35 Burst results for "fifteen years"

Judge rejects pharmacy chains' bid to toss opioid suits

AP News Radio

00:45 sec | 2 d ago

Judge rejects pharmacy chains' bid to toss opioid suits

"Hi Mike Rossi a reporting a federal judge allows opioid lawsuits filed against pharmacy chains to continue a federal judge in Ohio has rejected a motion from five pharmacy chains to dismiss opioid related public nuisance lawsuits filed by two Ohio counties U. S. district judge Dan Polster ruled and Ohio law allows lake and troubled counties to sue CVS Walgreens rite aid Walmart and giant eagle the lawsuit alleges the pharmacy chains in the two counties bought a total of nearly one hundred thirty million oxy code own and hydrocodone pills between two thousand and twenty fourteen that would be roughly two hundred sixty six pills for every week county resident and three hundred twenty pills for every trouble county resident during the fifteen year period hi Mike Rossio

Mike Rossi Ohio Dan Polster Walmart Mike Rossio Hydrocodone
The Making of an Instagram Tiny House Influencer with Brent Heavener

Tiny House Lifestyle Podcast

04:56 min | 2 d ago

The Making of an Instagram Tiny House Influencer with Brent Heavener

"Right I'm here with Brent Hefner Brent grew up with a family whose pretty creative sovereign minded, and who are always trying to have an influence where they're at. Brent believes that it was this love for creativity and influence that has kept him with in the tiny House Movement for a number of years creating content, writing a book and featuring incredible tiny house creatives. He now uses influence to bring the community together Brenan hefner welcome to the show. Even it's going to be here man. Great to have you so. Hoping you could just kind of take me back to the beginning of how this all started for you Your love of tiny houses starting the instagram account. Tell me tell me that story. Absolutely. Well. It started back man I was about fourteen fifteen years old and I did a lot of. A lot of social media blogging and marketing as a hobby as a young teenager and had a lot of friends that were doing it online and my dad one day sent me an email with the container house. It was a decis shipping container, which you've been transformed into a home and I'd never seen that I don't think a lot of people. My Age might generations It wasn't super super popular and I took a look at that and I was like Oh my goodness this is incredible. So. Sparked something in me and I started researching more into it and I found out that there wasn't a good place online for people to find inspiration that but there wasn't like A. Solid instagram account that really puts content. There wasn't a twitter account that posting quality great blogs I'm sure yours was around that time and there were like awesome websites but as far as like. Very, very instant immediate of content on media. I didn't find anything. So I was like you don't let me start something on twitter just as a passion project like homes that I love that brought me alive. So I started posting about it and and as you seen it out to friends and kind of using. Social Media Techniques today with it blew up, and then it went to instagram and out from there I've just been doing a featuring a lot of different people wanNA I've done some different short films on tiny houses and I. May Get into this that I wrote a book got published by paying around. House. Last year and I've just really cool stuff. I'm so thankful and just so blessed. So. About. When when is this that you start doing this on twitter and Instagram Sure This was about. Twenty. Twenty to thirteen maybe. Okay. That's pretty early on. In terms of like online tiny house stuff. Yeah. Yeah. There wasn't a lot going on at that. At that point I think really online like there were handful of blogs and then like tiny house blog and tiny house talk. Yes. House design three very good websites but your but. It's interesting that you know. You know at that point you were you were thirteen fourteen you said yeah, I was like, yeah run fourteen I think and I think it's it's so interesting because like You thought to go to social media first and say like, where's the content about this topic whereas like? You know other people other generations might be like, Oh, I wanNA find a website I wanNA find a book. So I think that's really cool that you just went to the place that you wanted to see the content and then couldn't find it. Exactly, exactly, and it started off as a passion project and this is something. I've started some different small businesses and I'm really into like creativity in startups and stuff like that. So one thing that I always like a good foundation is to always start something that you're super passionate about as most people they wanNA, they wanna you know figure out they WANNA make and figure out how to how to you know love it. Instead I say forget what you love and if you're gonNA, make money from it right so It's like it was something that I really love in that. That was a really healthy beginning. Nice. When did you start being able to actually make money from from it? Well money's never really. I I kind of use that statement. I guess. As as an overview everything by. Money's never really driven it in never been a huge part of it. It's always been content and inspiration creativity. But of course, I was able to write this book and that was that was a blessing. So that's really been a you know the main. Monetization is far as a apart from a helping out brands here and there doing doing advertising you're in there, but it's it's mainly just the creativity and passion that drives it in the people see that and they're like A. You know I, want I wanNA do something with that I pretty healthy foundation a pretty solid one to work from

Instagram Brent Hefner Brent Twitter Brenan Hefner
Big Tech, Antitrust, and Democracy

Exponent

04:59 min | 2 d ago

Big Tech, Antitrust, and Democracy

"I James. I'm doing. Okay. How are you? Good thanks. All Things considered I'm busy. Tell You I've complainer this on multiple guess at this point. But what's another one I feel like? Because no one is traveling or going anywhere what is usually the slowest months? August is just insane like stuff happening constantly it started off where it got very slow in March. I was walked down people don't know what to do and were nervous. I was over whelming sense of doom and the weird thing. Is Obviously, it's not that stuff has changed that much but we talked about this on the last episode people have adapted, and now they're like making up for lost I but they're just like news coming out everywhere right a no more so than in the capital. That's right. So last week last Wednesday the editor subcommittee of the Judiciary Committee in the House had a hearing with the four tuxedos Apple Google facebook and Amazon Microsoft was notable by its absence, but it was clearly a. Focus on consumer tech. In the reason I say that this was clear is not just because such. Adele wasn't there but it became pretty clear through the questioning that Tim. Cook was only they're Kinda wanted to say that they got all of them because they were not prepared to ask him questions at all. It's clear that all the work of the committee has been mostly focused on I would say first and foremost Amazon they had the most detailed stuff there they were pretty detail. About Google, they were somewhat detailed about facebook, but you could see sort of the quality of questionings really starting to come down there, and then they didn't even know what the percentages were in the APP store. You is kind of embarrassing. They would ask cook a question and let him just talk because they didn't know what to ask next wherever else interrupt because they wanted that points to make et Cetera et Cetera and I've thought that difference in the quality of questioning per company. was pretty striking. Yeah. It's interesting. The New York Times ran a tally of the questions and I thought that in itself was interesting and it looked pretty evenly spaced and then apple was dislike fifty percent of the other three frustrating in a way because obviously I've been sort of fixated on the APP store for literally since the beginning of attack relate what am I I set of articles back in two thousand thirteen was trying to understand what how is doing such a crappy job. Imagine the APP store and one of my conclusions there was there. So scarred from their near death experience in the nineties when they had to beg adobe and Microsoft to continue supporting the Max can remain viable and I wrote this is back in two thousand thirteen that they would never allow themselves to be in that position again and well. So interesting about that is the way that has manifested is that again, this is a long running things that they've really had kept productivity APPS. In particular, it's hard to make money. You can't charge upgrades is really important sort of business mile away. It's worked on other platforms white the internet which Tim Cook Pretends doesn't exist also testimony they jumped straight from brick and mortar to the APP store. There's no intervening period there where you could buy stuff on the Internet. It's funny because when you read his testimony, you don't notice until someone points out she's like Oh my word. Yeah. You just kinda skipped fifteen years of distribution. So I didn't watch it old but I did watch part of it, and the only thing that I can remember is someone was questioning him around he has complete control of which APPs and he's like I'll well, if the native APPs that's true except Web apps so think he's not to the Internet was like little buttons that you create insofar which by the way are totally handicap progressive lobster totally handicap on IOS in wipes away all their cookies and settings after a week in. Where are the interesting things about this is because apple was held captive by productivity APPs in the nineties all of their sort of onerous APP store terms in my estimation have mostly affected would be productivity APPs in your abyss situation where you get no great innovator of APPs on these platforms in part because much risk like maybe you're going to build something in apple's not gonNA prove it or there's no business model it and it just doesn't make sense to make a new sort of productivity after the most difficult in-depth after build from a physical. API's on the device or perspective and what actually has come to dominate are. All these network based APPS that are mostly API driven and what's interesting is because apple is not a social company I message notwithstanding that they kind of weren't paying attention to that and what happened was we talked about this China where we chat actually became the exact sort of dominant APP that I think the APP store was designed to limit. But because they weren't sort of paying attention, they ended up the exact same situation as a nineties is the apple as a company is much stronger than back. Then it's not even remotely comparable but the fact that we chat is more important than your phone is definitely the case you. Like Oh we trade the same well then why is it? We have a mini APP store for on purposes and no one else has allowed it like one of the most obvious examples of APPs not being treated the same and it's not true the same because we chat as more important than the IPHONE.

Apple Tim Cook Facebook Amazon Microsoft Google Judiciary Committee The New York Times Adele Editor Adobe China
Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

The Business of Fashion Podcast

06:11 min | 3 d ago

Tackling Systemic Racism in the Fashion Industry

"I everybody and welcome to today's be O. F. Live event. I'm Lauren Chairman Be Offs Executive Editor and I'm joined today by Brandis Daniel Chief Executive of Harlem's fashioned row Sandrine Charles founder of Sandrine. Charles. Consulting Henrietta Galina Brandon creative consultant, and today we're GONNA be talking about a really important topic always but you know especially in the last few months, how to tackle system racism in fashion it's a really big question I'm sure we'll only. Get Two to one or two points here. But but we want to do as much as we can, and in this hour that we have what I wanted to do I is for each of you to introduce yourselves and what you do in your own activists as well. So maybe talk a bit about what you've been working on in the last couple months as the civil rights movement has really come to the forefront in the US, Henrietta maybe we can start with you. I, everyone I'm Lena. I am a direct up by way of saying have been in the fashion industry for. About fifteen years now. What can range of. Brands. DIFFERENCE CASS grades. and. So. My wife is always been rooted increase efficiency inclusions I've asked. My wife tens of mocks stories. An image making and I would say, miss recently I WANNA be. confounds the cut initiative which Let's have a appoint Yucky. Great. Thank you brandis. What about you? I am the. Founder Pearl Fashion Row and icon sixty Harlem's fashion row has been doing this work thirteen years we on started really kinda focusing on designers of color in creating opportunities for them, connecting them with brands, press, and with consumers as well. we've also done several brand collaborations have been a great way to really bring diversity to brands who who may not have had. It were win couvert hit on the pandemic. We started a nonprofit icon sixty, which is basically a fine or designers of collar and We've been able to raise thanks to the NBA took over a million dollars in donations for designers of. Car. It sandrine last but not least I am. Sandrine. Charles of I have been working in the industry for thirteen years. Now, I own Sandrine Charles Salting, which is a week. Calms and Everything encompassing that agency her fashion and lifestyle brands. In addition, I'm the founder alongside Lindsay People's or the black and fashion council. Thank you offer for sharing that so. I think to start. This is a really big question, but obviously, the civil rights movement that's happening right now has been. Very prominent in the news in the last month, it's obviously never not existed but it suddenly. You know the fifteen percent pledge. Protest every single day. Brands are really saying I. WanNa make a difference they're publicly. Saying I'm going to do all these things to be more diverse, etc, etc. Now, a lot of their ex employees or or. You know. Consumers are calling them out for not practicing what what they are are pre chain and I'm curious to know from you all your all veterans in this industry you've you've witnessed this the systemic racism that is particular to fashion. What what do you think? The biggest issue is Ashen and that we can start working on or You know people are already working on but what is the? Biggest point that we need to tackle in order to start fixing all the little problems that have come out of this. Don't know if one of you wants to start. I'll. Brand half. Start I think on what Sandrine Lindsay is doing is asking with the Black Fashion Council asking brands to actually put a quantitative solution in place it's the same thing that Aurora Jane tasked with a fifteen percent pledge i. think the brands have to fully commit and the way that they can fully commit being you know here's exactly what we're going to do. So when you say I want my sales to get better you don't say go out to your. Team and say, you know what we want better cells next year what you do is you say WanNa ten percent increase we want to fifteen percent increase you know right so you create very clear goals so that you know if you're successful in meeting those goals or not successful meeting notes and if you're not successful, there are things you put in place to make sure you overcome that in me that all it's the same thing with this rain so I think. The first thing that Branston do is say, what is our commitment? What is our our firm commitment? Let's start with a very clear commitment and work our way back because my fear is that if we just start having conversations in conversation is a really key piece to this in having with lack people in non black people ruling to have honest dialogue. But my fear is that if we're only talking is the passion Unin die down in another. Year and I. think that's Oliver Fear Rate. But if you put a very clear plan in place and you say, this is what these are the numbers. We're GONNA hit across our organization that means in our leadership and on our boards because let's talk about boards and how they're barely any black people boards. There's only one black. CEO in the entire fashion industry. So that's just say what are we gonNa do across the Board in our organization? And then you work backwards from the air and doing what you have to do to to meet that goal.

