35 Burst results for "fifty kilometers"

Israel Independence War Era Weapons Cache Discovered in Tel Aviv

The Promised Podcast

02:35 min | 2 months ago

Israel Independence War Era Weapons Cache Discovered in Tel Aviv

"The day before yesterday as we record a gardener found underneath a bush at number twenty two cream as street a cache of world war two vintage bullets artillery shells and grenades which ordinance was stowed under a bush three quarters of a century ago by members of the haganah jewish militia to keep british soldiers and centuries from finding it such a hiding place for weapons was called a sleek from the hebrew root some lama couth to make rid of and in the one thousand nine hundred eighty s there were hundreds of maybe thousands all around the country though most of them were dismantled as soon as the brits left palestinian nineteen forty eight. But you know how it is. You put your grenades and your artillery shells in your bulletin a whole under bush in your yard and then you get busy ensure the brits go home but you tell yourself you'll empty the gun whole tomorrow and if it's not one thing it's another before you know it seventy odd years of pass that is just life in the big city so this week. The police bomb squad piloted remote control. Sapper robots under the tree and they exploded some of the grenades shells and bullets. And they neutralize the rest and sent them to the tel aviv. Forensics lab for further investigation. And for those of you wondering and who isn't wondering isaac jacob adolf. Crimea was the french jewish attorney who in eighteen. Forty along with sir. Moses montefiore made the trip to alexandria egypt to plead before Dive mohammed ali for the release of jews arrested in damascus blood. Libel that rocked the jewish world that year and crimea and montefiore secured freedom for nine of the thirteen syrian. Jews accused of killing christians for their blood. The other four having already died while being tortured after that chromium became minister of justice of france under the second republic in eighteen forty eight and he later founded the 'alliance eastern elite universal in paris in eighteen. Sixty one gathers that isaac jacob adolf creamier would probably not himself have hidden guns in tel aviv in nineteen forty eight but he probably would have understood the sentiment and arguably nothing captures the haphazard semi history city of this forever new and yet never really new city. We love so al tel aviv. Alto better than a gardener. Finding an old bag of old bullets and such tucked under a shrub to shield it from the prying eyes of the brits on a street named for a man who one hundred years before that sailed with an english financier to alexandria a city. Just four hundred fifty kilometers. Southwest of tel-aviv. In order to gain the release of wrongly residues in damascus a city just two hundred kilometers northeast of tel

Haganah Jewish Militia Bush Lama Couth Isaac Jacob Adolf Moses Montefiore Aviv Mohammed Ali Crimea Alexandria Damascus Egypt Al Tel Tel Aviv France Paris TEL
Man-Made Operations Present Serious Threat To Ocean Biodiversity

Why It Matters

02:42 min | 3 months ago

Man-Made Operations Present Serious Threat To Ocean Biodiversity

"Fish contend with evermore relentless methods other threats are looming over their survival the many other activities in the oceans that perhaps go a little bit under the radar or not as indata as fisheries for example coastal zone development the removal of mangroves and see grosses for a number of purposes from mineral extraction to the building marinas to the expansion of bet's to dragging of harbors lots of those activities that perhaps one does not think so much in terms of the impact. That is the first thing. Second of course. Oil exploration and such activities that do have significant impacts most of those activities. Take place with a narrow band from the continental shelf. They will be largely within the first fifty kilometers from the coast. That is the area of the oceans that he's particularly impacted. And i'm including here. Pollution issues runoff from agriculture production. Lots of nutrients are end up in the plastic pollution and the like those areas of a highly impacted when it comes to high-seas further away from the coast than the major impact really is climate change because the ocean place a very significant role in regulating the climate for example ninety percent of the additional heat that we have produced as a result of global warming sits in the ocean and a quarter of the carbon emissions that we emit are in the ocean so the ocean has a very very significant rolling climate regulation and also a significant impact in fact. It is the geographical area that will suffer the impact of climate change. Most so when you think about temperature change what you'll see is that organisms adopt that so all fish tend to have an environmental window. They feel comfortable in and that environmental wind might be safe from seventeen to eighteen degrees if those seventeen to eighteen degrees move physically because the water is warming they will move without water and so we expect a number of species to move to. What's the polls in both directions. So that's the first impact changes in distribution. There will be also changes in production. Some species will see a decrease in production another son increasing production all that has huge implications for food production in the ocean at all levels if you can imagine for example. A fisherman suddenly going out to sea not finding the face that they're used to fishing on it's not that easy to change to another species to fish because some of them require different boats different gear on different technology and different expertise. That goes all the way. The food chain all the way up to humans.

In Situ Community-Based Oak Conservation At The Morton Arboretum

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:20 min | 5 months ago

In Situ Community-Based Oak Conservation At The Morton Arboretum

"Suited to do some major impact stuff for a bunch of trees and the main focus of what we were connected over our oaks because the icn just did their assessment or trying to get this out that what is it. Forty one percent of species across the globe are facing extinction or at least of conservation concern. And i just spoke with your colleague dr murphy westwood about a lot of exit. You so taking trees to other places to help conserve them. But you are position in a way that you're doing a lot of the institute the other side of that coin which is also desperately needed. So let's take a closer look at just. What in situ conservation means to you before we look at some of the species. You're working with right. So the global tree conservation program in the morton arboretum. We have a very specific approach to how we try to save threatened tree species. We've i go through prioritizing because unfortunately we cannot save all the sixteen thousand three species on the planet and we wish we could right now but we don't have the money or manpower resources so we need to make some hard choices of what we are going to folks and that is We used a lot the redmi sting which is why you talked about with murphy and the new red list of folks which is one of our target tax on groups was published and my team members did that and so now we have a clear picture of which species need our help the most so then two approaches we can take our well. Try to go and save these species right were they occur and that's go in situ conservation so within their native range but also complement to that. Sometimes we just can't that we were not able to save the species right where they occur. So then we can compliment that with ex situ conservation. Which is what murphy. Also talked a lot about hoochie. You can do see the preservation and you can save species by having specimen symbol. Tammy berea so. My job is to focus on the in situ conservation part so where we do is that we select right now. We have tools as if he projects with two different species off endangered oaks which are coworkers brandy. Gi which is endemic micro endemic old that only occurs in the tip or huckabee -fornia peninsula in the california lack in mexico. Scowls working mogo. Well people those these resorts drink margaritas. And they have no idea that fifty kilometers from there There is these amazing biosphere reserve called sierra laguna forest biosphere reserve. And we've seen that reserve. There is the majority of the distribution of these core brand This is a very dry arid. Ecosystems very scrubby and so these are tree only occurs on by edges obese announced streams. And when you think of a stream or a river you imagine that yes. What but he's he's really funny. I guess share some pictures of you just sad there dry and only when there's hurricanes or weather events then erase a lot there and it feels app and it crashes the mountains a mountain range right there and so all. The rain gets dunked on everything. Floods the roles get destroyed. And then you pass this they rebuild it like with the sand like they have. Ob sands so anyway abc's where these oak grows but the problem is that because it's a very dry ecosystem that is also where the ranchers want to have the ratchets. That's there's water so they put these long hosts. And that's how they watered needle gardens or wetlands. Show there's a conflict between the place where the you know the specific habitat for these species. And where the ranches are and the problem. The ranchers be street because he'd provides shea in

Dr Murphy Westwood ICN Morton Arboretum Murphy Tammy Berea Fornia Peninsula Sierra Laguna Forest Biosphere Mexico California ABC Shea
Why Are Leaf Blowers So Annoying?

BrainStuff

04:10 min | 8 months ago

Why Are Leaf Blowers So Annoying?

"Hey brain stuff lauren Vogel Bob here the sounds of autumn satisfying crunch the crisp apple or fallen leaves to your feet or the teeth grinding noise of a leaf blower. Powered by electric or gasoline motors that propel air out of a nozzle to send leaves and grass cuttings flying leaf blowers are probably the most Vilnai's devices in the lawn care universe to the noise that they have met in the mid nineteen seventies when leaf blowers became ubiquitous in the United States to California cities adopted early bands of the Equipment Carmel by the sea beverly labeled the leaf. Blowers a noise nuisance and banned their use a move that has been followed by hundreds of other cities across the United States to some degree. But what is it about leaf blowers that people hate is that the decibels the constancy delete blowers pose real dangers to the health of users or others who happen to be within earshot increasingly, the answer appears to be yes to all of the above. Leaf blowers may send leaves and lawn clippings for a ride, but the gusts which reach one, hundred, eighty, two, two, hundred, and eighty miles per hour. That's about two, hundred, ninety, two, four, hundred, fifty kilometers per hour also create a nose clogging swirl of fungus spores, herbicides, and microbes. The resulting dust is so aggravating to people with allergies, asthma bronchitis, and other respiratory maladies that the American Lung Association recommend staying away from leaf blowers altogether. And then there's the air pollution operating a commercial leaf blower for one hour and it's as much smog forming pollution as you would if you drove a recent mid-size car as say twenty sixteen Toyota Camry from Los Angeles Denver, which is about a one, thousand, one, hundred mile or a one, thousand, eight, hundred kilometer trip. That's because most leaf blowers used to cycle engines they're lightweight and inexpensive, but they require a mixture of gasoline and oil to run unlike more complex engines. They don't have separate chambers for fueling lubricants when operated the engine wastes approximately one third of the combined mixture releasing carbon monoxide, nitrous oxide, and hydrocarbons into the air. Three toxins are some of the main culprits in the air pollution from leaf blowers. Carbon monoxide helps for smug nitrous oxide is a prime ingredient in acid rain and has been linked to global warming. Hydrocarbons are cancer causing organic compounds that also contribute to smog formation plus leaf blowers are noisy. How noisy are they when you engage in conversation? That's a noise level of about. Sixty decibels according to the center for hearing and Communication. If you're strolling on a sidewalk in a car goes by that's about seventy decibels a leaf blower, even fifty feet or fifteen meters away can be up to seventy five decibels and right up close that jumps well into the nineties according to the World Health Organization any noise about seventy decibels risks causing physical hearing damage. And then there's the mental toll. Miss. A phony is a relatively newly classified condition in which people are angered by particular sounds like chewing or knuckle cracking although leaf blowers aren't mentioned in the diagnosis parameters it stands to reason this phony may be related to people's dislike the machines because they're extra sensitive to sound. Preliminary data shows that phones brains may have a hypersensitive connection between the auditory system and the LIMBIC system, which is the part of the brain that's responsible for creating emotions. It's so much a part of life for a phones that they can be shocked others don't feel or react the same way to certain noises. But being irritated by leaf blowers doesn't necessarily mean your phone. Erica. Walker a doctoral student at Harvard. University's Chan. School. Of Public Health discovered that is far less irritating to create a sound than it is to hear it in a survey of one thousand, fifty residents more than a dozen Boston neighborhoods, Walker found that the majority of respondents said they couldn't control or get away from noises like leaf blowers and they believed that no one really cared that it annoyed them. What's more other research has shown that leaf blowers, a low frequency noise that penetrates through outer walls into homes and businesses in a way that some other noises passing vehicles, for example do not. However. Leaf blowers have become an integral part of commercial lawn care while a leaf blower may sound like fingernails across chalkboard to you for the businesses that rely on them portion of their livelihood. It's probably music to the ears.

