CONNIE SCAN. The. Hillbilly that also somehow lives in. Beverly. Hills. It's insane. I, mean, it's good that they're addressing this big gun culture I mean, we did say that this episode is hard to find and you said other ones are going to be hard to find when we do continue. We're going to go through the mall. We'll find a way and I'm sure you at home could find a way if you google enough. Yes. Yes and I will say I'm toying with the idea because this season two episode fourteen, it'll be whenever we restart this, which we will absolutely restart melrose. You promised a million times because you guys have been awesome supporting it this entire time. But when we do bring this back and we get back to hear, I we might Redo it. We might look at. A syncopal commentary possibly. Something I'm not sure if I can do this again. I got to say. A Lot. I kind of agree with you and someone said it last night. It was. It was either Erica Chris CA- Stephen I watched it this morning. One of you said that it was like extreme curb your enthusiasm and like to degree. Yes. Absolutely. I was the exact amount of uncomfortable watching Scott scanlon birthday party, not even the fucking death, the birthday party, right? Before he kills himself at his birthday party on his expense. is almost the lease remarkable part of the tire episode. Completely. Correct. All Weird. Awkward Moments. Yes. Exactly. Like the death was when I was finally able to breathe. Oh good. A tragedy at least. Being so socially awkward. So let me bring everybody up to speed on kind of what's been going on on that. inbet- In betwixt. No idea, why am I gonNA? Just showed. I mean not much. We like the Walsh Kids are pretty much the walsh kids Dylan Brenda, obviously, you're still going out But in the beginning of season two brand, we have like this weird summer season for like six or seven episodes. Long time for. And during so. A lot of things happen. David kind of. Scott goes on vacation and to Oklahoma of all places, and he's comfortable upstate on a farm somewhere. And Yada Yada Yada, but David starts ingratiate was more with the gang even more. So because Mel Silver, who is this episode? David's father starts dating Jackie Taylor. Kelly's mom, and that leads to a lot of funny awkward their Shenanigans, and now he's kind of defacto quote unquote part of the gang that explains the line..

Scott scanlon Erica Chris David kind Melrose Dylan Brenda CBS US Beverly Hills Taco Bell Mrs. Skeleton Brandon Walsh Stephen Sadek Europe BLU Oklahoma Bell Bush google Andrew
Understanding Whats Really Underneath Your Childs Behavior with Dr. Pejman Katiraei

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:42 min | 2 weeks ago

Understanding Whats Really Underneath Your Childs Behavior with Dr. Pejman Katiraei

"Welcome to the brain podcast. I'm your host Droop wrote and each week my team and I bring on a new guest who we think can help you improve your brain health feel. Feel better and love more. This week's guest is Dr. Pettman Qatar Ryan Dr k as he's known to many of his patients is a board certified pediatrician who's also board certified and fellowship trained in integrative and holistic medicine. He completed his undergraduate at Ucla and then he obtained his osteopathic medical degree at Western. University of Health Sciences. He completed his pediatric residency at Loma Linda University, the famous Loma Linda. where, he stayed on as pediatric chief resident and then as teaching faculty for over four years while he founded the Loma Linda University holistic medicine clinic. Dr K also completed two fellowships integrative medicine one with the University of Arizona Dr Case. Second Fellowship wasn't Endo Bio Jeanie and thereby ginny as a European systems biology medical model, which emphasizes the use of. In the management of Neuro Endocrine, system Dr K. is one of a few physicians in the country with mastery of osteopathy functional medicine, functional endocrinology, herbal herbalism, medical herbalism, and more Dr K. is now in private practice here in lovely Santa Monica where he focuses on helping children with severe behavioral challenges incredible bio. Dr Kate Welcome to the broken being pot. Adding more LADES, you're young man, you're only forty-three. There's a lot more accolades you can add to your resume over the. Perfect job. A Mike my goal at the end of the day to help kids feel better. That's beautiful. Goal a beautiful purpose and I can't wait to dig into that in today's podcast and I wanna get into a little bit of origin story. How did you get clear and where did all the puzzle pieces aligned himself that that is your goal. You know. I think the universe was calling me. To do this. The first reason why I got into, it was for my own health up as a kid, I had pretty severe anxiety. SPENT, most of my adolescent teenage years in mix of anxiety and depression yo and. My nervous system was upside down and I couldn't really understand why I knew that I was different. I knew I experienced the world differently, but I really had no clue why you know like who would have thought that eating fast food everyday. All Day will be an issue for for your nervous system going bonkers is that what was going on? Were you eating fast food and kind of go? How is the standard American new way of life I mean college like that's what you do. Right Even I remember actually Loma Linda is a vegetarian institution. Why it's famous for being one of the hospital in the Blue Zone. The seventh day adventists. Yeah. But when I got accepted there, one of the thoughts that I had is like Oh my God. What am I gonNA do without my burgers. And that was the mindset I had going into training because I didn't know any better and what actually got me to start looking outside was during my training. I kept kept coming across these cases and I remember one very, very vividly. Twelve year. Old Guy. Severe Severe Colitis. Came in with toxic, Mega Colin were his colon had dilated to about ten centimeters, which is huge, and we did around the steroids. We did some medications for him. He got better when home. Two weeks later, I was still on service. Worse off than before and Beato, our team started the discussion and we brought in all the specialists and basically the end of the discussion was well, he's failing medications. We just need to cut out his colon literally was like he failed medications. So the next option is we just cut out this twelve year olds a lot inflammation. Something's going on. Let's just cut the thing out. because. That is the next standard of care, right. I had a lot of these kinds of scenarios where kids would show up like I remember another guy who plays soccer. He scraped his knee niece bowl up and then thirty six hours later, he was dead. You know and they were just like well, sometimes staff does unlike I've scraped my knee, I haven't died like, what was it about his system that caused him to fall apart and it was this recurring question of like these things don't add up two plus two equal in this scenario and the institution, and they're really smart people alone Linda, don't get me wrong. But the pediatric conventional training was like no two plus two equals farm like it doesn't look this way. So as it is in most hospitals and worst Western approach. Places. Because that's what people are trained in. But you were asking a different question. You're like, okay. This doesn't make sense what's really going on. Exactly. Yeah, and that is what ultimately led me to start taking courses. So I, I went to one holistic kind of course, and it was a dinky little course, but I was like, oh. My God I, you know I have found my people, the light bulbs went off and you started connecting dots. And then from there I went and did a bunch of training with Institute of Functional Medicine and the trading with the University of Arizona, and in the midst of that, I started realizing the pieces that were affecting me so like. I did the elimination diet and started feeling better and then I found myself to have MTA. And I think my initial homocysteine was sixteen when I first tested it, I'm like Jesus. So I started injecting myself with B twelve and you know I was my own best Guinea pig. And in the midst of getting interested, what also happened is Loma Linda's in didn't have anyone that was getting interested in this stuff. They're like, Hey, you wanNA, start a holistic medicine clinic and. Like. Two years of my training and there I was like all of the sudden getting handed these patients you know and I was the expert even though I basically didn't know that much. But through the process of learning and I was really really privileged to be put in a place where you know fifty year olds, I was a pediatrician fifth year olds with Severe Lupus. Land in my doorstep helped me I'm like. I don't know anything about Lupus. So let me learn so I. I spent all this time. Just researching in learning. You know any person that I could find with any material they had on the Web I was reading books listening to the videos. And I was just consuming all of this information in the midst of that. Also learning from my patients,

Loma Linda University Linda Dr. Pettman Qatar Ryan Dr K Dr K University Of Arizona Dr Case Dr K. University Of Health Sciences Severe Anxiety Dr Kate Ucla Severe Colitis Institute Of Functional Medici Soccer Ginny Blue Zone Santa Monica Lupus
US, UAE and China All Launched Missions to Mars This Month