Black Fashion Council Founder Henrietta Galina Brandon Sandrine Charles Sandrine Charles Salting Harlem Charles Board Sandrine Sandrine Lindsay Brandis Daniel United States Chief Executive NBA Consultant Chairman Lindsay People Executive Editor CEO
Wonder Media Network signs with WME

podnews

03:11 min | 3 d ago

Wonder Media Network signs with WME

"Welcome to the New York Times Company Second Quarter Two thousand twenty earnings conference call. On the call today, we have married. It's cope it Levian executive vice president and chief. Operating Officer last. We acquired cereal production. We've also entered into an ongoing. Strategic Alliance with American light among other things will tell the American life podcast advertising. Next year New York Times CEO in waiting meredith cockpit. Hitlerian with the news of the company is to sell ads within this American lives podcast from next year. She also said that the daily has an average of three and a half million daily listeners few more than this podcast. The female founded and led podcast network. Wonder Media Network has signed with talent agency, w. m. e. to help the network expanded into books and television w emmy already represent pyrex rusty quill crooked media and Malcolm glad well answer Elton John. Lipton's CEO Chris Spencer has resigned. It worked at Lipson for fifteen years and we'll stay on as a senior advisor to the company. Last year bonus payments to spend. So was cited as one reason for a revolt by minority shareholders the settlements last October installed a number of new board members who's been publicly critical of the company and none of those are quoted in lip since release. Google. Play Music's podcast portal will no longer accepts new podcasts quote in the next few weeks according to an email from the company they'll be removing it entirely later in the year, you should be using Google podcasts manager instead the podcast academy holding August social a weak today via zoom, of course, meanwhile, new research into share of audio listening in Australia will be unveiled on August twenty sixth you'll find links. To both of those Paul's dot events and expanding yet further specify a hiring for a head of audio books. Is there anything that company won't touch a thank you to the podcast engineer for becoming our latest supporter based in Atlanta in Georgia the podcast engineer does podcast editing mixing and production so you can treat your listeners to quality audio you should be like them at hot news dot net slash support. And Impalas News Memory Lane with Kerry God limo interviews, different guest every week like Romesh Ranga Nathan Jo brand and. A Kosta talking about their five favorite photographs one. If you use the entail APP, you get to see the photographs as well. Also interactive with the tail APP is making the cuts with Davina McCall Michael Douglas. Not. That Michael Douglas presumably it's a podcast like trip advisor feel life apparently and just a little prick podcast with Pete Wiggs, it's all about two twos obviously and scientists using world of warcraft to learn how to fight covid nineteen that's according to wild wild tech which launched. Yes. Today these are the stories about your favorite tech companies that are seldom told they

New York Times Company CEO Google Media Network Michael Douglas New York Times Engineer Levian Executive Vice President Pete Wiggs Davina Mccall Strategic Alliance Romesh Ranga Senior Advisor Chris Spencer Officer Lipson Lipton Advisor Kosta
How Gene Therapy Helped Conner Run

Short Wave

04:12 min | 4 d ago

How Gene Therapy Helped Conner Run

"Mattie. SAFAI NPR science correspondent. John Hamilton Hi John Hi Mary so John, where would you like to begin I? Think we should start with the scientist. Okay. Let's do it. Okay. So obviously many many scientists have worked to understand this disorder. But today we're gonNA focus on Jude Samal ski back in Nineteen eighty-four and I'll ski was still a graduate student at the University of Florida and he was part of this team that cloned a virus called A V. and those are group of viruses that can infect people but they don't cause diseases. Yeah. I remember I learning about this in Grad School John that discovery was a big deal because basically we can turn these viruses in tools and and that's because viruses on their own are pros at getting into ourselves and getting up close and personal with our DNA, which is exactly where you need to get to treat a lot of genetic disorders at. Their source exactly, and he was one of the scientists who figure that out. So as you these viruses have just revolutionized gene therapy right and after some Oh ski and his team Clone Davie, they wanted to try to use the virus to treat descend muscular dystrophy. That's the genetic disorder you were talking about earlier. Got It. So a lot of these therapies work by kind of targeting gene or genes that are the root of a disorder. So what's The deal with to Sheng muscular dystrophy John Kids who have Sharon. Lack a functional version of gene called D. M. D., and this gene makes a protein called destroyed often that helps muscles stay healthy. Got It. Okay. The idea is if the problem is that someone lack a working gene, you could just give them a working copy of that gene and what's the most wanted to do was packed some of the genetic code from a disrobing gene inside. Right and then once the virus got into the body, it would infect muscle cells, and then that faulty code is replaced with a functional version. Right? smokey says a Aviv, this harmless virus would work. Station service it's a molecular Fedex truck. Carries a genetic payload and it's delivering to its target right but it turns out bring a gene is a little bit harder. Then delivering a package and destroyed gene is especially challenging. One reason is it's is the a the virus are Fedex truck is incredibly tiny even among viruses. It's so small. You need an electron microscope just to see it, and then you have the destroyed gene, which is huge. It's the largest known human gene it contains about five. Hundred Times more genetic code than a so fitting that specific gene into that specific virus would be like trying to get a football stadium into a fedex truck something like that. Yeah, and most he has some other challenges to One is that do sheng affects billions of muscle cells all over the body. So this a delivery truck would have to be programmed to find all of these cells recognize them, and then infect them with this new genetic code. Yeah and some spent fifteen years tackling these challenges he was going along you is making progress he said, but it was coming one small step at a time. This is very challenging. It was mount ever said the gene therapy community in each one of these steps was setting up base camp, but then in nineteen, ninety, nine so mulcahy's work for that matter all gene therapy research pretty much came to a stop. The reason was that a teenager named Jesse. Gelsinger had died in the gene therapy experiment, right? I. Mean I. Remember Learning about that in graduate school in genetics. It was horrible. It was really sad the experiment he was part of had nothing to do with muscular dystrophy or the virus nothing to do with some all skis work, but it didn't matter right gene therapy trials were postponed or abandoned investors disappeared and so did research funding it stopped everything everyone got supercautious everyone except the muscular dystrophy association. The Jerry Lewis Telethon people they continue to push for the advancement of gene

Scientist John Gelsinger John Hamilton John Hi Mary NPR Jerry Lewis Jude Samal Mattie. Grad School Aviv Graduate Student Jesse Mulcahy Sheng D. M. D. University Of Florida John Kids Sharon
The Importance of Self Compassion

Therapy for Black Girls

04:58 min | 4 d ago

The Importance of Self Compassion

"If there's anything we can use right now and in the coming months itself compassion. Today I'm joined by Dr Kristin Nafta about the many ways of compassion. He can be a helpful to us to get through these difficult times. Kristen is currently an associate professor of educational psychology. At the University of Texas at Austin. She's a pioneer in the field of self compassion research conducting the first empirical studies on self compassion over fifteen years ago. In addition to writing numerous academic articles and book chapters on the topic. She is the author of this book self compassion the proven power of being kind to yourself released by. William Moro. In conjunction with her colleague Dr Chris. Germer she has developed an empirically supported training program called mindful self compassion, which is taught by thousands of teachers worldwide. Dr Nefyn I chatted about what self compassion is how is different from self esteem, how it can be helpful in mediating difficult emotions and her favorite activity for practicing self compassion. If anything resonates with you while enjoying our conversation, please share with us on social media using the Hashtag t BG in session. Here's our conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today. Chris and I'm really really excited to chat with you. Self compassion was are yellow collective book club choice for last month. So it feels very timely for you to be joining us for this conversation. That's great. Wonderful. Happy to be here. Yeah. So I wonder if you could start just by talking with us about what self compassion is in what it isn't right. So the easiest way to think of what self compassion is simply being a good frontier self I saw in. Terms of how you relate yourself. Especially when you're struggling, you're struggling because you feel inadequate made a mistake or just when life is really difficult that you treat yourself with the same type of kindness warm care support concern that you would nationally showed two good friend, right? Most of us don't do that most of us go if we talk to our friends where we talk ourselves who would have no friends I in. So really self compassion is just turning that around and doing a u-turn in being kind ordered to ourselves. Now. Some people get confused about this they think. To ourselves me being self indulgent being lazy being selfish that actually that's not passionate right so so if you want the technical definition of compassion is concerned with alleviation of suffering. and. So in your self indulgent or you're lazy or you know you're helping yourself in your naturally getting your suffering, you're actually causing yourself more problems in the long run. Also, the word compassion comes from the Latin Pasha means to suffer an income means with. So. There's an inherent connectedness in self. Compassion is a sense set while everyone's imperfect everyone struggling. You know it's not just me, and this is what makes up compassion different than somebody Mike self-pity. Self Passion US remember that this is part of the shared human experience. You know it's not just me. To say that especially in today's times whenever I say that some people think this is like a coded version of all lives matter. Right. It doesn't acknowledge that some groups suffer more than others. Absolutely do the amount of suffering is different. The source of suffering is different. All people in all groups do not suffer the same way, and so we need to acknowledge that as the human experience. And yet every single individuals especially when it comes to relating to their own suffering, their own suffering is if you're paying. If you treat your own paying with kind of a kind caring response. You will be able to turn your attention outward more effectively. So it really sounds like you know sometimes we hear this conversation around like Grief Olympics are paying Olympics right where we're trying to say like, Oh, my heart is bigger than your heard, right? Yeah. Exactly. It's not like that York saying that my pain is bigger or smaller you recognize people's pain different is very important. I think especially nowadays you we have to recognize. Those. Who structural reasons pain of all people is not the same. And yet was self compassion. We can treat our own pain as worthy of a compassionate us. We're just saying that, hey, I haven't paying I haven't perfect and I'm not the only one very simple outweigh. The reason that so important is because if you get into self, pity was made for me like victim mentality fx not helpfully

Dr Chris Kristen Dr Kristin Nafta University Of Texas Associate Professor Austin Dr Nefyn William Moro Mike Self-Pity Latin Pasha York
Betty Ford's Healing Legacy: A Conversation with Susan Ford Bales

Let's Talk Addiction & Recovery

05:47 min | 4 d ago

Betty Ford's Healing Legacy: A Conversation with Susan Ford Bales

"Today, we're joined by Susan Ford Welcome. Susan. You are aid author, photo journalist. The youngest of four children to President and Mrs Ford. We are appropriately here at the Betty Ford Center, where you're also on the board of trustees of the Hazel Betty. Ford Foundation. Your mother's legacy. was as a breast cancer survivor and advocate, and as a woman in recovery, and as an advocate for being a woman in recovery. How has the legacy of your mother? Affected your role here at the Betty, Ford? Center. Wow Her shoes were really big to fill your So when she stepped down from the board and I became chairman. I. Think it was harder than living in the White House actually because. We mother and I come from two different parts of recovery. She is a patient and the family member. So we have very different opinions of things than and what's important to us One of the things that she made me do, which was extremely painful with sit on every city every single committee. And participate on my witness finance. Finance. But I learned it. Sure. And so I feel like she did a great job of preparing me to be chairman. So it's it's just we come at it from a different angle in a different perspective family and children's services is extremely important to me because that's how I was affected by this disease. Did you come to the the role of being the chair here at Betty? Ford, did you come to that reluctantly? No because I had been on the board for cheese, probably fifteen years I'm it had just been a long process Mother was gracious and allowed me to raise my children before I came on the board because I was pregnant when the. Betty. Ford. Center open. So. I don't think I came on the board until my youngest was first grade or second grade, and so she gave me some time to get my children raised in at least in school because it required several days travel and all of that in childcare and all the complications that we go through to participate in something like that. Let's go back a little bit and talk about the history of the Betty, Ford Center there's a lot of people who think that when your mother found her own recovery in the late seventy s, she went to the Betty Ford Center. It wasn't even here now was, how did the Betty Ford Center come to be. Johnson from Eisenhower Medical Center decided that. They wanted to have a treatment and it had been in the plan at Eisenhower for some time, they wanted to have an alcoholic treatment center on the campus. and. So Leonard firestone mother's dear, friend was also on the board of Eisenhower. And so Johnson Leonard. Kinda. Tag. Team. Durham. and. She was really in a recovery about four years. But she agreed and I and I thought that was a very courageous step to be so early recovery. So she came to all of us children and she said. When I'm long gone. You're the ones that are going to have to live with the fact that your mother had A. Drug and alcohol treatment. Centre, named after you. How do you feel about that? Wow, and we also we don't care. I mean. It's what a great Lexi you know. She was one of the first to step out and and share her story So once we got past that it was just a matter of mother and Leonard Raising the money. To get this place started and of course. Way? Back, then in the early nineteen, Eighty S. The Hazel and foundation played a role also in the birthplace. Can you share just a little bit about that? Well, mother spent quite a bit a time when to Hazelton, because Hazelton had done it. So well, they were probably the leaders in the in the sense that they had been around the longest And it was successful There's lots of treatment centers that haven't been successful. Some other went back and spent probably close to a week there visiting with counselors visiting with a staff talking, how do you do this? What did you do? Right? What did you do on? Why? What makes Hazelton successful because we basically wanted to copy what they had done, but in a different location sure who would have ever imagined decades later. The two organizations would come together and I WANNA to come back to that in just a minute. But First Susan I want to address an issue that. Always bothers me and then set the the Betty Ford. Center is seen as a place for. The rich and famous for the exclusive for those who can pay out of pocket. But that's not at all what's happening here is no and less than one percent of the patients here are what we would think of as celebrities. Yes. We've had some celebrities, but so was Hazelton I mean. So as other places everybody needs treatment, it doesn't matter what you do that determines you need treatment. So, and they don't get treated any different than. My Mother didn't get treated any different Long Beach. The women, she shared a room with. So it's the same.