United States Nitrous Oxide Walker Lauren Vogel Bob California Allergies Equipment Carmel Apple World Health Organization American Lung Association Toyota Camry Boston Los Angeles Harvard Erica
The Anni Hindocha Case

Casefile True Crime

04:42 min | 11 months ago

The Anni Hindocha Case

"In the light to thousands, life was going well twenty-seven-year-old. Any Indoor INDATA. The engineering graduate had a good job in Stockholm at the headquarters of Multinational Telecommunications Company Ericsson and had recently purchased Tirana potman with some help from her parents. and He's close Knit Hindu family were of Indian heritage and had immigrated to the southern Swedish town of Mariestad before she was born. Although any had moved away. She returned to her family home muffin maintaining a close relationship with her father mother older sister and younger brother. In two, thousand nine and his aunt who was the families expert match Banca introduced her to a young man named Shrayan Johnny. Twenty nine year old sheldon was two years older than any, and it was from the English city of bursts though. Like any, Hey, had Hindu parents and was one of three children with an older brother and a younger sister. Shrayan, had an economics degree from Manchester University and worked for his family successful business running nursing himes throughout England's Westcountry. Although any industry and lived in different countries, they soon struck up a long distance friendship. During a visit to London any went on her first date with when They attended a West end performance of lying king before having dinner at upmarket. Fusion restaurant. Couple had a wonderful time with trae in particularly locking the way. Any made him laugh. Despite the long distance, their relationship blossomed In February two, thousand ten, and he decided to relocate to the United Kingdom a move that would help develop a connection with train. Have Bothe- Vinod and mother Milan gave her their blessing. And he quit her job at Ericsson and on March one she moved in with her cousin in Luton. Town about fifty kilometers north west of London. Shortly after the move any cold her parents to announce that things were going well with her and train and that she had been welcomed by his family. Several. Weeks Light Up v Gnawed into nealon traveled to the UK to make trains parents. That was a whirlwind visit that included often tae a tour of Bristol and Dana at an Indian restaurant. By the end of the evening, everyone agreed that the meeting had gone well. On June Tan Sri until Gani to Paris on a private jet. After giving any a design address and Christian Dior. Shoes Shrayan took her out for dinner at the Ritz Hotel. Instead of desert any was presented with a diamond engagement. Ring Worth Twenty Five. Thousand Pounds. The couple begin planning their wedding. Day initially wanted to get married into by, but after an impromptu visit to India they fell in love with Mumbai and decided to have the wedding there instead. Anne in Sri in planned to have old traditional Hindu ceremonies. But because they wouldn't be legally binding, they would make the marriage official at a UK registry office after their honeymoon. On Thursday October Twenty Eight, two, thousand, ten, the wedding festivities began at Mambas Rene Songs Hotel. Lavish celebrations lasted for three days costing the Hinduja and Diani families around two hundred, thousand pounds altogether. The wedding concluded on Saturday October thirty with a reception held by the Wani's. Photos captured the newlyweds beaming with any dressed in a blue and green. Sorry and in wearing a silver outfit with a scarf that complimented he's broads. After the reception, the couple farewelled their loved ones with Anne, and her family weeping as they said day. Goodbyes. Train had intended for their honeymoon destination to bay a surprise. But before he could tell any that would going, he's not gonNA. Let it slip that he had booked a trip to South Africa.

Shrayan Johnny Ericsson London Trae Anne UK Milan Mariestad Christian Dior Stockholm Tirana Mambas Rene Songs Hotel Ritz Hotel Bothe- Vinod Sheldon Multinational Telecommunicatio Bristol Luton Manchester University United Kingdom
Anni Hindocha

Casefile True Crime

04:07 min | 11 months ago

Anni Hindocha

"And He's close Knit Hindu family were of Indian heritage and had immigrated to the southern Swedish town of Mariestad before she was born. Although any had moved away. She returned to her family home muffin maintaining a close relationship with her father mother older sister and younger brother. In two, thousand nine and his aunt who was the families expert match Banca introduced her to a young man named Shrayan Johnny. Twenty nine year old sheldon was two years older than any, and it was from the English city of bursts though. Like any, Hey, had Hindu parents and was one of three children with an older brother and a younger sister. Shrayan, had an economics degree from Manchester University and worked for his family successful business running nursing himes throughout England's Westcountry. Although any industry and lived in different countries, they soon struck up a long distance friendship. During a visit to London any went on her first date with when They attended a West end performance of lying king before having dinner at upmarket. Fusion restaurant. Couple had a wonderful time with trae in particularly locking the way. Any made him laugh. Despite the long distance, their relationship blossomed In February two, thousand ten, and he decided to relocate to the United Kingdom a move that would help develop a connection with train. Have Bothe- Vinod and mother Milan gave her their blessing. And he quit her job at Ericsson and on March one she moved in with her cousin in Luton. Town about fifty kilometers north west of London. Shortly after the move any cold her parents to announce that things were going well with her and train and that she had been welcomed by his family. Several. Weeks Light Up v Gnawed into nealon traveled to the UK to make trains parents. That was a whirlwind visit that included often tae a tour of Bristol and Dana at an Indian restaurant. By the end of the evening, everyone agreed that the meeting had gone well. On June Tan Sri until Gani to Paris on a private jet. After giving any a design address and Christian Dior. Shoes Shrayan took her out for dinner at the Ritz Hotel. Instead of desert any was presented with a diamond engagement. Ring Worth Twenty Five. Thousand Pounds. The couple begin planning their wedding. Day initially wanted to get married into by, but after an impromptu visit to India they fell in love with Mumbai and decided to have the wedding there instead. Anne in Sri in planned to have old traditional Hindu ceremonies. But because they wouldn't be legally binding, they would make the marriage official at a UK registry office after their honeymoon. On Thursday October Twenty Eight, two, thousand, ten, the wedding festivities began at Mambas Rene Songs Hotel. Lavish celebrations lasted for three days costing the Hinduja and Diani families around two hundred, thousand pounds altogether. The wedding concluded on Saturday October thirty with a reception held by the Wani's. Photos captured the newlyweds beaming with any dressed in a blue and green. Sorry and in wearing a silver outfit with a scarf that complimented he's broads. After the reception, the couple farewelled their loved ones with Anne, and her family weeping as they said day. Goodbyes.

Shrayan Johnny Trae London UK Mariestad Christian Dior Anne Mambas Rene Songs Hotel Bothe- Vinod Ritz Hotel Milan Ericsson Sheldon Bristol Luton Manchester University Gani United Kingdom England India
How Long Can Andean Condors Fly Without Flapping Their Wings

BrainStuff

03:03 min | 11 months ago

How Long Can Andean Condors Fly Without Flapping Their Wings

"Imagine your average three-year-old human child something around three feet or a meter tall probably covered in jam a now imagine that child trying to get off the ground with a pair of wings bid have to be pretty big wings. Welcome to the plight of the Indian condor species name Volt Hor griffiths the heaviest flying bird in the world. Weighing in at up to thirty three pounds or fifteen kilos, they keep their heavy bodies in the air with some of the longest wings in the world there wingspan can range over ten feet long that's over three meters. There are only a handful of birds carnally living on our planet have larger wings spans, and they're all pelagics, birds, a plastic birds being seabirds that soar over the open ocean for weeks at a time, such as fast petrels and sheer waters. As far as we know, the largest brand ever fly was the Pella. Gorna Sanders C., which lived twenty five to twenty, eight million years ago and was twice as large as the biggest bird living today with a wingspan of twenty four feet over seven meters. Seabirds can accomplish this. Thanks in part to the literally uplifting winds that flow over oceans the Indian condor. Mostly relies on updrafts high in the Andes mountains across much of Western, south. America. The problem with being such a huge bird is that it makes getting off the ground or even flapping those giant wings and flight a bit of an ordeal. Soaring is easy once they're up in the sky and that's mainly what Andean condors do they just float like hang gliders in the air currents sometimes serving the ground for dead animals to eat as a scavenger and sometimes just having an APP. But this means that taking off is the most costly part of the birds overall energy supply. Scientists have always known that they spend very little time flapping their wings but a study published in July of twenty. Twenty and the proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences found the Andean condors flap, their wings, a sum total of almost never. Not, only to the researchers find colossal birds, flap their wings one percent of their total flight time they discovered a bird could fly for five hours and more than one hundred miles or one hundred, fifty kilometers without flapping them once. The research team found that weather didn't affect how much flapping the condors were doing. Study Co author Hannah Williams a postdoctoral researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Animal Behavior said in a press release. This suggests that decisions about when and where to land are crucial as not only do condor's need to be able to take off again but unnecessary landings will add significantly to their overall flight costs. All of which means that in Congress must understand how to use thermals, thermals being invisible patterns and bubbles of air moving all around in the atmosphere to their advantage, and they must understand this much better than scientists previously gave them credit for.

