35 Burst results for "fifteen years"

How To Make Better Decisions, Faster With Matt Bodnar

The EntreLeadership Podcast

06:40 min | 19 hrs ago

How To Make Better Decisions, Faster With Matt Bodnar

"Every day were making decisions. Now hopefully take our business to the next level. What do we do with this particular team member. How do we find the best vendor. What colors and fonts should go on the website for next marketing campaign and hundreds of other decisions like these that we have to make every single week. The stakes are high. We can't afford to make a bad decision from the ramsey network. This is the entreleadership podcast where we business leaders grow themselves their teams and the prophets. I'm your host. Daniel tardy am i guess. Today is matt bonner match the chairman at fresh technologies and he's done a lot of cool stuff. He's helped star businesses run businesses launch. New business turn businesses around and especially as passionate about helping businesses scale up from the startup stage to be in a big deal. He knows a lot about decision making strategy and how to align our behaviors with our goals. But he didn't start out in this space in fact he actually started out as a successful analyst on wall street. He was making a lot of money at goldman sachs and so. I was super curious to ask them. Hey matt why did you leave. One of the biggest influences in this is a book. That's influenced me tremendously. Was the four hour workweek. The whole tim ferriss thing and so reading that and really thinking about what do i want to do with my life. And and where do i wanna spend my time and and thinking about. I mean in a place like that you can see the trajectory. Stay here fifteen years. I'm back. I if i stay here twenty years on that guy etc and so i could see what the future looks like and all they wanted to do something more entrepreneurial and i had this epiphany i was reading this article on bloomberg about one of the founders of google. I forget if it was larry page or or sergei would basically set this thing. And they've saying you know which everyone is. The ceo at the time and their salary was one hundred thousand dollars and as a first year analyst at goldman. My salary was more than that. And so i read the article and i kind of had. This chuckled to myself as like a twenty one year. Old or twenty two year old. And i'm like. I'm so awesome like i have a bigger seat salary than the ceo. Google and then literally there was a comma and the next half. The sentence was like andy's worth twenty seven billion dollars stock or whatever and so it was just like an anvil like crushing on the head. That was like oh. You don't get wealthy from a salary you get wealthy from having equity in something and that was really. That was a big difference for me that that made me realize that having a having a high salary doesn't really mean it helps but but ultimately ownership equity is really where you generate the most value. So did that. Prompt you to think i wanna start my own thing. I wanna build something. My dad's a very successful restaurant tour and he he had been doing. A bunch of stuff in nashville. And kind of the southeast. Broadly for you know. While i was in middle school high school all that stuff and he was always when i was up at at goldman he was always like a bug in my ear. Hey come back and you know. Help me out. Come join me join me. And so eventually I answered that call in and move back to national got involved with him in a in a company called fresh hospitality which is an investment business. Essentially that invests kind of across the food and restaurant world and scales various different restaurant brands. How big was the team when you joined basically me my dad My brother and one other gentleman whose name was nikola haggas is basically four of us at the time and There for yeah. Yeah and i mean there were there were other. I mean we were essentially almost like a small private equity or venture capital firm and so I mean the operating companies that we invested in obviously had a bigger sure employees based but really that was it at the beginning. And and since then we've built this whole kind of ecosystem and infrastructure of businesses. You've worked with a lot of businesses here locally many that. I've personally been a patron and i remember martin's barbecue when we went when they were a little like double wide trailer out. South nolansville autobody shop was yes barbecue around. And nobody knew who they were. Unless you live like right in that little community and now i mean if if you know martinsburg if you've been in nashville you know martin's barbecue i mean it's just it's the spot that you go if you're a nashville I'd love to hear that story. You know i mean you you you guys. Clearly were part of them you know becoming a big deal and kind of putting him on the map And i know you guys do that with countless other. You know restaurants But how do you. How do you find the martin's barbecue when they're just this little local story and nobody really knows who they are. I mean we're we're at a point. Now where and i think you see this in a lot of different businesses where you get inbound deal flow right and so i mean we. We met pat actually through a A point of sale reseller that we that we had a relationship with was selling terminals and that he's a hey. This guy's got a really cool thing. You should go check it out and so we went and we went and just had lunch. They're checked it out and got to know him and You know helped partner up from from day. One when they were back over that little auto body shop and You know our whole thesis for for how we invest in a company's specifically within the fresh Platform is we have this whole ecosystem that we've developed over the last decade or so of everything from technology to accounting to Real estate expertise marketing the whole the whole suite of services that sit around a business and we go in and we ate we provide them growth capital but we also provide them what we call our intellectual capital of all those different things to help them scale up and so you know we. We plugged that infrastructure in and really helped him. I identify a great site. And that was their store nolansville. That they moved to that was across the street. The kind of bigger flagship store and then started very strategically looking at. Hey what are some other great opportunities for this brand and and really one of the biggest strategic decisions we made up martin was we ultimately decided that we needed to have a presence downtown and to to truly be a competitive player in the in the nashville barbecue space and plant our flag so to speak. We we needed. We needed something downtown in. That's how we ended up ultimately finding the property at martin's we call it rutledge but the downtown martins barbecue and and that's we now we sort of we. We jokingly referred to it as the mothership because it's it's this behemoth compared to the other typical martin stores but it's been a really great opponent of that business.

Goldman Ramsey Network Daniel Tardy Fresh Technologies Tim Ferriss Matt Bonner Nashville Nikola Haggas Larry Page Martin Google South Nolansville Sergei Bloomberg Matt Andy PAT Rutledge
Grading for Equity with Joe Feldman

Vrain Waves: Teaching Conversations with Minds Shaping Education

04:22 min | 3 d ago

Grading for Equity with Joe Feldman

"Can you talk a little bit about why an understanding this sort of historical context is so crucial to our work around around the bigger issues of equity and just are better understandings of of how students work now. Yeah i mean. I think one of the challenges is that we we believe that Or many of us believe that this grading system has been just fine. And it's almost like this Just like the oxygen in the room. You don't really think about it in and everybody's breathing it and you know if it ain't broke don't fix it and let's focus on the curriculum design and the assessment design and how we can be culturally responsive multi-lingual and all those kinds of things and those are hugely important. But i think grading is often thought of as this justice sort of ancillary part of teaching and learning and it's not addressed in our training teachers. It's never talked about really even when you get a new curriculum in readers writers workshop. Nobody saying this is how you enter the grades for it or which grades to enter things like that so a lot of us are just doing the best. We can and replicating what we experienced in or trying to You know right. The wrongs of how might have been graded and i think knowing the historical context for where these ideas came from can act as a as a motivating engine for us particularly when we're trying to be truly not just in our individual behaviors in classrooms relationships. Boom we're thinking about how to create structures and systems in our schools That align with equity actions in values. Yeah so your work You're totally right like teacher school. I never took a single class on how to grade. It was all a k. Hearsay teach but we know that the feedback. We give students a huge part of learning your work. Kind of like takes the wolof of our eyes. And you're like whoa yeah. My grading system really was based on factory work And you want to change it but then you think well my jobs also to prepare students for the next level So how do you advise teachers to think about you. Know like elementary school teachers. Well i'm doing this to prepare them for middle school in a middle school teacher. I'm preparing for high school and then the high school teacher. I have to do this. 'cause this is what they're going to have in college. So how do we begin to tackle this problem with that reality in mind. That comes up all the time those questions. So i'm gonna talk on a couple of ways. The first is the idea that if a student needs to reduce something well that might be. Okay actually that if we want them to keep learning than we should let them keep learning and if we want to think about the world there's a place where second chances can be given to people in forgiveness and redemption can begin than we should have students experience so that's sort of the more theoretical philosophical. Aspirational there's also a realistic one with you. Know in the professional world. The idea of reducing retakes happen all the time so you know especially when people are in the early learning process which all of our students are all in the learning process. Not so much in the performing stage. So you don't talk. Don't say well you know the doctor who's doing heart surgery can't make a mistake. Well that has very little to do with what we want are thirteen and fourteen and fifteen year olds to think about what they're doing in school. This is time to learn and so and reduce happen all the time right so i you know i order something. Image chef makes it wrong from the restaurant. And i say this wasn't right and they say i'm sorry i will redo this and we'll you know we're sorry about that and we might get a little off your bill so we can say to students. You wanna redo it great. I'm so glad you wanna redo it. Now you're gonna have to study. You're going to have to invest additional time. Now that's what happens when you didn't get it right the first time. But that's okay. It's not going to punish you in your grade And i think there are just so many ways as you begin to get deeper into what Grading is that it actually. Better reflects the professional world than our traditional

Higher-Order Thinking and Personalized Systems of Instruction (PSIs) in Higher Education

ABA Inside Track

06:07 min | 5 d ago

Higher-Order Thinking and Personalized Systems of Instruction (PSIs) in Higher Education

"You i got interested in the idea of kind of looking at higher order thinking and sort of personal systems of instruction when you yourself were a student and that led me to the question of what was personalized systems of instruction especially computerized ones from beyond. You know i. I think today everyone sort of thinks about all you can do all this stuff online. You learn online. Everyone's an online program. But if you go back maybe fifteen years you know. Maybe even ten years it feels like one of these technologies that couldn't have existed but we know. Psi original work was from well before computers. Were something that everyone had seven of in their house and you know in in the form of a phone so could you tell us a little bit about what. Psi's were like when you were starting out in higher education. You were starting to use them as part of your doctoral program. Sure well can. I use a way back machine to tell you another little tidbit secret. Of course you can do right if we go way back to me being in grade one and then i realized this later that there were reading. Labs and reading. Lab was the self paced set of there. Were these big boxes at the back of our room and you could go through these little reading vignettes. I remember reading about brown bears and things like that. Like that. Just stuck out to me because i love reading about them right like what were they. Where did they live what they eat so forth. And then you would answer these questions and if you'd have to get them all complete and correct and then you could go on to the next one so there was kind of this. It was all mastery based and i realized later this. Psi in like k. Through twelve right like in this really popular back at the time that i was in grade one and you know as students we kind of love this we could go at our own pace and get immediate feedback on whether or not we're right and we keep going on and on and on on these things and there's a little bit of competition among us rate because like you could be finished all of this work in your reading and language arts like whenever it was up to you you could get it all done and then go into something else so that was kind of exciting or are you could help other students in the class so i think that i never thought about it until recently but i think that when i when i was introduced to computer aided psi which was topped by joseph parrot the university of manitoba but this is probably why i love this system so much because it is self paced but the early early psi if you go back to the work of fred keller when he published his seminal article and nineteen sixty eight rate and the journal of applied behavior analysis goodbye teacher based upon a rhyme and he's introducing people to assist them that he's developed and he introduced in brazil as well as the united states. Psi was you know these units of study that you could you know master hopefully in about a week or so and you would go in and you would take a test when you're ready to take the test and then you either pass or you've gotta re study and if you've gotta re study you could go over the task with the proctor or the professor and then you could come back and retake it when you're ready to do so after you know some amount of kind of time out to re steady So if you think about that like things that there's an instructor right like if you have ten units that you have to have students take tests on. How many different tests do you need for them. You know if they get a reset and one you don't just give them the same test you have to have like a whole bunch of questions and different forms of big zam right for each unit so imagine the administration of that right like just can you imagine like panel versus thirty students versus three hundred. What would that be like a lot of tests a lot of grading more file cabinets right basically all the file cabinets right. Yeah file cabinet. Imagine carrying all the tests to and from the classroom and keeping them organnized. And you know. And we didn't have and they didn't have computers back then either right so when joe pair computerized this he actually made it. So that you could go in and you could request a-tast online and this is before point and click okay. This is before we had windows right in the we actually had to learn how to type in commands into the computer. And i never think of myself as somebody who programs but i did. I had to learn programming to be able to do this. Because you have to give the computer commands to get into your account and then to call up a test and then tell it to add more lines if you wanted to add more information to your answer or are you. Talking like a dos. Prompt or more like an old like early. Eighties looking kind of you know unix mainframe mainframe o wow absolutely yeah rob. It's definitely a mainframe computer right. And so so we did that and you know we after you master to test then you could sign on to be a peer reviewer or printer for student who had not yet passed that unit. So i mean think of it right like if you love this stuff and you're and you just go in and on a weekly basis at least on a weekly basis you pass one unit a week or more you can be peer reviewing a whole bunch of them and the peer reviews were great because they were bonus points in the course you and and the final exam where something like sixty percent because it was in person and they that was the quality control you had over the online course was making sure that people were who they said they were and you know that they weren't just doing things open book so you know it was nice being able to pat up though the the bonus points just in case but he bit. But here's here's the track right like when you do that and you're actually going and you're taking your test and your peer reviewing other students test. You're actually

Joseph Parrot Fred Keller Journal Of Applied Behavior An PSI University Of Manitoba Joe Pair Brazil United States Cabinet ROB
Could This Simple Hack Reduce Anxiety and Panic Attacks? with Dr. Kristen Allott