Betty Ford Center Hazel Betty Ford Susan Ford Hazelton Ford Foundation Betty Ford Ford Center Mrs Ford Johnson Leonard Chairman Durham. Eisenhower Medical Center Lexi Leonard Firestone Eisenhower President Trump Long Beach White House A. Drug
Reflections with Wye Oak

The Noise Pop Podcast

04:02 min | 5 d ago

Reflections with Wye Oak

"Welcome back to the noise podcast on host Adrian Spinelli coming to you from San Francisco California. We've been working on having the Band Wye Oak, join US different I studios this past march earn episode talking about some of the most memorable music they released over the past decade plus. But then the pandemic it towards got cancelled world fell apart you know the story goes. But. Now a few months later pleased to say that we've got JEN wosner, Andy Stack, Wyatt, joining US remotely. Of course, for the first installment. In the series, we're calling reflections. On reflections, artists will take us through musical points on timelines of their careers, listen to the songs and then talk about everything from production process songwriting anecdotes, emotions they were experiencing at the time writes stories you've never heard and a lot more. The past fifteen years why okay have been incredibly rewarding band across their sixth studio albums and more. While originally from Baltimore both Shannon Andy. North Carolina and they each have solo projects out as well. Flock of dimes Jen enjoy Arrow for Andy. It recorded had been a part of live ensemble bans on their lot. Of. Negro so Vanessa L. Lamb chop a co-produced suckers lunch the latest album from Oakland's madeline. Kenny, and there's a new OK. P called new horizon you the Brooklyn Youth Chorus Out July thirty first on merge records. We'll talking about that album and everything that came before. It's because it's been a winding road to get twenty twenty for why oak and we'll be circling that path throughout this episode. Reflections on the northbound. PODCAST. With. Okay, we're on the line with JEN wosner and Andy Stack of y Oke Jen's coming from your derm. Now is our in North Carolina where you're at. Yeah, close enough. I don't want to tell anyone any closer to be honest with you. Andy is in Delaware right now hanging on the beach Ojai I'm in Delaware yes. This is a series where were calling reflections. Hopefully, it's that the first of many installments into the series and we're going to go through some songs y okay. Songs through the years and I'm excited. Talk you guys. Welcome. Welcome to the northbound podcast. Thanks for having us. Thank you. As far as the reflections knows my thought of the name I just had the Diana Ross and the Supreme Song like China. A song playing in my head. I could somehow Ford the clearance to play that song on the podcast. It would. Right now sounds like you get you get a theme song already you're good to go. I. Know Right. If you WANNA hire us to do sound like that would be fine to why oh, covering reflections by Diana Ross and the supremes the sound alike, no one needs and nobody asked for. who well so let's let's talk a little bit here. You guys have definitely speaking of you guys have not settled at all you guys have been super busy the last three or four months here, and there's been there's been a lot of Wye Oak music coming out, we're going to play a couple of those songs. Are you both originally from Baltimore Yeah, we're both from Baltimore. We grew up about fifteen minutes away from one another and. Actually get this out of the way in the no horizon EP is out on July thirty first on merge records Y. Okay. IS A. Is a core merge band if you will you guys have been with merge since. Two thousand nine correct maybe even sooner. I think two, thousand, seven. Yeah. First record came out in two, thousand, two, thousand, six, hundred, thousand, seven I can't remember a long time ago.

Shannon Andy Jen Wosner Andy Stack Baltimore Diana Ross North Carolina United States Wye Oak Adrian Spinelli San Francisco Oke Jen Delaware California Supremes Kenny Brooklyn Ford Wyatt Negro Oakland
Anti-Kremlin protests continue in Russia's far eastern city of Khabarovsk

Monocle 24: The Globalist

09:27 min | 5 d ago

Anti-Kremlin protests continue in Russia's far eastern city of Khabarovsk

"Thousands of people took to the streets again in Russia's. Russia's far, east and city of Khobar of yesterday protests against Moscow, and the Kremlin have now been going on for over three weeks. Joining me for more to mark. Gherman Russia analyst stunt senior associate fellow at the Royal United Services Institute Good Morning and welcome to the program Mark. Could we first recap what exactly has happened so far? The first protests were sparked by the arrest off a local politician weren't they? They were the local governor elected local governor Sergei for Guile, and this was on fifteen year old charges of involvement with some contract killing, which may or may not be true. He was set me involved in some questionable business. But the widespread assumption amongst the locals was that it was simply because the Kremlin was was peeved at him at the fact that he had stood against their candidate and then just simply rummaged around looking for suitable charges, and since then these protests have continued for, as you said, now, almost a month and it's really. So transmogrify from being about four, how to actually being about Moscow. About Putin and about the sense that in a way, the government in Moscow cares about the rest of Russia outside. It's ring road when it comes to taxing them rather than looking after them. Have those protests course most grow by surprise? Absolutely, an indeed one of the interesting signs of that is precisely that there has been such a clampdown on any references to the protests. In the official TV media, we've seen accounts in the newspapers and online sites, but very much from the televisions point of view, it's nothing and that's a classic sign off what what Moscow does when it doesn't know what to do. It basically tries to by itself, some breathing space, but the trouble is cost nowadays. Russians. Are Very Internet savvy and. And the news has gone out anyway, and at the moment I, think the Russians Russian government is essentially playing a waiting game. They don't really want to try and take on these thousand strong protests especially because the local law enforcement and security agencies frankly don't particularly infused to do so and therefore ain't now waiting hoping that it'll die down to the point when they can actually begin to crack down. Do you think that's going to to the protests? We'll just eventually die down. Well I think the honest answer is, yes. We saw the most recent protests are actually smaller than in previous ones and impact that was because it was rainy rainy day in such like. But because it's not as though, these can can go anywhere what the what, what are the real significance not that somehow this protest will, it will explode and expand. It's precisely what it shows about incipient protests potential within Russia because there's nothing particularly special about kebabs. He's not like he was unusually poor or badly hit by corona virus or whatever, and I think. Right. This is so worrying for the Kremlin, is that sense of fine we can ride out this one protest in this one city. But what does it say about the potential for more protests all across the country exactly disease dimension that. Putin rather strong grip on power buddies this. Really, the case everywhere in Russia also in more distant places such as city in the Far East? Well. This is interesting thing. It's that you might have protests the loyalty to the center. Until. Push comes to shove. We've seen as particularly in Russia east of the Urals for which there is classic. Russian proverb God is in Heaven Bizarre is far away where absolutely Moscow is a very distant force and we've seen it in the past where actually local authorities. Are often in cahoots with local security operators in their own corrupt deals and so forth. But also they feel the same kind of pressures and resentment as ordinary Russians. So I think one of the strengths of Putin's regime has always been that he's understood when not to push when to make concessions. But at the moment in a corona virus has eroded his personal support, the money is tight it's that much harder to make the kind of. Deals Shantou involve splashing the money around that. He has in the past. So it's an interesting question. I mean, yes, he's not gonNA be swept away by this. He's not disappear anytime soon, but the slow corrosion, the legitimacy of his regime is becoming all the more visible exactly, and let's remember this beauty can did now stay in power until two thousand and thirty six thanks to changes to Russia's constitution. Do you think he actually has to address this issue of erosion and do you think people are going to appreciate him for years to come? Well I mean who knows quite how history is going to take him. Frankly, I think probably quite harshly. He will have to address the question of legitimacy, but again I think the thing is that. Putting has been around longtime. He's been power twenty, two years I. Think if trump has exhausted his capacities to reinvent himself he's got these grand national projects that you meant to be about totally reconfiguring national interest structure and health and such like, and it's really quite telling that he's recently pushed back the timeframe for their accomplishment. He clearly has a very ambitious agenda. Agenda, but he doesn't seem to know either how to really accomplish it, and secondly how to afford it. So I think he's he's hoping at the moment that things just get better that do course the virus abates. The economy stabilizes and things will work out not sure how far holding your fingers. A crossing your fingers is really going to be a proper answer. The most go the Kremlin on Moscow seemed to be waiting that these protests were seeing in Cabbarov Squirrel, just gradually die away. But what if they doesn't what kind of a warning example this? Of Four four Moscow and UNFOR, Vladimir? Putin. We we have reached elections coming up rather soon. How can make sure that something like that doesn't happen in those cities in those regions as well? Well, here's the problem he can't because it's really about is going to catch nation of random factory in football was not particularly personally popular. It was more the just his arrest, which under other circumstances might well have. Have passed pretty much unnoticed. Just somehow catalyzed. They just general sense of being fed up. There was a coastal city. Now. Elsewhere, we have certain places I. Mean, for example, in in Novosibirsk in Siberia, there's sort of contested elections coming up where we actually have real opposition politics emerging. The government is going to hope that it considered squelch Shalit's, but didn't that it has to have these parliamentary elections however. Much the parliament itself is just a rubber stamp. Nonetheless, it has to have these elections and elections. Inevitably case it paces when situations are that, there will be discussions disagreements, it will generate or kind of precious. Again, what we're seeing something that means it's highly difficult to predict. That's irritating for an analyst like myself. You difficult to predict exactly what and where it's going to happen, but there is a prevailing sense in Moscow that. The country is entering some bumpy. Times? Would it be easier for peace in to lead his country. If it was simply smaller, it is understandable that Russians thousands of miles away from Moscow? Mayfield. They don't wants to be controlled by the capital, isn't it? Exactly. Eleven time zones away or whatever I mean the actually that sense that Moscow doesn't really care is really quite pervasive, but to be perfectly honest look I've traveled outside Moscow itself. Even within the Moscow region, you find these pockets of ticky rural poverty, where actually all the shiny new infrastructure, the bright lights, the hipster bars and things of Moscow seem alone wrong where way. So size does matter, but I think it's really not the key issue. It's about the extent to which this is a regime which is focused on Moscow and Petersburg, a handful of other major cities and really has developed them at the expense of the rest of the country. And just finally, Mark Looking at these protests and fierce Moscow and beauty may have. How can President Putin bring the nation together? Again is widely assumed that looking for enemies from the West has been one way for into boost his own popularity domestically. Do you expect that we may see some kind of new maneuvers from the president in the future if things get worse domestically. Well, there's this overwhelming assumption in the West that, yes, that he tries to distract attention this way we have to realize that with the exception of the two, thousand, fourteen annexation of Crimea. which was very, very unusual case. None of the various overseas adventures that Putin has engaged in Syria and so forth have been either driven by domestic considerations or frankly popular i. mean half the time. Actually the Russian regime lies to its own people to claim that it's at interventions abroad are much less than they really are. So I think what we're going to say is not some kind of adventure abroad, but we will. Will see a rising tone to this propaganda about the world is a hostile place and the Russia is beleaguered fortress. He doesn't make Putin popula. What it does do is it legitimises his Moose clamped down on the opposition because he can say, this is not a time to be divided because Russia's very future is at threat