WSJ Tech News Briefing

02:29 min | 2 weeks ago

US, UAE and China All Launched Missions to Mars This Month

"We've also seen recent Mars missions from the United Arab Emirates and from China. There are others coming up. So why is there so much activity around this kind of mission lately? Well a some of it is just a function of orbital mechanics. It's of course extraordinarily difficult to traverse the distance between Earth and Mars and depending on where each planet is in this elliptical orbit. We can be as close as sixty one million miles or as far away as one hundred and thirty some million miles each one of those miles represents of course a pound of fuel that you'll have to cart along with you in order to actually make this journey. Every twenty six months or so earth and Mars are very closely aligned than it is possible that that moment to make the most economical journey across the void. That's what we're seeing right now this summer. This July and August is that moment of alignment between Mars and earth. And I'm sure there are geopolitical reasons for doing this right now as well right. It's very hard to separate space exploration from national EGO international diplomacy and the search for prestige. Which really we're talking bragging rights. It is a fact. That for the first fifty years of interplanetary exploration it has by and large been an American show the Soviet Union early on also send some things tomorrow but of course. That's a confederation. There's no longer with us. This has been an integral part American prestige. I think our ability to land on another planet to effectively plant our flag. We have encourage international cooperation with this sort of thing. But it's very different being a partner from being the lead sled dog and I do think the efforts we're seeing with both China the United Arab Emirates and then the European Space Agency which is partnered with Russia for a launch. That will now take place in twenty twenty two. These are moments of the kind of coming of age. Not all countries have been exploration countries. But more now are and more are now willing to put big money on the effort

United Arab Emirates China Soviet Union European Space Agency Partner Russia
A California tribe has land to call its own for the first time in more than two centuries

Native America Calling

04:00 min | 2 weeks ago

A California tribe has land to call its own for the first time in more than two centuries

"This is national news I'm Hughes Infrared Antonio Gonzales. The Navajo nation is laying off hundreds of gaming employees. The Navajo Times reports notices started going out over the weekend for more than nine hundred employees. Another one hundred forty workers will remain through this week. The nation's four casinos have been closed since March. Nearly twelve hundred employees remained on the payroll since that time gaming executive Brian Parish warns last week. Cash reserves are depleted, and the operation would not be able to sustain keeping the workers any longer. The trump administration announced the start of an effort to tackle cases of missing and murdered native people. Department of Interior and justice officials announced the opening of the missing and murdered native Americans, cold-case office in Minnesota's twin cities, it is scheduled to be the first of seven offices dedicated to reviewing some fourteen hundred unresolved native missing persons cases in the country. The efforts stems from President Trump's executive order last year in a written statement assistant secretary of Indian Affairs Tara Sweeney, said cold cases in Indian country will be addressed the determination and the understanding that the victims in these cases will be accorded some measure of dignity and compassion. Democrats on the House Natural Resources Committee are exploring a range of options for how to deal with healthcare woes that were plaguing Indian country before the pandemic hit Matt Laszlo has the story from Washington as native communities continued to face high corona virus infection rates, longstanding struggles with healthcare access are being seen under a new light under the current system. Many native American veterans are forced to leave their communities to get treatments. However, during pandemic, leaving tribal communities introduces new risks for Native Veterans Acting Chairman of the national. Indian Health Board is William Smith told lawmakers the marine bursts for travel through the Indian health services aren't workable during a pandemic in Alaska. The behind did converse Indian. Health Service. mitric anchorage to say by Dr Up there they'll pay for transportation. They won't pay very housing because they think it's. My back, but with coq nineteen going on, you can't fly out, so you have to do a drive up three hundred six miles to anchorage and out of pocket you'd have to spend the night. Smith says of the sixteen billion dollars earmarked for veterans and cove relief, only one billion was given to the native health service that's left. Native communities underfunded once again besides veterans, lawmakers are also working on the coverage for urban Indian Health Providers Act. It would make it so. So individual clinics no longer have to use their own funds to purchase liability coverage at could save some clinics up to two hundred and fifty thousand dollars annually, which some officials want to go directly to patient Care Robin Sunday Allen is Vice President of the National Council of Urban Indian health. She says tribes need any extra funds they can find now. Insurance has increased fourteen percent over the past five years so becoming increasingly more burdensome for us to carve out that money. Money that we wish could go back to direct patient care. All the coronavirus pandemic brought these health issues in Indian country to the forefront. They're persistent problems. Tribal leaders are hoping we'll finally get a permanent solution for National Native News I'm Matt Lies Low in Washington a California tribe has completed purchase of twelve hundred acres of land for four and a half million dollars. The San Jose Mercury News reports. It's the first land acquisition for the excellent tribe of Monterey. County in. In nearly two hundred fifty years, Esselin chairman Tom Little. Bear Nason told the paper. He is elated by the purchase saying the land is the tribes homeland and the origin of their creation. The mercury news reports tribal leaders expect to use the land to reinvigorate tribal culture conduct, traditional ceremonies, and inform the general public about their culture and history, the tribes, traditional culture and language were nearly wiped out by Spanish missionaries backed by the military starting in the late seventeen hundreds. With national native news I'm Art Hughes.

Executive Washington Indian Health Board William Smith Bear Nason National Council Of Urban Indi Navajo Times Antonio Gonzales President Trump San Jose Mercury News Art Hughes Health Service. Acting Chairman Department Of Interior Chairman Matt Laszlo Minnesota Monterey
Wim Stocks: Covid-19 is an opportunity for esports to go mainstream

BIG Esports Podcast

04:18 min | 2 weeks ago

Wim Stocks: Covid-19 is an opportunity for esports to go mainstream

"Those people who've. been listening to some of the content for period of time, when of ours was still fresh, we had women wheels headband Pfefferman I'm Canada from UK, capital and Mckay sports on board to work about a bit of coronavirus, economic response and things like that and one of the main things. He said women's right now you'll find his blowing up twenty four seven with presidents of basically every single media netware Colin you asking for content, a be interested in Konic kicking off the conversation with that e e, still getting these mainstream organizations looking for a splits programming way we are, and just had a sort of a conversation yesterday, which with a bunch of sports networks. At are represented under an umbrella of a media company, and and all still to this day all baseball comes back Major League baseball tonight in the United States. So that's a good thing. more normalcy, CPJ seeing some some driving events some some of those coming back, but still east or is the is the predominance or these days, and and it's yes, it's on twitch, Time Youtube, and and showing up on facebook gaming in elsewhere, but but now the these these I think what what has happened in the past pandemic is, that is traditional. Broadcasters potential traditional networks now Allie, the stand what he's is, and no, it's. It's a replacement for sports. that as I mentioned I think last time Jesus Alabama's back in the bottle, but also they're. They're now really sort of waking up the fact that man. We need younger audiences here we are is fifty year old. baseball demographic isn't going to is isn't going to. Be around forever. The sixty year old PGA demographics tackled mirror off forever, so so they're all waking up the fact that this is the way to communicate with an affiliate with much more youthful audience. Lousy Jesse's, and it's it's now. It's home to roost. These guys get it. They get managed, and they've got now got to figure out how to be gall whether or not. It can be involved is another Matt as another matter entirely I think he's four. doesn't need traditional media as much as traditional media needs. These sports but. You know this is their livelihood. This is what they do. They not Ino- broadcast. They know entertainment. They know how to do engage millions of people, and and with with the right formula with right approach. They have ever shot at this, but but thus far as we all know. This is all playing onstream in online and not -sarily other. You know we were just reflecting yesterday in this conversation about Turner. Journal riots early Turner had it right early with their first league in for car strike, and and not only do they have right, but the brands that they brought in to support it. They also had right, and that was that was four years ago. I was a long time ago. And and in the scheme of things yet they made some of their forays into in a broadcast use for in in bringing predictability around the broadcast that that's still Jack. Jamie stands up is one of the other great moments in in. In sort of democratization of of sports so so. I think I I don't think it's over for traditional media, I think. There's plenty of opportunity especially, as as now more organization comes to sports. It is getting more predictable. There are more path as two point eight to point B., or for players for events for mountain and the notion of broadcasts. Predictable broadcast is scheduled broadcasts that we all we all know. You know even if you're not. Austrailia I think you're pretty much. Know that NFL owned Sundays. At. One PM Eastern time and four PM time at eight eight thirty eastern time on Sunday. That's a sport doesn't have it, so I do think this is. Predictability. What what scheduling and programming can do for his or these? These big networks that are more traditionally focused I think they have. Do they replacing in this

Baseball Turner Jamie Mckay Matt Konic Facebook Allie Youtube Major League Canada CPJ United States Colin Jesus Alabama INO UK Austrailia
A relatively simple change could reduce bat fatalities from wind turbines

Climate Connections

01:10 min | 2 weeks ago

A relatively simple change could reduce bat fatalities from wind turbines

"For the climate, but scientists estimate that wind turbines kill more than half a million bats in the US each year. Migratory species like the hoary Bat are the most vulnerable. Research by Winifred Frick of bat conservation international shows that if nothing is done to protect them, hoary populations could drop by up to ninety percent within fifty years. The level of mortality that we see is high enough that it could potentially cause rapid declines of that species. But she says there are ways for bad species and wind energy to thrive for example during migration season, wind turbines can be turned off on nights when the wind is low. Studies show this could reduce tallies by about fifty to ninety percent with only minimal effects on energy production. We've learned a lot. In the last ten years. In terms of the interactions between bats and wind turbines that can really point towards effective solutions now the challenge is implementing those solutions widely, but I says she's optimistic that by focusing on the issue and we can have renewable energy, and we can protect biodiversity I. Don't think that those are mutually exclusive outcomes.