Broken Brain with Dhru Purohit

06:16 min | Last week

Could This Simple Hack Reduce Anxiety and Panic Attacks? with Dr. Kristen Allott

"Dr analogy welcome to the broken brain podcast. It's an honor and a privilege to have you here. Thank you so much drew. I am so excited for this conversation. I think it'll be just fine Back and forth to share information. Yeah i love what. You're bringing to the world in this topic of anxiety and i think that we zoom out in the context of the current world even prior to cove nineteen pandemic anxiety. You could see that. The instances and usage of the word in just general language newspaper social media is skyrocketing and you know languages so powerful and sometimes we really have to parse apart a word to really understand like what do we really mean when we're saying that because sometimes we say anxiety and we actually could be meaning something else when you talk about this world of anxiety and your new book which we're going to get into in a little bit. What do you really want people to help understand. What exactly is anxiety. Yeah so i think that's a great question. And i will just tell you how i approach that When i started in practice about fifteen years ago Because i'm a naturopathic physician acupuncturist decided to specialize in mental health. And people were coming in. And saying i'm anxious and and i just didn't think it was like so. How does that apply. Physiology was really the question that i was interested in and because some for some people it's stress for some people. It's i'm afraid to move forward and take a step forward for some people. It's a i'm overwhelmed like there's all sorts you know. It's a catch word as you say. And but there's also a curious about what the physiology of depression or anxiety or whatever these words were saying. And and so i. When i started in practice i literally in my on my living room floor. I had stock physiology textbooks a stack of neurology. Textbooks and the dsm and the dsm is the diagnostic statistical manual. It just describes. What the diagnosis categories for anxiety are and i was just like will. I think it's more than just an emotion like a candy but like the people were coming in with panic. Attacks like that is not an emotion that is a full embodied experience right. And and so i started just parsing out like what are the. What are the fizzy. What physiology causes these physical symptoms of shaky and racing thoughts and your heart racine. And maybe you're sweating and and all those symptoms that you know sometimes it starts small and Escalates to really big asu started to parse that out and then was like well. Once once i started to understand the physiology in the neuro physiology will. Where do we. Where can we intervene to help. People feel better and so answering your questions kind of copying out. But it's like. That's that's the approach that i took because so many people were using words and i was like i want a grounded in something concrete. Absolutely i mean if we look at the history and evolution of just anxiety and a lot of mental health. A lot of these things in early medicine were considered to be They're kind of in your head right like nothing else is going on right. We made a documentary a few years ago. Which then led to the name of this podcast. Broken brain my business partner. Dear friend dr mark hyman. We made a documentary called broken brain and the underlying premise. That documentary was what you do to your body you do to your brain. Your brain is not in. This isolated eight oregon that just as floating on top of your head. That's completely disconnected than the rest of everything. That's going on there actually an intertwined system and we have to understand that yes there can be. Let's call for lack of a better term emotional factors that are there right. Stressor is the complete driver of so many different things that we feel but let's also look at the physiology of what's happening underneath so when it comes to that topic of anxiety and the physiology gonna ask you a question which is a question that i came across a few years ago in a book by peter thiel little bit of a controversial character. But i really love this question that he had inside of this book. I think the book is called zero to one and he said what truth do you believe is true that other people disagree with in that category. So when you look at right what do you believe is true when you think about anxiety and physiology that people maybe traditional western medicine will say like. I don't know if that's true. Yeah so The one truth. That i see time and time again is it is really hard to have a panic attack. If you just ate. And i don't see panic. Attacks occur unless people are five hours from food or more at or they may have eaten some really sugary substance to at two hours ago. But if you had a real meal. It is really hard to have a panic attack. That's powerful right. There and people like that is not true and and the same applies to suicidal Which is know just part of the spectrum of people keep doing doing panic attacks they can get there and and and and the reason for that is that are i mean i can go into the physiology but but people don't believe that until they start looking mental health professionals or physicians and then when they want start looking at the pattern it holds true. Now there's always an exception to the rule ways but it holds like ninety five percent true

Pandemic Anxiety Dr Mark Hyman Drew ASU Anxiety Depression Peter Thiel Oregon
How Monster Beverage Shares Soared a Monster 100,000% in the Last 20 Years

Odd Lots

03:19 min | 2 weeks ago

How Monster Beverage Shares Soared a Monster 100,000% in the Last 20 Years

"This has become one of your favorite companies. Not just because the story around bro. Culture is quite interesting right now. Lots of people are playing more video games. Were all stuck at home in. So maybe wanna drink more of this particular beverage while you're gaming but also because the returns on this one have just been absolutely stunning yet. Exactly right so. The company is a monster beverage. You've almost certainly seen them like at any deli or grocery store anything. They're known for their big cans of heavily. Caffeinated drinks sugary like super aggressive label labels on them. and it's like this sort of like very like macho. Frankly bro beverage and the stock has done phenomenally well but depending on exactly what Settings you use. it's it might be the single best performing stock in history or certainly over the last twenty or so years. I figured southlake eighty-five thousand percent over the last twenty years or one point it was like it's just unreal. We're talking like bitcoin level returns actually could probably put like bitcoin indie Etf to but we're talking like a bitcoin level returns for a company that sells a sh- sugary caffeinated beverages. Right and i think when most people think about the best performing stock of the past couple of decades they're going to think about amazon or google or apple or something like that. Not many people are gonna think about you. Know a consumer facing beverage company after. Tell you something. So i don't know much about monster I've never had one of the energy drinks. Although i am very aware of the branding and advertising strategy has been a big part of their success. And i'm sure we're going to get into that on the podcast. But i have to say in the course of doing some research for this episode. I found the most amazing anecdote on read it. Of course it came from read. It changes that perfect. What what what the anecdote. So i think it was on the financial independence retirement early board but it was some guy who said he invested ninety thousand dollars in monster energy drinks I think this was in two thousand ten. He posted and he said he'd invested five years ago so basically he had a five hundred percent increase on that ninety thousand dollar position which made him a millionaire in the space of five years and the best part of it was he wrote that in two thousand ten everyone on the message board basically said you are absolutely crazy. I can't believe you have this huge chunk. Appoint foley of your portfolio in a single stock. You need to sell it right now. And of course had he held onto it at. I don't even know what it would be worse now but like the big spike in monster energy came after two thousand ten so you can only imagine what ninety k. Invested back in two thousand five with look like after a fifteen year. A monster run in monster energy. It's really incredible. I mean it's like one of these charts where you just like slice it up. And you're like holy crap. These amazing returns and then you zoom out and looks even more amazing. It's just. It's just

Amazon Apple Google Foley
Bourbon, Banter, and the Best of 2020!! - burst 02

The Broken Cork

05:46 min | 2 weeks ago

Bourbon, Banter, and the Best of 2020!! - burst 02

"Welcome back everyone to the broken court. Podcast episode to who. I'm dan aaron jake and right. Now i'm gonna throw it over to my man aaron for our toast since it's real close to valentine's day. I thought i would give a valentine's toast one of those cheesy almost greeting card. Esque toast hallmark. Here's here's to you. So roses are red violets are blue. Don't get me flowers bourbon. Will do cheers. cheers everyone. Damn let's get stuff so right now. World bourbon news. Going around out of new rift still company out of newport kentucky. Something that's kind of Near and dear to my heart. Since i do work in the world fast food. They're doing something really cool for all of us New riff is putting out a fifteen year. Straight bourbon whiskey. they're calling. i believe it's called. Relief is bottled in bond. Just like all of their other products. Distilled in indiana. By what what we can only think is mvp. Because they're the only ones. I think are going to have the stocks that are up there in fifteen years and i think it is. Gp wouldn't surprise me. The barrels were purchased out of mvp and again that's all speculative but they were stored at their warehouse with the remainder of their time and this run is limited to just nine hundred if not less only to be distributed out of their distillery for the price of two hundred dollars. I think i tweeted about that. Too on the burkan broken corker twitter page to if you wanna if you wanna get in more in depth about it. I believe he did. But that two hundred dollars is going to go to benefit Restaurant workers around the ohio and kentucky area. I believe that release is going to benefit. Both the ohio restaurant employee relief fund and the northern kentucky chamber of commerce who's in charge of distributing the funds to people who need it the most for more on that you can check us out on facebook at the broken court crew is our facebook group or you can follow new riff on all of their social media for more information on that release. And i'm sure it's going to be amazing man. I think you know what a great especially this time of year. What a great a cinnamon for them to do. I mean cove is really hit. That service industry pretty hard. It's ruined a lot of people and you don't see a lot of people talking about i. Understand nurses and doctors are at the forefront of all of this kovin but they don't talk a lot about like like your fast food workers who have been working throughout the entire thing. I mean i've been fast food. I have not stopped working since covert started. Yeah and i mean. God bless all the frontline workers as far as medical is concerned because they are. They're in close contact. All that like i said are the forefront of all of this but you rarely hear about anyone else you know. Keeping america fed keeping america clothed. Everything like that. So big shout out to all our healthcare workers and big shoutout to all our fast food workers. Anyone who's working retail right now and all of our truckers keeping everyone delivered to and everyone stocked up so we can get through this together. Definitely a big shout to the truckers. So we have a new segment on the show. And i want mr jake over there to take it over. Oh yeah this is our new segment. It's called what's cracking so basically what it is. We give a shoutout to whatever we've had since last podcast. Something's good something you drink and right now something you wanna tell everybody about to me. It was new roof winter whiskey. I tried that a good friend at a bar. Bought that around for actually me and dan and you talk about unbelievable. That's one of the best new products i've had. It really really is. I haven't had very many and of what i've had it. It's up there. I really so good. It opened my eyes to new roof and made me wanna do a little bit more research into their products. And then i mean on top of all of that. We found out about this thing that you just talked about the fifteen year. Oh yeah what's cracking for you. So what's cracking for me. I've had a couple of new bottles. I'm gonna give a couple of honorable. Mentions i never had seventeen ninety. Two bottle in bonn. I know very very strange. But i had that and it's delicious. If you can get your hands on bottle relatively cheap. I paid forty five ninety nine for man. I think that's right around retail so also from french. Lick indiana lead w sinclair four grain. It's called the iconoclast It's a four product from them. What happened long story short. They had three barrels. That were of the league w sinclair that. We're just a little off. They didn't say whether it was a good offer a bad off. They just said it was often. So they mix those three bottles together and made the iconoclasts. But the one. I really really wanna talk about is the o. H ingram whiskey It is from brown water. Bourbon company out of nashville. Where the whisky comes from. What happens with it. It's really cool. They on the mississippi river in an o o h ingram. Born and so really. Yeah so they have Redone this barge completely rick house out of it and so what

Dan Aaron Valentine Ohio Restaurant Employee Relie Northern Kentucky Chamber Of C Kentucky Jake Aaron Newport Facebook Mr Jake Indiana America Ohio Twitter DAN Bonn Ingram Whiskey
Bourbon, Banter, and the Best of 2020!! - burst 02

The Broken Cork

00:38 sec | 2 weeks ago

Bourbon, Banter, and the Best of 2020!! - burst 02

"Welcome back everyone to the broken court. Podcast episode to who. I'm dan aaron jake and right. Now i'm gonna throw it over to my man aaron for our toast since it's real close to valentine's day. I thought i would give a valentine's toast one of those cheesy almost greeting card. Esque toast hallmark. Here's here's to you. So roses are red violets are blue. Don't get me flowers bourbon. Will do cheers. cheers everyone.

Dan Aaron Valentine Jake Aaron
A Forgotten African American Burial Site Could Be Hidden In Washington DC

WAMU: Local News

03:46 min | 2 weeks ago

A Forgotten African American Burial Site Could Be Hidden In Washington DC

"Over the past century. Archaeologists and town residents have unearthed dozens of human remains on the thirty three hundred block of street northwest. Experts have spent years trying to identify the origins of the remains. And they told dc ists. Elliot williams they may belong to a forgotten african american burial site. It's a quiet historic street in georgetown on one side. There's volta park a slice of recreational heaven with a pool tennis courts and a jungle gym on the other. A row of million dollar townhomes from the late nineteenth century beneath those homes. Residents archaeologists have found countless skulls jaws ribs and skeletons from bodies buried ages ago. One q street resident. Diana scholl calls a day in two thousand twelve when she noticed something odd at her next door neighbor's house digging a pool and i came home and the police were there and they have found remains the dc. His story preservation office says burials. Like this are quite common on q street. Evidence is growing that this block was the site of a pre civil war. Burial ground for free and enslaved residents men says she loved to know the identities behind the barrels but she also has renovation plans of her own. I'd also love to build a pool or say you know. I don't like what's the protocol know that you've already got a half a body. She's not the only one with questions. Reuther coli the city's official archaeologist has been excavating backyards and basements on q street for nearly fifteen years she and a team of researchers are looking for answers on who might be buried there so q street is unusual for in so many ways. It is very hard to do research on this earlier time period in georgetown because when it was found it was part of maryland. In most cases the city is called on the smithsonian to help analyze store the bodies remains belonging to at least twenty eight individuals are currently sitting and smithsonian lab waiting to be fully studied only seven have been analyzed so far and all of them appear to be of african descent the law and just ville an anthropologist at american university is studying the bodies as part of his dissertation the pandemic has slowed down his research but he says the q. Street burials are crucial to understanding by history in dc. How do we identify these the sentence when there was mass. Push out about relatives from from georgetown. Old newspaper clipping show that victims of cholera pandemic of eighteen. Thirty two were buried in unknown locations. Georgetown justin ville says it's possible. Some of these victims often low wage laborers could have been buried in mass graves on q street. Some residents even believed the burials could be evidence of georgetown's involvement in the underground railroad. I think site Whether or not it's at nap with jerry. Lawler cemetery and or both. I think it's only the starting point for this network of Taking of the black geography. Georgetown if he will once the lab reopens just unveiled plans to hit the ground running and he has the city's full support. It may have taken a longtime for this project. Come up and for everyone to get on board but oh my goodness it's it's time it's come. Congress recently introduced the african american burial grounds network. Act a bill that would direct funding and research toward burial grounds like the one in georgetown. If passed the legislation will help protect historic black graveyards from time development and decay. Perhaps it will help. Uncover some of the mysteries on q street