Moscow Russia President Putin Analyst Khobar Royal United Services Institut Sergei Mark Looking Urals Novosibirsk President Trump Official Guile Football Crimea. Senior Associate Petersburg Mayfield
The Most Dangerous Fruit in America

Gastropod

05:55 min | 6 d ago

The Most Dangerous Fruit in America

"To start our watermelon adventure, we called one of the world's great watermelon. Harry Paris he has worked on watermelon science per years as part of Israel's agricultural research. Service. Well, I think the first thing that comes to the first two syllables water right? This is a true rich table. which has a lot of water and which actually probably the first use by people of this particular natural products. Was To quench thirst I've spent summers in Israel, and it is basically watermelon paradise but that's not actually were Harry I fell in love with a watermelon it all started when his dad grew watermelons in the backyard in their home in Brooklyn in the nineteen sixties then Harry gave watermelon farming himself fifteen years old and there was a new variety called Crimson sweets that came out and plans at a few seats in the garden and Lo and behold by the fall we got one nice big sweet high quality watermelon fruit. That we grew in the backyard in Brooklyn and from then on I was just hoped. Harry was well ahead of the local war hipster curve in Brooklyn but the watermelon is neither from Brooklyn nor from Israel, in fact, its origins are a little bit of a mystery. One of the big headlines was back in the mid nineteenth century when the British explorer David Livingstone went to the southern African deserts and low and behold. It was the year in which there was more rain than average and he found a large areas just covered with wild watermelons. He's wild watermelons were hard but does the name says have water say to pound them and so on and so forth but you could squeeze the water out of them David Livingston was searching for the source of the Nile. But apparently, he was also as a side hustle looking for other sources like the source of our sweet watermelons and people thought he'd founded the wild ancestor but Livingston was wrong about the source of the Nile and as it turns out now. We know he was wrong about those wild watermelons to now that scientists can examine the DNA of melons. They found that the Kalahari desert wild melon that Livingston came upon is not the ancestor of our sweet watermelon. But DNA is just one of the tools that scientists are using to try to figure out where and when the watermelon was domesticated, you can't just use one approach. You have to use an archaeology approach you have to use clients science you have to use. Linguistics you have to go into literature some of it'll some of an ancient. And even more than that. Of course, with the latest that we know genetics and genome can assist us first of all the plant Science Livingston was at least on the right continent because there are wild watermelons of various different species all over. Africa. So the wild relatives watermelon their fruits are smaller and rounder not elongate. They have often perfectly round it small fruits the outside looks like a watermelon like little, green and white. But inside they all have this extremely bitter and usually white. Whitish pulpits azan Renner is a professor of biology at the University of Munich and she's another one of the world's watermelon expert Suzanne's as you could boil these Super Beta watermelons for jam or you could use them medicinally as kind of a purge to clean out your insides. Basically, the wild watermelon wasn't a tasty thing to eat raw at all. So where the desert watermelon comes from, there are two things that have to happen to these bitter wild melons to turn them into the watermelons. We love today to specific genetic mutations. The first one is a mutation. That switches off the production of bitchy chemicals and so this mutation occurs in nature as bad for the plan because the plant of course has this bitterness to defend itself not eaten so that the fruits would not be yeah for the plan is better to lose the bitterness but for us, it's good and we can only imagine that native people every once in a while tried one of these melons maybe for what may be hoping for something to chew on and found some that wasn't bitter Suzanne's scientists know what that mutation is and how to find it in. A melon they just to look and the second mutation is the one that turned it red inside rather than white the red colors also well understood this is well studied and it's a completely different set of teens. This is and other scientists know exactly which two mutations they're looking for. Those mutations aren't common and wild melon. So when did they happen? When were watermelons domesticated Harry says the place to look for those clues is archaeology in ancient Egyptian tombs. Archaeologists have found paintings of whole watermelons on a platter there oblong and striped watermelons today not round like the. Wild bitter ones but did those ancient Egyptian watermelons taste like the ones we eat did they have the mutations for sweetness and maybe for the red color the painting can't really tell you that. But fortunately, some other watermelon evidence has showed up in a four thousand year old Egyptian tomb complex the seeds and leaves from the tomb ended up at the q Royal Botanic Gardens in England Suzanne wanted to find out if those remains held any clues about whether the watermelon had already been domesticated by them. So she wrote to mark Nesbitt who coincidentally starred in our tonic. And who runs the economic botany collection at Q. and she asked if she could borrow a watermelon leaf from the tomb, it was in a glass box encased in a box and he opd mark opened it, and he said it hadn't been opened since eighteen seventy one or whenever singles arrived there then and her colleagues analyzed demand the leaf and I they were thrilled the watermelon leaf DNA did in fact, have the mutations that would have made the fruit sweet and read but then when you see fourteen Dating for this material that we had received for Mark Nesbitt, it turned out it was much younger than we thought it turns out the watermelon material in the two had been left there by a later visitor carbon dating showed it was from the late eighteen hundreds huge bummer.

Harry Brooklyn Israel David Livingston Suzanne Mark Nesbitt Harry Paris Science Livingston David Livingstone Kalahari Q Royal Botanic Gardens Africa Harry I LO University Of Munich Azan Renner Professor
A Native Bee-nanza!

In Defense of Plants Podcast

04:12 min | Last week

A Native Bee-nanza!

"I, think of myself as the the bridge between the plants in the pollinating insects sign trying to. Really Delve into the habitat and plants that are supporting our native bees in particular but also some of the other secondary insects that are doing some colonization as well. And where did this come from I? Mean were you always a nature? Person were always a plant person or was it like more interested in insects than than it? All kind of came together later on. bengals certainly focused more on the plant world in on the last fifteen years working restored clam communities, and even just in gardens that had been converted to mostly native plants. I really started to see a lot of patterns and just the difference in insect diversity so that really kick starting my interest in insects again, and basically I went down a rabbit hole after that never came out. have been trying to learn more about our pollinating insects in their specific interactions and it's that you know I'm pretty observant person. So just seeing you know year after year the same sort of visitation patterns between particular inspecting eight of plant that. That's sort of what stimulated me to write my first book. You know just start documenting some of these interactions in an interesting pollination ecology bits two about plants and how they may be tricking or. On eating. Insects. To. To their flowers. I love that the power of observation in it's something I see everywhere I've moved if I set up a garden or helped friend set of gardens, it's palpable. You really do notice a difference year after year especially, if you start using more native plants in a variety of native plants at that, you start to release pick out like you said these associations and I know anecdotes don't data, but it is very powerful to see the difference between what a lawn was like versus even the smallest Garden Patch can make in terms of insect diversity. Yes exactly. I. Mean I look at my neighbor, for example, who has over a half Acre of lawn and I. You know you can't still anecdotal of course but. As you just said the obviously I have a lot more going on in my garden that's just chock full of native plants versus his half Acre of one. So and I think that's what's the most encouraging inspiring thing about it is yes are small native gardens in urban or suburban areas. A may be attracting sort of generalists or you know a general amount of on eating insects, but it's still quite diverse and in pretty fascinating and and you can find some some rare species in gardens is just a case again of of looking hard for them in and documenting them. For. Sure. Yeah. It's again. It's one of those things like I'm a plant person I like bees, I like insects. I know almost nothing about them. So I often go outside in have no idea what I'm looking at and unless it becomes like super prevalent or if it's the case of lake, are milkweed stem Beatles right now and they're destroying all of our queens that I don't you know it takes me time to learn this stuff but you shouldn't be going out just aim at collecting the rarest of the rare to your landscape. Even just like you said, having a generalist suite of pollinators is an incredible step up from that half Acre of law next door. Right, right it's your garden is is functioning in providing good service. and. Then of course, the other important piece in many people don't realize just we had this huge diversity of be the loan in North America and and they all have different needs. They all have different seasonal phonology. So understanding how we are stewards of the land in how may be impacting our garden maintenance practices for example, all those things come into play when people start to realize they are attracting different. Sour. Visiting insects in you know they may all be nesting in different situations even in a garden

Tricking North America
How to find (or become) a good CFI

The Finer Points - Aviation Podcast

05:00 min | Last week

How to find (or become) a good CFI

"People keep asking me how to become a better CFI. On how do I get better as a CFO or if you're on the pilot slash students side of it, you can say, what am I looking for when I look for a good? Good CFI. I mean, that's a really tough one to answer honestly because you can. Be Brand new to the game. And you might have had fantastic instruction and you might have. A BIG APPETITE FOR Washington struggle I mean that's not a bad but he might enjoy helping people solve problems. Born teacher and just because you're new doesn't mean you're bad. Without bragging I sort of think that's the situation I was in right I met Richard. I knew I wanted to be a teacher. I was intentionally putting my whole heart into an reteaching some of the stuff that he taught me on and. Certainly Green when I started a lot of mistakes and have corrected a lot of those things since that I still make mistakes. But I think I was a pretty good teacher straight out of the gate. Had A colleague enough for jet blue and I distinctly remember him saying to me one day. He said, Hey, dude, I can't I'm feeling really guilty I can't see my students. For anything, except ours. He was seeing as little our Johnson, his logbook. But even though he was coming from that perspective, he did a pretty darn good job. Right? He he had a sense of responsibility when it came to teaching people and he was doing his best. Now, you can have an old timer who hasn't worked at a flight and Flying School or Fight Club and twenty years. Maybe he has fifteen thousand hours in his logbook but I might be a really bad teacher you know set in his ways not. Not, keeping up with the things that are changing on. This just illustrate how it's not a very simple problem. Certainly from the student pilots to know. If, you've got a good instructor how to find a good instructor if the instructor you're working with this week in any way. But one thing you can ask are certain you know metrics I'd ask how many students that person has put up for a check ride in the last say three years. Or two years, which is the. Recurrent training interval required for CFI's we have to go back for a flight instructor renewal course every two years. And it doesn't have to be a lot. If someone says I put ten people through in two years says something and someone says that but one person two years that's fine to. The point is they're working with an examiner and that's really When I think about that question what makes against the F. I? How do I find a good CFI? And I struggled a look for some common denominator among all of the people I just started described in a two personality types I just. Any one of those things is some version of peer review. That's an extremely important part of the process for everybody. Phase checks, for example. I rely on fees checks heavily on even if it's not an official face check, I love it when my students. Take a lesson I can't be there and I say they want to eat fly with Mary this day or Fly with jaffer whomever it is. It doesn't even really matter what I want from that instructor is one hundred percent honesty no ego involved right? I've been doing this for. Twenty years more than twenty years now, and I want to know if there's holes in my game and I'll give you a great example. You know this is probably five years ago. So there I am fifteen years into Jane. On and I sent a student on a number two as a lesson or a check but he goes out with Jeff Rappaport who jeff was a pretty new CFO at the time he was my instance student. So you had been a relatively museum. and. Jeff comes back and says you know you're seeing it in great on this this this and the other thing. But I noticed that he didn't do after landing checkless. and. You're right. I don't think I'm very militant about after landing checklists. You know if you don't pull check this out for every climb level offer descent on you like white on rice but am I really that diligent about an after landing checklist when the wheels are on the ground over staring at the park probably not and is that a good thing? No. No that's not a good thing. It's a whole that Jeffcott immediately, and then certainly in examiner would catch. Right. So I immediately plugged that hole in my game. Haven't seen the all the time just made a mistake on Patriot regarding night currency requirements and one of the guys on my content team cut in, and we now I call the examiner and get to the bottom of it, but it's that Peer Review I. think that keeps instructors sharp. Keeps instructors current and saying relevant information. I'm in. It also inspires confidence. For the student.