Winifred Frick Bat Conservation International United States
How One Covid-19 Victim Was Lost in the Chaos

WSJ What's News

12:06 min | 3 weeks ago

How One Covid-19 Victim Was Lost in the Chaos

"Images and stories from the pandemic that will be seared into many people's memories forever. One of them was the discovery in April of rental trucks, holding dozens of dead bodies out a funeral home in New York City. The people found that day were victims not just of the coronavirus, but of a system overwhelmed one of them was seventy two year old nathaniel hallman. He lived in the Bronx with his wife Mitzi. They were married for forty two years. He repaired whirlpool appliances and in retirement he and his wife or a Deacon and deaconess at the Church of the Meek Baptist. Harlem they visited. visited the sick and shut ins in early April at the height of the pandemic and New York City home in was at a Rehab Center in the Bronx, where he was diagnosed with nineteen, the sent him to the hospital next door where a few weeks later he succumbed to the disease, but that's not where the story ends. It's where it begins our reporter Michael Phillips. He died on April Seventeenth, at Saint Louis Hospital and his goddaughter hope who is a very astute person. decided she would take responsibility for making sure that he was cremated and taking care of and and so his wife is widow. mitzi wouldn't have to do it. And so hope was under the impression that she had only seven days to get his body in the hands of funeral director, or the hospital would give the body to the city, and the city would bury him in a mass grave on Hart Island, which is a the Potter's field for New York City. One hundred and fifty years that the people have been left behind have been buried on on heard island. And, so she thought okay I've got a week to find somebody to take care of the body, and she started calling funeral homes, and they were all full. This was the height of the epidemic of hundreds and of New Yorkers were dying at a day on the day that that Daniel died three hundred eighty four New Yorkers died. And so the funeral homes would just overloaded. She called something like twenty funeral homes, and they all said we can't take him. Her Middle Son was even doing an internship at a Newark New Jersey funeral home and they were full to take Nathanielsz bodies. So she grew more and more panicky over the course of the week, and she contacted a family friend Reverend up in Connecticut, Marshall, Morton and Reverend Morton being in the you know the business of of being a clergyman new number of funeral home directors called up an old contact that he had named James Robinson. Mr Robinson worked out of a funeral home in Neptune City New Jersey as well as one in Brooklyn. And so he said, according to Reverend Morton I'll take care of this for you. I've got it and please. Please take the body down to my funeral home in Neptune. So the Reverend and hope son managed to find a funeral director, who would could drive the body out of New York to Neptune New Jersey Neptune city. And deliver it just before the what hope thought was the deadline at the hospital. They get the body out of there, so they took the bodies of Neptune city Mr Robinson the funeral director was not there. A person who was there said I'm sorry. I can't accept this body. They called up. Mr Robinson the funeral director. And this is where there's a lot of disagreement about what took place, but from the point of view of the family and Reverend Morton. What happened was Robinson said. I didn't mean for you to take it to. New Jersey Take my place in Brooklyn, this is something that that Mr Robinson disputes. He says he never said such a thing. The driver took the body up to Brooklyn to a funeral home called likely funeral services on UTICA avenue in Brooklyn. He dropped the body off there with the people who were there. They put it in. A refrigerated truck was parked on the street. And the family assumed everything was OK at that point. The body was supposed to be cremated on the twenty ninth so a few days later. And when hope called the the crematory to ask whether or not or godfather had been had been cremated, she got an answering. Machine were closed for maintenance the next day. She got answering machine message, but Never received confirmation he had been cremated. During this time news broke about all these bodies in Brooklyn in U. Haul trucks, and that was the same address where they had dropped off Mr Hallman. So hope began to panic and put things together. She called up the Reverend. The Reverend put things together. They all started to worry and at that point they tried to get Mr Robinson to explain where the body was. They tried to get a funeral home to explain where the body was tried to get the city. Medical Examiner explain where the body was, and they just couldn't find. It took until the fifth of May until. Finally learned that her godfather's bodied Nathaniel Hamad's body had actually been in the back of an unrefrigerated u-haul truck left on the street in Brooklyn, just a horrible horrible discovery, and it wasn't the end for Nathaniel. Family, who then spent several weeks trying to get his body and arranged for his final resting. What happened after this? There was another misstep when the bodies were discovered at the funeral home. In the U.. Haul trucks hope called the city medical examiner's office. They had come over. You know when the when the police got there and the after nine one one call reporting bodies and trucks on the street. You know hope called everybody. She could find the governor's offices. The attorneys general of the State of New Jersey and New York. You know. Where's My Godfather? And when she called the medical examiner's office, they had already collected sixty one bodies from the trucks and from clerk. Lee's funeral home itself, including many that would simply on the floor in various states of undress, and on the floor of the Chapel at the funeral homes just loaded with bodies. And so she when she called the medical examiner's office, they went through the list of all the bodies. They retrieved from the funeral home from the trucks. And Nathaniel Holman's name was not on the list, so for days and days she couldn't find out where he was. She even went over with Reverend Morton to the funeral home. Mr Clearly was not there at the time. Mr Robinson was not there at the time and she said. My father was here. Where is he and couldn't couldn't get an answer? And, what happened was and the fifth of May. That medical examiner's office discovered that the name on his paperwork had been reversed as hallman nathaniel so when they had looked up the bodies they had. When hope it call then they looked in their record, says he will what bodies we have. Do we have in home? It came up as a negative. The only had a home in faneuil. And by the fifth of May, they figured this out, and now remember he died on the seventeenth of April, so we're no weeks into this, and only then does hope discover that. In fact, her godfather had been in one of trucks and was now in the care of Medical Examiner's office. At that point, the the medical examiner said look. We have him safe. He's in. You know in cooled unit, so he's he won't decay. To be blunt about it. You can leave them here until you find a funeral director. WHO's able to cremate him? which is what the family wanted to do, so they held onto him and it wasn't until five weeks after his death. I think thirty nine days exactly after his death that they were able to get him cremated, and now his ashes are in an urn that his his widow Mitzi keeps at her bedside Michael. What else did you hear from city officials in response to this as well as from the quickly funeral home. The state authorities suspended Mr Claes. Licensed to act as a funeral director, and then held a series of hearings online hearings to decide whether to permanently revoked his license for you know poor practices, the ruling has not yet come out. They've had three hearings and the lawyers have submitted final closing statements, but the administrative law judge has not yet ruled on whether to revoke his license in listening to the at least one of those hearings, and in talking to Mr.. Claes attorney, he's basically the the argument is they were holding the bodies in the U. Haul trucks as they were moving them from the refrigerated truck which was. Recognized waited two whole bodies into the funeral home to be packaged up four cremation. And so he said we would keep them in the in the U. Haul trucks for a while and then move them. It was hard I think for the prosecuting attorney. I guess he'd be called the prosecuting attorney. Understand that because the argument is why not just move them from the refrigerated truck all the way into funeral home instead of stopping. This is just a matter of a few yards, so stopping and putting them in a truck. Mr Quickly. That's Mr Clarke's defense as well as his lawyer said to me. Look the whole city was inundated with bodies. Just wasn't enough. Space to handle the mall and so things happen. And he said that he thought it was unfair that his client Mr clinically was being singled out when so many other funeral homes were also overcrowded in his in his argument. So, that that is his defense Mister Robinson's defense. He has not been charged with any anything by the state. He has not been his has not been suspended, but in talking to him, his argument is. I never had that body. I never signed any paperwork saying that that body was under my control so everyone who says that I did agree to take control of Mr. Hammond's body is line. That is his argument. There are text messages back and forth in which he says that he would take care of the body, but he also said and give me the paperwork, so there's now a lawsuit underway Msci Hallman and hope dukes. Who is the the Goddaughter of Daniel? Hallman have filed suit against the he quickly home as well as Mr. Robinson And are seeking damages for what they describe of course as mistreatment of Nathaniel remains. Michael as you say, and as you've heard from many of the people in this story, Nathanielsz body was one of dozens discovered in rental trucks during the height of the pandemic. What did reporting out the story and what happened in this one case? Tell you about what happened here in New York at the height of this. So, what are your takeaways from this tragic story? This won't come as a surprise to anybody but. When the pandemic really hits and went really hit New York. Hardest I. At least in the United States of course. It just overwhelmed the system. The city and the people who who manage these things would just not ready for overwhelming the doctor. Was Internal Internist resident at Saint Barnabas Hospital. Who took? Mitzi up to see Nathaniel before he died is she would cry constantly into her. into a mask and goggles because there's just so much misery. All around her. And the same situation occurred with with the body's. Just the city. Wasn't prepared for the awfulness that that's that hit it. I can't judge whether they should have been more prepared. Or there was some mistake making made made at some point. That's not really within my capacity to judge. But, certainly, it was overwhelmed. And that meant that there are a lot of a lot of collateral damage and. Michi and hope, and of course Nathaniel himself were part of that collateral damage, and now I think. Between lawsuits and historians and journalists looking back at what happened. We'll start to peel that apart and figure out. Who did what who could have done things that were you know could have done things better and who who? Who did the best they could?