Elliot Williams Georgetown Volta Park Diana Scholl Reuther Coli DC Tennis Justin Ville Ville American University Lawler Cemetery Maryland Cholera Jerry Congress
Hasbro, Mattel Say Toy Boom Isn't a One-Off

MAD MONEY W/ JIM CRAMER

04:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Hasbro, Mattel Say Toy Boom Isn't a One-Off

"Last night. We got a terrific from the tell. That's the iconic toymaker. What happens the soccer name. No kidding it actually said because day reminding. Managers found hard to get excited too worried about the ready crew. Gresley bidding up the canvas stocks. But make no mistake. Mattel's doing great. Ceo on crisis orchestrated effort. -nificant turnaround here. And let's have got yet another confidence-inspiring aspiring quarter. The country poorer top and bottom line with bush guide for twenty twenty one in response suck actually spiked. Three percent in early trading. Getting dragged down by the on weeds. What i'm calling the rest of the market. So could this really have room to run. Let's take a closer look with you on crises. The turnaround orders chairman. Ceo patel real. These results michigan. Welcome back demand money. Jim it's great to be here in on your manager word when things weren't doing waste things weren't doing well when things that down very low you said things are starting to get better. This was the finest fourth quarter in fifteen years despite a worldwide pandemic. Talmadge do it. Yes jim this was an exceptional quarter for mattel without best performance in years with strong consumer demand and another milestone near for the company for the second quarter in a row which have double digit sales growth without grace. The industry in gain share on a global basis but are results excited expectation on many levels with the highest fourth quarter growth in fifteen years as you said with a significant increase in profitability with a full year operating income. That was two and a half times higher than than last year. But this is not just about the quarter or the year. It's about a multi year strategy that is tracking very well which puts us on in a strong position to continue to increase profitability and etc growth. In two thousand twenty one and beyond what i liked about it but these were all fantastic numbers but you told me one day jim this company which has terrible cash flow can make fortunes on everything that it does put out so when barbie has a plus eighteen percent quarter number one toy property globally in twenty twenty doll- but boy you're making a lot more money off each barbie even though they're more interesting fascinating diverse inclusive than any of the line. At that i've ever seen as we made significant progress improving. Our ability. Gross margin has increased for the tenth consecutive quarter. And this is only getting better and stronger in terms of cash flow if you look at the journey that we've achieved last three years. Gross margin improved over. Eleven hundred points are cash flow improved by almost five hundred million dollars and our operating income is up more than six hundred and fifty million dollars so very strong performance on the bottom line. And we're making good progress on the top line as well. This was the second quarter in the row where we improve our top line by double digit. You're making it look easy. There was a time. When i first met who. I looked at your balance sheet and i question you're you're not your visibility your viability. The viability certainly taken off the table. Visibilities take off the table. At this point. I now have to wonder. You've got this great balance sheet now. I mean really is you've delivered. You have the number one of the industry you ever. American girl turnaround. Is it time to do something. Even were used something. The entertainment industry that you used to be king of come on free cash flow has steadily improved over the last three years we went from a negative three hundred and twenty five million dollars in two thousand seventeen to a positive one hundred and sixty seven million dollars this year going forward will will be focused on converting an increasing percentage of our ebitda into free cash flow and as we've previously stated we intend to utilize cash to reduce our debt and improve on balance sheet even further given the expectation for higher and more asian of cash. We expect to Continue to reduce our leverage ratio. And make our way towards an investment grade rating.

Gresley Mattel Ceo Patel Real Talmadge JIM Soccer Bush Michigan Barbie
How Being Yourself Makes You a Better Leader with author Minter Dial

Marketing Today with Alan Hart

06:01 min | 2 weeks ago

How Being Yourself Makes You a Better Leader with author Minter Dial

"I want. say congrats on your latest book. You lead how being yourself makes you a better leader. What was the motivation for this book. So just like in the same idea. Be yourself how do you do that. And how much of you should you bring into work. We talk about authenticity transparency. But is it about being radically transparent. Radically empathic and radically you totally you. So that was the question. Mark ahead in my mind as i launched intas but actually i started writing this book in two thousand and fourteen and at the time i wanted to be like the book of my life like everything full out work personal and everything in between and it took me a long time to Stu and come up with this line which is hopefully to change the way we lead a not just in business but ourselves because in the end of the day. If there's is huge lack of engagement oversee the previously to books haven't exactly figure that out and then to understand how we can bring more of ourselves feel engaged fulfilled and up bullshitting ourselves at work. Which hopefully has knock on effective leading everybody else to want to be with you. Yeah i mean. Starting in two dozen fourteen. Roughly six years was their their moment where it accelerated for. You does seem like a long time. But i know other books. People have written not you but other people could take ten years fifteen years sometimes so. I'm just curious if there is an unlock moment for you. Well it's great. You know like those more academic papers need lottery such things like that. No this was the actually. The thing that happened here was sort of blocking moments Blocking tackle i had. I went off to croatia. At thirty thousand words. I was like all excited came back wife about it. I've really got a big slug of all of us. Had something happened. And i had actually three big loud bazooka moment blocking me or changing the course of my direction which included a call from the television station. Pbs saying hey mental. Your story so great. Let's put on television and clearly. That wasn't part of what i was thinking and and i'm busy doing something else. Meaning internet this actually takes preference so i then put on hold when off that one and then a friend of mine killed himself and that kind of took on another path and then so i've had these different things that have happened anyway. I would say that the walk. In kensington park with a friend of mine who had been published kogan page was the catalyst to getting contact with them and they said awesome. Great idea really. Love it and next thing you know. I had a publisher and that happened of course before the old pandemic started. We'll let's get into started down this path. And i stopped you apologised for the rabbit hole but i wanna to talk about what you mean by you lead. You talked about authenticity radically being yourself. Tell us a little bit more about what you mean by. You lied so i. I generally feel that everybody has leadership potential and but a lot of times. You sort of like won't take away the responsibility and this listen to orders. And i feel like if there's such disengagement at work something is not happening so the of initial premise. Is you lead you and you need to be master of you. Which essentially means at its heart getting to know who you are and what matters to you and so often we go through life. Allan where we're doing what we're supposed to do getting the title on the business card getting extrinsic ideas doing following in my father's footsteps or not as man whatever and we're not actually in touch with ourselves and this is a particular challenge when you're successful often mail. You just think that this is the thing and so the one. I'm trying to really griffin to is to be in check with who we are as an individual and then once we have that established we get rid of some of the chips in the shoulders. Were more cognizant when we're being emotional and irascible and disagreeable and and potentially more vulnerable and then we can definitely model a behavior that the rest of the team might follow through with got it and i mean those sound like great things to do like just a better know myself to be more aware of my own tics and talks. Yeah why is this important for leaders. Do you think well on one hand. My feeling is that leadership is still wonky. If not a terribly wrong and the other hand i think that is much as some people want to be authentic. It's they're not sure what they're being authentic about and why they're doing it so very quickly you can be put off the course you can be doing something because you think it's good to do because it's like there's the narrative being sustainable development is great. Let's do it but there's no real hook anchor back into who you are as we end up doing so many things because it's good to do. Oh that sounds like a really smart idea let's do that and by justifying rationalizing all these smart ideas. We actually ended up frustrating ourselves. Because we're going to not get to want to get too so i feel like the issue is. We've all been to university a lot of us or you know educated and were reading even if you haven't gone university it's fine but with intellectual curiosity we we kind of think we know ourselves because we have that arrogance may be pretension says i want of course i know myself. I'm fifty six allen. God dammit you crack question me on who i am but i think we have this sort of absolute ability gloss over the details. I'm an executive powerful. And i'm excited. I'm confident on curious. I'd fine but that kind of describes everybody at some level to sort of leggings generic concepts that you want to project but who are you deeply inside and if you're excited about sustainable development can you not attach it to something that's more relevant to you for example or hopefully i'll have one day grandkids. Well i'd like for them to live in an environment where okay well. That's at least a more personal hook as opposed to the intellectual size that it was going to help our customers think that we're better people.

STU Kensington Park Kogan Croatia PBS Mark Allan Griffin Allen
Community-powered solutions to the climate crisis

TED Talks Daily

04:11 min | 2 weeks ago

Community-powered solutions to the climate crisis

"Home. It's where we celebrate our triumphs. Make our memories and confront our challenges and these days there are plenty of those an historic pandemic wildfires floods and hurricanes all threaten our basic safety. These challenges hit even harder in communities that have been cut out of equal opportunities in the us. Unfair and racist housing policies called redlining have for decades forced black brown indigenous and poor white families into areas rife with toxic chemicals that make people sick. They're surrounded by concrete that traps extreme temperatures demand more cooling more money more energy more carbon. Our problems are interconnected. Imagine all we can do when we realized the solutions are two at the solutions project. We've seen that some of the people most impacted by covid nineteen least likely to have a steady place to call home and most affected by the damage to our climate are already working on effective and scalable solutions. Take buffalo in miami where affordable housing has become a community solution to the climate crisis. Buffalo new york is the third poorest city in the united states and six small segregated but our people. How're is strong. Over the last fifteen years my organization push buffalo has been working with residents bill ren- affordable housing deploy renewable energy and to roll the resilience in power in our communities. We saw heating bills soar over the last pay. We organized state policy help. Small businesses into our people to work. By the rising homes we responded with equal landscaping ingredient infrastructure when record rainfalls flooding our neighborhoods. We replaced the concrete that overwhelmed and may heat ways unbearable. Let us visit school. Seventy seven and eighty thousand square foot public school building that was closed and abandoned for nearly a decade but pushed off low in the community transforms to solar power forcible senior apartments and a community center. This is what the community wants it when private developers were school building for high end loft apartments eight hundred residents mobilized came up with a plan. We became new york. State's first community. Solar projects in during the coronavirus pandemic abon tier running mutual at catalyst. Miami anga miami climate alliance. We work with dozens of other organizations to enact policies. Ride safe housing anthrax climate. Here in miami. We've seen a four hundred percent increase in tidal flooding between two thousand six and twenty sixteen. And i've seen forty nine additional ninety degree days per year since nineteen seventy. We fought for the miami forever. Bond to fund four hundred million dollars for affordable housing and climate solutions. Yet every day we continue to see luxury high rise condos being built in our neighborhoods added more concrete in heat on the ground. Some of our members are taking matters into their own hands. Literally conscious contractors is a grassroots collective that formed during hurricane irma to protect rebuild and beautify our communities all while increasing energy efficiency. They don't think that anyone should have to choose between paying a high a. c. bill and living in a hot in moldy house that will worsen respiratory illnesses such as asthma or corona virus. They fix problems at the source. Advocates across the country are holding their governments accountable. Climate solutions that keep their communities in place we need to push from reportable housing green infrastructure and flip protections because these are the solutions that solve many problems at once.

Bill Ren Buffalo Miami Miami Anga Miami Climate Allia United States New York Anthrax Hurricane Irma Asthma
Episode # 62 Crafting a Powerful Performance Review: Col. Carla Bass