Instructor Johnson Jeff Rappaport CFO CFI Richard Washington Flying School Jaffer Official Mary Jeffcott Fight Club
Austin Jochum on Bringing the Training Session to Life

Just Fly Performance Podcast

04:29 min | Last week

Austin Jochum on Bringing the Training Session to Life

"So why? Want to say this. So how it was there a better way to spell your last name then or would there be like Italic so I can have people pronounce it correctly when they read the headline here. Yeah everybody thinks like it's A. Job looks like Josh right here. But if you have really gonNA spell, we probably with a Y Y Y. Que you or something like that since last name just totally jacked up. The I I'm not GonNa lie when saw I think maybe it was when you asked me to. Be On your podcast dry your podcast before I thought it was Josh. So I apologize I just wrote in my little notes I put. Okay You M. so hopefully that eleven maybe that'll resolve things a little bit. So just for everyone out there that'll. Thousand my that was my iteration. And that's where we just have to get to a point as a coach and a company where people in the not to say. That's one of our goals. People say Yoga the right way yeah. Yeah. That'd be good. Creative Project Austin. So I know one of the things that I really like about looking at your work is I. Know that want to know you're really creative coach always love I know this is GonNa be an awesome talk and I was curious you did football I think track a you're into strengthening conditioning. What what was your formation in your years as a college athlete and then your choice to become the type of coach that you are now? Yeah and I think it's funny that you say I'm a creative coach because as a player I was anti creative like from from the very day one. Started lifting in high school with Olympic lifts like straight. Olympic. Style. Monday Wednesday Friday, all we did was clean and jerk clean snatch, and then maybe some bench presents watts and just the differ variation of that and. I mastered swore by those for so many years. That's literally the only thing I ever did. If. We sprinted if we did anything maybe some ladders we did but. The entire program was Olympic lifts swear by it was awesome in highschool got really strong at that. Thought that was the answer. When into my first year college at Saint Thomas Football Kaikan on the field first day we actually lifted before we went on the field we lifted and I was like smoking these guys like smoking on cleaner jerk like doing. More than a lot of seniors on their all I'm here I arrived I'm sweet a freshman. Football, we go to the practice that day and I I my mind was blown I had no idea was happening speed the game was different. Everything was different I'm move to like a robot out on the field and just moved terribly and I started the. To all right, what's happening in the weight room is not what's happening on the field and I need to find a way to bridge that gap and that started the full journey and I think it is a journey because then it was west side stuff on my. All right not the Olympic stuff. Now it's west side. Now it's the powerlifting. Now it's some box. Johnson plow metrics advance to my are still stuck in that weight reminds set of. Bands the bar now GonNa be faster and it helped a little bit I moved just a little bit better. But I think we're just because I was destroying my body a little bit less than the weight room and I still a little bit slower on the field and it was just this journey than it was bilateral to single lateral. Then it was traffic training and this this full hodgepodge of things but never fully breaking out of the weight room mindset never breaking into the movement onset and by the time graduated. At Saint Thomas I had some athletic success on the field and. But it was in a way of I forced myself into a mold of athletic success. I plays Nose Guard and my movement options were very small and I was watching other players and I was doing a job that was required to do doing his thing. I'm field that is required to do but the game move fast for me everything move fast for me I had. Very little movement options I had one may maybe one pass rush move and I was good at the pass rush move. But I didn't have a lot of options people next left and right and me that works out in quotation worked out a lot less than me that they had way more options and that's really where I started to dive into how can I get more movement options for myself? How can I move better? How can I give my athletes the ability to? Now that you have a huge output, you're able to lift a bunch of weight. You're able to sprint really really fast to do all these things. How can we give you options to do this? How can we give you? Can we slow the game down a little bit for you and that's Kind of a little bit of where we started the journey of where Rats Day and hopefully the journey continues for the next ten to fifteen years I can look back at this podcast. About Austin but that's kind of the

Josh Football Saint Thomas Football Kaikan Olympic Powerlifting Austin Saint Thomas Johnson
Breaking Through at CVRx

MedTech Talk Podcast

05:33 min | Last week

Breaking Through at CVRx

"Welcome to the MED tech talk podcast your host Pardo and I'm very excited to welcome the deem yard CEO CRX to this edition of the podcast Nadeem has had the lustrous career starting at GE and then his GM of MEDTRONIC's navigation business but his biggest and most important challenges come CPR which we're going to focus on today for full disclosure. I've had the pleasure to get to know Nadeem over the past eight plus years, and for the last four I've been on the beam sport and killed as an investor in Cebu. Rx. and. I'm really looking forward to the conversation today. Deem it is great to have you on cats. Thank you jeff it's great to be with you today. Terrific will good what we have a lot of things to cover today and really want to focus on CBS which is turning into I think an incredibly exciting story. But of course, their their roots to the CRX story and maybe you can take us through that a little bit the genesis of. Both. The CRT is therapy in heart failure but also barracks. Absolutely Jeff. So I talk about heart failure it is. A devastating disease. Very expensive from a cost perspective, but also from the human side of things, patients unfortunately suffering from heart failure, end up having those episodes of congestive offense way as they feel that drowning, it's like a continuous waterboarding expedient just how painful that is right and unfortunately one of those episodes could lead to their death and. In the United States hot figure is the second most expensive disease. If we consider cancer as one disease, if you stopped separating cancer between breast cancer by cancer sets that hot figure becomes unfortunately the most expensive disease in the US. What is hot forget? It's. When the heart over the years of. Insult or injury to starts becoming larger the walls of the heart becoming thinner. And the heart's ability to pump blood to the system is compromised. And that's. Compromise happening in multiple forms. One of them is called synchrony when the left side and the right side of the heart start becoming disconnected from each other. So think about it like a car. Engine where have the cylinders not kill into properly? Than the COD would not produce horsepower that you need. You need to tune the car that is what's Artie Cardiac. Surgery synchronization therapy. Was designed to do they. You know put two pacemakers right now it's only one pacemaker with two wires. That's why they call it by basic they based both ventricles and they tried to synchronize the left and right side. That works wild if the heart is distinct honest. However in heart failure. Only thirty to forty percent of the patients have synchrony. That s of the patient's heart become lodged the world's thinner. But the left and right sides are still beating in harmony but not strong enough. And for those patients, unfortunately crt devices did not produce the results that WHO, hoping for. Ten fifteen years ago when we're testing them. And that is where our approach berry. Flex. Therapy comes into play. The genesis of this therapy goes back multiple decades not gonna go to the whole history with Dr Professor Bronwyn than his wife and everything, but nevertheless indie. Let me take one paper from Dr. Abraham. From nineteen ninety nine and that is about CRT devices. In this paper that was published in the New England. Journal of Medicine Dr Abraham demonstrated the sustained. That's or the sustained benefit of CRT. Comes from the fact that when you should denies the left side on the right side of the heart, the pulse pressure of the volume of the blood leaving the heart. Activates the Beverly Flex. In the cutouts dodgy. Trusting. Right. So those patients with this synchrony, you recent combined the left and the right. Now you're sending a pulse pressure strong enough you activate the battery flex let a convoluted way to do it. How did you see that actually signed to do it well? Alex secrets wandered in the body we went with a Wyatt directly into those better receptors in the. Wall and activate though cells. Jackie with. Why go all around right now, our device would work in all forms of heart failure, but we have to go in developed the evidence one by one and demonstrates and in our first. Quote Unquote. beachhead strategy. We selected a large segment of patients who are not able to be treated by CIT devices. Why not the eligible for Siasi devices? Those patients are those who do not have distinctly. Right. So they left the right side of the heart beating in synchrony, but heart is not strong enough. The walls fin the muscles of the heart are tired at the. Pump, the blood.

Jeff Nadeem Cancer United States Dr. Abraham Ceo Crx Medtronic Journal Of Medicine Cebu GE Pardo CBS Dr Professor Bronwyn Artie Cardiac GM New England Jackie Alex Wyatt
Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

The Bio Report

04:27 min | Last week

Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

"Marco, thanks for joining us. All my pleasure, then a four inviting me. We're GONNA talk about drug resistant Fungal Infections Sign Nexus and your efforts to develop Antifungal to treat these infections. Maybe, we can start with how big a problem resistant. Fungal. Infections. Today. It's a growing problem and simply because Antifungal. A unforgotten being to use many decades ago, and that are very few of them. Only free classes. One, the pollyannas introduce sixty years ago. That's all introduce four years ago, and Makino candidates introduced twenty if ago, and of course, we've all this time. Fungi had an opportunity to develop the fastest against these free classes. This is why we are developing a new class in order to overcome the growing problem of these. Phone. Calls. How threatening are these infections? Well the type section that we're treating. Difficult to treat an invasive fungal infections invasive from getting fashion. Infections meaning infection bloodstream of internal organs. Usually, they happen in patients water immortal compromised. So cancer patients with a undergoing chemotherapy or. Transplanted patients, solid organ transplant, bone marrow, transplant patients, and these patients. They don't have the emotional defense five vs infection. So using fictions. They are very aggressive. They can spread inside the body of the patients in mortality of visiting factions can be still. Now, we've a best treatment between twenty to fifty percent Wayne thirty to fifty percent, go extremely high mortality. You have, infections. Are Not internal like, for example, Mucosal infections of his office of the mouth of China. That, that can be very, very difficult to treat and these are we all the type of infection invasive and dilemma Khoza that we are trying to treat. Now we've our compound. We hear a lot about antibiotic resistance and the causes of that. Why are we having this problem with Resistant Fungal Infections? Very good, question Danny. Video. Not The resistance to antibacterial as being on the wrong line is because bacteria. Very. Quick in developing resistance and reason is because they are very promiscuous. Based chain the. Not Charlie between the same species, but also between different species of bacteria and very for development over resistant to antibacterial usually develops very quickly after a few years of being actual product on the market. I'm fungal. Infections and. July. Up the development is extensive slower. It may take ten fifteen years before the be significant amount of. Become, resistant, and these. These why? Now, we start to see the problem becoming bigger and bigger. When you start to see classes a been introduced point, you're forty years ago or even longer. And reason of the focus romantic materials is because They develop resistance. Very, quickly. And in very visas being before course over the last. Probably fifteen point years. But he's not Antifungal. 's is becoming a major issue and you have new species amounting like a candidate horace of. Be Shown to be more drag resistance with high mortality, very difficult to control infections.

Infections Marco Makino Charlie China Wayne Danny
Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

The Bio Report

04:33 min | Last week

Battling Drug-Resistant Fungal Infections

"Marco, thanks for joining us. All my pleasure, then a four inviting me. We're GONNA talk about drug resistant Fungal Infections Sign Nexus and your efforts to develop Antifungal to treat these infections. Maybe, we can start with how big a problem resistant. Fungal. Infections. Today. It's a growing problem and simply because Antifungal. A unforgotten being to use many decades ago, and that are very few of them. Only free classes. One, the pollyannas introduce sixty years ago. That's all introduce four years ago, and Makino candidates introduced twenty if ago, and of course, we've all this time. Fungi had an opportunity to develop the fastest against these free classes. This is why we are developing a new class in order to overcome the growing problem of these. Phone. Calls. How threatening are these infections? Well the type section that we're treating. Difficult to treat an invasive fungal infections invasive from getting fashion. Infections meaning infection bloodstream of internal organs. Usually, they happen in patients water immortal compromised. So cancer patients with a undergoing chemotherapy or. Transplanted patients, solid organ transplant, bone marrow, transplant patients, and these patients. They don't have the emotional defense five vs infection. So using fictions. They are very aggressive. They can spread inside the body of the patients in mortality of visiting factions can be still. Now, we've a best treatment between twenty to fifty percent Wayne thirty to fifty percent, go extremely high mortality. You have, infections. Are Not internal like, for example, Mucosal infections of his office of the mouth of China. That, that can be very, very difficult to treat and these are we all the type of infection invasive and dilemma Khoza that we are trying to treat. Now we've our compound. We hear a lot about antibiotic resistance and the causes of that. Why are we having this problem with Resistant Fungal Infections? Very good, question Danny. Video. Not The resistance to antibacterial as being on the wrong line is because bacteria. Very. Quick in developing resistance and reason is because they are very promiscuous. Based chain the. Not Charlie between the same species, but also between different species of bacteria and very for development over resistant to antibacterial usually develops very quickly after a few years of being actual product on the market. I'm fungal. Infections and. July. Up the development is extensive slower. It may take ten fifteen years before the be significant amount of. Become, resistant, and these. These why? Now, we start to see the problem becoming bigger and bigger. When you start to see classes a been introduced point, you're forty years ago or even longer. And reason of the focus romantic materials is because They develop resistance. Very, quickly. And in very visas being before course over the last. Probably fifteen point years. But he's not Antifungal. 's is becoming a major issue and you have new species amounting like a candidate horace of. Be Shown to be more drag resistance with high mortality, very difficult to control infections. Given the.