Max Planck Institute For Anima Gorna Sanders C. Pella Postdoctoral Researcher National Academy Of Sciences Hannah Williams Congress America
Elon Musk's Starlink internet-from-space satellites leave astronomers 'frustrated'

The Tech Guy

05:45 min | 1 year ago

Elon Musk's Starlink internet-from-space satellites leave astronomers 'frustrated'

"I want to go back to starling for this episode. That's the. That's the thing that I'm very torn about. An many photographers are very torn about because on the one hand. They promise this this fast Internet for almost everyone anywhere because it comes from satellites, but on the other hand there are asked to photographers and. astronomers who are not that happy about this because. What these satellites do and definitely, or you're likely have seen articles about it. They add new light dots to the sky, and those dots are turned out to be bit of a problem so now I have to say though this is musk's spacex and they're going to plan a launch guest Dan back. As twelve thousand of them, there's already hundreds in the air, but one thing they did talk to astro photographers, and they understood their concerns. They are now putting a sun shade on these satellite something. No other satellites do so That's and that's what I wanted to explain what? To what's actually happening than what the reason for this is, so? They initially had one of the satellites with the White Antenna Arrays, being painted black just to see if that would. well first of all reduce enough lights to to make them more invisible, and also about, and it turned out. This didn't really work because they were heating up too much, and they were blacks colors space. And they weren't reflecting infrared now. I got good for for watching the sky, so that didn't really work and. I think we have to I. Look into what is the problem because when you WanNa, take a photo of the sky and of the night sky, or if you have a telescope, and you WANNA take an exposure off whatever faraway galaxy, then you will too along exposure, and that long exposure means. Things that move during that exposure will be visible under picture so instead of having just a dot from a satellite you have a stripe, or in case of x and the and the starting system, Yup multiple strike especially when these satellites have been launched, and when they're still on their way to the final orbit, which takes weeks or This is nothing new, but with the prospect of maybe one hundred times more satellites in the sky, it might be a little problematic. So so. I'm I'm kind of happy. That's basic is listening. Trying. So they tried the what they call dark sat, which is the painted sat and that didn't really work and then. As you said they are now, have a test satellite up which has visor that shades these parts from the from from the sun, so there won't be sun falling on those areas of the satellite that are reflective that doesn't mean the satellite won't be there, and it won't block late, but at least it will afflict collect light. And it will also not make them completely invisible to the astronomers what they are looking for what they're trying is they wanna make them invisible for the naked eye, and now they have worked with an observatory to really understand the problem and it. The problem is not necessarily that there will be additional things on the paper. Because what these? What these sky watchers do, is they? They do what's called stacking. They take multiple photos and right. Take out what is different between them. So that's a method that is is being in use already. The big problem is that these telescopes use what's called CCD sensors, though if you if you're in your camera in your Ds Alanya Murless Camera, you probably have a a C. Moss sensor and the Sima. Censor If you overexposed Pixel, then that's pixel that's over exposed. The rest is not affected. What happens with the CD's is that. If you overexposed group of pixels from pretty bright satellite like if those are really saturated pixels if there is if they are what we call blown out, then that has the chance to to affect more than just these pixels. It might affect an entire row of pixels. It's called blooming, so that takes good. Might knockout an entire row of other pixels, and that is the big problem, so. What they are working now on is several things. The first is the the visors. To reduce the reflectively. And the second is that they as soon as those satellites are in their in their final. Like. Five hundred and fifty kilometers up there. they have their their solo areas, which are also reflective what they call a shocking configuration, so it stands on top of the satellite, so she look at it. It's pointing away from the earth and what they can do is and what they're planning to do. Is they planning slightly? Rotate the satellites in a way that the the the the the whole era isn't visible from the Earth so. Reflections are pretty much shielded that way too so there's multiple things they are doing. To to get a hold of this, they have that. We don't really have results just yet I think as of today there's there's one of these visor satellites up there, but they seem to be so convinced that this is going to work that they are. At. They are planning to have all the satellites from now on quickly these visors.

Ds Alanya Murless Camera Spacex Musk DAN C. Moss
How Foodora couriers made history with their fight to join a union

The Big Story

09:12 min | 1 year ago

How Foodora couriers made history with their fight to join a union

"By now I think most of us no problems with the GIG economy. It treats workers as disposable doesn't offer benefits or protection or anything we traditionally associate with. You know a job. It doesn't pay well enough either so a regular shift can barely make ends meet so for the workers not great for users. It's incredibly convenient. And it's not going anywhere and that means that if anything is going to change in terms of working conditions in the GIG. It's going to have to happen the same way. Those conditions have been changed for more than a century with organizing but before you can officially or at least in the eyes of the law in Canada you need to be classified as workers not as independent contractors or entrepreneurs so that is the first fight but once it's been one then the doors open and then we'll see who tries to walk through it and how the companies that drive the GIG economy. Try TO SLAM IT in their face. Jordan Heath Rawlings. This is the Big Story Sarah. Much headway is the work and wealth reporter with the Toronto Star. She also has an upcoming podcast. That is all about the fight for working conditions in the GIG economy I saw. Why don't you start because I know you've done a ton of this reporting? Just tell me a little bit about what it's like to work in the GIG delivery economy for food or or companies like that. Yeah I've learned a lot over the past year about kind of the daily routine and kind of daily reality for these workers. I mean the first thing to say is obviously often very physically demanding job done and often quite harsh and Brinkley. Dangerous Conditions Just imagine riding your bike around Toronto fifty kilometers a day in minus twenty weather. It's it's not easy so One of the major concerns of these workers as safety on the road and that partly speaks to as well the way. Our city is designed and not being Super Friendlier. Safe for cyclists. But you know. A bunch of the careers are also drivers. And there's a bunch of safety challenges that come with that as well in terms of having to sort of be tuned in this APP on your phone and driving around the city having to find parking spots that it's very challenging The second thing is that the pay is very low. I mean it's they get for food or are they. Got Four dollars and fifty cents for each delivery. And then they get a commoner a dollar per kilometer from restaurant to drop off so there's really an An incentive and an pressure to get as many orders as you can so again. That's quite demanding in that sense. In order to be financially viable. Really have to turn out those those orders. So yeah the low pay. The unpredictable pay is is Is a major feature of the job and I think. Lastly it's the sense that there's a bit of a lack of respect. I think is how the carriers would have described it for their job and For the for the people doing it. So so that's really sort of what I've learned about the everyday realities of the job. Will you mentioned briefly when you were talking about driving? But to what extent are they tied to this APP? At least according to what you've heard. Yeah so there's been hearings at the Labor board over the past six months that really revealed a lot about how these APP companies operating and obviously most companies don't have to reveal their inner workings but in this case they've sort of had to in a tribunal setting so we've sort of gotten a window into how the APPs intervene in workers kind of daily workflow infra doors case There's an algorithm that determines when you can get shifts so basically the fastest rider the best riders. The ones that you know never are late logging into the APP. And all that kind of thing they're gonNA get first priority in terms of selecting shifts. So that's one way that the APP kind of heavily bit of control. I didn't even realize that they worked in shifts. I thought it was kind of like Uber. Where you know you log in whenever you're ready for some more now that's the major difference between Food Aura. And say Uber Eats. You can just log in and start picking up orders but with Dora. There's sort of this. Extra layer so so some of the features of the way food were operates are are unique to fidora shifts has definitely one of them and then once you accept an order you sort of have the APP beeping at you and telling you whether you're on time in terms of delivering and that kind of thing so that's another way where you're sort of interaction with the APP all the time and Auras also unique because it does have a layer of human dispatchers who careers can also communicate with While they're on shift and what we kind of learned is that those dispatchers are in some ways monitoring couriers behavior which again can restrict or change their ability to log into the APP get shifts so the dispatchers issue strikes for what they see as poor performance whether it's late deliveries or whatever it is And that can in the worst circumstances actually lead to craze being deactivated from the APP and not being able to log in at all. So you've kind of hinted at a couple of times but what is unique about food or maybe explain this just Through the Lens of who is I've an Ostos. So I've also says a career with Dora and he's being at the forefront of trying to organize the union and If this group of careers successful they will be the first at based workforce in Canada to unionize and actually one of the first on the continent so it is a. It's a big deal and really the reason From speaking to an interviewing Ivan and other carriers that they're sort of trying to form a union it goes back to wages the safety and the respect on the job and really a big part of their argument is that you know food says all of these couriers are self-employed entrepreneurs. They don't have the right to form a union. They're you know they're entrepreneurs doing their own thing. The Independent contractors that we hear about all the time exactly and this is a huge pillar of the GIG economy and what Ivan and other careers basically sat at the Labor Board. Was I mean no? There's all these ways that the APP controls the way we do our job and in that sense. It sort of resembles an employer telling you you know when to work and how to work So that was One of the main thrust of what we heard at the Labor Board and recently the Labor Board essentially agreed with the carriers and said yes. This looks more like an employment relationship. So what is the difference or at least? What's the difference supposed to be between a fulltime employees or even just a part time employees and the typical independent contractor? Yes so I went. Boil it down to say that an independent contractor someone who has a lot of power and control over the way that they do their work and these stand to either profit or lose profit from the fruits of their labor so really easy to example to think of as a contractor that you hire to renovate your house your apartment you know you strike a deal with them and then they choose how they go about doing the job whether they bring in five guys to do their work for them or you know they call the plumber to come in and do something. They're really in control of of how they do that. Work and you can say hey at the end of the day. I'm not happy I'M GONNA end this contract. But you can't be like you know. I'm going to give you a performance review and discipline you for this thing that. I don't like that you did because they're not your employees so that kind of is the essence of an independent contractor And again most APP companies Classify their workers in this way. How does the term allow up companies to get more from these workers? Well I think what it does is really reduce the burden on the company as certainly a financial burden it means that the company companies are not paying into a pension plan into an inch employment insurance neither of the workers It means that the workers have no protection under provincial employment laws. It means that they don't have the right to join a union that they don't have the right to minimum wage. So you know it's really downloading a lot of the responsibility for you know your rights and protections on the job to the individual worker and removes them from the system That is set up to protect regular employees on the job. What was food or

Labor Board Toronto Canada Dora Ivan Jordan Heath Rawlings Reporter Brinkley
Satellite Constellations and the Future of Astronomy