Mister Robinson New York City Nathaniel Hallman Reverend Morton Nathaniel Director Brooklyn Mitzi New Jersey Funeral Michael Phillips Neptune New Jersey Neptune Cit Mr Robinson Neptune City New Jersey Bronx Mr Claes Mr Clearly Mr Quickly
Ken Miles' Mustang Shelby GT350R

CarCast

05:56 min | 3 weeks ago

Ken Miles' Mustang Shelby GT350R

"Right, so we have all this auction stuff to kind of get to and some of the some of the. Surprises and some of the reductions and Ken Miles Mustang and there was a lambo four hundred that went and we can kinda talk about. Where we think the market is going. Maybe we should give you guys some ideas on some cars. If you want to invest in something I J B well. That's right. You'd be weld. Proud sponsor car cast their pox. He's used by pros and DIY and trusted for fifty years and get J. B. Weld Dot. COM and wherever wherever at home depot all that O'Reilly everywhere jv well. All right so. The in Miles Mustang your prediction with three million mind was a two six five. It blew me out of the water, and even even you at two eight five with the big. Three, eight five Oh. Sorry, yeah, three, three, eight five. Eight five, so, but now broke the record most expensive. Mustang ever the bullet which was recent. Was the most expensive to and yet, but I'm Kinda. Glad, the Ken Miles car beat the Bowling Kind of a made up car cool, but made up car and the other. Has. I don't know just just has some real. Not Movie History, but like actual history history street. Yeah, yeah, no, I agree the. History, it's. It's earned history I. Don't know well. Friend I just like the racing. First things first. A GT, three fifty eight of in an of itself. Sixty I think this car sixty six so. That car in and of itself is two hundred If you just want to stock one then. When you get to the GT, three fifty are yeah, at least before this, you are at five hundred grand, maybe six hundred grand, so that was Kinda the basic, because this is a GT. Three fifty are so yeah. The the base value of this car is about five or six hundred grand before you get into the test mule and the Ken Miles, and all that kind of stuff now. The Bullet Mustang the base price on that car seventeen five. Just get a Mustang. A Green Mustang and. PUT A ad suspension in the rear in a what a call that a torsion bar traction bar NERF BAR THE HELL! Is that stupid? WE LE-, bar in the back that they put on the back of the live. Really Lakewood SORTA traction bar. It's attraction bar and sometimes called a slapper Maybe that could be a little bit different design. Somebody in throw better than I like. You Know Holly Double Pumper on it and stuff like. All you could build that car. That's twenty grand worth a car. So who cares and then was in the movie, which is cool. That was a great chasing, and all that kind of stuff, but the Ken Miles cars, the I are and kind of the test meal and it was nice to see. Pete Brock involved with the digital video and talked about he's listed as one of the drivers for the car. The Mustang. So People Kinda. have. It is to Ken Miles Mustang, but a few other guys drove the car. Brock is is amongst them. Yeah, that's cool and one for ten dough I more than what we thought, but I think. It it earned the right amount of money. You Know I. Don't I don't think. In and look I I think the Ken. Miles car now should bring up. The GT three fifty ours. Yes, right? I, think fifties cool, but three fifty ours being what thirty four something made. You know why why isn't that a million dollar car? Yeah, well I think it is now and I also think. You if you are dry if you bought like the Shelby Museum. I've always said GT. Forties like undervalued cars because the. Ferrari. And some of the Ferrari. LOMAS STUFF P! Four hundred team trying to think of. The five whatever the PS were. This got too many designations, my head, but the point is this. The GTO's were always half the price less than half the price of those cars right and so. That Shelby Museum bought the GT forty that came in third place I think in. In the one two three finish car sold that at Monterey two years ago three years ago. You know they bought that thing for nine seven or or something like that? When you take a Mustang and bump the Mustang to four million bucks, yeah I'm sorry, but now the GT forty just got bumped up fourteen. You know like it got shoved up to. It's GonNa Push. It'll push the. Cobras with good history right it'll. It'll raise up the other just in general. The Mustang fastback. Even the street versions. K Code K Code. Ones think the code ones the HYPO yeah. Those are out and all. That stuff is just going up. Yeah, the the the shelby. Stuff, and I've noticed sixty eight, sixty nine. You know the ones we don't like quite as much. Those are popping up like. The, shelby, maybe it's the movie. Maybe it's the doc you know. Maybe it's the whatever the steeping process or something, but. That stuff is starting to pop up.

Ken Miles Ken Miles Mustang Shelby Museum Shelby First Things First Pete Brock J. B. Weld Dot O'reilly Ferrari Lakewood Monterey
GUI Pre Cap

Geeks Under the Influence

03:39 min | 3 weeks ago

GUI Pre Cap

"Hello everyone and welcome in use the Gui pre can recap. Going For the week of July Twenty, twenty, two one before it happens. My Name is Bruce let's start with G. Y. Pick the week. Actually I'm going to hold off on the pick of the week until we get to one more thing, you'll understand why in just a few minutes. For TV pages on Monday e has the premiere of hoarders and intervention. Nat Go has when sharks attack. This is the beginning of Shark Week. For Tuesday CBS has finale of game on Wednesday. Nothing Thursday NBC has the finale of Blindspot Fox has the finale of celebrity, Watch party and TBS has the premiere of lost resort on Friday CBS has the premiere of greatest at home videos. Because why not and paramount has been MMA live for Saturday. Hbo Has Premiere of Motherless Brooklyn amfar Sunday. Sifi has the premiere of wine owner URP for DVD's coming out this week. You've got scoop and capone for on Line Services Net flicks. You Have Jake Whitehall I'm only joking on the spectrum season. One St Food Latin America season, one fear city, New York versus the media season one. Sing on Spain season one offering to the storm. And the kissing booth to for Amazon Prime. You've got Jim. Pale tourist and radioactive. We've got no video games coming out this week, but we do have episodes of G. Y. coming out this week. At least things on the Gui network. Just go to Gyi. PODCAST DOT COM and check out and see what we've got for one more thing. For the first time in fifty years, Kahn or were forced to make a heartbreaking decision to cancel the annual celebration of comics and pop culture soon after the cancellation, they announced an online version set to launch July, twenty second, the official start date of the originally scheduled convention. The virtual event will exist on comic, Dash Con Dot Org, which is their website starting at nine am Pacific daylight time on Wednesday July twenty second this will transform to comic con at home. The redesign web page will be the means for all participants to access programming, online exhibit halls and various interactive events. Join the fun is the Comic Con Museum which has been long-planned an interactive component They began offering activities through comic Con Museum at home earlier this summer, and will continue through comic con at home weekend, and beyond Youtube will host over three hundred and fifty panels in programming as well as the twenty twenty Eisner Awards, the Online Exhibit Hall With Approximately Seven Hundred Exhibitors, and for fans of those gaming, those activities will be on the discord platform. COMECON will also be offering an online version of their souvenir. Book will be available for free. DOWNLOADABLE PDF starting on Wednesday July, twenty second, the two hundred sixty page book contains new art articles, celebrating various industries, including the one hundredth birthday of Ray, Bradbury and Ray Harry Hausen. This is the way you can celebrate San Diego Comic Con with outstanding all day in line to get into hall, age or the overabundance of CON funk.