Infections Marco Makino Charlie China Wayne Danny
2 Kings 19 and Psalm 46, 80, 135

The Bible Recap

04:55 min | Last week

2 Kings 19 and Psalm 46, 80, 135

"Today, we revisited part of the story. We I read on Day, two. Oh, six including! HAS ACI response to Kingston Aker ABS threats. We're reminded of how humbly he responded when troubles came as way, and since we've read this story before you probably recall that after this when he's been blessed, and has stockpiled fortunes, and he gets to live an extra fifteen years, his heart Arc's away from God, it becomes prideful doubts God's words and live somewhat airless Lii. One of the things we didn't touch on home. I read this story. A few days ago was the part where God puts a spirit and snacker. That will cause him to hear ally. There are a few noteworthy things about that burst. God is in charge of evil spirits there on a leash, and they have to do what he says and go where he commands that comforting second God himself didn't mislead snacker. Scripture tells us repeatedly that God cannot lie. Bruce Sixteen eight says he's incapable of it. It would be contrary to his character because according to John. Fourteen one of his name's is the truth. Is the truth, but God's certainly does use equal for his own purposes when Romans eight twenty eight says he works all things together for the good of those who love him. Evil is included in that list of all things, the good, the bad and the ugly the truth he speaks, and the rumors other speak. So. He allows snacker up to be misled. If you think that might be an unjust response, try to zoom out and remember how sin. Acura of has been Lee bought your way and his leaders tell the people of Judah that they shouldn't let y'all way. Trick them into trusting him. This is a merciful response based on what's inaccurate. Deserves from God. Isaiah also tells has a that they will win this war without even putting gas in their horses, and he's right before a Syria can fire an aero toward Jerusalem God's Army, an army of one shows up and wins, but it isn't really a balanced fight. The Assyrians are way outnumbered by the angel of the Lord who kills one hundred and eighty, five thousand of them and one night, plus he has the home field advantage since he owns the whole earth and whatnot, then eventually, king inaccurate is assassinated just as God promised. Next! We jumped back into the psalms. There were two verses in Psalm, Forty forty-six that stood out to me in light of what we just read. Burst this reference to Jerusalem in verse five stood out. It says God is within her. She shall not be moved. God will help her. When morning dawns, this is certainly what played out over the course of the night. When the angel of the Lord showed up and won the battle for them while they were sleeping when morning dawned, they laid eyes on God's victory. The second verse I loved is the most famous one in this chapter Burston be still and know that I am God. One of the things we've seen repeated as you've been in Isaiah lately. Is this idea of quietness and rest and trust? This stillness fits right in with that, doesn't it? In Psalm Eighty the corporate cry is for God to save them and restore them. In this song Israel knows its identity and echoes it back to the God. Who gave them that identity to begin with? I love this imagery in verses eight nine? It says you brought a vine out of Egypt that vine reference to Israel the people the ones he rescued from Egypt. Then it continues saying you drove out. The nation's and planted it. You cleared the ground for it. This is a reference to Israel the place God drove out the Canaanites and planted them there, and now they've been burned up cut down plucked up and they ask God to restore them and promised to praise him for it. Someone thirty five is where my God showed up today. I really love this psalm. I went through it and circled all the action verbs where God is the subject and here's everything. God does in this chapter. Chose Jacob in Israel. Does whatever He pleases, he makes the clouds rise. It makes lightening brings forth the wind. You struck down. The Egyptians is sent. Signs wonders you struck down many nations. He killed mighty kings, then gave their land to Israel he will vindicate his people. You will have compassion on his servants E, Doyle's in Jerusalem. God does a lot of things here, and as we look back on all of them. We see his hand to bless his people. To restore and redeem the very ones who have repeatedly gone astray from him. and. He doesn't do it begrudgingly. He does it willingly joyfully. You know we know that because I six says he does whatever He pleases. It pleases God to adopt centers into his family, and call them sons and daughters. It demonstrates his great art bore redemption. You will vindicate his people. He will have compassion on his servants. It leases him. Wow, ease where the joy

Israel Jacob Isaiah Egypt Jerusalem ACI LII Acura Bruce Sixteen John LEE Syria Doyle
"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

05:11 min | 3 months ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"An education. You know and Oh also dealing with you know how do you explain to your small child or your young child like what this means you know. What is a pandemic wire? We wearing masks. Why can't I go over to my friend's house? Why can't we play on the playground? Wise the movie theater so this is incredibly challenging for everybody and you know most people are doing pretty good at it. Well you tell you what if you're with people you love. It's a lot easier and so that's why it's nice if it's a family that really gets along that's it can be okay. How about you Robert? You doing all right. Yeah overall I had some incredibly horrible illness Late December of last year that lasted like a month and a half under. If you have it I I would love to be tested there. My own hospital has like Lsu exhibiting symptoms. Don't come anywhere near and so I'm like if I had it and I'm over it I would love to get out donate blood plasma or why. Fortunately son got back from Asia and On the twenty eighth of March he was in Bali Vietnam. He was traveling all over was living with a bunch of kids in Bali. Finally convinced him to come home bout about a week. After he got home he got sick. He had a headache. He was weak. He had muscle pains. He coughed and we couldn't get him tested. He's much better now. He's fine now. He's one hundred percent now and I told him you might be in luck. You're one of the first. You know he just graduated from college last year. We might be one of the first people in your age cohort to be able to go out and work because you've got. You might have immunity. Steve Gibson also got weirdly very. Ill wasn't able to get tested. He's recovered so people like you like you and Steve and my son You could be the golden you might have that yellow card you can carry around saying. I'm I'm cove it free. I got the immunity now. Just doing whatever I can to keep friends and family com safe and anything anybody needs. I can get it done nice and all our local businesses are closed down except for essential services like many places but well in a way. We're lucky because we're all of us are already a little bit introverted. We're used to staying at home. Skype chats and this is a dramatic change. Innocent really is one of my one of my hardcore like extrovert friends was saying how like how horrible this was and I said this is exactly how I feel when you invite me to a party where I don't exactly I love you guys. It's so nice to see you. I am so glad you're all doing so well And I thank you for being friends for more than twenty years now since the tech TV days When we started when I started twit I did and I bring this up every time offer. Both Patrick and Kevin Partnership in the company but they declined which is a good thing. Because you'd still be working for a living right about now but I'm Kevin Obviously didn't need me did much better without me and I'm glad you're doing so well and I'm glad the family's doing well. Patrick I love you. I hope you find a home at someplace we will. Somehow at some we will but A lot of America look at maybe about as close as we can get a unless the real estate prices. Come down a huge way in Portland. I love Portland. We both love the mere fact that Powell's books is in Portland. We want Yeah in Powell's books in the shelving system running around with a flashlight. Robert Heron great to have you to. It's always a pleasure to see a former lab rat. I have much to thank you for and you are. You've always treated me really well even even in the earliest days of being attacked TV and being the underlying on culver help just ever since then and throughout the last fifteen years we've had it's been fun to watch career all of our careers and party and it's it. I'm glad I know you people really I find it quite slow guys hug. I love you guys and it's been really fun Fifteen years I look forward to fifteen more no. I don't think so fantasy a couple of weeks ago that maybe on this episode say. Hey It's been great. Thanks so much. I hope you all have a good life. I'll see later and just walk off enough. I'm Don couldn't do couldn't do it. I love this too much. Thank you guys. Come back real soon. Okay we're seeing all these stay safe. Stay safe stay as we do every Sunday afternoon. Two Thirty Pacific. That's five thirty eastern time. Twenty one thirty. Ut See you can watch us to live. Took DOT TV slash live? Is the live stream audio and video there.

Robert Heron Portland Steve Gibson Lsu Powell Patrick Bali Asia headache Bali Vietnam Ut culver America Don Kevin Partnership
"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

05:33 min | 3 months ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"If you blind date be it. There's no difference and It's it's a little frustrating to see some of the stuff that's out there And then you hear something. It's amazing and it's like oh so I don't know it's it's curious the whole thing but you were. We were talking before everyone you went to commercial and the rest of US ran into the bathroom. it's good that they have that catheter retired so I I think I like headphones can you and your have. You taught me about headphones back with graders. Us right way back when concern. It's so amazing. All the headphones that are out these days. Yeah and then I bought. And this was Scott. Wilkinson's recommendation he reviewed it Recently this little Dak. It's called a hip. Dak from I fi- and it's it's a battery backed up. You know so it's got its own power and you and you take the USB out of your Mac book which has an okay Dak or Using it with X. P. S. thirteen. And so you just get the digital audio from your device you can use it with your iphone with a right cable and this really makes it big difference then you can put on some put some decent headphones in it sounds good and his way. I'm a little more portable you know. Yeah well my workstation. Yeah yeah actually. Some good speakers with these might be pretty might be pretty good. It's funny like Audio quest who makes Expensive Speaker Cables But they do a whole series. This is their high and one that I got in for review The dragonfly tax in that thing. This is the Dak was the actual physical. These things are ridiculously good. I would start with the black unless you have like. Some player headphones. That require a lot of power. Those things complete overkill for the vast majority but the the dragonfly back is Amazing I am listening on hi. Fi men Electro plane are whatever you should. You should look at Dan Clark Audio and and The a onto that they just came out with. I'm actually getting a set of those in for To take a look at but Dan Clark if they're closed headphones are astonishing. If you're at my age I should probably just wear hearing aids and these are pretty third and there. It's funny 'cause when he came out with the original aons you know I was talking to Mike. You're you're delivering something. It's like as good as your primary product but for half the price and part of his thing is he's just out there kind of blow up the industry and deliver as much mys- breaks his heart. Because there's so many kids listening on these little white ipod headphones or iphone headphones. I don't think the music I really don't that. Also be something. I remember the revision. Three offices I kind of became like you know the man I hear you hear you can make music sound better. I'd like a set of headphones. And then disappear come back. It'd be like you know and even like Santa Sony. Md are seventy five zero six. Which Roberts probably wearing right now or has near like for eight hundred bucks. Yeah those are good head right now. Yeah Yeah heard with an external or a USB Dak That I love from a company called Shit and they're full Cho C. H. I. E. They're very good. Yeah I I do something that gave me a physical knob like old school analog Knob for volume control. It happens to perform perfectly and you're looking for a headphone amplifier. Take a company called J. D. S. Labs I know these guys friends But they're Adam amplifier for ninety nine dollars When you go to someplace like audio science review it's outperforming. The this is a ninety nine dollar inexpensive product. They did because they they do There elements was society. I my old headphone amplifier. Dak kind of trashed they had. Just come out with the element. I fell in love with it. And then the the primary engineer spent a couple of years kind of experimenting and figuring out how to lay out the boards and he's created this. You know I was laughing because they had this like you know. Thirteen hundred dollar said of this very serious audio companies speakers and it was picking up all the noise from thirty four inch curved monitor. It was really frustrating because if there was a pause something. Or if there's a quiet passage I would hear noise from the Monitor. And then this ninety nine dollar headphone amplifier. You could basically like shove it up against the alternator of car and it picked up nothing. I mean you know I it was it was next to this monitor and it was picked up nothing. And it's an amazing like companies like these guys like GPS labs and and again like Mr Speakers. They're delivering astonishing audio quality for not that much money and It's amazing stuff. You guys talk about a Navy Excel. It is talk about T- screens and projectors and content and what's going on in the industry and Yeah Good Roberts Roberts kind of if you if you ever want to know about television's Robert I. He's he is calibrated. Several of my. Tv's thank you Robert Very much. You are very well without his calibration. I wouldn't know if the field is redder. Blue our our show today brought to you by a longtime sponsor..