Astronomy Cast

11:11 min | 1 year ago

Satellite Constellations and the Future of Astronomy

"We are back at the American Astronomical Society Meeting in Honolulu Hawaii and and we last episode. We talked about the big controversy of the construction of the thirty meter telescope. Here on the on the Hawaiian islands the Bit other big controversy. That's going on is of course. The starling constellation and literally just a couple of days ago. SPACEX launched launched the third batch of starling satellites another sixty satellites into space. And I it is safe to say. Hey that astronomers are outraged. I think that's an under Sabin. Yeah and there. There were three different arguments. Demint put forward and I have to admit at the top of this episode. I am somewhat biased. I desperately want to see the digital divide to be overcome and low cost Internet Internet to be available globally and Starlink promises. That and so a lot of what we're GONNA talk about. Today the issue comes down to whether or not you trust. Trust Elon. Musk to actually implement the low cost in the low cost Internet so the three arguments that we heard today against Starlink And one was a cultural problem of old but the children if you see satellite zipping around in the sky will people still fall in love with the stars. Will your experience visiting a dark sky site. Turn you off to astronomy if you see satellites and the cry of outrage. We heard was that people won't be inspired by the sky if they see manmade objects now I have to admit I distinctly remember exactly exactly where I was the first time I saw satellite. I I was up in the mountains of the caucuses camping beside a glacier and and I was sitting on a rock all by myself because being a teenager is hard and I was fifteen and sometimes you need to sit on a rock by yourself from your fifteen and and the satellite. I just saw something moving in the sky and I realized what it was and that realization of I'm alone on orrock beside a glacier but there's a satellite moving through my stars that at the age of fifteen was amazing moment and this idea that satellites make it impossible for people to fall in love with the stars. I I don't think that's the case. But it was one of the arguments arguments put forward and getting together to the second but but sort of like from a practical technical standpoint win. The starlings are first launched launched. They are actually very bright there about magnitude two or three which makes them easily visible to the unaided eye from many spots on the earth and they look like this train of moving across the sky. Call this this string of pearls and end and then as the starlings raise their altitude up to their final position of about five hundred fifty kilometers altitude the dimmed back to about a five magnitude which is at the very limits of the human. I can see in Nice dark dark skies and and but of course in the eyes of a of an astronomer that is incredibly bright. Eight of fifth magnitude star is very bright star in in the eyes of telescope and then the other problem is that when when when they pass across the sky they will really only be visible to astronomy when they are low on the on the horizon during the summer months. So when it's when the night is the longest the night is the shortest. You're going to get really. You're only going to be able to see these satellite right. Aided the right after twilight and right before sunrise. And and that's it you have to be and then for the for the rest of the night there won't be any satellites delights but as the nights get longer the satellites get brighter over C- over the entire night sky and so they're anticipating baiting that over some of the the big observatories in Chile and in the Northern Hemisphere. When you're in the middle of the longest nights you're gonNA see these? These satellites run across the entire sky. So so there's no question that these are going to be very bright objects that are going to move through your field of view and I leave streaks and one of the things that people keep bringing up is there's already thousands of pieces of stuff. There's eighteen thousand thousand tracked pieces that you can pull from the database right now. Eighteen thousand seven. I think you can pull from the database and you can track the position using celestis and other other things like that. Yeah so there you know we know and to adding another twelve hundred. which is the goal for link? So so let's narrow this down even further so there's eighteen thousand things up there. Prior to the launch of Starlink only two hundred objects were naked eye visible. So Oh you can only look up two hundred different things in heavens above and go outside and see them with the unaided eye with Starlink. They're adding well over for a thousand by the end of this year to the list of things that will be visible to the unaided eye and its brightness that is really the problem. I was an observational astronomer. For a number of years before realizing I am the rain God in those years years that are as an observational astronomer. I had myriad satellites go through my images but because they were low brightness objects there'd there'd be the straight line of pixels that well I couldn't see stars in but that line was the size on the sky. I that the satellite was on the sky. We starlink what's happening is these well captured. photons that are reflected off of the satellite delight. There are so many of them that they saturate the pill pixels spill over to adjacent pixels wiping out a larger swath of your detector than the satellite alone would wipe out. And when you saturate a pixel that saturation can cause the next. Several images to have ghosts hosts of that satellites passage still visible so not only. Are you wiping out. A larger percentage of pixels with that satellite but you're wiping them out across multiple images. Yeah and and so you know a lot of these these these satellites as they pass the field of view view can overwhelm the sensor and essentially make an entire observing frame worthless and the speed that they're moving is of great concern into these dreamers as they as they move through it's about. How quickly is this thing moving through your field of view? And how long do you have to not be able to take data data while this while the satellite is is moving through so so they're they're quite concerned just about overall in the time domain as well and of course the the big observatory that's going to be the most effective is the newly renamed. That's a different controversial. I know that's like a third the Third Controversy Jersey. We won't get into that but the newly but we. I think we can all agree. That the Vera Rubin Observatory is a wonderful Navarine Observatory and that is going to be the. That's that's going to be the facility that's going to be deeply affected because it just is staring wide eyed at the sky for all all night capturing as much as they can as deeply as a canon so every frame is GonNa have starlings and one ebbs and all this past them and this is this this is a problem of because it has a giant field of you. The probability that there's going to be a Starlink in any one image goes up if you have a small field of view. There's the potential that you can time your images to avoid having star Lincoln them but because this is a huge field of view. You your ability to do. That is greatly reduced. And they're going to end up picking up. STARLA starlings left and right and here's a question starts to become one of mitigation so folks are working with spacex to see okay. What do we need to do to reduce the brightness of these objects so that they aren't blowing out the detectors? Yeah there's more than that so so Someone from spacex actually gave a presentation this morning and that was actually a bit of a surprise and they didn't do a very good job of letting us know that this is is going to happen. There weren't a lot of people we have the whole ballroom and there wasn't a lot of people they're listening to her her talk. They mentioned essentially a couple of mediation strategy. So the first first thing is with this first launch they have. They've applied some darkening materials to one of the sixty satellites to see if the some of their ideas to make them to have a lower Albedo lower flexibility. And before you laugh at the fact that it's only one the thing you have to take into mind mind is these suckers were already largely built in preparation and turning around and re fabricating that takes time and so my suspicion. My hope is that that they were only able to fabricate one with the new materials fast enough to be able to test and I think it's you know. No this is how you perform an experiment right. Is You you isolate. The variable does putting all this material on one of the satellites make darker than the rest and and we'll find out what happened happens so so that's the first thing they did is experimenting and and this is a good sign. I mean this is like literally. This is the first time I think that any satellite constellation Elation has ever had a conversation with Strana mors and said what can we do to minimize our impact on your science. I don't there's you know the two hundred others others that we mentioned plus all the eighteen thousand. No one's ever tried to make them not bright in the eyes of strimmers so till the first strategy is to try at a paint them so there will be the second thing is to provide an open source real time. Location of all of the satellites in the Constellation and to communicate with the other networks. And anyone out there. Who is who is going to be relying on knowing the position? These starlink so in theory as the as the Constellation gets built your of your telescope operator. You're going to know when a Starlink is going to be passing through your detector and you'll be able to shut detector down. Wait for the starling. Pass opened the doctor again. And continue to get your to get your

Starlink Spacex American Astronomical Society Honolulu Hawaii Constellation Elation Chile Demint Third Controversy Jersey Musk Northern Hemisphere Strana Mors Vera Rubin Observatory Starla Lincoln Navarine Observatory
Wolfgat, a Far-Flung Destination for South African Coastal Cuisine

Monocle 24: The Menu

07:03 min | 1 year ago

Wolfgat, a Far-Flung Destination for South African Coastal Cuisine

"Just a few years. South African Chef Cobras. Fundamentally has is boosted restaurant Wolf cuts to the Toba many lists ranking the world's best dining spots located in the fishing village of Party Nostra a hundred and fifty kilometers from Capetown. This small restaurant with seats for just twenty diners as the reputation for serving dishes made of some of the greatest local South African ingredients. I met Cobras at Kadoorie House studio one to discuss his success the south-african cooling the identity and first of all how his background as a journalist has been free tamers arrest or two and chef working with restaurant news At the DOT website. You kind of differently. Open up your eyes and your ears to what's happening globally. So I think that must have definitely played so some small role in the output when I started applying myself restaurant sort of scenario if that makes sense in wait sort of yeah I suppose it stimulates your your thoughts you know in terms of what's possible and what what can be done. And what's a gap in the market. Because I think in South Africa we still only just starting to realize what amazing things we have on home turf and to appreciate. It are indigenous produce and to present that as something that can be on a global stage and we sort of forging a South African culinary identity not which hasn't existed. In my opinion you're also talking about the importance of good storytelling. You learn as a journalist your I suppose definitely am. I still still do a lot of research for menus for the kind of inspiration for the restaurant. We situated historic voting on a very significant archaeological site with an old cave. That's located right underneath. The building said there's a lot of storytelling these a lot of early history that inspires everything everything what we do and how we compare the menu. How while we'd like to serve the Food and what we want to think of when they when they eat these things? It didn't more about your cooking philosophy as you are already making clear. We're talking about very very local food super local ingredients and so forth. Yes very intuitive menu. In a way whatever inspires us you know seasonally from the landscape. The way they're the history very much of that coastline and then picking indigenous succulents seaweeds wild herbs the whole teams involved every morning. Literally we up picking what's necessary for today's menu and it's about a six kilometer radius around the village. Everything comes from that radius. Not Everything I mean. We do get flour away from a neighbouring village a couple of hours away and we get of course we get more dry goods supplied like like any other strong on all local but not everything is sourced from you know that six kilometer radius but in each dish we always highlight an element that we've picked in that. Very like hyper local location. What are some of your favorite dishes just to paint a picture of listeners of what you get served at this restaurant I like really simple food? I like the combination of textures and flavors to be the surprise element around like things is to be to overwork. Layered all complicated so often dishes have only three or four ingredients. I like to combine elements of the land and the sea. So it could be an alien being that we puree and then serve with and some local green succulents or on the current or the menu. That just finished because we're now in a break Our our ultimate menu. We actually served one of the simplest dishes ever for our main course which was venison with seaweed so yeah literally like two elements like a surf and turf with local Springbok served with a kind enough Nari same species what's used for Sushi that grows in our local rapports poor fire and we found out in sort of a happy accident went way of this very special technique to get really really sulky. So it's always quite a nice surprise for gas because you see the sort of big almost chunk of seaweed on the plate and it looks like it's going to be a textual challenge and there's like this really silky smooth Emami slightly smoky seaweed that just really complements the venison quite well so two elements on the mate and it looks really simple. I mean you can't really do too much in terms of plating even so it's very pared-down pared-down and minimalist dish but then the flavors are just completely unexpected. And I'm quite new. Well we're resolve African food. Now what do you think is happening in your home country. It's a very exciting time because for so long we've had a bit of a Lack of confidence in our own produce and We have so many different cultures in South Africa. It's such a melting pot of different cultures and histories and traditional foods that we don't really have one single so African cuisine but now finally people are realizing that we need to create this momentum and for us the way to start in a small more way was to look very locally so to do something regional because then at least you get a little bit of an identity already and that you can work with but I think in the bigger context South African shapes differently becoming a lot more conscious that these sort of collective thing that we need to work together to establish. Tell me about your principles at work. I was reading that in your restaurant. There is no really high rocky over there and and it's interesting what people you've been hiring over there they don't necessarily we have massive qualifications so I work with a team of five For Women One man all born and raised in paternoster. None of them have any for more food background. Whatever or restaurant work our training and yes? We don't have any hierarchy or any distinction between kitchen in front of House. How does it work quite well? We're a Small Well oiled machine and we everybody does everything and often. It will mean that you you pick ingredients for a dish that you'll be doing the preparation for you know you do the part of that dish this necessary during service to finish preparing and you'll often often carry it to the table so it's kind of you come full circle and you can explain to the guests exactly what the dishes made up of and even the technique so for me. That's a real synergy energy in being that hands on in creating and serving the menu so you know just the way drawn or a or a chef you basically fulfill all the

South Africa Capetown Party Nostra Kadoorie House DOT Paternoster
Volkswagen raises forecast for electric car production

AP 24 Hour News

00:41 sec | 1 year ago

Volkswagen raises forecast for electric car production

"Fold Vulcan is raising the bar for its production of battery powered because saying it will reach a goal of one million per year two years earlier than planned Volkswagen says it will turn out a million battery only because by the end of twenty twenty three instead of the end of twenty twenty five it'll reach one point five million the announcement comes as European automakers are under pressure to meet low emissions limits aimed at fighting global warming faults rock and is planning to boost sales by introducing the ID three about free mobile sending for around thirty thousand euros with a range of up to five hundred and fifty kilometers on a single