Comic Con Museum Ray Harry Hausen G. Y. CBS Bruce MMA HBO Jake Whitehall Spain Sifi Amazon New York Capone Blindspot Fox TBS San Diego NBC GYI JIM
Edwards' Katie Szyman on Medtech's Accelerating Changes

MedTech Talk Podcast

06:52 min | Last month

Edwards' Katie Szyman on Medtech's Accelerating Changes

"Katie has had a fascinating career both at Edwards, but also at medtronic where she was president their diabetes business. In addition to that she served on the board of numerous start up companies that are each having a huge impact on their various specialties companies like Inari. Inspire tourney a welcome Katie. Thank gap. It's great to be here. Thanks so much for joining us in. We have a lot of things to cover today, so I'm really excited to have the opportunity at beyond the podcast of let's start with Edwards in critical care and i. a lot of people don't realize that critical care is a seven hundred million dollar business within Edwards. Could you give our listeners an overview of critical care and really what the core of the Edwards offering is? The core initial started Edward. critical care started with the Swan Ganz Catheter, that was actually invented out of Cedar. Sinai and many people know the kind of the story. That invention was just that It was sitting on the beach and said Hey. How do I get a good reading of a patient's pulmonary artery pressure, and it's really hard to do unless you're inside the heart, and it's really hard to get to that pulmonary artery position and figured out that if you took a you know, think about how sailboats work. If you blow up a balloon and let it flow really through the body like a sailboat. Sailboat it would land in the pulmonary position, and that was invented almost fifty years ago. by a Jeremy Swan Ganz out of Cedar. Sinai. That was the beginning of our business. And since then we've really expanded and focused on advanced Chemo, dynamic monitoring, really in patients in the ICU or in high risk surgeries whether cardiac surgeries or high risk, non cardiac surgeries that may be four patients that are very thick and that have surgery greater than three hours, so are being screw from the beginning with the Swan. Ganz Catheters, and now we do you know all kinds of pressure? Monitoring Technologies really focused on making sure patients. Are Stable. That's great actually didn't know the the history of the slum Ganz Catheters so that's fascinating. One one of the things that must be having a huge impact on your business is the current crisis were facing in vid. How has that Changed Your Business in in? How are you seeing? Critical care evolve through this crisis. It's an interesting I. Think for us. We always assumed so much of our business was in the ICU and out with the with Kobe hitting. We've seen it hit in various degrees, so for example in the UK They realized that they had a significant shortage of ICU. And so they came through and ordered like one point, two million DP or pressure sensors from us to stock up so that they could build out there I see us other countries like Germany or the US had adequate ice, you beds in different parts of the country of the US. We've seen some regional spike, but overall I think we've found in the US. We had enough ice. You better than in Germany. They have enough, but then kind of across the rest of Europe. They found significant shortages so. So, we've seen some spikes in demand, related to building I, you capacity, and then we've seen just various spikes in demand like regionally for example in New York and New Jersey. Of course we've seen some higher demand there, but on the flip side, probably fifty percent of our revenues come from high risk surgery, and so with the cancellation of surgeries, really across the US and the world we've seen the kind of downward demand or downward revenues for about half the business for the high risk of our procedures. Interesting. I didn't realize it cut both. Ways. I think the the the building of stockpiles are expanding capacity is interesting dilemma that I think a lot of companies are are facing because on the one hand, it's great from the near term business side on the other hand you wonder. What will purchasing look like in the future with these SORTA stockpiles? How do you deal with that are a that? Is that something that? You see is. Concerned going forward. Yeah absolutely like so. It's been interesting journey for lot of our products manufactured of the Dominican Republic and in the Dr. Reduction of human you know of of human capital in terms of the workers, because many of the workers that were over age sixty were no longer able to come to the work that reduced our capacity by about eighty percent, and meanwhile then we had this bike demand. So now. We're sort of getting back to a steady state where you know, people are able to come back to work, but it's been a really interesting short-term. And there's also the concern as you said like. We've had this surge in demand, so we've had to work double. You know three shifts, and through the weekend to meet kind of these spikes in demand building capacity, but we all recognize that that's not going to be sustainable, and it's going to go back to a normal state afterwards so mostly. We're just hiring. And trying to use extra shifts as a way to kind of manage it so that we don't all become over capacity by ourselves right permanently. Yeah, yeah, no, that I mean you think of the. A lot of people think about what's happening on the front lines as they should, but the ripple effect through your business through your supply chain is, it's incredible. Just think how complex our businesses have become. And little changes in the overall environment can impact the you know the whole supply chain. It's it is amazing like for supply chain in particular, because we've also seen the regulatory bodies whether it's in Europe or in the US being flexible to try to approve product quicker just to kind of provide for the emergency situation, so you know for example we had excess capacity of our Asia sensors, and so we were able to quickly get those approved into Europe so that they could actually get to their patients in Europe almost on a temporary basis. Basis so I. You know I think the one summary of what's happening is very unpredictable and I think there's some really good permanent changes in terms of realizing that we can all work together globally better whether it's regulatory bodies whether it's manufacturing whether it's you know distribution channels as you're talking about shipping channels. All of that I think is all going to be permanently changed, and hopefully some of the changes will be for the better I really believe that.

United States Edwards Ganz Catheters Europe Swan Ganz Catheter Jeremy Swan Ganz Pulmonary Artery Germany Katie Medtronic President Trump Chemo New York UK Dominican Republic New Jersey Kobe Edward.
"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:41 min | 4 months ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"Slip down to make sure that there could be a young Replacement for him. And you know We GINSBURG and Stephen Bride did not do that. During the Obama Administration the Democrats really need to play to win. Take back record all right out of let me let me just challenge you a little bit here and I say this as someone who was raised by a pack of lawyers and and and did a year of law school and still remains fascinated by all these things like where does where does that begin right like you just use. Examples of how Kennedy basically orchestrated this whole thing to get cabin on there. You know and and there's been various different reporting about it and we. We could probably argue to what extent he did but certainly Ginsburg brier refused to sort of contemplate. The idea that they would step down and sort of like put that type of strategy in their forefront of their minds have certainly the prerogative And you know the the idea that we need to to win the political battle but we we hear stories of like you know what was done with Fordis- in the idea of like Merrick Garland and I see Chris coons going on the air. You know six months ago and saying if we win back the Senate the first thing we should do is reinstated institute the Filibuster for for for justices. I mean this is like a what point do in this comes from lawyers and I and I understand it right. I mean like I say I was raised by a lot of them. At what point do does the sort of the broader institution of law as opposed as distinct from? Let's say the conservative movement and all the lawyers who make up Who are who? Who who serve that have been to Diagram. Covers both of them? At what point did they say we're going to give up the ghost on the Supreme Court not being a political body because it seems to me that you know you've outlined that at the very least the Republicans it more aggressively gave up? That goes fifty years ago. But I you know. I think you can argue that coming out of reconstruction they had given up that ghost. It's just that The the the Democrats the laughed. They don't seem to sort of be able to let go of that vision of the Supreme Court. I think that's right. And I think as a result you know they're bringing you know a watered down to a nice site. I mean you know I Mcconnell has been very clear you know he. He refused to have any Hearings at all for Maryland and then. He went out of his wages. Hello Kentucky Audience Dot long ago of course if there were a vacancy in the last year of trump administration.