Dak Roberts Roberts Mr Speakers US Dan Clark Audio Dan Clark Md Wilkinson Cho C. H. Scott Mac Robert I. Mike engineer Adam J. D.
"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

06:32 min | 3 months ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"You can't oh I didn't know that I I've been using and just have to use apple's messages you for for SMS right. Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah you can. You can use it on on Apple. The here's why I don't use signal I remember. Now it's time to a phone number for a normal person. That's fine but if you have if you like. Kevin and maybe me and you have more than one phone. It's no good. You Bernard Phone Leo you just. This is the one on my bedside table. Most of the game I keep my school. Google voice account around just for having that burner number and an account and texting system. That you know what I'll give that out to the public so if I use the google voice number then I could put signal on every phone and just say Oh. It's this number. This is it's number. I don't think that work. I have a separate number for both. I have my so you have to signal accounts. That'S THE PROBLEM. You have one free phone number. I only use signal. You can only do it to your main numbers. That's that's the problem if signal. Look what we just need apple messages with Android Support. We need something that works on. Irs and Android That has a desktop client. That's not tied to a phone number. Frankly that to me is a privacy issue with signal. I don't know why they do that because I know they published a couple of documents recently outlining how they're aware of that buried condition and how it is an issue for a lot of people to join up and it is something. I know the number and they have a way. They've come up with might actually work but they needed to get it implemented in right now. I think they're more concerned about that. New Trust Act or whatever the hell it was that was looking to circumvent and the earning act. Oh yeah that's the name. It's Ernie is more clever than I than I thought I could give. Congress credit for because Congress and the Department of Justice and every government in the world is trying to eliminate end to end encryption. Their position is oh no law enforcement needs to be able to know everything you're doing or we can't stop child pornography or terrorists or whatever. The offensive flavor of the month is but the but the problem is at least in the US. They've done it in Russia they've done in Australia. They've done it in Sweden They've done it in many countries where they say. No no you can't have end to end. Encryption it's up to the signal or whoever you're GonNa make an a plain text version available on forsman if they ask for it. They can't do it in the US because people like us. We'll get up arms so they thought they were clever. Oh we gotta I know will threaten to withhold section to thirty protections the ones that say not responsible for the content on your website your blog you know the the comments on your blog or the videos on YouTube. You're not you can't go to jail or be sued for those because you're just a carrier but they say if that protection you have to earn it by. Yeah you gotta earn it. By following quote best practices in terms of encryption or just in terms of offering your best practices but what they're really team has encryption and who is the final arbiter best practices. Sure they've created a committee but it's all deferential. To the Attorney General the United States of America one William Bar who thinks incriptions the worst thing that ever happened so Stein and Dianne Feinstein who is one of the sponsors of the earn it act so Dick Blumenthal and other sponsor said it's not a bad encryption. We just don't want child pornography. What COMPANIES TO BE RESPONSIBLE? They have to earn their section to thirty protection. But it is about encryption. The funny thing is Dick Blumenthal is going on and on about how you gotta use encryption that needs cut sponsoring this stupid act. It's very offensive. And it's just it's or willow. They don't realize that this is a whack. A mole game encryption is never going away right so you down messaging and guess what you just take up file text file encrypted put it on dropbox chat with someone else you go back and forth and you just keep doing them and it's like it's so ridiculous it's just people are gonna find ways around this. Have you ever used? I loved Magic wormhole about that. That the problem. The problem with using dropbox is dropbox has a copy of courses encrypted but it's there and they you know maybe that sets up a red flag or something magic wormholes point to point so if. I want to send Patrick A secret plan to dominate the world. I would I would use magic weren't hold encrypted and it would give me you know an English pass phrase you know nasal walnut glow nasal walnut. And then I would call. Patrick said Glow Nasal Walnut and hang up. Then Patrick Fire up his magic wormhole type glow nasal walnut and it would do a peer to peer connection. And so no third part. Well I guess the phone company know about it can bit torn had something like that Dan. Recently Right Yeah. Something they did. That was encrypted like that. The problem with bittorrent resilient zillow is they never they never talked about the they never. It's not open source never revealed the protocol So it seems like a good idea. Yeah you'd have a unique identifier. Anyway what are we talking about Google Fi? Oh Yeah and the IPHONE so I hope this doesn't depress you Kevin but John Prosser who by the way I don't I don't know who this guy is. But he's been leaking on twitter and he had every detail of the IPHONE. Se including the name before anybody else did. He even said the release date would be Wednesday. Just tweeted a couple of days ago should have some iphone. Se Plus News for you soon. Really odd there's another one coming. Is that the larger version. The larger version PEOPLE ARE UNHAPPY. About how large this one is. Four point seven the naming conventions of the IPHONES are so confusing. Well Anyway Yeah. I think I'm going to get one I think is is You get the plus. I love the exile. Wasn't that a nice phone. What's the difference between a SE plus an x?.

apple Google United States Dick Blumenthal Bernard Phone Patrick Fire Kevin Congress YouTube zillow Ernie Irs Australia twitter Sweden
"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

03:28 min | 3 months ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"We use took about twenty. We can't get the TETON anymore. We bought a ready for this Scott when I first set up to it when we first step video which was in the In the brick house we bought thirty five of them. Wow Green cameras travesty or left John are all not all thirty five thirty three. We're using it right now. What I'm on right now is the old vic is that's pretty funny and you know we see and it's so funny because we've been totally eclipsed we had mark branly on a couple of weeks ago and he's shooting everything on reds editing on four or five. Mac PROS THE NEW ONES. The ones that start at six thousand dollars with. Xt Artists plays. He even has wheels and an monitor stands. That's how well he's doing and The Times have changed quite quite apparent. I'm still funny that you're shooting your movies and the same camera that we're doing it on. That's yeah and I did though I just bought a Mark. Four five cannon. Yeah shoot video and gets to my next project. I'm hoping to show what I think is the most underrated state for beauty in America Nevada. The Vada you think of you know Vegas and area fifty one but you think in the northern two thirds so I got. That's about thirty five hundred bucks. Maybe get some tests. The video looks is sharper than than the Vecsey out but Yeah so another old timer is actually in this in the Chat Room Karston Bondi. Who produces this show? He's producing it home these days. He can't come in to the studio. That's that's no one can accept me but Karston was also one of the people who went to La with Kevin and Robert and stayed with them until two thousand five state with G. Four TV he says Mark Devito. He misses Mark Veto. Most of all the TV folks. He had the dirtiest mouth of anyone. I've ever met saying something given some of the people we worked. There were some pretty foul mouth. Scott it's really nice to see you. I ran into Scott when I came back to facebook. And it's the only good thing that's happened to me in two weeks on facebook but it was great to see it's got goes. Is this you really? And then he says all right prove its you? What did I used to yell during the tapings of Internet tonight and I had no idea so I so I do remember you yelling foul obscenities every time you busted to take which is pretty much every time Scott didn't remember that that's the funny thing Carson remembers the lowest shouting then. I actually had to ask you like okay. Name three executives Ted and that gives you meant driven. Yeah I knew it was you. I I mentioned appear Hammersley Greg Driven and whoever could forget the weirdest CEO? I've ever worked for? Larry Weinberg Yeah. Wow that's good teams. A nice guy driven once once told me that Larry Weinberg came up and said you know. Leo's not bad looking into.

Scott Larry Weinberg Mark Devito mark branly Mark Veto facebook TETON Greg Driven John Mac The Times CEO America Vegas Leo Vecsey Nevada Karston Kevin
"fifteen years" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

02:25 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ears Edition

"But then on t shirts that read contract. You you are celebrating fifteen years. The fifteen year anniversary of trap music. Yes, I am. We all are. Yeah, we wanted. Everybody wants me everyone. It's it's. It's a music that has. It's a music. This five people who wanted to have music is fine. Yeah, but but but it is, it is a genre that's come to define hip hop as we know what today you look at all the stars that have emerged from it and people credit, many like yourself. As the full fathers of trap music, you releasing a new album, and I love how you described. You said this is going to be the Ted talk of trap music leaning the Jonah. What does that mean? Well, when when trap music was introduced to the world in two thousand three on August nineteenth, when I released my second trail. It was, you know it. It was really inspired by, you know, activities that we engaged in due to a lack of options in the undeserved areas of the community. And you know, just as we always have, we taken with the devil meant for bad and had God use it for good, and we took those experiences set them to music and turned it into a commerce that allowed us to change our lives and our families lives forever. And I bet they didn't see that coming. I know what I didn't see coming was the way you use the money. So you know, I always grown up, you know, seeing hip hop as as an avenue for expressing wealth, but was really interesting. Was the puff that you took, you started making money and then you had a conversation. I, I believe it was with your uncle and said, hey, let's let's grow this money. Let's do something with it when no, it wasn't a conversation. It was. It was a demand uncle told me to, wow, he said, give me the money. Give me the money. Before you spend gay rights. And I, I kinda gave it to him and you know, and didn't really think anything of it in a couple of months. He drove me down the street and in our neighborhood showed me a house that I actually used to crack out of and you know, and it was rehabbed and had a family living in it. And he said, that's how we deed. And I was like, what for real, he's I, yeah, and we're going to get to more and then we're going to get four more and so on and so forth. We ended up doing about sixty five homes before it was over..

Ted fifteen years fifteen year
"fifteen years" Discussed on Undisclosed

Undisclosed

04:40 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Undisclosed

"That unsolved mysteries episode we continue to be aired on national tv off and on over the years even after investigators close the file having exhausted all the available leads for over a decade if you happen to be watching daytime tv and cut a rerun of that particular episode of unsolved mysteries you'd see that same segment played unchanged that same plea to the public for tips to be called in later on in the two thousands the unsolved mysteries franchise was by spike tv old episodes the strays repackage into a shorter format and renarrowed by new host dennis farina and so a new shortened version of the slain sweet episode was released redoubled freeness voice instead of stacks this time though the slain swain segment had a different ending the murders of herald and foulness wayne remained the mystery or they just random killings committed by violent transient all were they oppland and premeditated and if so why update fifteen years after the murders police arrested a man named dennis on perry who lived near the church perry evidently had a grudge against harold swain he felt that swain had ridden kill them when he has to borrow some money perry pleaded guilty to the murder of herald and film swain him was given consecutive life sentences like you mentioned before there were some things about this episode oneself mysteries that didn't exactly get right and this update is one of them dennis arnold perry was arrested in two thousand for the murders of rising daughter baptist church but there was no guilty plea dennis perry went to trial and convicted by a jury in two thousand three the prosecution was seeking the death penalty and while waiting sentencing after his conviction payers attorney told him at the jury that just committed him to murders was likely to send him to the electric chair that's when the prosecution approach defense with an offer give any right to appeal this and we'll take the death penalty off the table you'll live the offer was accepted there were also some smaller details about that update that weren't quite right like the part about tennis perry living the church that wasn't true at the time then grandparents did live your by about a mile at the road and dennis living with them for a while but in nineteen before he'd moved out and gone live with his mother up in a suburb of atlanta end the time swain's were killed dennis perry was living in working up jonesboro the half days drive from waverley but as for the explanation for why herald had been killed unsolved mysteries was right about that being the state's theory of what had happened that night a few weeks before the swain's were killed at rising baptist church the state argued at trial dennis perry had bumped into harold swain somewhere most likely at his grandparents house that's when dennis has herald twain if he could borrow some money but herald had laughed dennis's face and made fun of him for being poor dennis had been upset by the deacons ridicule but it also seen a silver lining in his whole unfortunate and counter because dennis period always wondered what it was like to kill a black person although black person is not the word he would've used and now he would have had an opportunity find out so on the day of the murders or maybe the day before dennis had left atlanta and made his way back down to waverley in order to ambush harold swain in the church killing vilma hadn't been part of the plan not really just incidental a split decision he'd made as she had come through the doors and then after that dennis had found his way back to atlanta and for the next fifteen years would live out his life as if the whole thing had never happened all of that is what the states has happened anyway but dennis perry has always maintained his innocence he has been in prison for eighteen years now <music> this case brings up a lot of bad memories for a lot of people in camden county and all that happened so long ago now the swain's murder dennis's arrest conviction all of that is decades in the past i think for a lot of people they just want to be a chapter in their lives it has an ending the part of people still talk about the case is that even with a conviction so much about it feels answered the case doesn't feel solved because if dennis payers guilty

fifteen years eighteen years
"fifteen years" Discussed on Z100

Z100

02:18 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Z100

"Fifteen years old smoking cigarettes running from law through the back feels and getting jong with my friends i kiss on friday night recognize i was younger than take me back to when we found chiefs mm straight friends nonsol not oh how we've grown go me two so close in works down the coast to kids lives alone the dogs already on his second wife these days news oh county when we.

jong Fifteen years
"fifteen years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

WFAN Sports Radio_FM

01:59 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on WFAN Sports Radio_FM

"Well first of all let's talk about saquon what ultimately we know what you think of his talent hall of fame touched by god yeah ultimately what separated saquon from potentially trying to line up your quarterback in the next fifteen years really and truly saquon was a top player on our board and draft is about value and it's nothing negative about any other player but he was he was the top player on board and you know the the biggest thing guys is you know so now you say stuff well he's gonna improve out you know make running game better i mean the kid can take it to the house from any spot in the field he's gonna make receiving game better because you got excellent ends he's he's a match up nightmare on linebackers the next thing he's going to do is the toughest thing for running back so rookie running backs excuse me guys the toughest thing for rookie running backs pick up stuff but you know that real well so you know and he does it he sees the biggest thing sing it and figuring out you know on the scam protections who we have to pick up and the next thing is wanting to do it and the next thing is doing it so he's got all that stuff and the other thing he's going to do is keep our offense on the field which means the defense has rested so with all that was all that thought you know and each just a wonderful young man and he's got all the qualities of wanting to be a pro now guys near to two levels of player in i league the professional football players in the guys playing professional football.