Volkswagen Free Mobile
Boeing Starliner Orbital Flight Test Landing Scheduled

Cigar Dave

00:32 sec | 1 year ago

Boeing Starliner Orbital Flight Test Landing Scheduled

"Story we've been following the latest updates from NASA on the condition of the Boeing starliner capsule that has been in orbit after failing to dock with the I SS here senior VP of Boeing Jim Shelton vehicle status really excellent all our avionics systems are good our life support systems in the cabin all look great thermal management power is neutral or better meaning we're you know we're able to orient the spacecraft right now it's in a circular orbit about two hundred and fifty kilometers above earth its schedule for a landing tomorrow morning at five fifty seven at the landing site New Mexico as also a backup window at one forty eight in the

Nasa Senior Vp New Mexico Boeing Jim Shelton Fifty Kilometers
Rebuilding lives after terror in Cameroon

UN News

03:59 min | 1 year ago

Rebuilding lives after terror in Cameroon

"Meru a bustling regional capital set in the dry and dusty plains of numbering cars ten times over they ferry people around the city of around Hoffa million people many who live here have been through the most matic experiences having been forced to flee villages close to the border which had been attacked by terrorists line to Boko Haram or other obs- How do we get these women or any victim to recover and rebuilder lives and that's of course much more complicated because it requires a lot of longer term assistance Daniel Dickinson and in this special UN use the leaders on podcast from Cameroon. I'll be looking at what can be done for people who have suffered at the hands of violent extremists people who through no fault of their own have lost everything and who now need somehow restart their lives it's noon and the hottest time of the day and Moore but trees provide comforting shape right at this outdoor workshop a couple of blocks from the main thoroughfare of this city one man and four women in brightly colored robes sit in a circle on the floor working diligently stitching leather sandals the leather has been cured from slaughtered animals and the souls and made from discarded vehicle tires it is one of the women in June two years ago she was forced to flee her home in the town of Mohra and what's the north of Moore after it was attacked by Boko Haram everybody got Amanda mckellar dignity coogan embody local there was fighting but I didn't realize I was frank read at the time my husband had gone to work he was killed there the local chief came by my house and told you that had to flee the children that day I was so scared had never felt feel like this before I don't know how to explain it I didn't eat a had no strength I was overwhelmed by the situation I'm in to Sally's home was burnt to the ground in panicked surrounding that attack she lost everything she still doesn't know what happened to her husband whose body she's never seen she now makes up to two passive sandals each week and sells vegetables on a small stand outside the workshop to make ends meet these offer only sources of income so she's pleased to have received the training I like walking IBP thanks because I would like to get more training and then maybe have the strength to raise my children my husband died two years ago and it's only now that I'm beginning a new life with I five hundred to sally as just one of around two hundred fifty thousand people who fled terrorist attacks in northeast Cameroon in the vernacular of the UN she's known as an internally displaced person or ADP body it's not just cameroonians reflected by terrorist groups like Boko Haram as I spoke to her some two hundred and fifty kilometers north tens of thousands if people were pouring across the border from the Nigerian town of Ram just a few miles away into the village of Gura in Cameroon honoring renewed attacks by terrorists

Cameroon Sally Daniel Dickinson Hoffa UN Moore Amanda Mckellar IBP Mohra ADP Gura Two Years Fifty Kilometers
Why Is the Ocean Different Colors?

BrainStuff

05:48 min | 1 year ago

Why Is the Ocean Different Colors?

"Today's episode is brought to you by starbucks. They say that starbucks nitro does for cold coffee. What music does for workouts road trips in grand. Romantic gestures sound too good to be true. Guess we'll just have to try it for yourself. Starbucks nature cold brew. It's called coffee that subtly sweet lush and velvety smooth only at starbucks welcome to brainstorm a production indivi- heart radio. Hey brain stuff lauren vogel balm hair someone gazing out at the ocean from the maine coast seized very different hues is them someone's squinting at the c. from sunny beach on a greek island but why does the ocean come in so many shades of blue of course ocean water is an inherently blue blue. It's clear that we see on the surface are the result of light being absorbed and reflected by the water itself. Whatever is floating and living in it and the surface of the ocean floor below low it a glass of water will of course appear clear as visible light passes through it with little to no obstruction but if a body of water is deep enough that light isn't reflected off the bottom it appears blue a basic physics explains why light from the sun is made up of spectrum of different wavelengths the longer wavelengths links appear to our eyes as the reds oranges while the shorter ones appear blue and green when the sun's light strikes the ocean it interacts with water molecules and can be either absorbed or scattered. If nothing is in the water except water the longer read portions of the spectrum tend to be absorbed by the water molecules whereas the light of those shorter wavelengths is more likely to go deep hit water molecules there and scatter back up towards her is making the ocean appear blue depth depth and the ocean bottom also influence whether surface appears a dusky dark blue as in parts of the atlantic or casts as safir like shimmer as in many tropical locations. We spoke nasa astronaut gene carl feldman. He said in greece the water is this beautiful turquoise color because the bottom is either white sand or white rocks fox. What happens is the light comes down and blue light gets down hits the bottom and reflects back up so you make this beautiful light blue color in the water darker sand rocks or other formations mean darker water. The color is further complicated by the fact that the ocean is rarely just water but is instead instead teeming with tiny plant and animal life plus suspended sediment or other natural orban made contaminants oshii offers monitor the oceans color the way that doctors read vital signs of their patients color seen on the ocean surface reflect. What's going on in its vast. Depths felt ben who's based at the nasa goddard watered space flight center in maryland studies images taken by these sea viewing wide field of you censor satellite launched in nineteen ninety-seven from its perch more than four four hundred miles above earth or nearly six hundred and fifty kilometers the satellite captures van gogh like swirls the oceans colors the patterns are not only mesmerizing but they also also reflect where sediment and runoff make water appear adult brown and we're microscopic plants called phytoplankton collect nutrient rich waters often tinting at green federal plankton use chlorophyll to capture energy from the salem to convert water and carbon dioxide into energy and then waste through this process called photosynthesis phytoplankton generate about half of the oxygen we breathe oceans with high concentrations of phytoplankton can appear blue green to green depending on the the density some length the water yellow reddish or brown tint phytoplankton serve as the base of the food web and primary source of food for zooplankton which are tiny animals animals eaten by fish the fisherman eaten by bigger animals like whales and sharks. It's when oceans become polluted runoff. The amount of phytoplankton can escalate late to unhealthy levels fellow painted feet on the pollutants flourish and them die sinking to the bottom to decompose process. The depletes oxygen from the water over the past fifty years oceans zones with depleted oxygen have more than quadrupled to an area roughly. The size of the european union part of the cause may be an increase increase in ocean temperature due to climate change since warmer water supports less oxygen in coastal areas phytoplankton blooms are suspected to be the cause title plankton may serve as the base of ocean food chain but as feldman says too much of a good thing is not a good thing on a map on feldman's office. Wall is a marker showing knowing where there's little human. Interference and ocean water is perhaps the clearest on the planet in this region off the coast of easter island in the southeast pacific ocean. The water is deep and remarkably clear due to its location in the middle of giant oceanic. I which is a large circular current. Its central location means. There's minimal mixing of ocean layers nutrients aren't pushed up from the deep bottom the purity of the water there coupled with that make the ocean appear a deeper indigo than perhaps anywhere else. Feldmann albin said the light just keeps going down down down. There's nothing bounces back. Here is the deepest blue you'll ever see in today's episode certain by amanda onion and produced by tyler playing raines is a production of iheartradio's has to works for more on in this amounts of other topics is their home planet has dot com and from podcastone my heart radio is the iheartradio app apple podcasts or wherever you listen to your favorite shows aw today's episode is brought to you by the capital one venture card when you earn unlimited double miles on every purchase your next trip is closer than you think. What's in your wallet.

Starbucks Carl Feldman Nasa Orban Feldmann Albin Greece Maine Iheartradio Easter Island Amanda Onion European Union Maryland Wall Salem Raines Apple Fifty Kilometers
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Dots, Lines & Destinations

Dots, Lines & Destinations

02:37 min | 2 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Dots, Lines & Destinations

"North West Way west of town like fifty kilometers west town interesting. It's not on mass transit but is on the highway line and they're saying they think they can get to like a million passengers a year in the first year which again sounds like a huge number but if we take our hundred eighty thousand number that we just did you know with conscious just an American and sort of do the math. That's about twenty seven thirty seven or eight three twenty high-density l._l._C. flights a day. We're just not bad for your one. That's basically get a couple of airlines. Either at a few flights are one of them to move over there and you're done but they're really. Really trying to figure out how they can make that work and grow it and what's challenging is the the main airport is designed to support forty million passengers a year and it's currently handling seventy million so obviously things need to change inch but the new one is going to be designed to only handle about twenty five million. It's not gonNA open for five or six years. If it happens and and you know it's not going to be up to twenty five million for a few years after that and so you like your back filling with pat like not enough capacity. It's not necessarily in the best places and I'm still not sure how it's going to deal with the overall air traffic space their airspace traffic congestion problems. That Bangkok suffers from yeah so lot going on there well. It won't be the most convenient it's not actually on mass transit yeah well you know take a page out of the el-sisi playbook in the Rhine airplane but call Bangkok and put people on buses yeah yeah right. I mean that's that in there are less common in Southeast Asia because there's more airports closer the town's but people have done it. They've made it work. I just WanNa talk about the southbound flight so yeah you found housing. It's about a thousand bucks coach one way or rancher round trip one way or let me see. I believe they're only selling it. They might be telling you one way because it's the return flight isn't as the return flakes fuller than the APO so I could see some people trying to get a little earlier for a long weekend or something that's true so a message from our sponsors yeah so <hes> you know I'm have no loyalty with hotel programs. You guys do to an extent varies a little more bite. Finding Good Hotel deals always exciting for me. <hes> good friend of ours runs a site called extreme dream hotel deals and just launched premium services <hes> sort of subscription email thing so you subscribe. It's geographic based alerts. Some of the best alerts that they've got on hotel deals around the world. <hes> looks pretty cool. Certainly we're checking now. I haven't actually subscribe.