Workplace Perspective

06:53 min | 2 weeks ago

Episode # 62 Crafting a Powerful Performance Review: Col. Carla Bass

"Listeners. And welcome back to workplace perspective carla bass. Hello and thank you for the opportunity. I'm glad to have you back. I was. I was looking back at our shows and we had you on the show just about this time last year talking to us about how to be better writers in our work lives. And today we're gonna be talking about performance reviews from both the employer employee perspective. Secret cited to hear what you have to say about all of that but before we get started. Why don't you tell our listeners. A little bit about you and what you do right now mike. My mission is to teach people how to write powerfully. Why because opens doors to opportunity that would otherwise remain closed now with that in mind and based on the difficulties that cove it has inflicted on everybody. I can post three free e books on my website. They address How to write a standout resume how to write a performance review and how to write a grant submissions. So i- laser focused everything. I'm going to say on those three areas but my my journey has done amazing for forty five years. I've written products for the white house and congress and generals and ambassadors Thirty of those years was on active duty in the air force in the last fifteen was with federal agency. The pivot point for me that changed my life and is what brought me to you. Today is when i was a lieutenant. Colonel i was a squadron commander in hawaii in charge of four hundred eighty wonderfully talented people when i arrived that unit was the most losing unit in statewide professional awards. Not because the kids didn't deserve to win but because the supervisors could not write winning packages so i developed. My methodology. Taught my guys how to write. We began sweeping the awards. And then i ended up teaching that for the next fifteen years to thousands of people and When i retired. I pivoted that and turned it into a book that that place to everyone. Corporate business private and that's right to influence It's now in its second edition. And it's one eight eight national level awards so this is what i do nowadays. Well that's awesome. We'll have links Your website and you'll publications on our podcast page when we get your show put up. But let's get into it so when it comes to crafting these meaningful powerful performance reviews. What advice can you offer to employers and supervisors and on the flip side employees. Ls what you're thinking. sure. I have eight tips for the employer a supervisor the first to recognize that a performance review is a strategic tool. Not only are you grooming the future of the individual you're also grooming the future of the organization because through it you're trying to promote the best of the best so it actually impacts the organization's future second is impact Make sure when you're telling these stories that you explain the so what. The impact is the heart of the performance review and supervisors because of their elevated positions have a wider perspective. And they sometimes have a better vantage point What impact the individual actually had like dropping a pebble in the pool. The the individual can see the first couple circles but the employer has a bird side. You and understands more so he needs he or she needs to explain that to the employees and make sure it's reflected in the performance review The third tip is to position your subordinates. For future successes create material for the next performance review and by that i mean recognize outstanding performances formerly with thank you notes or time off awards. Note compliments that they received from clients and keep an email file for each each employee. That would Where you can gather this this very valuable material. The next is award speaking of awards if you have a superstar that you'd like to submit for award and you're you're really really busy. Ask that individual to draft a reward nomination on him or herself to do the initial legwork that does two things it takes a little bit of the burden off of you and it also gives that individual practice. And here's how you craft a hard hitting award report qualities do you. Do you value specific qualities in an employee like teamwork or flexibility communication skills. Or whatever if you do tell them that so they have that mark Against which they can they can measure the performance number six and this applies to. Everybody is framed. The story put the put the The item that you're describing in context was detailed detail provides a mental yardstick where people can actually understand what you're trying to say so for example My most valuable branch cheese sounds good but you could only one or two branch sheets so say the most valuable of my eight branch cheese or employee of the quarter okay but employee of the quarter selected from forty five peers. That's what i mean when i say. Put it in context and the final two tips for the supervisor of the employer is started off thinking terms of a boxer. You hit the reader with a solid right cross. That's the opening hook and here are some examples of opening hooks Her top three of many accomplishments bla-bla-bla propelled her office to new heights and then continue Impervious to stress. He that that that that the an opening hook like that tells the reader pay attention. What follows is important. So that's the criticality of open hook that the last quote the last words. The closing words are as important as the opening hook because that forms the final impression so examples of a of a closing hook the closing words would be excelled in this top job or her proactive can do approach is contagious or place in positions to influence others. So you've basically got a sandwich you've got the the hard hitting opening the center that focuses on the impacts and has the details. And then you've got the closing. So those are the thoughts for the supervisors and for the employees. It's there hang onto the second. carlisle me. ask you something. We're going to take a break in the end. We'll come back and talk about the employee part of it but let me ask you this about the supervisors. Those are awesome thoughts. That's great. I love the you know putting things in context

Carla Bass Colonel Air Force White House Mark Against Mike Hawaii Congress Carlisle
Tesla buys Bitcoin: Elon Musk's plunge into BTC

The Trader Cobb Crypto Podcast

05:34 min | 2 weeks ago

Tesla buys Bitcoin: Elon Musk's plunge into BTC

"I twenty four hours we've had since loss on. Look the biggest thing really to speak has been the involvement of tesla in tribe. Of course been talking tweeting. A i guess talking and tweeting Quite a bit about the Dosage pretty much about dodge With hashtag bitcoin as his twitter description. Of what you want to call it now. I'm market is currently sitting just shy of one point four trillion dollars. This is huge. It's huge for all of us. All of us that have been around for a wall. He's in for those of you. That are relatively new to this by. It's huge for you as well. This is the reason why she age. You've got it's six one white half a dozen the other whether he's the wealthiest man in the world next to jeff basil's. I couldn't give to hurts about that. The fact is you've got a rebel entrepreneur who is willing to put himself on the law. He sold pipe off. I think he's a hundred ten million and what he did was invested in the tesla and spice x and barred money inside on couches. Now this is sort of man that is not in anything for the money. This is a man who has a drive. he has a purpose. And after that i he is. He's kind of just want say something. You've never seen before. But certainly the level of entrepreneurship. I haven't seen before in my been rating books and being involved with a lot sorts of stuff. Since i was about fifteen years old when i read zig ziglar top was offered to me by my very first mental. And it's it's quite. It's quite an extraordinary thing as far as long consent to how somebody who is so different and so different. I guess it's not just about money. The guy puts it all on the line. He he he i mean. He smoked a joint. With joe rogan. I mean the guy. He's a rug. He's is mac villian. He does what he wants. He is the person the creek di really represents. All sorry hayes to his now become the person that he's a spokesperson he is. know bang. And it wasn't just because he bought does all. He talked diet and put hashtag bitcoin. It was because now. The tesla i look. Let's be honest about this Point five billion dollars of bitcoin. That's the mall when it comes to capital but if you dig a little bit deeper and you start rain in between the law ends of how long he's been talking about cryptocurrency and how he's involved with non himself i assure you i'm sure he's involved wrestling. But with tesla sought on one unravel that a little bit now show Some studies going to accept bitcoin. And if you can see what lamborghini days when you know in two thousand and seventeen where land beginning saw accept. Bitcoin is pilot for the motor vehicles. That mccain win lamb by you know. There's always named saddam about lamborghinis. Lamborghini didn't back bitcoin that he's accepted. You're going on mosque now. Who has not accepted it. But he hasn't accepted yet but he's backed it by going into now. There will be a time. I am fairly sure of where any touchstone believe. I haven't read everything about it. I caught the busy day where they'll accept bitcoin and at time you gotta think about. What is the community. Give the community gives back to those at help the community gripe and i think it's an absolute bloody moss strike because as this new you know parade on the finance and whatnot comes around. I forget the taxi high tells them what not hide airbnb only different places the So try to fought against Progressional spurs part of this put. The banks don't like bitcoin and it's because the bank's can saving obviously threat to to their empire. You're gonna moscow's out there doing his thing and there's a lot a big millionaires billionaires that have been created three bitcoin cryptocurrency if he's going to accept bitcoin as a method of pilot. Then i think it's an absolute buddy. Moss destroyed for him to put one point five billion in to tuzla in in bitcoin. I'm and maybe he'll go more possible trends. I'm sure he certainly thinking about on the dan if he's not but that one point five billion he's already put in would probably you know what he'll pick up if he accepts. Bitcoin will be far more than one. Point five billion dollars in sales now whether you look at him as the master of you know the universal massive pot of cryptocurrency. Now it's just a smart

Jeff Basil Tesla Zig Ziglar Joe Rogan Lamborghinis Twitter Bitcoin Hayes Lamborghini Wrestling Saddam Mccain Moscow Tuzla Moss
Dissecting the Rise, Fall and Future of Topshop

The Business of Fashion Podcast

09:00 min | 3 weeks ago

Dissecting the Rise, Fall and Future of Topshop

"What do you think talk shop representative young costumers here in the uk because this was prior to the international expansion. And all of that. But i remember coming to london during that time and it was. It was a destination you know it was a place that people all around the world had heard because it had become kind of representative of that kind of cool brittannia moment and all of the stuff that was happening in the uk at the time. What did young customers feel about the talk shop brand. After after this all of this new activity. I think they felt that it was as unite bill. A kind of a real ownership of it on a at this hour as we great because with because we've sort of created together but like you know it was something let's talk if that makes any sense as a so that brings me to the question. That's on so many people's minds this week as we hear the news of top shop being acquired by a sauce you. Where did things begin to go wrong for top shop in. What was the tipping point where top shop began to lose. Its way well. I think it's a very difficult question to answer. In some ways. I mean young. Fashion is roussel. you have to be constantly reinventing yourself to make sure that you'll always relevant to your customer base. I felt well. You know bennett grain had taken over a two thousand. I had been very clear as soon as he joined the business. I didn't want him today any conflict. Because he wasn't china he was. You know an acid struck him more than anything else. He bought as an insult them again. I had a lot of conversations when he was not a retailer. In the way that i saw a return should be said was sort of capture the margins in the business but then pejorative that time. He then broke kate. Moss and hats off to him. She was a great choice at the time we hadn't wrote any celebrities weeks outlets limiting wasn't really talk shop. It was all about design evoke nelson. I knew that she would be incredibly with the with the talk shop customer base but also knew that it would it allowed to get into top shop if he lied to enter into an stop being apart top shop and i knew that i couldn't work with him. I could. I could do this with my team because we were all incredibly passionate because we understood it. I could not with him. Why not because we just had temporarily different views about everything is was that you basically that the buying decision was that you bought something as cheap as you could possibly buy. A new sold differs much. As you'd be get foreign mike. Philosophy was that you would make sure that you designed on bought something. That was so amazing that no one will be able to resist. It said we will philosophically. We had a very different view. The business so assigned that he took over he i think he felt that he knew young fashion that he could cross the business. And i'm sorry but you know he's he's. He's a middle-aged mom who doesn't have very much retail general certainly didn't ever about young fashion on. I think from that moment on probably He started to make decisions about cultural. Besotted run it in a way. That's a Realize that that a business needs to be constantly. Reinvented that you need. Passion within the union huge passion from everyone involved and if those people are not as passionate Do i really have to do this. then i think it's i think he is very quickly. My feeling was that before he kinda came into it. It was like we were a room full of people together. All of us creating together something. We were terribly proud of. I'm so it was amazing but we were doing it together. I think he his his view much was was a top down management. I'll tell you to do that. You'll do it. And i think that's not just a very very different thing. You know if someone says to me you've got you do that. Yeah i'll do it. But maybe i'll do it but i wanted to very well whereas if i feel on upon something creating something that i will give it everything and i think that's what it needs and needs everything. Is that ultimately why you decided to leave that. You could bring your everything you know what what happened to precipitate your departure. Well just just. Purely the fact that i knew that he he had an end that he would now become involved in social and a half million. Just didn't want to work for that. You know. I didn't have to work for him. You know and also. Let's not forget. I was by that time in my early. Booties and i kind of thought you know what this is. This is young high russians. I am no longer opposed. I kind of grown answer bit. I could do something else better. And i could give everything to another to another type of business. Oppose the other thing that was happening of course during the rise of top jump was also the rise of other big fast fashion houses whether that be zara or you know h inam the other new giant global companies looking back now the companies. That took that as fast approach to fashion are now really being in the the really the kind of the focus of fashion's Climate crisis challenge. You know the all of the training that we've given to customers to buy things cheap by things often and then dispose of garments. How do you see that whole fast. Fashion sector now. Top shop included with the addition of players like a sauce and boohoo. People calling them. Ultra fast fashion. It seems to me that it's this part of the fashion industry. That's most problematic as we think about this. Ten years left before we can get these carbon emissions under control industry that contributes ten percent of global carbon emissions. What's what's your take on that. Now while i you know a lot of people that have accused me of having been one of the False fashion and then sort of turned around and said a watch. Now it's it's not the right thing to do. But i. I never set to to create disposable passion. I says create something that was accessible to you. Know the great things are accessible to a lot of people and it's been on a journey myself in over the last sort of. I guess ten years. When i began to start feeling that this was moving in that. This was wrong that you know that we were that the fashion had lost its value. If you like that would just literally buying things in throwing them away wearing wants to moving because it was so cheesy do that i began to feel seriously compromised by that and began to build that i that i should leave the business and five because i couldn't i couldn't Begging apartment of such an incredibly damaging industry which which we now know that it is and to buffet and we didn't really know not Templeton fifteen years or so prior to that we did pass. We didn't know what we didn't think about it. And i think. I think it's it's very difficult and i always seems to me is certainly in young false fashion that the the they the customer base it is soon of splitting and that you have only sort of what the numbers but but it feels like this little v fifty percents Who recognized that. Passion is a real problem and have moved to depop hamilton. To buy vintage charter shots. Recycling up cycling read cetera. And and yet. I'm still two percent who are still buried addicted to is seriously mean. That addicted took Having things immediately. I think it's very hard to say those people. You can't have that. I think what you have to do is offer some sort of bad but alternative is as exciting or is as as tempting or whatever the sort of the yes away from from from. What is that doing. Because i agree with you. I mean it almost feels like we're coming to an end. Endpoint what. I do take what i am. Encouraged by is the fact that if you nonsense question about ten years ago i would have said that. Eighty percent people was with selected fashion. Maybe ten fifteen twenty percent. We're actually starting to realize that there was a different pop that could travel

Bennett Grain Roussel UK Moss Nelson Kate London China Mike Depop Hamilton
RADCast Outdoors Episode #37: Al Lindner Discusses Faith, Family and Fishing - burst 01

RADCast Outdoors

1:05:47 hr | 3 weeks ago

RADCast Outdoors Episode #37: Al Lindner Discusses Faith, Family and Fishing - burst 01