football fifteen years
"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Under the old system and this will take place in 2019 will be the first year this do you think this is enough was this a lottery reform that that you wanted or do you think maybe more should be done to discourage teams from designing teams that are intentionally battle this is where we are i voted for a tougher reform a few years back but it cut voted down which was flattened it out even more in the idea of flattening out these odds mean flicked you're either in the play offs or you got a chance to get better towards the top of the draft you know and the teams that don't make the playoffs that are legitimately trying hard but just aren't as good or their small market they haven't been able to attract free agents you know the draft is really important in early gets more important early than any other league because the bed players can take a team to a championship because they can handle the ball every twenty four seconds and they can also play defense you know the other twenty four seconds and you know the they're only five guys on the court aren't eleven on a football team or whatever it is so or nine baseball team you know an individual guy really can't affect baseball team they don't touch the ball that often basketball it star driven and you get the lebron james you know you're probably gonna win the championship and so we got to figure out who has the best chance to get the next lebron if the rubber is one uh at that level and so it's probably the worst teams but you flatten it out so that everybody out of the playoffs at no has a decent shot in it reduces the urge to be the very worst team in legitimately just be terrible on purpose and you know this is not good to sell tickets if not good for the integrity of sport it doesn't look good it's tough to say the celtics are playing someone who's doing that you know fans enjoy the game thanks for coming you know they they're not can enjoy the game as much new right so anyway that's the reason to vote for a flattening and it did get flattering letsie l works you insist paid or do you think there's any.

lebron celtics football baseball twenty four seconds
"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:40 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

"In the year uh as is improved himself his numbers and his play every single year these been the nba the gone up which is really unheard of i mean just steady improvement now he's got this year were you know with this obvious physical setback but if gordon can come and be a you know a great contributor an allstar level you know i i that sky's the limit for us over the next five years but don't know exactly how to play up yeah i mean i know there are a lot of passionate celtics fans i don't know how much they get to see western conference basketball whining know about gordon hayward is that he was the best player on a team the utah jazz last year that made the playoffs in the west in the west is a difficult place to make the playoffs western conference allstar which is saying something yeah exactly i mean you look at the players it over there so i mean he's he's a very very good players will be really interesting to see how he sort of assimilate into this team once he gets back healthy you mentioned you know having added star not necessarily a big decision you have to make but a big decision you guys do have to make that coming up the end of the season what to do with marcus smart smarts of really unique player wake in that when you look it has may be box score stats are what is shooting percentages and right now it's thirty one point three it doesn't tell the full story of his impact on the games how do you guys evaluate what marcus smart's value is to the boston celtics now will there's a theme here chris of i'm not gonna talk about contract negotiations in advance so you can ask but i'm not going to answer that i ask how how do we well you can ask of it's a little boring if i just say i'm not going to answer but we evaluate marcus smart game by game along with all the other players and he's a phenomenal contributor he's you know a real heart and soul glue guy for the team he makes so many plays the contribute to winning at when we've won a game you.

nba gordon sky basketball gordon hayward marcus smart boston celtics celtics western conference utah five years
"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Two thousand seven so it was the end of july who took all of july after the draft in the trade for reality to convince kevin to get her now that's interesting so i do know that's another owner to owner wants so you've been involved in the only two that i two of the biggest transactions in celtics history the kevin garnett trade in a career victory yet will i'm involved deputy i'm definitely evolved in all the things that go wrong i think that's it go right you know it's danny and its brad nitz corinne people like that i want to ask you something about your team because it's been a great start to the season but you said in the beginning of the year that you weren't really sure if your team was a true championship contender i'm paraphrasing those were not your exact words but do you feel at this point that your team is a true championship contender or do you feel like you're maybe one superstar way even with gordon back were twenty three games in we don't have gordon um i think we're a team in the top tier of the nba but i can't say when i watch golden state and cleveland the finalists lebron's been seven straight finals as far as i can tell there are a couple or three teams that are really up their houston san antonio always seems to be there we'd love to be in that mix but we're gonna have to prove it for we said if you have gordon hayward on the roster healthy next year ju look at that core now with the young guys tatum and jaylen brown taking steps and playing so well and say okay we need to add some roleplayers tweak it deeper bansard you look at that and say we need one more star cause you to the their sort of that hierarchy of stars normally on a championship roster you mentioned golden state is a super team we all know what they have steph curry durant draymond klay thompson owen one record against this this here that's true is pretty darn without gordon hayward on your team so that lead me to that question do you feel you know with the healthy gordon you have enough or genie that one more star we don't have to make that decision will look in february at.

celtics nba lebron san antonio tatum gordon hayward kevin garnett cleveland jaylen brown
"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:37 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Seasonticket is sponsored by ziprecruiter looking for your next great higher but short on time you just need the right to smarter two with ziprecruiter you can post your job to over one hundred top job boards with just one click than they're smart technology notifies the most qualified candidates to apply no wonder eighty percent of employers riposte on ziprecruiter get a quality candidate through the site in just one day right now you can post jobs on ziprecruiter for free that's right free just go to ziprecruitercomtalk ticket that's ziprecruitercomticket ziprecruiter the smartest wade hired welcome back if you like seasonticket be sure to subscribe to us on apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts remember subscribe means the best way to make sure you get our latest episode as soon as it's available all right we're back here with boston celtics coowner ceo and managing partner with grouse back where you mentioned something before about the people that have decided to join this organization and come to boston brad stevens al horford gordon hayward cairo irving it's funny there was a narrative a media narrative that this was a place where you couldn't attract star free agents or stars in their prime did you ever feel there was any truth to that when you guys were trying to add players to the roster it seemed to be true it seemed that it was a tough place to attract people and you need the trade for them we hadn't ever had free agent taproom before so we really didn't give it a real try but anyway of feels knell like we are a a real destination people people are choosing us and i think the fans have a lot to do with it and brad has a lot elected.

Seasonticket wade ceo managing partner brad stevens apple boston eighty percent one day
"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:35 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Cavaliers getting that deal done that so two guys that obviously have done a lot of deals and business and just made up their mind that they were going to get this deal consummated no in that deal with you had to give up one of the brooklyn pick since the last brooklyn pick in 2018 and that takes me back to this draft you guys finally win that draft lottery i'll try not to bring up two thousand seven although those band did win it i was sitting out there who were that you've got how it you had to be excited because i know two guys on the age of paying a huge on television with next to magic johnson enjoy lim be going who's that guy nobody cared uli was pretty well that was me by the way and i really had a fun time when winning that letter yeah i know especially after a seven when you didn't i know that one was that one was tops so you were the lucky charm i'll take whatever happened though seven it it ended up working alpha isn't that the truth i mean having the new big three no we did not we went from the second ranking to the fifth pick in seven yeah he doesn't remember yeah no that was tough at the time but it worked out great gotcha championship with kevin garnett paul pierce in rowan but you win this loud we have the number one pick and you guys make a decision to trade down to number three you make a deal with the philadelphia seventy six or through take marquel folts at one you guys take jason tatum who's been fantastic this season at three why was jason a better fit for you guys denmark marco faults while i will tell you that when the picks come up danny makes them so we look to danny to lead our talent evaluation and so the trades or another thing that's there's more input and there's more back and forth in the more aspects to it and he leads that process as well but he really has a total of thought.

Cavaliers uli rowan philadelphia jason tatum brooklyn johnson big three kevin garnett denmark danny
"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Nobody i know around the celtics for sure thinks the celtics is a business it's a brooke love it's a great passion it's our tradition we don't run it like a business we we do have business aspects to it but we run it for love and the people and you can start with brad stevens and the way he loves the team in the players and you talked with about kyrie irving you know there's a lot of love going around this team it's not a business and that's why actually why it's going well this year we maybe that's a whole different topic but anyway it was really tough to see gordon lying there and then the way everybody's rallied round him has been inspire yeah definitely says something about the character of your team i think a lot of self expands work wanna know is there any chance gordon can come back this year from that dislocated ankle and fractured tibia while i've been told that it's a long road back but it's better to have broken a bone than not to in a sense breaking a bone in something in look at paul george who had a different injury but a horrific braley at one with uh and he's back playing at an all nba level so we're very hopeful that gordon come back over the long term but we don't every predictions about when that's going to be we have the disabled player exception for the year now that tends to show you where everybody thinks that medical community doesn't think he's rushing back anytime soon we won't russianbacked you mention that disabled player exception for 84 million there are obviously some stipulations in terms of using that has to be a player who's in the last year of his contract what would you pag wickets the likelihood that you guys do use that exception this year well i've never actually or if i did it was a slip or a mistake really predicted what will do with contracts is not my my mindset we're going to maintain oliver flexibility all of our options with that but vans no over fifteen years we do everything we can to put it at the best possible team out there on the court if we see and opportunities that i'm sure will use it speaking of putting the best possible team in the court he had a great team last year number one seat in the.

celtics brad stevens gordon paul george kyrie irving nba oliver fifteen years
"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Seasonticket is sponsored by ziprecruiter looking for your next great higher ziprecruiter offers simple tools and powerful matching technology to help you find qualified candidates fast it's the smartest way to hire try it for freeziprecruitercomticket that's ziprecruitercomticket well everybody and welcome this season ticket i'm your host chris gaspar it's friday december first we have a great show clear today and a very special gas we are joined by boston celtics coowner coa managing partner with grouse bet thanks for joining us here on seasonticket chris glad to be here yeah great to have you here in it's a great time to talk celtics guys get another win last night against the philadelphia seventy six years 10 aid to 97 a td garden you're now nineteen and four on the year that's the best record in the nba i have to say wake i did not see this coming after gordon hayward went down just five minutes and forty five seconds into the opener and cleveland did you see this record coming in that sixteen game winning streak that fueled it no way i hope that with our team that we thought we had together we could be a team that surprised everybody seven away just in terms of going on streaks ambient super good i thought we had the makings of a really good team but them seeing gordon go down so horrifically i've got a i was just thinking we'd be scrapping to be um just scrapping we'd be scrapping and trying to build and see if we could survive the year um and if they are off to a much better start than i thought what were your emotions when according to go out this horrifying a you know for him really in it it's it's certainly a politically correct or whatever up marketing spin move it probably sounds like say really you just think about him but knowing him as i have just barely started to get to know him at the time but new he's a great guy and his wife and young family interest i really did think of them they made a huge move to come to us in an here he is in pieces on the court it was just heartbreaking for him in robin and then uh then you start to think of boy it's bad for us to have yet obviously very disappointing for gordon.

Seasonticket celtics managing partner philadelphia nba gordon hayward cleveland chris gaspar boston grouse forty five seconds seventy six years five minutes
"fifteen years" Discussed on Z100

Z100

01:34 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Z100

"Fifteen years old and smoking cigarettes and running from la after the bag feels and get injured along with my friend first kiss on friday i was younger than say me back to we found weekend jobs when we go chiefs dream them straight nah nah and so now we grown good sure man.

la Fifteen years
"fifteen years" Discussed on KQED Radio

KQED Radio

02:23 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on KQED Radio

"The last fifteen years or more but obviously was something you felt you had talked about even though you were part of that department yes eggs exactly and and part of this too uh you know when i had this talk it wasn't so much as you're an african american kid here's how you should conduct yourself it it was more about here's how you should conduct yourself period because the african american part i think is a factor let's not does not you'll miss any words here but it's more about common sense things that will we'll keep you safe in how to interact with in the event that you get stop because this face it you know most folks at that age are making the best decisions in their lifetime when they are teenagers and whatnot not and that has nothing to raise that's just part of life so how they interact if the they are stopped by the police or come in contact with police officers i think is a discussion that all parents t the half there had been studies before you got here about a police stops in san francisco and it was wildly disproportionate of african american drivers and i think maybe latino drivers as well what have you done maybe this as part of a implicit racial bias training but what how how concerned were you about that and what what's been done to change it well that's a that's a lot of very complex subject number one we need to understand a data and part of our our task is really have the ability to capture the right data is one thing to to put the data out there that the numbers out there other needs to be some context to the numbers you'll who were stopping why we stop and in what areas and what the context of those stops and all that is important but it still doesn't take away from the fact that the numbers are disproportionate the arrest number than this the national problem this is a national issue rather arrest numbers wildly disproportionate in terms of uh particularly man of color that are in our prisons in our jails now that the oath that's i think something that we really need to understand and why they are so many issues the feed into this and it goes beyond policing but we have to do our part in part of that is collecting the right data having the technology.

san francisco fifteen years