Bangkok Good Hotel Southeast Asia fifty kilometers six years
Get A Glimpse: Total Solar Eclipse Set To Pass Over South Pacific, South America

Here & Now

01:26 min | 2 years ago

Get A Glimpse: Total Solar Eclipse Set To Pass Over South Pacific, South America

"Will next Tuesday, there will be a total solar eclipse, but it won't be visible in the US, only South America and some regions in the Pacific. Paul Maili will be at sea to watch. He's an astronomer who hosts guided eclipse, tours with the ring of fire expeditions. I spoke with him just before he departed from Tahiti yesterday. I have a group of one hundred and forty six people were boarding, the Windstar win spirit. And we're headed for an area of about two hundred and fifty kilometers, southeast of a small atoll, call off awry, which is about five days journey from Tahiti by ship, and you're going to be in the path of totality. Right. For the eclipse, that's our plan. Okay. And I assume in that part of the world at this time of year, you're not going to have to deal with any possible cloud, cover oil, you never. This is a tropical area. So, yeah, we'll probably have to deal with CS and cloud cover to some extent. And because there are no reporting stations in that area were having to take our chances using whether models and satellite real time data, and who, who are these people that are willing to travel all the way across the globe to see an eclipse, many of them are experienced clip tracers, but predominantly the majority right now or excited enough after the big eclipse, and the United States in August the twenty seventeen so this will be their second eclipse.

Paul Maili Tahiti United States South America Pacific Fifty Kilometers Five Days
SpaceX Starlink Gets Launch Approval

SPACE NEWS POD

03:48 min | 2 years ago

SpaceX Starlink Gets Launch Approval

"SpaceX approval from the FCC to launch Starlink. So they're working on worldwide broadband satellite internet, that will bring connective to basically everywhere on the planet. This is a huge step for SpaceX. They are going to be the first company with a humongous spread of satellites that encompasses the whole earth that will be bringing said lake communications to a lot of people that just don't have access to a right now. People in rural areas people in desert's people in you know, weird climates sort of out in the middle of nowhere. They're going to be able to connect with everybody else. The spread of information is going to be available for everybody anywhere. Any time. Thanks to this new FCC ruling. And usually we know SpaceX from its commercial launch business. They help Nassauer how they take things up to the ISS and take satellites up into space, but the satellite internet industry. It's going to bring space sexes worth to a whole new level. And it's going to spend that money and it's alternate goal to make humanity a multi planetary species by going to the red planet Mars. So this business will it'll fund things like newer bigger. Better. Rockets will also help enhance the things that they already have. So they can put the work in in make the rockets that they already have even better more economical and also work on projects like Rovers in Landers for Mars Gwynne shot. Well, who's the president of? Spacex said this approval underscores the FCC's confidences SpaceX his plan to deploy its next generation satellite. Constellation and connect people around the world with reliable and affordable broadband service in this idea for these internet satellites it's been around for awhile. There's about four thousand of these satellites that Elon Musk's talked about since about twenty fifteen and he said that it's going to be generating revenue to pay for a city on Mars as we said back, then so yeah, this idea in his head the whole time that speech sex wasn't just going to be a rocket company. He needed a way to fund his vision of sending humanity to Mars and everything else this space x does they're going to be building on the technologies that they build now going to be billing on them in the future to make bigger better faster, more powerful rockets, that'll take humanity to Mars and beyond and the Starlink will be paying for it. So you have C C head. Previously okayed a series of startling satellites in the past, but this new one this new approval tweak some stuff and it covers four thousand four hundred nine satellites now in each one of these satellites ways eight hundred and fifty pounds and one thousand five hundred eighty four of them had been moved from their eleven fifty kilometer altitude to a much lower five hundred fifty kilometers and that lower altitude will bring the lanes down to fifteen milliseconds super fast for satellite internet to of SpaceX is competitors one web and Keppler communications have both claimed that this lower altitude could cause interference with the communications between the ground and the satellites in but the FCC isn't buying it. And they denied that claim

Spacex Rockets FCC Mars Elon Musk Keppler Communications ISS President Trump Rovers Five Hundred Fifty Kilometers Eleven Fifty Kilometer Fifty Pounds
News in Brief 01 April 2019

UN News

03:05 min | 2 years ago

News in Brief 01 April 2019

"This is the news in brief from the United Nations. Proposed changes to Brunei's penal code to incorporate punishments under a strict interpretation of Islamic sharia law, including death-by-stoning should be halted the UN's top human rights official. Michelle Basch Alette said on Monday in an appeal to Brunei's government to start what she described as draconian revisions due to come into force on Wednesday, High Commissioner brush, let's maintained they would enshrine in legislation cruel and inhuman punishments that seriously, breach international human rights law. According to a statement from his bash Letitia by her office OH HR, the death penalty would in theory be applicable for fences such as rape adultery. Sodomy extramarital sexual relations for Muslim citizens robbery and insult or defamation. The prophet Muhammad public flogging as a punishment for abortion with also apply as well as amputation for theft. Other changes include making it a criminal offence to expose Muslim children to the beliefs and practices of any religion other than Islam Misbash. Let said before describing them as potential. Really mocking a serious setback for human rights protections in the southeast Asian state. The United Nations is highlighting the important role population trends play in promoting sustainable development during the fifty second commission on population and development which began in New York on Monday, this year's commissions also an opportunity to take stock and review progress made since the landmark international conference on population and development or ICPD which took place twenty five years ago in Cairo deputy secretary general Amina Mohammed said that since then fewer people living in extreme poverty, the risk of maternal deaths declined by more than forty percent and primary education is expanded the horizons of millions across the world, but she added there are gaps in implementation and many challenges remain. She also warned that efforts by nations to meet some of the ambitious sustainable development goals or SDG's by the twenty thirty deadline and not keeping pace with population growth and in Mali the UN mission. There manuka has reported that intercommunal violence continued through the week. Tend in the Mopti region of the north west African nation with multiple attacks. This follows on from tax on the twenty third of March against Fulani herders allegedly carried out by members of the Doug on ethnic group in which more than one hundred fifty died at least seventy were injured. More details from UN spokesperson, Stefan Zureik, the mission said that unidentified armed assailants targeted villages. Fifty kilometers south west of Banja, gar town on Saturday, leaving at least one person dead another wounded scores of houses and granaries were burnt cattle was rated and on Sunday and attack on CASA village. Located nearby bungee Agora resulted in three people killed in one wounded minutia has deployed a rapid reaction force of peacekeepers to support Mauleon armed forces and help restore security in the region for the protection of civilians, including 'Support to deter further attacks the head of the mission. Muhammed self an called on all parties to remain calm and refrain from further violence, he reiterated the UN's committee. Wants to spend no effort to ensure that the perpetrators about to Justice might wells U N news.

United Nations Brunei UN Muhammad Amina Mohammed Michelle Basch Alette Bungee Agora Letitia Robbery Mopti Official Mauleon Rape Mali Theft Commissioner Deputy Secretary Doug
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on The WAN Show Podcast

The WAN Show Podcast

01:47 min | 2 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on The WAN Show Podcast

"Also as two hundred fifty kilometers per hour. Probably need to. What? Sorry, what two hundred fifty kilometers an hour. Yeah. At one hundred fifty five miles per hour. So I thought you said fifty five no. No. Yeah. Okay. So that is apparently the next goal. Okay. That's a big that is a pretty big bump, they will definitely have to repave. And also, a big note here is that they were using model X's as vehicles and all the demos. They showed like big buses and like other types of eagles. Apparently, they're saying the bumpers that they have on the inside could be attached to essentially any Todd Humous electric vehicle. Not just to tesla share. So that's interesting. So they're not like married to their other company, which makes sense. But yeah, I don't know. I'm not surprised it was kind of disappointing. I think they probably shouldn't have demoted yet or they should've demoted. With the right expectations. If this is the state they were at they must have known. They didn't make it go to and and fifty kilometers an hour. They must have known. They were only gonna go eighty and it was gonna feel very much like driving it eighty on a road. They tried it. Yeah. Like, I don't know. I think maybe they could have communicated that a little bit better or just not done attest yet. Yeah. Setting expectations is key. Yeah. So I think that's probably where they missed. The Mark your what does he pose? Be. Yeah, you're supposed to standing hence the tea part. Oh, someone wants me to pose for five seconds. But you're supposed to. Yeah. You have to stand frame. That's just not in your army. Well, oh, yeah. That's that's gonna be a problem. Okay. On the other day, go Nick wired. It was worth a shot..

Todd Humous repave tesla Nick two hundred fifty kilometers p two hundred fifty kilometers fifty kilometers five seconds
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"That is to counteract the atmosphere draw draw drag that the experience a five hundred fifty kilometers. So they're going to be constantly getting a little bit of drag and they're gonna use these thrusters to counteract that and stay up in orbit. And apparently that this is a because of all the related changes to this change. They see a lot of fuel savings and a lot of reduced wear on their thrusters. So a lot of. Good changes here for Starling a lot of stuff that corroborates my theory from yesterday said at the front of the show, I don't want to rule out that propulsion did fail in these first two demo satellites that was some of the rumors going around that they were stuck in this lower orbit because propulsion failed that could still be true. You know, they could have launched that the propulsion could have failed and they've could have said, well, they're up there. Anyway, let's do some tests realize that the would have worked better started doing some thinking realized all these advantages and went with it for that initial constellation. I don't wanna rule that out likely the cases they kind of had this in mind, anyway, they deployed at that lower altitude to see if any of their theories were validated. They were so they begun this process. So either cases likely I would say it's more likely that this was an idea that somebody had up front. I don't know how happy certain regulators are going to be that space x authorized for an eleven hundred kilometer orbit for these two satellites operated them at five hundred. And then a, you know, change their original application, I don't know what's going on behind the scenes there. But that seems a little scary to me knowing how some of this people worked ends ago. But I guess we'll see so overall pretty good update here from space x confirms a lot of what we're talking about yesterday. And I thought it'd be worth knowing on your end as an a little Denham little mini episode addendum here to yesterday's show. Thank you all so much for your support as always at patriot dot com slash Meco. This little mini episode was produced by thirty four executive producers. Chris, Pat, Matt George Brad Ryan in dean, Peter Donald Lee. Jasper Chris Warren, Bob Russell, John MAURICE. Joel John David grant, Mike, David Mintz, Eunice eight anonymous executors thank you so much for making this episode possible. And thank you to everyone else over at patriot. Dot com slash Meco. That is it for today. It'll be headline show coming out later for you three dollar and up on patriotic. And that is it. I will talk to you pretty soon.