Supreme Court Stephen Bride Democrats Mcconnell Kennedy Obama Administration Ginsburg brier Merrick Garland Senate Chris coons Maryland Fordis
"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

04:50 min | 4 months ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The Court of Appeals The next step and then it gets up to the Supreme Court and again five to four. They say nope. There's no obligation of any remedy across the district line. So if blacks are trapped in Detroit and were unable to give him an education because there aren't enough weights and each weight too bad so the combination of these two rulings mutually ensured. We would not have equality of education this country. 'cause one said you don't have the right to equal funding for your district and the other said if you're in a big city where so many minority students were you've no right to integrated education and again if eighty four been there. It would have been fired for the other way. So those are the key education rulings that have obviously implications Through the decades that followed and and and continue on today and I think in many respect also Made our education system so susceptible to the Corporate Reform Movement. That we have more or less just sort of passed through And which also did a tremendous amount of damage to our education system. And the other sort of I guess I twin horse of the apocalypse of of inequality as you as you outlined it is Has To do with our campaign. Finance system and really what that ultimately means is the failure of politicians to be responsive to the issues sets and the needs of ordinary people as opposed to monied interests. Exactly right and you know I talk about how the World Report that came out in twenty eighteen By Thomas Ticketing other on this. And they said there were two main drivers of inequality in the United States one was educational inequality which we just talked about. The other said was the lack of progressive taxation. Which you know. The top tax rates have gone down so much In in recent decades and that really is both of these are attributed to the Supreme Court and the reason are terrible unfair taxes attributable pinker is just what you said is that starting nineteen seventy six. The Supreme Court just begin striking down campaign finance law after campaign finance law and as a result the Supreme Court ensures that wealthy individuals and later corporations really have undue influence Congress in the legislatures and it really did starting nineteen seventy six when the same conservative court decides that money equals speech and they struck down. It was after Watergate. Congress actually passed a very strong campaign. Finance law really would have changed the role of money in our society and the Supreme Court strikes down strikes down the limits on expenditures. And says you have a First Amendment right rich person to spend as much money as you want to get someone elected. And that's really been the undoing of our democracy Let's talk about some of the Those you know those cases in the sort of the the The I guess the like you say Buckley v Vallejo is the most important one. Just give us a sense of what was involved there and then I guess we could talk about Obviously that that goes through a series of other cases to get to citizens United Buckley. V Vallejo is the original sin in that regard right and So as I as I said after Watergate there was just tremendous tremendous popular pressure on Congress to pass campaign finance or for reform because people forget now but watered the Watergate scandal dishes being about breaking into the Watergate Hotel. There were major major campaign finance improprieties uncovered of corporations. You know delivering money to the committee. Re like the president in paper bags and things like that so Congress does pass this very strong reform. It gets challenged by James Buckley the then. The New York's conservative senator and some other people The D. C. Circuit Court of Appeals in Washington. Dc which is the case. I actually uphold the entire law and quite reasonably says. This really isn't about speech. You know this you know that giving money to campaign isn't really speech and it also has very strong language about how this is very very important for Congress to act to protect our election so that was a great ruling from the DC circuit. It goes up to the Supreme Court and they reverse and as I said. They created this framework. That you know Is still with us where they said. Okay well if you're giving money to a campaign that could lead to some. You know our fear of corruption. So we're going to allow regulation of that but if you're just spending money on.

Supreme Court Congress Court of Appeals United Buckley D. C. Circuit Court of Appeals Watergate Hotel Corporate Reform Movement Vallejo Detroit United States DC president Washington New York senator
"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

03:16 min | 4 months ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"I think it did pave the way in some ways for you know liberals to do things like reject Judge Bork down. The road So I I think I think it it aged meeting somebody boulder role for the Senate but But I think that you know in in in my looking back on it. The real tragedy works is over lost opportunities that we have there to have a liberal court to last longer. And what's incredible is that what is his name is really never mentioned now. you know if you go to a loss to. Yale law school where where was graduate of the most brilliant graduate of your law school? He's just not talked about. He's considered in the BARRASSO and It's an overreaction. You know he did some things. The main issue got Got In trouble for was accepting money from a foundation that was run by a Wall Street financier but it was a good foundation and judges injustice. Who actually did do consulting work at the time. It sounds a little strange now Although we do judges and justice certainly do a lot of speaking occurrences but there there. Just wasn't that much that terrible but the idea that Ford is now considered a liberal harassment. He's very much a conservative embarrassment. Because he's really mean exhibit in how the Conservatives used skulduggery to take over the court and sixty nine much as they used it. You know half a century later with Merrick earl to hold onto the liberal majority. So that's the Ford is next project. I think people should know but it's just not when the people are talking about off Okay let's move on to the cases that that follow this right wing. Takeover of the court We've cases like San Antonio School district versus Rodriguez that we can talk about and Milkin be Bradley Alati case and dangerous re Williams. Where where do you WANNA start in terms of an in some ways? We have sort of different Tracks depending on what the issues are right and then I to you mentioned are absolutely critical and I say that you know not only because When I graduated from Moscow I became public interest lawyer for the ACLU Southern Poverty Law Center. And I worked on education tastes and I was really me and my colleagues working in the shadow of these cases because those two rulings Rodriguez nineteen seventy-three and Milliken nineteen seventy four really close the door to Progressive Reform in education. Coming from the Supreme Court Rodriguez was a case in which poor Mexican American Stevenson parents in Texas sued Texas because there were such enormous funding disparities between rich and poor school. This baited maybe education say very equal. They made the very logical argument that if the government is going to provide education to children The equal protection clause says do that equally government is supposed to treat its citizens equally. They won the Federal District Court level. Three Court judge unanimously ruled for them. It gets up to the Supreme Court and in nineteen seventy three. The court rejects their case. Five to four and you know that one.

Supreme Court Rodriguez Federal District Court Yale law school Ford Judge Bork Senate Merrick earl Texas San Antonio School district harassment Moscow ACLU Bradley Alati Progressive Reform Poverty Law Center Williams Milliken
"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:11 min | 4 months ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"New state. They moved to Connecticut and Connecticut had a awaiting a residency requirement. That you had to be there for year before you got welfare. And some people put people move their for their first year. Wouldn't get welfare. The Supreme Court struck down now. There were those who had hoped that they will do it. Even more expansive ways come up with some kind of broader rights welfare or something like that according to do that in Shapiro it grounded its decision on the rights to travel but still it was a very very important decision that in practical terms delivered welfare to a lot of people who are being denied it and I guess I guess my point is that that's the type of case. Because we're we're starting to see like analogs of this case in the Roberts court where you start to slowly Develop a line of cases that begins to expand or contract. writes in some fashion and that that Shapiro case could have been radically the building blocks of expanding the State's obligation to its citizens. That's right and you know one of the things I talk about. In the book is there was h really robust movement in the sixties of poverty. Lawyers who were there were many of them around the country and they were very wind. Chill who were an academic? There were a lot of poverty. Law Academics will working Wyndham who were trying to establish much broader right so actually in nineteen sixty nine. The same year that Shapiro. B Thompson decided Frank Michelman who was then a young Harvard law professor constitutional epicenter. He's still a professor there now. Really very disgust much discussed article in the Harvard Law Review the first article in the Supreme Court issued that year argument there was actually perhaps a constitutional right to subsistence to things like food and healthcare from the federal government. And that was the high watermark but those arguments were being made and some people hope that Shapiro Thompson would be the case in which the court embrace that kind of broader idea about Economic Rights.