"On this episode of red cast outdoors we sit down with legendary fishermen of famer and co founder of in fisherman lindy equipment co owner of lender media. Al lindor course. Everybody knows al from his days on in fisherman and has seen him on a number of different tv shows including the angling edge and on this episode of rod cast outdoors. We sit down. We visit with him about a number of different topics including fishing family. Fame his faith and of course. What are his favorite things to fish for to this day. We hope you'll sit down. Relax and enjoy this episode of raw cast outdoors. Sean rad cast is on hunting fishing and everything in between this is red cast outdoor from the borders ten cast studio here david merrill and patrick edwards again outlets gay debut on the program. I do wanna a quick shout out the ending curdle cousin for helping. Set this up with al this kind of a big deal. thanks dante. yeah so really. Appreciate danny and I'll just want to welcome you to the shell. Thanks for taking time out of your busy schedule to hang out with this on a podcast for a little bit and looking forward to nothing makes me happier than a cold in minnesota. If i can't be out fishing. I should be talking about the. It'd be well below zero tonight. So that's probably one of the big motivations for patrick and i to start this podcast. We both have young families. And we're both avidly into the outdoors whether it's fishing hunting or of both. So that's our goal is to You know recruit new new anglers and new hunters to the to the outdoors around. The timing is really appropriate for unit. We've got a whole new. Recruitment a coming in because the cold or sport is never seen before experience in the outdoors and they need our need some guidance. in cases do you know respect the resource in S an important part of what's happening now with these whole. Nobody's covering it. Yeah it's it's been fun to watch you over the years. 'cause you you've really helped kind of teach everybody about that and i know as a kid. I always look forward to outdoor life coming in the mail and also in fisherman magazine because that was that was kind of the thing was you know i wanted to learn more about fishing and growing up in cheyenne wyoming. It was like a dead zone fishing. I mean there's there's really not much closer unless you're going to drive like two hours to glendow three and a half hours to seminal five hours to voice in like you just forget about it. There's just nothing there so you're talking about teaching people. I was reading that as much as could. Because i knew when i went. I had to really capitalize on those trips and sell ob. You've done amazing job about that. And i just wanted to know if you could just share some tips with us you know. What's what's in key strategies of getting kids and just other anglers out on the water. What are some good strategies and tips number one number one. Make sure you take him when you can get a bit people. I i mean i can't old is powered pork edges especially with the younger ones. That have a short attention. Spans inter is critical. That baba's going down or something pulling on the end of that line and Are that's one in even with a new adults and we have a lot of those coming into the sport now that have never fished before and yes. They have patients where the young people don't however their patients will wane after one or two trips without getting up by. It's the biggest hinderance that i've seen to our sport and your people neck key is getting a bit a bike. Too late that fire they gotta catch something and You don't wanna take him out in this herbal weather conditions yet the weather good into everything your power to make sure that they get back in there and the reason people fish in continue to fish is they had a good experience and a good experience is something pulling on the end that the wire gets really the reason you're out there. That's what motivates people is the miracle of of this. It is amazing to me. My entire life in this business to see would fish can do this change. Somebody's like yeah. Yeah you know a kid sitting under edging blue gills and all of a sudden nowhere. A two pound bass runs out reminders. That back and grabs your bank. You never had. You're catching a six inch blue gills and having a ball in this best is your hook break where your life forever somebody had never muskie fish. You know they heard something about it. They're they're going out with somebody that knows something about all of a sudden next to the boat. This monster opens his mouth bites on. It's an image yet burns into your into your spirit that change. It never goes away. That's what likes to fire in this sport. And here's why it's so important. That that their two n into good weather to do it in your. That's the key is to get get a matching get a matching get them and then if they're really young after three hours to think to run into live whether you get a few fish rockets there fascinated with fish bouncing around in a live That's the key really. Is the key to keep them motivated. Keep them fishing kit. In a short period of time you know and again with the adult young person after after you know you get them out for two trips. Third time Yeah you're going to say you want to go fishing or meet today too bad experiences them. They're gonna go bad back in play video games. Interests will beer so al. I was fortunate enough to grow up near salt water and my dad in the pacific northwest. We did a lot of salmon and halibut and deep sea and i got introduced very young to fishing. We actually just had a podcast with my dad on talking about starting that fire that you're talking about i'm curious who was the fishing mentor in your life. The person that got you hooked on fishing. Actually my my brother and years my senior and He he took me every weapon time. I was a little kid. Yeah you know. He's seen a bring cash and he shared that he said there was something about it from the time you were little. You're obsessed with fish and fishing and he nurtured that he actually nurtured that dad dad in him being older than i am a yeah you know. He kind of took me under his wing and I had some really good experiences in those years. One of them that that really fed my passion for fishing was my mother and this is kind of strange but a share. That story with you. My brother obviously loved to fish. Yeah yeah you know so. He took me everywhere. Everywhere we go. We fished all pans and lakes and creeks and rivers and between chicago and milwaukee. And there's many of them and we're at every moment we could go go go. He'd be a good way he he took me took me took me My mother really liked to fish and She's seen you know people would ask me at a young age. What do you go to a christmas. Gathering family or friends like this and say l. conference. Yeah what are you do when you grow up bowl recovered. I'm living fishing going to a look at you. Oh okay yeah you don't blow it off my mercury. She she under the guy a brother with it she she at christmas time or birthdays or special event every time all my christmas presents and gifts were the latest greatest fishing tackle in the industry whether it was a ride or real allure magazines books. Anything that that that she fed bed it and never said that's a dumb guy you can make a living in the fishing industry. Yeah you know especially at that time you know that many years ago yeah you know and the only thing you again you know. You had tackle manufacturers at outdoor writers that At that time. What are the inspiring outdoor writers to me as a kid was jason lucas. He wrote for sports afield at that time. And he he wrote a book called lucas on bass and becky. I read it a dozen tanks. That and marked every page variances burned it into i mike and that. So yeah you know. It's experiences like that Then television every member. I n nears our tv tv fishing business. The first one His name was geared about gaddis. The flying fisherman he was the first one hit syndicated television fish and chips and he'd tried different locations all over the country and sheriff is fishing. Experience get out get it and then and then that led diverge award. That was the true Championship fishing and he was the one. Got my fire to get into the fishing industry in do a television show in the business ahead He was here in my hometown. In brainerd minnesota yet We're starting lindy deco company and His producer His name was j jadwin. He gave us a call at the office. What day and he says i am not. I would perjure war championship patient. We've been in the area for three days or even how we went into a well. I want you ask buster and can you help they understand you know the lakes. You're really good bishop. And everybody says go while alkyl corral. You aren't one so says you do show absolutely. We went out and we got a phenomenal show. Shot for hours to get everything done. He's all happy he took off and went back through missouri. And we finished. My brother looks at me at night. We're talking he's internet. Does your television show and talk about the lures that he manufactures. So you know we could do that. We got into. Why don't we start at television fishing. Show and helpless guess what little fire in pakistan. Tv channels that was would but a camera. That's what camera in my brother. Learned how to use it. And how to splice taped together at your rewind these stories and how you get into the game and enter the fishing industry and enter the sport different aspects that are available. All you get these different stories from everybody that that has been there enough to make a living business. But i'll go back to what i say just a little bit. Herb just amazes me. What a fish. A fish do to change. Somebody's stunning to me. How it happens all the time when experience would have been in. Just bam young know. You're right this change. Yeah i agree. It's it's an amazing experience. I i remember catching fish when i was little and how it lit my fire and again i. I promise that i would do this on the podcast. And i hope it's not lost because i you hear this stuff a lot but my friend. Seth ewing who lives in northern idaho and myself we we grew up. Just eating up your your shows and Magazine and and it really did benefit both of us. He's he's an incredible fly fisherman and he he learned a lot from your fly-fishing video that she goes put out with dollberg and You know and i. I love the small mouth and the walleye in those kinds of species and so it's just one of those things where i i hope it's not lost on you when you hear say you know. Thank you so much for doing all of that because it really did inspire a lot of people across the united states in the world To go out and fish to take other people fishing which i think is really cool one of the things that i always enjoyed and my dad and i always enjoyed watching. Fish was just the joy on your face. You were always you know chuckling and laughing and having a great time and we were just living vicariously through you as the wind. Blew about seventy miles an hour through cheyenne. But i mean it's it's just it. It really did make a big difference. And i do want to. I want to ask about this because this is really important to david. Ni- we we both have little kids and we take them out fishing hunting different activities. And you know you have kids of your own. And and i know. He's very influential and big into the fishing businesses. Well but can you talk a little bit about what that was like raising your kids to be fishermen but also you know kind of raising them during that time that you know you're just so busy and you got all these things on with the with the fishing world and the fame that you had going on. How did you manage all those things and still make it a great experience for your kids. They grew up in the business. they did. There's not all all seven right here except in children. I've got two boys all of the kids. even girls. Three of his kids are girls. They all served in the business wing. Some of your friends. At the time we started lindy dako copier reports sinkers learning advertised snow. Rapper mind cars. Were exposed to the business is a family run. I mean all their life you know and they grew up in many different fields yet. You know it other things. But-but-but number stayed in the business in our in the business today like jim. dna billing and mesa troy. Yeah you know and and my daughter niece who worked as a pr rest. For many many years fishermen still welts me A right right material and press releases and things like that you with the gifted in that area but they grew up in the business thing. Yeah and and that way you were able to spend time together so they understood it. They understand the crab and the things that this life style. If you went to make a living a good comfortable living in deficient indiscreet. I don't hurt my myself and i know many people that you and i do not that then ended the business row ripley. Welcome rarities Actor to it these days. It's a lifestyle business that you want to get into anything cup. Lack of time it is. It isn't in ninth the fact you you know you eat sleep twenty four hours or so you go to bed at night thinking in still today at the. That's been in this my life. There is not one and go. That goes by that. I don't read something about fishing. Watch something about fishing. Talk to somebody about dishing. It happens all the time. Not a day goes by where some aspect of it is in touch in my life. A part of my life in My closest friends are pretty much involved in fishing industry. Right closest friends. Are that sparks your question for me. L. and that's you know i'm kinda way way beginning of this journey. I've got a small family run company but it's in the hunting outdoor space. And you know. My boys are being raised growing up when we work right. We have stuff to do. There's it's a small family run business. it's not you know. Dad goes to work at nine. And we're we're done at five and let's go do x and y but my question is long term for me. My dad took me fishing law. And now i go hunting and now. My boys are in a hunting company being raised. How did you see kind of the transition of with raising these kids. In the company in fending fishing industry they stayed on and continued to fish and still thrive as that was our was that a positive experience for them. Oh yes yeah. Yeah for a number of now. There's some of them that was not. I'll use my to poison example. My oldest son george in here in heat you shared with the. I'll give you my first experience with it. needs he. He was raised in the business. He worked in. It works wade through until they went off to college in it but he was interested in fishing gets his passion in his case. Was things that move fast snowmobiles motorbikes four wheelers dirt bikes. This is what he loved to do. Sounds like we'd get along pretty. Well do troy and the other hand off from the time. He was a little tiny kid. You could see the seat of he would be back in front of our h- house here a day and night catching frogs and just running up and down the bank catching he'd loved it from the time he was four or five years old internet. Never change he absolutely left. And i just think again. God created all slightly different with different interests and is a good thing. You had one boy in the garage tinker on motors and going faster and you had another guy you couldn't keep at the house. He was taking his fishing pole and he was to the water at four and five. Yeah in in in you and your the answer. Paracha half have respect know. I respect that. They have to be their own person in in in seek out for thinks the all that you know that those different interest levels impacted their right as they were growing up in reading some cases to to what they're doing today you know again my son toys into it in a lot of different areas of my oldest son and interestingly he he he liked even as a kid. You're living on the edge. He here you love the excitement of the snowmobile races today. He he'd get so pumped on yet in today. He's he's the paramedic he's a wilderness paramedic in he's fighting fires -fornia loves the game. You're whites. He likes ribbon on the edge to me. I like living on the salary to belated contentment. That's what i really like. And you know. I follow troy on social media and that that guy is always out doing something. And he's. he's an incredible fisherman. I mean it's it's yet it just anything anywhere any way any loves digging around in offbeat places for a coupla. He's got he's got pack whereas in no matter where he goes scurrying rats. He sees the body of water anywhere. Anything they could hold the fish he just drives up insider road. And rodney goes spacious anywhere anywhere crapping around the country with him because spent he's spent some time out west and i know he's fish some areas where i've been and it's just kinda cool to see that and i do want to ask you a question about that. Everybody has some of those favorite moments. What it was like a favorite moment for you fishing with your kids that you can recall the years ago with troy. I'll give you a. I'll give you my my oldest son that never got turned onto it and here's winter. Mistakes that make made with the there was a series the best tournament series. Starting in minnesota zillion years ago it was called the northstar bash turned into and when he was about four years old. I took an pre fishing. Mary and i got a cabin on the lake. And i took him pre fishing for that tournament with me and he had snoopy rag. You had snoopy rag. And they had to wait spinner baits. Then you know it was cool. We're up in the morning out. Who day thinking around. He's dragging this spinner baits through the water. And you know. I'm trying to catch some fish. Internet little said something. It's something from we'll get more moves out to have been great you you you hold in iraq ruled colin. He looks at me. it looks at the rad. He throws looked at me again. I got the message. You burn me out so bad. And so i think there's a balance there were so you know. My dad took me steelhead fishing. And i've i've got quite a few steelhead to my name. And if anybody out there knows steelhead there they can be finicky and tricky fish to catch i. I mean the passion for catching them is kinda gone. I've i've i've been out steelhead fishing and i've seen this in the hunting industry where you know you get some guys. That are pretty. Some prowess in are pretty successful. They take their sixteen seventeen year. Old son out. He shoots a world calibre elk and ten years later. He's he's not in elk cutting he's into fishing or snowmobiling or something else does. Ruggles images of the other side of that story would try. What are the experiences a for a number of years we as a family. A number of where we fished in tournaments in canada Rainy lake in minnesota canadian border. Another one at nor tap happened awake to work and we fish team tournaments up there and over the years that we hit fished at is a group together ranch fish with one of his sons. Jimmy and billy clubs voice fish fish together with danny. We're troy and We look forward to these these tournaments every year of up there and we won a number of them in your jimmy and in billy one. Two of back in those weeks the week caprice fishing leading into that terminated. That was the week muster sunday for fifteen years. Yeah you know it was the highlights of of our trip together with all of us as a family together and each one bus us. Everyone about when i talk to the boys inclusive of troy. Now he says that was some of the most enjoyable experiences we ever had and all of us at weren't time and