Jasper Chris Warren Starling Joel John David Denham executive John MAURICE Peter Donald Lee Matt George Brad Ryan David Mintz Eunice Bob Russell Pat Mike five hundred fifty kilometers eleven hundred kilometer three dollar
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

Main Engine Cut Off

03:35 min | 2 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Main Engine Cut Off

"Construction process and continuously add features to subsequent generations of spacecraft. For example, SpaceX initially will use K you ban spectrum for communications between satellites and both gateways and user terminals, then incorporate dual K U K a ban chipsets and other supporting technologies to phase in the use of ban spectrum for gay communications as it populates. It's constellation. Similarly, SpaceX initially will use parabolic antennas for its gateway earth stations and introduced phased array alternatives as the system evolves. So that's about the fact that they are going to do what my theory was which was build an initial satellite constellation that will work that will get them operating that will get satellites on orbit and expand from there. So they're going to start with the k- you banned then expand to dual band. They're gonna start with parabolic antennas for gateway earth stations. And then moved to phased array faith, raise much more expensive. Still a lot of people are working on building. Phased array alternatives for both gateways and end users. So that kind of says they want to do a cheaper alternative affront, something that gets them built out. And then move to phased array, the more expensive complicated thing as they move forward. Couple other aspects that are important to note, they spend a lot of time talking about the fact that lowering these satellites from eleven hundred and fifty kilometers to five hundred and fifty drastically decreases the disposal timeline of these satellites. So they talk about if a satellite died at this altitude. It would take a couple of years to come down and five to seven years. I think in the worst case or three to five in the worst gays a little higher than them would be five to seven. So that is drastically lower than the eleven hundred and fifty kilometer orbit which would take hundreds of years to come down on natural decay. So this facilitates disposal very quickly to turn the satellites over. So the typical disposal process is going to be to drop from five hundred and fifty kilometers to drop. The Pera g the lowest point in the orbit down to three hundred kilometers, and then that would drop out very quickly out of orbit. So this would facilitate faster turnover of these satellites, which I think in part helps the idea of launching an initial amount of satellites and initial operational capability of satellites letting them die out letting them get disposed of and replacing them very quickly sort of it alludes, some of those field fears of massive Kessler syndrome, and it's also much less congested at five hundred fifty kilometers eleven hundred kilometers that range. There's a lot of constellations up at that that altitude lot more chance for collisions with this many satellites and down. At five fifty. There's much less congestion that's kind of a mid point between the lower orbit satellites and the higher earth orbit satellites. So that's a big a big advantage to going to five hundred fifty. Couple of other notes here that are interesting. They talk about the fact that this lower orbit requires less fuel to get into these are going to be deployed. At around three hundred to three and fifty kilometers from the launch of falcon nine launch. That would launch a bunch of these satellites would drop them off at three hundred three hundred kilometers. And then they would climb to five hundred and fifty that requires significantly less fuel than their old plan, which was drop off at four hundred climb to eleven hundred. So they tout this as an advantage, and they also are able to make the satellites lighter because of that the needless fuel load and apparently at the end here. It says SpaceX has been able to decrease the overall work required by the hall. Thrusters hall affect electric propulsion system by at least fifty percent with respect the regional design. Now.

SpaceX fifty kilometers three hundred three hundred ki five hundred fifty kilometers eleven hundred kilometers three hundred kilometers fifty kilometer fifty percent seven years
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

Monocle 24: The Briefing

03:14 min | 2 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Monocle 24: The Briefing

"Now a look at what else is making news today. Hurricane Michael has caused devastation across the Florida panhandle, with the extent of the damage only now coming into focus winds of up to two hundred fifty kilometers per hour. Wreaked havoc affecting the lives of over three hundred seventy thousand people. Six are known to have died so far. The disappearance of Saudi journalist, Jamal kashogi continues to draw condemnation around the globe with members of the US congress, pushing to prevent further arm sales from the US to Saudi Arabia. In the meantime, the office of Turkey's president. Edwin says he has agreed to form a joint working group with Saudi Arabia to investigate the whereabouts of kashogi. The dissident journalist disappeared after visiting the Saudi consulate Instanbul last week. And finally, the buyer who bid for a now half threaded banks, painting southern auction house here in London. Last week has confirmed. She will go through with the final purchase. The artwork was reduced to strips as part of an elaborate prank by the artist, but it's thought. Value of the peace purchased for over a million pounds will now only increase is the roofing, a monocle, twenty four. Ooh. This week on the station. We've been examining property markets around the world earlier Monaco editor, Andrew tug join me to talk about what it takes to truly build a community from the ground up. I guess we've come to the conclusion notices magazine, but as a society that the way the mobility is built into new, sit, his new towns, new neighborhoods, it needs to be the starting point in the bedrock. So you need to think about how people are going to get around now as great creating communities, brand new, detached off in their own world. But as you, the easiest thing to do is Bill communities connected to existing networks transport. So there is access to the existing subway line of city, for example, but within those communities, I think what we're seeing is a real genuine move to thinking about how people can walk cycle and get around without using that cause. And that's going to happen more and more, especially in western societies, and especially in the more ambitious liberal social. Critic society that the Nordic countries you look new developments in the Netherlands and Denmark, the posted around this idea that first of all is good to have 'cause on the roads, they try to discourage that in the building of new communities and they the the heart of they plan in the best games. A feeling that there is an encouragement in the landscaping in the public realm to get you walking get you outside. And the other thing I think is when you think about good communities is not having too much strict segregation. So whether that's across clause or whether it's to do with age, how'd you shake up again, the way that we live next to each other. I, there's no good for us in a social silos not to mix with other people and to his people's mental health and the levels of loneliness and feeling of connectedness. If old people live in one part of the town, there's a student qu..

Saudi Arabia Jamal kashogi Saudi consulate Edwin Hurricane Michael US congress Turkey Florida London US Bill president editor Denmark Netherlands two hundred fifty kilometers p million pounds
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on The Persistence Factor

The Persistence Factor

01:38 min | 3 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on The Persistence Factor

"No man percents the biggest thing is the whole some of the five people and i talk about winners and losers right and i don't believe i do believe like if you five friends or a millionaire you'll become a millionaire you far fucking lane you'll become lane you know there was a study that if one of your friends is our base and they leave within fifty kilometers of you fifty two kalman's of your you have a fifty seven percent likely to be or basis well that's if they live within fifty kilometers man like that's crazy so it's like fuck off fifty five kilometers away that'd be my friend we'll get lean other one you'll fucking causing me to get back right there but the low of association mirman that happens with everything if you find the broke clock you think it's okay to be broke it's no okay to be broke because if you make more money you get to help more people absolutely amazing right and so will the yes those sums of five of work but i would rather go to the some of the five people with as far as the standard you live by standards come down to the belief structures on i think tight the way i live this lot i am a victim victim i do not blame i do not make excuses and i did not justify my comment life i'm the one who gave me the loss of accountancy house and i'm the only one that can change the life there i count we have and if you have the standards of that and you'll the only way out and you'll be a problem and the solution that insane time and you find five people in your life that they believe that the will doesn't happen to them now you happen to the world and they determine that fight by sony essentially the disciplined execution and the ownership that they.

kalman sony fifty kilometers fifty five kilometers fifty seven percent
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Hollywood And Crime

Hollywood And Crime

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Hollywood And Crime

"And at the time when we are planning the mission we're going into an area where we didn't have maps charts and i saw two pieces of equipment for the first time ever i did not know what there were in how to use them was gps in it was a giant box that had a digital readout in the other was a digital camera in that that time everyone had film in their cameras in go to the mall and it would have developed this camera had three and a half inch floppy disk and i didn't understand how it worked he can play this computer prince photos yes up is new technology among okay so we did a flight over and we had the informant roughly show us from the air and it's difficult for them to orientate themselves from the air to what's going on the ground roughly pick out the ranch that he thought it was we took photographs with digital camera in than we took pictures of the river to try to map out the course because we knew it'd be dark to be in the middle of the night before night vision where we would have to insert in find in locate this ranch some fifty kilometers downriver latte sounds like incredible amounts of planning had to go into it before you inserted in then you say you insert by helicopter fifty kilometers which is roughly twenty five thirty miles that right away from the actual ranch yes about thirty miles away and one of the questions jim ask earlier that didn't answer with how many were with us we went with a very small footprint we attend bolivia police special forces called houma par we had one or the da special agent including myself he was the plan or the mission he was assigned to the santa cruz office in bolivia and we brought to coast guard guys with us once we set our boats up went down river we found the ranch at about one him i come for one second carson you mentioned that you had ten bolivia's with you certainly we've all heard about corruption that goes on inside these police in federal police organizations in latin america certainly.

houma carson bolivia jim santa cruz fifty kilometers one second
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The border town of my as more people arrived in kenya the bbc's emmanuel against is there the refugees of costal from ethiopia living under really harsh conditions their situation is really dire you're talking about thousands of people who crossed immediately from the border almost ten days ago with nothing on them they on some of them only had the clothes they're wearing so they've set up camp just quite near the border several sites and one we've been going around over the last two days you've seen them trying to make makeshift houses made from trees from the nearby bush's disappear who don't have enough food they don't have enough water and this area of morality on the kenyan side was already is already facing food shortages and so this massive amount of people who've just crossed over the border have really stretched resources here there is only one hospital and now the aid agencies have had to bring in extra staff to try and address the consent of the people who are coming in many many of them are women and children are very tired very hungry and so it is a situation as the humanitarian agency could get quite watson the next few days are local people how are they reacting to this are they helping out because he say they are stretch so you have to remember that this is a border town that you have common tribes on either side atp in kenya so there's been really big support for the refugees of in we've seen people who've been going around collecting clothes foodstuffs and taking it to the refugees but also there is a bit of tension today's ago we did see one person who who had been hosting some of the refugees getting really angry and kicking them out from his land so the competition for resources here is really big this is an area that has constantly had clashes between people from from ethiopia and people from canaan so aid agencies really want to move this people this refugees of coming to camp fifty kilometers from the border town so that they can turn east some of the tensions that has been building up because also some of the.

kenya ethiopia bush fifty kilometers ten days two days
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Made Of Human with Sofie Hagen

"Trying and communities i joined four thousand people from across the world in occupying the largest openpit coal mine in europe it was so many of us the police couldn't stop us and we walk straight him the mine hats stop production for the day and we were in every major newspaper in germany also bear in mind this took place fifty kilometers away from where the international climate talks were taking place in bong bonn bond bone bone one of those despite being pepper sprayed cancelled and intimidated by police with danced sung and had consensus decision making plenary's in the mine it was the most incredible show of people power i've ever seen and who truly hopeful despite the failure of the negotiations themselves p s i would love to hasn't bad as climate activists on the podcast meet made meet to that is our fucking love that ad i love that so much for click again my from was on now's the i love that so much i really do i think i was meant to go there one point i think i i had like a crush thing happening on someone who am who asked me to come announcing i how come i love from climate and it was a horrible our main reason for going to a protest but i was months ago that the gives me no credit at all so ignore that i said that but ado goes made of human progress are come if you want to submit your own acts of disobedience now i want you to enjoy this episode with a avery edison who is listen.