Shapiro Thompson Supreme Court Harvard Law Review Frank Michelman Connecticut Wyndham professor
"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

The Majority Report with Sam Seder

02:54 min | 4 months ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Majority Report with Sam Seder

"The Supreme Court thinking outside. Things always works In nineteen fifty four with Warrants FIRST YEAR ARRIVING COURT HANDS DOWN. Brown versus education and After that begins we slow but eventually fairly successful project of desegregating schools in the south and the same time. They are transforming many other areas of law. This is the period in which we got the Miranda decision. Which leads to tell you that you have the right to remain silent before the question. You we got giddying Wainwright wainwright which promised every poor criminal. Defendant the right to a lawyer. We got Decision striking down the poll tax. We got decisions striking down Force prayer in public schools so in many many areas. The Warren Court was Transforming Society for the better When you say activists I mean what made the Warren Court activists? Well the Warren Court was not afraid to strike down laws or to Issue orders to institutions when it's thought unconstitutional things going on so for example Striking down laws. We just didn't south segregating not just schools but you know Jim. Crow segregated every aspect of society. The court was willing to strike those laws down in the way that the court had not been before. But also you look at the decision like Gideon B wainwright guaranteeing every indigent defending the rights to aware. That's a huge thing with that is imposing on every jurisdiction in the country and affirmative obligation to come up with lawyers for people that was inexpensive ruling for every city and county and state in the country. The Warren Court wasn't afraid to do that when they thought it was a constitutional rate that had to be vindicated. And let's just I so there's really two different elements to activism in this context. One is A willingness to strike down laws and really in some ways act contrary to a Legislators legislative will based upon the Constitution. And then the other is to create mechanisms or requirements to protect constitutional rights. As in like you said in Gideon I think that's right exactly and these were thing that the court had done at some time in the past it it more often that the conservative direction In nineteen twenties court was being activists to strike down progressive legislation including laws against child labor. But here in the sixties Starting fifties mainly the sixties. We had a liberal quote was actually willing to do this activism on behalf of the most disadvantaged members of society. Okay and so.

Warren Court Supreme Court Transforming Society Wainwright wainwright Gideon B Brown Miranda Crow Jim
"fifty years" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

03:20 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Science Show

"The side when mungo lady had emerged recent rainfall had refresh the surface of the win and while following a distinctive soil horizon he spotted a tiny patch of white shining in the afternoon sun it was the dengue part of a human skull today's later a team arrived to investigate and alan thorne identified it immediately as a man lying in an outstretched position hands over the groin in a catholic prepared grave the curious feature of the burial was a pink staining around the grave margins bola realized that he was looking at oca an incredibly rare resorts in the landreau area the body had been painted or spring with over two kilograms of the sacred material a ritual practice unfathomable to researches at the time the image of manga man in his grave was telecast around the world the ceremonial nature of this forty two thousand year old burial transformed global understandings of the time depth and complexity of indigenous histories and cultures oldest evidence of ritual burial with a complete interred fully modern man that was extraordinarily there's no other country in the world that's africa that has such comparable experience in this context we have the book ends of that home i graciously story out of africa to find these people in a straighter at forty two thousand years and now beyond beyond fifty thousand with that level of cultural sophistications is absolutely mind boggling in global terms the reading thing now is that traditional aboriginal views of the dream time and the dating of it by scientists is increasingly becoming confident it's not to say that the dream time is timeless but when we get back beyond fifty or sixty thousand we might as well think of it in those terms so science and traditional aboriginal views are really coming together on this particular issue light alum thorne but then concerns about what had been done the sensitivities about taking people from prepared graves jim bola in the afternoon of that dot phase of body collecting i come along and allen psalm the physical anthropologists comes along and removes the bones so you can understand the air dry bridge of everage it'll people when they heard that this taking place now you now defense when i was out there on a wandering geologist looking at climate change they wasn't aboriginal person for one hundred twenty kilometers so there was no one there could refer to nor ellen thorn could refer to so when the feelings of passion are aroused they're perfectly understandable and justifiable but in the circumstances that faced us we had no option head we not famine of salvage there's buyers my were eroding at the surface and they not been so they would be no we'll erica geria in the landreau today the aboriginal people would not have something which to probably proud.

geologist ellen thorn mungo alan thorne landreau africa jim bola allen erica geria one hundred twenty kilometers forty two thousand years forty two thousand year two kilograms
"fifty years" Discussed on The Science Show

The Science Show

05:11 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Science Show

"The jim bola was able to party to look at the side was in march nineteen sixty nine when he led a group of geologists so fantasy innocuous will andrew lakes region in far western new south wales they stayed in the sheer has sheds lake munger explored the genes during the day and debated ideas at night of lamb chops and flagons of wine the eulogists harry allen reece jones contain and jomo vini tantalized by the possible association of artifacts and extinct megaphone and they excitedly fuller jim to juma to investigate the charred bones the find was far more dramatic than they had imagined as they carefully investigated shattered bundle of buns after up to piece of human joba in an instant the scale of straining history changed in bowl words we will confronted not only with human activity but by the very presence of humanity itself the skeleton became affectionately known as munger lady her cremated remains had been buried in a small round hole on a sandy beach a few meters from the water's edge there she had remained for forty thousand years as a lake system dried and the camp with abandoned as a descendants moved to other parts of their country and as the rabbits and goats and farmers arrived jim bola hadn't stumbled across her remains in july nineteen sixty eight within a year all evidence of her life and death would have eroded into the wind fortuitous nature of her preservation and the influence of her discovery only straight in public has led traditional owners such as dorothy lawson to declare that she surfaced for a reason as monty monty elder mary pepin as often told jim bola you didn't find mungo lady she found you the gist quickly fighter graft andrew the features at the burial and collected the loose fragments they then made the decision to remove the bones they were sheep grazing on the net and thunderstorm with brewing the site was federal one downpour could sweep the bones away carefully cut and removed the disintegrating calculate books in which the bones was set and packed them in the only vessel available john mulvaney suitcase some of his close la returned as patting the following day they took munger lady to camera billy griffiths and here are two of those who were there archaeologists alan thorne and reece jones on dating and the significance of mungo what happens is that the iranian in the soil is dissolved then it enters the bone sometime after death and then it decays so you have thorium raid on all these other things so you measure the different daughter projects and that process has been going on since the beginning of the world is the best method of all but the amounts are so tiny i this is just minuscule amounts the miniaturization of all this so that's the problem is so that's getting any sort of age age estimate is a real coup technically what what they've done so anyway they've tried to do the uranium series plus this electron spin resonance which is trapped electron message on the teeth and boatswain give values of the same rough order so in a sense they've tried to address the problem jim raised may turn out that these remains are themselves the literally the earliest evidence for human prisons on the continent but what is interesting of course is that most of the early sites the to have been in the extreme north here we are in south western new south wales in the southeastern corner of a straighter so whatever these dates are they are very much minimum dates because obviously they didn't just race down from the north coast to turn up in the semiarid climates and environments of wish new south wales at the national university it took physical anthropologist ellen thorn over six months to excavate and reconstruct the hundreds of fragile bone fragments contained in the calgary books there were found to belong to a young adult female of slenda bill and small stature who had been burned on a pile by the lakeshore over forty thousand ease ago what was groundbreaking was that the remains unequivocally human shattering lingering nineteenth century something that bridge people had evolved from an earlier race of hominids the news of mungo lady spread quickly around the globe and was reported in their front page of the national newspapers the bones were at that time the oldest evidence of homo sapiens outside of africa the new had become the a few years later in february nineteen seventy four jim bola returned to.

jim bola forty thousand years six months
"fifty years" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

Marketplace All-in-One

02:04 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on Marketplace All-in-One

"It's perfectly legal for landlords to turn someone down based on their source of income antonio fascinated by is executive director of the homeless persons representation project in baltimore and williams lawyer she says fifty years after the fair housing act we see this as essentially one of the last frontiers of ensuring that people have access to fair housing landlords say it's not discrimination adam skolnick is executive director of the maryland multi housing association a trade group this was all about the governmental bureaucracy that comes with aching voucher as opposed to any other issue skull nick says landlords who accept vouchers face inspections and paperwork the public housing authority determines how much rent they can charge almost one wimbledon i take rogers i love the income stream while mid that and i find it worth dealing with the agony but that's why our association thinks it should be somebody's choice fair housing advocates say say that choice perpetuate segregation and concentrated poverty jill williams eventually did find a place to live on the way out to see it we passed several complexes where she says her voucher wasn't accepted there including of here no such now sexually she's fifty nine now her gray ponytail pokes out of a woman veteran coastguard cap partment right on the corner ground level outside the grounds look neatly kept but she says she doesn't feel safe going for walks and it's far from her family it was disappointing because i couldn't live where i wanted to live and i just never thought that i would find income discrimination as well as at my age heaven experienced discrimination because of my color williams hopes to move to annapolis maryland capital so she can advocate for the homeless and because they're discrimination based on source of income is prohibited in baltimore i'm amy scott for marketplace.