other did really good way. And i did a couple of seconds and thirds internet but did win one with him in california and in went ahead and opportunity. You get fish with you. Those times that we're in those events burn memories that they talk about still in. Those chips are really important with father and a son. I know with my dad. We had an annual trip that we would take to flaming gorge and that always meant the world to me because we'd spend five or six days out on the gorge just fishing and not worrying about all the other stuff you know. The work stresses of life. And you know i had told you in an email about a trip to voice in just those kind of trips. Just make a huge difference in a young english life and death makes it something that makes them wanna come back later ended it burns into your sweet. You get so excited and then you think about it so often you think you keep revisiting that your mind. Our great great great experience. Yep absolutely and i wanted to touch on something else because we do try to help you know young new people into get into fishing and whatnot. And what are some tips that you give people when they're going to a brand new fishery and they've never been there before. What do you tell him to look for. And what are some tips that you give them. You know it's gotten a lot easier these days because of social media into local bites really. I mean you're you're you're deficient research on lake levels in what the bites been like recently. Water clarity stabilized. Image is endless. In comparison to what we had sixty years ago running through the changes that i've seen are gathering in the business of what the liberal. But you could do so much preliminary work you know. Get getting on your computer Checking out google earth. Going to local site Hunting down to let local reports. That give you an idea of what the bite is like what they're biting that. Yeah you know. Even to death preferences that stuff today is is in most cases. These areas have a very dependable week. Al outlet and that retail outlet Is a great source of information. They don't hide stuff from people they want you to have a good experience and they have fishing reports. That are done weekly. yeah you know. There's things that are posted a soon as their retail operation. So they give you the most up to date information you can possibly get and the is saves you so much time by doing a little bit of homework. So i'll you've got fish a lot of places in your lifetime. What was one of your favorite destinations. One place you wanna go go back in two at this point so far i probably one of the greatest place that i would go go bad bad and it was a family of them. Refer went to australia and We fishburne windy and we floated the rivers my wife stay. She didn't go coin with us into the jungle. And we did it three days when but ahead my two boys and We floated the river. spur morning. And we can't detonate banks and stuff and it was going through the you'd see what originally state you with. All these people would come to the river and you see these salt water again. Getting you know we're we're presented teasing experience. We we fish adequate the very typical coins When with the river for and wendy was that the guy that we're with you at a massive john bolt in. And i think if i remember would the sixty four or more on knew we weren't we took Took off at a tipping point when we went out. I don't know how many miles thirty miles or so it was in between darren new canning two oceans. Boil them your. I've never seen so many fish in my life and we got stuck his thing. We had backup quit. I don't even know we've -able experience that in there then we fish. Gt's the great barrier reef. Yeah you know a couple of days we did that tap water fishing critique keys but that was the the most probably the most memorable trip send in the boys rules enough to to remember that and enjoy and i've never been back again but never been back after us really get to do that. Sounds like a lot of fun to me It was exciting. It was really exciting. Every day was true adventure. Oh man that's one awesome thing about fishing is you know whether you're going out your back porch to your little pond or no for for me it was. We went to alaska couple times in my teenage years. Dad took us up to prince of wales island. And those you can either go on a short little ten minute trip around around the corner and fish a canal right by your house or you can go. Halfway across the globe know go to australia does. The opportunities are endless and every one of them is special in. Its own way you know in every fish. Especially it's it's all the way to work with some incredibly you state. Anglers jimmy jeremy hardcore muskie. They looked. I mean this is their fish of yeah this twelve months a year. They're they're on sites. They're always thought worst. What's what's next year. Where their plan. And what is your shoots in that. But every one of us might might bishop choices of small outbreaks. And then i'll go to a wall in allege mouth after that and i enjoy muskie fishing but not like these guys do either yet. It's their deal. And we got guys crappie fish at that looked crappie fishing nets. i'm kinda more kind of favor with troy. I like a little of everything in every case everybody in office sometimes throughout the year goes and jerks and goes a car. What would we are. We'll get a car. Pike in warning to every two to get to tax at least yet you know something different something out of the ordinary it go get some carbon in you know it. It pulled the fun to catch challenging at times. There's a lot of different ways to get him the. It's something i would not want to do every day. Like the mix it up. I like to catch your letter. What types of things. I can't do when thing. I liked the variety but i mean They're so fascinating fish. And i still in our country today in the states. Stay they you know in your up in different places the world there yet. They're big deal especially european nations. You so that's the money. It's like our best here in drives the market. And then he many cases sh- something silly in some off beatles little place in the and trial go round when i visited him. He'll take me shore fishing spots underfunded we mainly corporation jumping. You see him in the afternoon. We'll go think around for two hours or hours a year some place. He'd learned that when he was in arizona for years he went to college. There learned all the inner city rex. He didn't have the both twitter. Invent until i took down with a boat. All during breaks and classes he found every single nook and cranny at fish in and around the entire phoenix area. And believe me. There was a lot of those a lot of little pans and stuff and in and it was you. Carpeting had more more at your standard run carpet. It hit they all had best large mouth bass in your blue gill winner catfish so we just think around shore fishing nets or his wealth of bank fishing for years. He went to school there. All he did was bank fish off it back and it was just fun. I would love to do with you. Know i got the greatest in late. Greatest poison the war world my london. I'm rigged out with everything you can imagine the boat you know. The latest technology and everything enters a full ride at times. It just a whole lot of fun. It go beat a path pine fish for sure. Get some louis. This episode of rag cast outdoors is brought to you in part by. Pk lures pk. Lures make some of the best fishing lures on the market. They're high quality lures shine when others don't by helping you put fish in the boat or on the ice consistently i've been using keilor's successfully now for over twelve years and i can personally attest to their effectiveness. When is fishing. You can bet that. I have a pk. Red dot glow digging spoon or a fire tiger going spoon tied on one of my rods. They've helped me catch many high quality fish of various species from season to season my favorite hard water lures. Pk spoon pk. Flutter fish in tungsten predator for open water. i love the. Pk spinach ig pk. Dakota disk and the next generation. pk ridge line. Crank bait this past season. I was introduced to the pk. Warbler which is also a really effective fish-catching machine from the boat. They also have some incredible video on their website. Pk lewer dot com to show you exactly how to use these wonderful lures. So if you wanna have a little more success out on the water and you want to help support the company please go to pk. Keilor dot com again. That's pk lure dot com and get your pk lures today and please tell them that. The rag cast outdoors. Podcast sent you. So i was gonna ask you. I've always wondered this. And i'm sure you've talked about it before but you know everybody's got their favorite method of catching a fish catch fish in any type of method. Any any species. I know you love the small mouse. I love the small mouse as well but if you could catch efficient any type of presentation what's your favorite. Revered you're absolutely no question. Whoever i remember watching you on the wall i video and a bass video just catching tons and tons of fish on those jigs. I had a feeling it might be jagd merick rigor and well like smaller. My mouth says big big pig. Pike some version of chicken for must be done gun with tubes. Big rubber bates. It's it's a jig gonna jk. There's a better way for all kinds of fish all the time anywhere. Get a one sti- family of bates natural leaders acted under the heading up a chick but she was a piece of red or some kind would addressing the guy if might wait if may wait. Four ounces for watering might be a one sixty four for crappie a purple mylar. Jig will work pretty good for steelhead. But i i'm preferential to to top water. Dry fly stuff. I like to see that fish commit. Come out of the water. That's just i. I did enough. You know wet. Fly fishing. That i patrick knows. We've gone on some high mountain lakes. And i just. I really liked to fool that fish to come up all the way out of the water. He's any kind of fishing for musky. Your small mop mop secure rare occasions. Pike tap water breaks. Those are fun if you wanna be consistent year round. Yeah you gotta you gotta get beneath the surface of the water. Yeah my biggest hike. Was i had a fifty three inch. Pike and this thing was was monstrous and it was lake. Naturally larry larry dahlberg and he was filming. But we're reading and got in fake cockney kakatua water are you talk about a memorable experience with that and You know where he's been everywhere to do everything. Yeah yeah you know. He's still thought at their daddy issues. Deck it was unbelievable scene and fifty three inch this. We figured it was mid thirty pounds. You know thirty five thirty eight pounds something again. Maybe it was. It was jackie gigantic for bike. That was half water. Fish birds played beat of ball. That would be. That would be a lot of fun. I now i'm like. Wow that sounds like a blast. But i wanted to change gears just a little bit One of the things that have admired you for years is that you're not afraid to talk about your faith and i think that that's very important thing and you know i want to see if he can share just a little bit about your spiritual journey and how god is played a big role in your life after the two most important parts of my life. The next year shared all all the time. It's fishing in my unity. Go hand in hand every day. Day is just part of my life. I integrated what we do with the television shows. You know the the impact that it it a try to kind of quickly for you until the time. I was thirty five years old. You know i was a person. It was not an atheist store. Nick knight that nasdaq. I probably would have favored more upper eighty s. And i don't believe anybody that spends any amount of time in the outdoors anywhere can be an atheist. I think that's an impossibility. But i had no really. I was obsessed. And i guess that's the only word i could use obsessed with fisher twenty four seven. That was all that and you know. It gets all in our businesses. Were building at that point in time and At thirty five started giving turkey in my heart to Right to spirit a guy who was just tugging in my heart. I met people that that Turned her life over to the lord. Lord that were hard party hard-drinking people that i knew a hard partier. You know when they were like a different person you night and day and he started to talk to me about about jesus guy stuff i never heard of before the enemy sound comes with a lot of people you gotta understand nothing really new number and then i started the search knowing there's life got you got your busse heart who's much of his life in in one day turned us away lord has given us percents and i says well i i can't do it myself i need help i need your direction. I'm just saying guidance. Any made a confession of faith. Like they're nice and his life and then for about two years you know i wandered around back. Studied the word guide. The bible began challenged thing to me to get through a through know little things like could this really be real. You know like so many people. It's this bible. Could this stuff really. But this this thing is is there a guide the foundation guiding coke. Jesus was the foundation. Is this thing that he really is is. He says he is to be comfortable recently. Said he did from beginning to end. Yeah you know. And i started looking at this stuff. You know one day it got out of my head arc. It was never less years. All i can say is if you truly search is real. He's there you care some words to be. It's a real experience. You know the the point he's got to get out of your head in it. You have become a part of my everyday life. I'm not ashamed for the dash. That's it openly. That's who lamb. And i can only share the experience that i hear. And how would i life. My family My outlook on business. Now look on life right back by relationship with my wife and the older. I get a clearer easier. It is for me out to be more appreciative of of my lord grayson so al. I've got a question. It's a immuno high positive this way in a as starting my own business in the outdoor industry and then walking in faith in how how has that affected you know business decisions and just in a living in the limelight and and outwardly expressing. Your faith is there. You know ever moments of doubt. I mean 'cause i in today's society and day and age is definitely not something that's widely accepted. Are you saying in here by some subject back. But what would you buy. S- i mean as far as just running a business and then walking in faith. I if you look at the marketing partners that i have every single one of a from boat motor rag reels lures lying a wreck. Chronics are the top right at the top of their field in their individual categories. Everyone of and we've been with them for many many many years. Some of them almost my entire career. And i've said in corporate boardrooms all over the country. Go going all over television space over television network and contract saying that we re mega conglomerate and never have. I had one of say anything about my confession of faith and that show it all. Most of them have said they appreciated it and go forward and one of the reasons for that is an and some of them are not people but they businesspeople and the bottom line. Is i self stuff for. That's what i still stuff on. I do my job or am i would absolutely. That's why they don't you know so it's it's a only one. Major major challenge would network. It was who was with a network and and jerry jones johnson. They want forgot about guy that that was the words that they came back came back and they said that it's interesting the way they did notification we played on this network for a number of years and this particular year correct when just the way it always hits in five weeks into the show and it was a wednesday afternoon when it got where got i got contacted by the president of networking. And he said it's gonna pull the show because you're religious stance on it. We don't believe it's we. We went network anymore. This was on a wednesday. We get i managed. They did this going to pull it if we did we. Did we read it. Every i reiterate that we think energy i get contract signed with a bunch of sponsors and i had to deliver the numbers in so we get at that show and euronet weekend in the entire re edited version. And we continue our attorneys. Said you know you've been with. They want to take the court. You can't beat it you got. You ran for five weeks already. You did this for years. They never get it. They can't do for this thing and and they talked iran in in my wife. Laura his wife's no we'll go to thorough. They don't want you. i don't i don't want to be there. they want. They want us to be pulled what they want. They wanted to be this what we did back to show to them. We make the changes in our last of the contract for the television season. We sent them with bill. They said the bill hearing on pitching to us and we sent them the bill. Bill them back or the editing changes. We have to make sent it back. I never heard from them. That i didn't pay for the network in europe. Charge them back for all of the pain and misery went back bent. So it's no legal. Nobody called us back. Matt a single thing the legal. Nobody their legal. Nobody never heard from him since well. I'm really glad that you guys you know you. Un ron have have always been good about you. Know talking to people about your faith and it's been a centerpiece of the show and one of the parts of the show. The actually look forward to a bunch is the very end when you go through whatever god lays on your heart and i really just want to say. Thank you for doing that because we need to be able to talk about these things and i. It seems like culture is trying to move in a direction where they don't want you to talk about stuff that might offend somebody. But it's like you know these are things that we should all be talking about. You know if that's part of your life that's an integral piece. You should be able to talk about it. And there's one one thought i have on that. Patrick is to speak to have speech to have thought. You risk being offensive. Right to someone. And i mean if we're just gonna walk around muzzled and mass and never have a conversation about anything i mean. I'm into big game hunting that that can be offensive. Catching fish can be offensive. So we have to push back. We have to go. They'll run over here if you don't get you know and i'm a big thing an immediate business all my life. I'm a big believer a freedom of expression freedom of speech. Even if i don't with it so am i even. If i don't agree with it you still have a right to share. I understand and i respect it. And i think that's something that people need to remember. Is that just because somebody says something. You don't like doesn't mean you have to agree with them. You can just choose not to listen to that person anymore. I mean there's there's stuff that's put out all all the time that i don't listen to and i don't want to be associated with because i don't agree with what their stance is and you know there's plenty of stuff that i do love to watch and listen to that. I do agree with people that disagree whether you should catch fish on spawning beds are not right in an argument about that or you can easily selena when you can easily get there. But but again. I i like i said i. I respect our our freedom speeches. An expression is an important thing. I've been in the media business my life all my life and in people have a right this year that i have i a right. The like to tune into a cheddar offer. Do whatever i want with it not read it. I can