europe avery edison germany fifty kilometers
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:15 min | 3 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"Of stars zinke wanted to know what the massive all of these galaxies were how much did they way there are a couple of ways you can measure the massive something in space isaac newton's equations say that if we measure the speed with which the galaxies a spinning then we can work out how much the cost of ways the other way you can do it is by looking at how much light the stars giving out you can work out how many stalls they're all how big they are and from there you can work out the mass of the entire galaxy cluster however when's vicky did this the numbers didn't add up newton's equation said that that was loads more mass than he could see by looking at the lights out put the any explanation was that the have to be some invisible matter he couldn't see he called it dark matter now mike produce agrarian night we couldn't face staying up until four a m on monday nights to see the coma cluster and frankly neither could professor malcolm fairburn are astro guide from king's college london seriously so you could d guys just just campaign overnight when you hillary goldstone horrible okay so that makes his but malcolm could show was something else with his telescope another galaxy the proves the dark matter exists are you looking for you'll see a cloud in the middle of the eye pace and it really does not lie very much in fact you my funny quite difficult to say now i can see it yet there is a fuzzy did mmhmm yeah so that's the very center of the amdro it a galaxy and on drummond is moving towards us a and could survive ognjen fifty kilometers per second and we can use that observation to weigh the entire system and the answer is the whole thing ways something like five million million times the mass of the sun and we can't see anywhere near that number of stars so there has to be something else that we think the most today is doll matters said there's a whole lot of stuff out there this stuff that.

isaac newton malcolm fairburn drummond vicky mike professor king hillary goldstone fifty kilometers
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

NASA In Silicon Valley

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on NASA In Silicon Valley

"As an exciting well we are we are rogue one of his will allow let's take a look at that so never hear another site another or one of the sites that are really exciting that that could be considered for human exploration are locations on the moon where the remnant magnetic field that means the field the mag of the the main unicef through the moon which it must ahead early on in its life is gone away and of the core is now solid is probably not liquid is now circulating degenerated a magnetic field and so the rocks that that were molten at the time as they solidify they take that field a take ownership of that field and then the background field goes away and and here's an area these are called swirls and they're really this is really huge i mean these are the the the central feature off to the left that's probably a hundred and fifty kilometers in size and and then you have what looks like a snake he uh feature off to the right that's also trapped magnetic field material and and we now know based on our knowledge of our earth's magnetosphere how the magnetic field of our earth is protected us over time and so we want to be able to drive into these areas we want to be able to see how the how that magnetic field interacts with the solar wind what happens when coronal mass ejections hammer the moon and and hits a swirl like that and how we could be protected because of the field now that feel has to be intense for us to be able to make a measurement of azeri we can measure it for more morbid well jesus' that's fantastic so as you can see that that the discoloration on the surface.

fifty kilometers
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on NASACast Audio

NASACast Audio

01:56 min | 3 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on NASACast Audio

"As an exciting well we are we are rogue one of his will allow let's take a look at that so never hear another site another or one of the sites that are really exciting that that could be considered for human exploration are locations on the moon where the remnant magnetic field that means the field the mag of the the main unicef through the moon which it must ahead early on in its life is gone away and of the core is now solid is probably not liquid is now circulating degenerated a magnetic field and so the rocks that that were molten at the time as they solidify they take that field a take ownership of that field and then the background field goes away and and here's an area these are called swirls and they're really this is really huge i mean these are the the the central feature off to the left that's probably a hundred and fifty kilometers in size and and then you have what looks like a snake he uh feature off to the right that's also trapped magnetic field material and and we now know based on our knowledge of our earth's magnetosphere how the magnetic field of our earth is protected us over time and so we want to be able to drive into these areas we want to be able to see how the how that magnetic field interacts with the solar wind what happens when coronal mass ejections hammer the moon and and hits a swirl like that and how we could be protected because of the field now that feel has to be intense for us to be able to make a measurement of azeri we can measure it for more morbid well jesus' that's fantastic so as you can see that that the discoloration on the surface.

fifty kilometers
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Down in the clouds are opec to visible light and even to most infrared light but the microwave which is longer than infrared more like uh radio waves can see right through the clouds and so we can get the thermal radiation coming out from ma's deep is three hundred fifty kilometers and that gives his temperature down there to tell us what you've learned with this past because you're you're putting together the anatomy of the of the right response on you we're putting together the three d is structure of the red spot where this we have only known it from a two de perspective before and we're learning that the red spot is relative to its surroundings is warmer even down at the deepest levels that we can see with the microwave radio ometer and how long as the spunk gone and ame you are you niran seeing that question it's been getting thinner over time but in a slightly smaller but can go on for a few more 100 years the the red spot has been shrinking your right about that just a few decades ago you could stuff to earth into the red spot now you can stuff one and a half earth's so you can extrapolate as well as i can that was fifty years ago forty fifty years ago so it's conceivable that it will cease to exist in another few decades and to injure seoul of nonstop speaking to jonathan amos the film industry is facing its biggest challenge since tv was invented streaming services such as netflixing amazon prime video are aeging into cinema audiences and revenue so what does the future hold i'm access more than one thousand supersize screens in over sixty countries are business reporter rob young has been speaking to its chief executive rich gulf on he says major movies such as the new stalwarts film are helping his company one of the things that was noteworthy as we had the royal premiere at royal albert hall here in london and i think that was a statement i mean the royals.

ma seoul royal albert hall london opec amazon reporter rob young chief executive three hundred fifty kilometers forty fifty years fifty years 100 years
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Down in the clouds are opec to visible light and even to most infrared light but the microwave which is longer than infrared more like uh radio waves can see right through the clouds and so we can get the thermal radiation coming out from ma's deep is three hundred fifty kilometers and that gives his temperature down there to tell us what you've learned with this past because you're you're putting together the anatomy of the of the right response on you we're putting together the three d is structure of the red spot where this we have only known it from a two de perspective before and we're learning that the red spot is relative to its surroundings is warmer even down at the deepest levels that we can see with the microwave radio ometer and how long as the spunk gone and ame you are you niran seeing that question it's been getting thinner over time but in a slightly smaller but can go on for a few more 100 years the the red spot has been shrinking your right about that just a few decades ago you could stuff to earth into the red spot now you can stuff one and a half earth's so you can extrapolate as well as i can that was fifty years ago forty fifty years ago so it's conceivable that it will cease to exist in another few decades and to injure seoul of nonstop speaking to jonathan amos the film industry is facing its biggest challenge since tv was invented streaming services such as netflixing amazon prime video are aeging into cinema audiences and revenue so what does the future hold i'm access more than one thousand supersize screens in over sixty countries are business reporter rob young has been speaking to its chief executive rich gulf on he says major movies such as the new stalwarts film are helping his company one of the things that was noteworthy as we had the royal premiere at royal albert hall here in london and i think that was a statement i mean the royals.

ma seoul royal albert hall london opec amazon reporter rob young chief executive three hundred fifty kilometers forty fifty years fifty years 100 years
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on No Agenda

No Agenda

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on No Agenda

"What could it be well i've i've done a little bit of research but i thought it was time to spruce up our second half of the show and i stumbled across an interesting article of from the navy navy millon factors where this comes from and navy died milf name navy that milf exactly n r l which stands for a naval research laboratory scientists produce densest art of densest artificial ionospheric plasma clouds using heart my huh so they created the so essentially they're creating plasma blobs in the sky as part of the read the from the the press release this is from end of february from this year this press release these glow discharges in the upper atmosphere were generated as a part of the defence advance research projects agency sponsored basic research on ionospheric characteristics and affect also noticed brioche those guys are so funny were there codenames aren't they looked at the piece of bread in the sky brioche the brioche campaign to explore i honest feerick phenomenon and its impact on communications and space weather my my theory on how essentially there's a space were going on all the time and that we just kind of oblivious to it yeah we haven't heard that for a while yet but when i see this year using the three point six megawatt high frequency harp transmitter the plasma clouds were balls of plasma are being studied for use as artificial mirrors at altitudes fifty kilometers below the natural ionosphere and are to be used for reflection of hf radar and communications signals now this is bull crap.

press release navy navy fifty kilometers six megawatt
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

WNYC 93.9 FM

02:28 min | 3 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on WNYC 93.9 FM

"West an nn near the western oasis and about city 100 than fifty kilometers from cairo and and that was really painful because save a young use and from the police were killed by the terrorist the egyptian army group there led the different are merely arrange another counterattacks and anger and killed several terrorists however it that incident shed lights about the periphery of the country not just in sinai but in mainland eat and i note denied a visa turn this incident is closer to to reach and gays and for you where there is a high it is not really as the richest cairo and if you called cairo h i mean i'm in thin perspective but also that the people there are vulnerable to listen to air very hard core none compromising islamist message that is what i was keen to pick up on what makes them vulnerable to that in those particular areas well first of all is an fda did his highly interest in investing in those area in art in music in any sign of modernity and in trying to counter the message so basically most of their other can groups pickup areas one boast people don't listen to television dorm watson years are just really live in their day to day activity trying to get by struggling with the economy unemployment am and nobody counter the message over the mosque is the centerpiece and whoever teach saer nobody challenged send messages fill a word you about a book coming out from you net early next year a distant justice the impact of the icc that's the international criminal court on african politics that some quite a weighty subject to just to sum up in one perc itit's are made that i read the book really focuses specifically on the international criminal court's role in in your dander and the democratic republic of congo but but it it does have a chapter of its trying to look at that the role of the court army in africa in its totality i guess what the what the book is really finding of i've been researching this for about ten use now is that the icy seas really struggling to to do justice from afar that this form of justice diluted out of.

cairo fda congo egyptian army africa fifty kilometers
"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Global News Podcast

Global News Podcast

02:02 min | 3 years ago

"fifty kilometers" Discussed on Global News Podcast

"Showing some actually newlybuilt buildings having collapsed in front of the older buildings which are standing toll what about the response then if this is something they experience on a regular basis the mechanisms for helping people for not only in the cities as he outlined but but guessing to the people in the remote areas is a lot of red tape a we have that in the issue of forest fires as well deploying the helicopters and everything to get to those places but nevertheless unless you're there it's very difficult to give a proper assessment but the interior minister has gone there the head of the regular army is gone there their will deployed their resources to help those area so how effective they are we don't know but from the officially counts it seems to be moving in order as parole hirth quakes pit when you read the social media and anecdotal accounts of people were still stuck in many areas where help has not beginning to you get a different picture and on social media you seek clearly electricity sound powerless down this time of the year in iran it's very cold isn't it apps lee that was one of the problems that last night because as the tremors and aftershocks were coming thick and fast people went out to the streets and it's very cold out there so there were told to stay in the streets don't go back um and that itself presented a huge issue many people could not even get their blankets up in time the picture in iran welt several people have also died in iraq where they fled into the streets in the capital back that the bbc's rummy higham is in arbil in northern iraq about two hundred and fifty kilometers from the epicentre of the earthquake lee rocky prime minister has issued a statement saying that's all efforts are being made to ensure that the the affected regions get all the help that they need we're talking about much lifts and scale of course between what happened in iran and what happened in iraq here we hear about six or seven people were killed perhaps about three hundred fifty injured many of them in shaw and the others with light injuries that's what we have been hearing so far.

interior minister social media lee tremors bbc arbil iraq prime minister iran shaw fifty kilometers