executive director baltimore adam skolnick nick jill williams annapolis maryland capital amy scott maryland multi housing associa fifty years
"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

"We were sending kids to the department of you services that's kids prison by leaps and bounds and they would come home and what would they do what they know best continue to commit offenses because they became unemployable they perhaps didn't have education to rely on the reality is we lost a population of young kids and to what george just chill blazer she took her budget she asks the state of ohio for any extra money any extra favors she took the budget that was already there and she created a series of programs when you come into a court she would give you a chance to stay in your home life go to school but still adhere to these programs that she was set up for you that she created through her courts and monitoring and as a result of these programs are numbers dropped by more than half of the amount of people she's sending to kids services aka kitty jail so tell that you saw this judge do you wish you had gone through a program like that i do i do you know michael have had a lot of conversations pacific ly with regard to programming and i believe that good programming is good security and the prison and as we start to transcend from prison back into the community how we take a look at how we are affecting people when they aren't secure and controlled them by moments as extremely important with regard to the outcome of those specific individuals once they get back into the community at we don't start to take a look at people's values if we don't start to have a conversation about integrity and some other things that it will take to be successful once you release then i show you that most people will go back so three your own personal experience in through this documentary what our viewers supposed to.

george ohio michael
"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Hi my name is kristen i'm calling from evanston and i wanted to talk about what my daughter's school does for martin luther king day they do an assembly they have the kids perform they be passages and sing songs and it's like the most beautiful thing to see all the children up there so appreciate mr or sixty five for making it a priority got a comment for the show hit us up on our facebook page tweet us at the takeaway or leave us a voicemail at eight seven seven eight my take your ideas and takes a huge part of who we are let us know what you're thinking about this is the takeaway they are not just gangs of kids anymore they are often the kinds of kids that are called superpredators no conscience no empathy that was the first lady hillary clinton at a campaign speech in nineteen ninetysix six husband bill clinton's second term she was making the case for criminal justice reform to support president clinton's violent crime control and law enforcement act that super predator idea it's stuck alleged gang members and young people of color were labeled dangerous uncontrollable it was the start of a cycle of juvenile punishment that continues today this week hbo's vice launching their sixth season with the episode raised in the system actor michael k williams host the episode he also starters omar little on the hbo series the wire trauma whether it be physical sexual mental health or just plano good oldfashioned lack of resources in the home you take a.

evanston hillary clinton bill clinton hbo omar martin luther facebook president michael k williams
"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

"Our guest charles mckinney said dr martin luther king junior's legacy has become distorted over time and listeners we are hearing from you how is dr king's life addressed in schools today penatta stephen elementary school music teacher from nyack new york mice didn't have the impression that dr king was powerful speaker close friend of the president and widely accepted more leader i emphasized to them that he was arrested for protesting around twenty times vilified by the press and threatened with physical violence regularly i also talked to them at length about the poor people campaign emphasizing the fact that much of dr king hoped to achieve particularly economic quality for all races has still not yet been accomplished my name is peggy and i'm calling from england new jersey and i am actually a middle school art teacher the decision about who does what to celebrate it is usually left up to me and they might have a little bit of discussion but unfortunately it's not taking us seriously as i like i am a black woman and it is serious and important to me so i make a point of trying to incorporate some project around that time however is just not enough devotion put to this and it's sad because i teach an urban school district and our kids really should learn more by name is gin yell and i'm calling from hollywood florida i have a son in fourth grade and they do a little bit about martin luther king and a little bit about rosa parks but they don't really go into it it's incumbent upon the parents to teach the children because this will only going touch the circus.

charles mckinney president florida martin luther king dr martin luther penatta stephen elementary sch new york peggy hollywood
"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

"It also represents potential there are a growing number of organizations a growing number of activist organizations growing number of of mainland organizations right shout out to black lives matter memphis grassroots organizing coalition coalition of concerned citizens the fight fifteen out memphis right shoutout to so many organizations in town who were doing the work of building engaging in this in this beautiful struggle there's a growing number of people working in the school system who underst who are starting to understand come to an understanding of the deleterious impact of segregation on education right we can't get around it we we simply can't right so there's a growing group of people who are saying look let's start having let's start having some real conversations about how we move forward right what's the definition of insanity you keep doing the same thing over and over and expecting different results well you know what for the last fifty years we've engaged in a series of practices and patterns that have gotten us here we gotta try some thing we gotta try something different and so there's a critical mass of folks i think in this town some elected officials some other civic some other civic leaders a few folks in the foundation arena where we've got to get a few who got to get a few more them on board we're starting to say hey you know what some of these old patterns and practices they're not working it's time to start thinking about about new approaches and so so we see that in memphis again we see the reality of inequality but we also see so much potential to to confront those realities professor charles mckinney associate professor of history rhodes college thank you.

memphis professor charles mckinney associate professor of history fifty years
"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

"People of african descent in that city today yes that and that number is is virtually unchanged from nineteen sixty eight right we've got the highest black child poverty rate in the country but also we have we made gains yes we have made gains right so when we look over the course of the last fifty years we see a dramatic expansion of the black middle class but also we see poverty rates and african african american poverty rates virtually unchanged henry louis gates was once asked to talk about this period is fifty year period and he says you know what the easiest way to talk about this say it was the best of times it was the worst of times is there enough economic opportunity given the cloud of race within memphis to allow someone to achieve your level of success today memphis is going to have to be honest with self right about what memphis can do so on the one hand we say we want people to achieve and we say we want we want to expand opportunities for african americans on the other hand we tell oh companies in corporations that they should move the memphis because they can pay their employees slave wages the chamber of commerce used to have a some language on their on their website before activists pointed it out that you know they talked about hey you know move your company here come to memphis because you know we're not unionized and you can pay you can pay people really really low wages if we extrapolate for a minute and look at memphis as sort of a hyper focused example of something in america what does it symbolize given all the controversy over apparent growing inequality in america right now what does memphis tell us what should we be thinking about as we honor the legacy of dr martin luther king junior memphis represents reality and potential it represents the reality of of persistent racial inequality represents the reality of what what town what city when a county can look like when the majority of the people in that in that space when african americans are systematically routinely shut out of the halls of power.

memphis henry louis gates chamber of commerce america dr martin luther fifty years fifty year one hand
"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

The Takeaway

02:49 min | 2 years ago

"fifty years" Discussed on The Takeaway

"And then when he died racial problems all of that now and it makes me wonder just what kind of a world we are living in and what's going to happen now martin luther king try to help roseanne away from not having a violence or any kind of rubs i think they should have sast pray that his family then find in the memory of all he tried to do for the land he loved so well always willing to share my king with the world he caused he was a symbol of the finest man is capable of being yet to us he was a father and a husband today we mark fifty years since the assassination of dr martin luther king junior king was in memphis support the city's striking sanitation workers they were protesting abusive working conditions and low wages the night before he was killed king spoke at the mason temple in memphis delivering what would become known as the mountaintop speech a long life long has its place but i'm not concerned about that now i just wanna do god's will and he's allowed me to go up to the mountain i've look over i see the promised land i may not get there with you to the night people will get to the promised land in a sense dr king for shadowed what was to come the following night april fourth nineteen sixty eight martin luther king junior was shot and killed as he stood on the balcony of the lorraine motel today the lorraine motel stands as did back in nineteen sixty eight it's no longer a functioning motel it's more the national civil rights museum dr king while he's grown larger than life he's an icon of the civil rights movement and a symbol for many but for trolls mckinney whose an associate professor of history at rhodes college in memphis there's a danger in the wake kings images in stride into our national consciousness professor mckinney warns us that danger should not be ignored we've worked hard to produce a version of king that is like a black santa claus fright to dissenter king to move him away from the political idealogue to move away from the person who was comfortable with mass based protests and that's a problem because that's that's not the real king right that's not the historical king.

memphis king mason temple lorraine motel rhodes college mckinney martin luther king roseanne dr martin luther associate professor of history professor fifty years