exercise my own decisions. I'm not gonna go in there in equality sponsors sponsor them. Because you're doing this dead. I never do. And i think that's something that needs to be heard and i'm glad that somebody i'm sure a few people here it on this podcast but what you said is very true. We don't need you know this. Cancel culture of of things that you know. Ripples need to be able to share and people need to be adults about it and mature enough to handle it and choose what they want to listen to what they don't. I mean that's it's it's really part of the backbone of what what our country was supposed to be about and Were anyway i do to change gears. Just a little A guy that's been really influential in my life on fishing is pat o'grady. I met pat. Oh man that's probably been twelve thirteen years ago. And he was getting his company started. And i jumped in and helped him out with. Pk lures and here. He had told stories about you coming out to wyoming and doing some fishing. I remember reading. In the law. ally wisdom books About seminole and a few things. So i just wondered if you could share a little bit about coming out to wyoming. Western space are so different than northern or ride scary. Yo it's a whole different world and you mentioned to you mentioned alluded earlier when they get used to is. Never any wind ever ending win in. I mean if you go if you're going to fish you better better get used to win. Better not bothering you. The rick the vote right the handle nbc and being a safe piece the piece of equipment. They handle wind in it. I don't know if you guys ever go through three straight days in a row word you calm day never. I don't think lever happen. I go to archery shoots. And i have people say well. I'm not shooting in the wind and they start playing. Oh the winds blow. And i said well you come to wyoming. If you don't shoot or hunt in the wind just don't go hunting joke. Defeat w. t where we go to the code is as an example. You look at the weather report the night before they they say the win the window. We from fifteen to twenty five. It means it's going to be forty plus asu. It'd be forty dollars. Plus that's what you're going to get the truth. Well you talk about seminar. That is one of the windiest places. I think in the lower forty eight. I mean the the wind speeds on that reservoir are ridiculous. But i'll tell you the fishing is phenomenal. How many winter they put around it. Yeah they put a lot of wind turbines that sucker for good reasons but those western reservoirs growth big fish. Hey we're trying to keep that a secret. Al off carp fish is amazing and even some very. I'm a small mountain. i love smart fishing. The small mouth world small mouth. Fishing is as popular as it's become the tournament organizations. That have the come up north and since two small fishing and a great lakes and now they're coming everywhere yet yet you know you get to experience it in tournaments Love it the small mouth. Fishery that exists. West of the mississippi river is still some of the most unexplored smart fishing in north america systems. I can't you're innocent. At west of the river or to western states many of those reservoirs got phenomenal phenomenal. Nominal bishop i. I liked to tell the story. I've told a couple of times there's a. there's a river in oregon. I won't give the name but an all out to you. We drift boat floated at one day. And i hooked sixty small mouth in a day and i got tired of jagan forum. So i put on a mouse pattern. I tied and i caught. You know half a dozen small. He's on a mouse pattern. Just throw it right against the bank and start stripping out and they'd at that river this drift boat only so motorboats in that that can be a lot of fun i mean those are their sparkling out there and some of the some of the bigger systems pick the missouri river as an example for four. You've got set at saf. You've gotta wacky a. These are massive bodies of water massive massive systems and their in in in in there. I mean the small muppet. Nobody hears coast that they won't see an angler in your role year for small. Nobody'll be their four. Pack four pack is one of the most remote fisheries. I've ever been to. And i'll tell you what they're there have got to be miles and miles of shoreline that never get fished and i mean there's massive massive in their own up in way up at that even at the dry air dry air too short that is about what forty i think. That's forty miles long. And then you've got that main arms like one hundred and sixty miles long. There's very few accesses. Oh yeah you know you're right. I remember we had a pw heat from the tournament. They're in what we we got the attention that anisimov parsons weighed in. It was kabaya. They rent way when came to brought the smart in with his bad fish. So we could wait and it was like a six three or six or this. Was that smaller. That miniature scale in your macro swarm are up in san francisco. I couldn't pull about about have to lead. Somebody's somebody structures. Just drive in his crazy ton of them in there. That's an incredible says. I said there there miles up. It is the most untouched massive untouched mama. Fishing attack. the guy goes through not to mention some of the. There's one night and forget. That warned that they bleed. I think they believe their next record. Birsh sure commander there. I can't remember to saturday with no gather some wells. Old anti yeah. There's some fantastic fisheries out here. And i know just in wyoming alone. I mean you've got a number of really good reservoirs for walleye and you know a couple for small mouth that are really significant and a whole bunch that are good for trout of various species. And of course he got flaming gorge with those humongous lake trout. And that's and that's an incredible fishery to we touched on earlier smarter and they've they've kinda taken a dive the they they think that the Burbot that made their way there. Somehow somebody moved burbot down there into that drainage from apparently around this area and They just haven't they haven't done as well they they were doing really well in the early two thousands. I used to go down there with my dad and we'd catch some up to four four and a half pounds and now it's pretty hard to find them. They're still there. They're just not in the quantity that they used to be environmentally. Then yep There's something to be said for that. You know when i grew up steelhead fishing. You'd spend a lot of hours and when you finally hook into one of those thirty forty inch fish. I mean they they take you for a ride for a while but you can fish for two three four days before you even catch one hook one hook up you go small fishing and have those fisher so dang aggressive are fun. It's fun so that's one of the beauty of them. Yeah there's a there's a little reservoir here in wyoming that kicks out you around five pound fish. Pretty regularly And i i went there with a buddy of mine one time and we are fishing. Top water thing between josh. And i we we both got probably fish apiece just fishing little poppers on the surface in it was just a lot of fun and then that thing that you talked about al that happens in wyoming happened in the wind blowing really really hard to get off their old of the gun the boat for your life. Get your your jacket on. Got what. I'll tell you that much we got wet but so what's what's next. What's in the future. What's what's you know. What do you plan on. what's coming up. What are we. Should we be watching for and getting a little long into or the age also slowing down. A little bit i mean jimmy wego muskie fishing me for four hours. I ain't gonna go in our barrett fats or two pound rubber. Big thing can happen. You're only as old as you act. Al see you know strongest kid. My body doesn't want my five. You don't want to receive that. There are things that are wearing down a little think. That's wisdom speaking to abandon. No too so. I i have to pick pick and choose a little bit a little bit more but i still loved the game. I mean know as long as i can contribute that this sport in a positive way. I'm gonna do it. i'm not gonna. i'm not going to quit. I'm not gonna retire up. Going to crack back. And i mean by cutting that i wanna do more fun fishing on the shows. Jimmy jeremy that the staff and other people we work with. I'd like to see troy get a little more involved with this stuff. These guys you pick up the ball and run every night for long enough to fund fish a little bit more by that go do some things and places a lot of bodies of water that i'd like to play around a little bit now for two hundred and a lot of people don't understand that you know when you're going fishing for the weekend without a camera crew that that can be quite pleasurable when you're going filming for an episode that can be you know when you gotta redo takes a redo when you just wanna go explore to make it happen you gotta make. It's working people don't they. They sit in their living rooms and watch that and go. Oh well they were just they. Turn the camera on and went and had a fun time. There's a lot of hours behind the scenes when the cameras work was in. And then there's a year no it's addressing a lot of times a lacking half and on hot fight fetched but then when you dress the show after that. That's when you get the underwater cameras stuff out to fit. That fit the scene where the fisher coming in in to get the right drum shots environment. Those those all add to the editing and make it a little more exciting the music tracks that that go with it. you know. Music is so subtle in you know a lot of shows don't use music because you have to pay Their cost us thirty thousand dollars a year to use a music so yeah bachelor of music track because their royalties and alma my companies right in this is our very first go. My dad and i went she putting this last fall. We hired a cameraman and we took him. And i'm learning very quickly of the shortcomings of we didn't get you know. Be roll. Shot here and this extra shot here and you know getting that underwater shot or that overhead shot that you need in. It's you know it's really hard now to recreate and get those extra shots that we need to produce the film that i wanna purdue so make a real exciting piece you back. That'd be rollers goals man just putting the actual the actual easiest park. It is actually catching deficient getting their artist on films that easy. Then you've everything else is putting it together. It's all better than that anything. Sweetening the more things you have to compliment. Show the better. It becomes the up on where we're struggling. We're stretching it as as as as we can stay but it's fun man fun. It is a lifestyle worth living. Believe me i if you if you could do it. And you find a way to get your niche in their buck doing it your sizzle lifestyle business for a lot of people if you if money is your motivation and you want to get rich. Don't come fishing industry and here's a lifestyle some of us. I mean you could make a good comfortable but if money is silicon valley and they live in that world out there if you want to be able to go out and enjoy the great outdoors and have a comfortable lifestyle. Fishing industry in hunting industry. Got a better choice. you will never regret. it couldn't couldn't goodness it better myself. I have one more question and this is a really important question. Now because on this podcast we talk a lot about recipes and we talk about food. I'm sure you eat fish i. I'm positive that because it's so darn good but is your favorite fish species to eat. And how do you like it. Prepared real simple for me. I had a free nights ago again. It's just brought up perch beer batter perch sounds pretty good to me. A can of bean beam beam some some cream corn on the sidewalk outside with it. And it's like eating better than a lobster themselves as it gets it. Sounds like there's always it's yeah it sounds like you've into edwards family dinner because that's what we do in my house the fried walleye perch and crappie and some some spicy bangs man purchased it. It they are is still. You can celebrate thinking about my wife. Exciting as getting just guys came back from a leech lake and they were a good perch. Blatancy wentz arch for your prize. Bring them over man. Yeah well that's awesome. And again i just want to say thank you again for coming on the show. We're really grateful for you. You know not just the impact on our lives and whatnot. But just i know how busy you are. And i am grateful for you taking the time to spend with us today. I really really enjoyed the opportunity guys. Like i said If they can't be fishing the next thing to do is talk about fishing. What ten below tonight. I'm enjoying. I enjoyed our time here. Today and You know another rapper. During some that you might want to get. You might get some time. You're looking for another guess. she can. She did older jim. Your jeremy better outstanding and they noted you're ready to get the truck getting some real offbeat stuff. Those guys i jimmy and his muskie fishing jeremy those guys. I'm i'm really jealous. Because out. here you know we just don't have access to purebred muskie's it's just we don't have them so i watch those guys and i watch those shows. I just sit there. And i salivate and i cry a little bit because i really wish i could be there but man. It's your fun. Watch those guys catch them. Windfall muskie by turns out. I'm telling you they get like you know that it's happening. After two pearl they get in their fall formless derise turn glassy. You can't even talk to him out space. I can appreciate that. Patrick knows win. When fall. season rolls around. David gone. david all gone but al will. I'll tell you it or if if you make it out this way we'll put you on some fish instead of just talking about some fish arabic bro. I like it man. i'm in well. God bless you and You know be safe on your travels this year and i look forward to watch and more of the winter media so i appreciate it very pretty opportunities guys everybody habitation. Thanks a lot. So i think we should keep rolling for a minute. We'll wrap this show up and do you have to tell a story about al. I'm really glad he came on the show. In my first and only time that i've al was i cast in twenty eleven and i was working on my laptop and i was up in the las vegas convention center and i was sitting on the side. Which is a huge building enormous. I'm sitting out and kind of of the way trying to find a quiet place. I get wifi and do some work for pat gradient. Pk lure so. I'm working on it. And i see this guy. Come out the come off the stairs. I see that it's outlander. And i'm like oh man that's that's all inter i wanna go say. Hi and say thank you. And so i get up and start to head that way and i kid you not. It was like a stampede. The ground shook. You know the sky got dark. There's all these people just came from every direction and kind of cut me off and you know it was like okay. you know. These guys are more important than me. These our sponsors. You know these are guys that have a vested interest in talking to al. And so i'm like i'll just wait here for a minute. I'm sure clear out. It didn't clear out. The mass massive people just got bigger and bigger and bigger and then that mass move down to where all the booths were. And i was like well. There goes my chance. Shake his hand and say thanks But w quicker next time patrick. Yes but now. He's got to spend an hour talking with him and he's he's a wonderful guy and he's made an impact on my life that you i can only just tell you guys that it meant a lot to me today to be able to talk to him when i was younger. My mom passed away. When i was fourteen and after my mom passed away one of my things that it was kind of an outlet for me was fishing just to get away clear my head get away from life and my dad. I remember one saturday. He took me down to cabela's in sidney nebraska which is about a hundred miles from cheyenne. So he went to sydney. Bought some fishing gear but we also went and we found that they had a rack of in fishman. Vhs tapes and books and so we picked up those things and brought it home. And i mean. I was in those things. Like you wouldn't believe you know on those rough winners of shan that i keep talking about you know with the wind. Cystic crappie fishing. That was there. And i don't mean the fish you know we we would watch those videos. And we'd get amped up for that next trip to the gorge to catch small mouth or that trip that we had that next year where. We just clobbered the ele- perch walleye at poison. So you know those kind of things really mean a lot to me and just al and just the way is just how he has so much. Fun has so much joy around fishing. It's just so inspiring to me and so having him on was a big deal. You know for me today so it was great but i learned that and positively right. Vate faith and fishing is what he said. But you if if you're not having fun in this industry and he really did hit the nail on the head. Yes it's it's nice to be able to get to a point. You could make a living at it. But if you wanna make money go to silicone valley go go go create the next app or whatever the next thing is you make money and live that lifestyle but you know he touched on it. He's been in the industry for longer than about anybody and he still working i. It's it's crazy. He's seventy six years old and he's still going and just definitely an inspiration to a lotta people and one of the things. I wanted to pass along as if any of you wanna try to win a trip to go fishing with al. You can actually put in for that right now if you go to. England edged dot com. Which is there lindor media fishing page. So it's angling edge dot com. You can actually enter to win a trip to go with al which i highly recommend you at least in the show notes yet. So i'll have that there and then of course go check out their website. I mean they have so much information on so many different species of fish. It's kind of mind blowing because there's just tons of it and you can order. Dvd's and a number of other things but definitely support them. They're great family. Great group of people definitely take a kid or a new person with you fishing. Pick a go. Pick mali's yeah. It'll catch some mvm. Some of these dvd's are shown. Their youtube channel for over magazine cited in fact last night before doing this stuff. I showed the kids i said. Do you wanna see who are going to have on the podcast and the kids were like. Yeah i do. And so. I pulled up youtube and just played one of their one of their walleye videos. And they're like oh man that's really cool dad and they were all excited so definitely get people inspired. Get him out there. That's the whole goal. Patrick exactly so again. Thanks everybody for listening to this podcast. It doesn't happen without support of our listeners. And david and i definitely appreciate it. We do sorry you have to listen to me some days Or for that matter so as not all there but definitely go to our website. We have shown notes. We have a lot of different episodes on tons of topics. Bears elk in wall. Is you name it. We've got a little bit of everything. And then of course you can check us out on the social media. You want to support us. Computer read cast hat. Give a half ship it to you. They're pretty cool. A pretty sharp and of course. Go out and subscribe you. Know if you're on apple podcasts or spotify or any of those places that you gave your podcast subscribe to the podcast like podcast. Pleased definitely leave us a review. Tell your friends your friends. Yeah so anyway just wanted to say thank you again again. Check us out at red. Cast outdoors dot com.

Troy Minnesota Fisherman Lindy Equipment Co Lender Media Al Lindor Sean Rad David Merrill Patrick Edwards Jason Lucas Cheyenne Lindy Deco J Jadwin Seth Ewing Lindy Dako AL Wyoming
Promoted To Chronic

Big Book Podcast

03:49 min | Last month

Promoted To Chronic

"This career girl preferred solitary drinking the blackout. Kind often hoping she'd stay that way for keeps but providence had other ideas. I wasn't always alcoholic. In fact it has only been within the last fifteen years that i changed from a fairly normal control drinker into an alcoholic. I don't mean that. I went to bed one night. A normal drinker and awoke the next morning as an alcoholic. It wasn't that simple. I started drinking socially and at parties. And proms when i was about twenty years old. I didn't like it particularly at first. But i did like the effect i got from it. It made me feel quite grown up and mature. And i think another added attraction was the fact that so far is my family was concerned it was forbidden and it had a special attraction for that reason after a while i really did enjoy drinking and what it did to me and i became dependent on it for every occasion eventually. The day came when i was dependent upon it even when there wasn't any occasion when i didn't have anything else to do a dull evening at home i'd sneak a few drinks upstairs in my room and that began to be a habit in nineteen thirty nine. I went on my first weeks. Bender of solitary drinking locked up in a hotel room because my family opposed my coming marriage. I figured that. Perhaps if i went ahead with that marriage which i was sure was right for me. That would be the answer to my drinking problem. I thought i would be quite happy. And never would i drink too much again. So i that i think my first feeling of fear came with my first week. Solitary drinking locked up in that hotel room. The hotel management knowing that something was wrong sent for doctor. The doctor apparently realizing that one thing that i certainly needed was sleep. Left a bottle of sleeping pills there and in my drunken state i took them all instead of the one or two he had prescribed. If it hadn't been for an alert hotel made. I might have died then from that time on. Fear was with me. Because i realized that not only would i not remember what happened to me while i was drinking but apparently i couldn't control what happened and there didn't seem to be anything to do about it. Having passed over the border line the next five years were filled with fear failure and frustration tragedies during those years that were caused by drinking such as the breaking up of my marriage. The death of my child other things had little restraining affect in fact. Sometimes they served as good excuses to drink more to forget it was in washington. Dc that this transition took place and that the really bad part of alcoholism began happening. The last christmas i spent in washington fourteen years ago comes to mind only a few days before christmas. I went to the dentist for periodic checkup. X-rays show that a couple of teeth had to come out. I hadn't been drinking much about that time for. I had begun to realize that there was something abnormal about my drinking. Although as yet i didn't realize that it was so out of control on the day set for the extractions on my way to the dentists felt a little nervous so i had a couple of drinks and after the teeth were out i was very nervous so i had a few more when i got home. My mouth was very painful. So i got an ice bag and went to bed the next day the ice bag and i were still in bed but we had a bottle to my pattern of drinking at that time had reached the point where once i really started i would retire to my bed and drink myself into oblivion. The rest of that week is pretty hazy.

Providence Bender Washington Rays
Interview With Mary Anne Shearer

Goodbye to Alcohol

04:42 min | Last month

Interview With Mary Anne Shearer

"Today into being a lady who's pretty well known here in south africa. Her name is maryanne sheera now. Maryanne is a woman before had time. She wrote a book called the natural way more than twenty years ago. An only now is the way of life. She advocates going mainstream on apart from being an author. Marianne is a motivational speaker. And she runs a very successful pekan restaurant as well as running natural health programs. I'll begin by asking maryanne satele to bit about herself. I had serious health problems which included being bipolar had kids at had ear infections tonsillitis runny noses that was high blood pressure so we had these kind of. I call him normal health problems because it wasn't like the big three cancer heart disease diabetes. It was just all like niggly stuff that was affecting our relationships and was affecting the way we functioned from day to day. And i have always been interested in the human body i prob- i might have become a doctor. But i'm i'm glad i didn't because it made me look for answers and other places so i was fascinated with the human body studied physiology anatomy and chemistry in the sciences and i was fascinated with the how the human body worked. So we're not. We started having these problems and we were being treated traditional medical way with anti anti-inflammatories and antihistamines for a head allergic dermatitis. On my hands and the kids with antibiotics just didn't make any sense because nobody actually got well. all it doesn't seem to do is suppress symptoms. And then they'd come back two weeks later. I saw the athol up. Gotta find answers. This was long. Before the era of google that really dates meet And just go and do a search on google. And the closest i've got to google was on several occasions sneaking into the fits medical library in johannesburg and he are trying to find says there and looking at books in the archives and just like nobody really had answers to my questions had to find the myself now. I really believed because i could see the. You'll buddy actually repays itself if you cut your finger to paint it stop. You don't need to go and you know cost a spillover it or go to the doctor. My fingers cut itself. Please can drug. I mean unless you chopped to finger off you'd want to beg on but just a cut finger. Paper cut irritate you. It hurts but you it just eventually repays itself and and if you study the human body like a did you find out that the liver you can actually cut off your liver out. Remove it entirely donated to somebody else. Give the small lobe to somebody else in the big global grow and then you've donated your smaller that logo groesbeck like this is the most amazing thing and yet when it comes to lever cancer you told is no cure for it. You're going to die while you would because you're going to be given all these drugs and you live a second will just get sick and pick up than you will die so i was looking for ways to correct the looking for the causes and then ask trying to fix the causes. I did find that. Nutrition made a huge difference. When i changed my diet. Took after find sugar and my by pella symptoms when my crazy periods of manic unbelievable highs. We are could take on the world. And i was going to change the world and i'm actually by nature very idealistic person and my mission in life is i want to change the world. One person at a time. I want to get them healthy enough. Got the goal to reach. A million people wrote a book called the natural way it came out in nineteen. Ninety-one was a runaway bestseller according to the publishers and it sold as i say of three hundred thousand copies it's been published in the united states. The funny thing is it seems to be taking of now first published in the states in two thousand five fifteen years not getting traction. So it's like if it does take off and i happened to reach the new york times. Basically nobody can ever say was an overnight success at this pathetic years. So you're a woman before your time. Someone emission to really help people if i can get rid of my bipolar symptoms and be completely sane And and thinks straight and have a brain in and and bow bowels and bladder that works properly all the time and be living in that sweet spot of health than anybody can do it. Because i had terrible problems. Janet

Maryanne Sheera Maryanne Satele Cancer Heart Disease Diabetes Allergic Dermatitis Maryanne Google Tonsillitis Marianne South Africa Johannesburg Cancer United States New York Times Janet
"fifteen years" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

Slate's The Gist

05:06 min | 2 months ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Slate's The Gist

"To remember him. Speaking this way melissa corogne melissa crone who is an american citizen. And who has filed an affidavit under penalty of perjury so that woman melissa koran. Did sign an affidavit. She swore that had happened. The accusation therefore edged closer to proof and when melissa croon herself testified before michigan state. Lawmakers guess what tactics. She used proof through accusation. And i signed something saying that. If i'm wrong. I can go to prison did you. Because i'm making the accusation it edges closer to provide signed it after all. No one ever lies. While making an accusation. It is very rare for someone to put their name on something and be lying. Therefore you must believe me when i tell you these. Tens of thousands of voters who signed their names to the election rolls were lying. There's this old phrase about when the laws on your side pound the law and the facts are on your side pound the facts when neither is on your side pound the table. It's one of those expressions the first time you hear it seems kinda clever but it clogs up cable news. Discussions take so long to articulate. Anyway i bring it up now. Even knowing of its viscous rhetorical properties because proof through acusations is saying something like well. I pound the facts then pound the law then pound the table even though you must know that by pounding the table. That alone is quite a significant action. How meaningful it is that. I am engaging in table pounding. You know not. Everyone has a table. The oh it takes time and attention for me to pound the table the very act of contracting my hands into fists. I mean you got. The flexible polices longest of the four forearm. The flexible polices breath of the thumb. Not to mention the hypothetical muscles on the side of the palm. You need to be careful and consider the import and significance of my pounding. The table just as it takes a whole amount of time and attention to book the four seasons really any kind of four seasons in the philadelphia area and also to apply. Hair tonic to say nothing of hours of hours of research on the cracking. I studied the classics. You don't just do that without there. Being a really compelling and deeply truthful reasons so take evidence the fact that. I am asserting that this is evidence. Yes yes yes. You're right the specifics of that argument or ridiculous. also horrendous. The nature of the argument is ridiculous. The fact that this argument is being made and listened to by anyone. All those attorney general's it's disturbing and ridiculous all this ridiculousness is clearly. Why i'm ridiculing it. But this very poor type of argument will live far beyond its deployment in this specific case. So i recommend you watch out for it not succumb to it and especially. Don't ever make it yourself because remember only a very serious person who cleared a high bar of toss would choose not to make such a clearly ridiculous argument over and over again. Such a person by dint of their judgment must be trusted. And that's it for today. Show daniel schrader just producer. Fifteen years ago just a young boy and the threshold of getting his driver's license taking sat's and watching the season's top rated tv show desperate housewives thinking this is spicy but i longed for some housewife content. Fed is more. I dunno wheel. Margaret kelly produces the jets fifteen years ago. She predicted a smart little. Tv comedy about office workers in scranton pennsylvania would be appreciated for a few seasons then quickly forgotten own. How wrong she was because she was talking about the show. It's scranton last for one season on the wbz fifteen years ago. Montgomery executive producer of sleep. Podcasts is working as an editor for an npr. Show having to deal with pain in the ass reporter out of new york who filed scripts. That were hard to decipher and tracks which included hard to penetrate new york accent. You thought it might be. I reflected that reporter was me the just speaking of me. Fifteen years ago. Batman had just begun the had gotten their revenge and young well. Thirty four year old. Mike pesca had just begun listening to podcasts. Well how you can listen a fresh air or the sound of young america wherever you are plus bbc film reviews. I said and pitch this to my bosses. What if i recorded a three hour interview about like pot an ma and conspiracy theories and sensory deprivation chambers or got another one me and a friend got together and we bitch elite dished about famous murders that we read on wikipedia. I prefer to think of myself as a visionary. My employer at the time considered me. What was the word. I yes suspended without pay pending review. Recap raju peru. And thanks for listening..

melissa corogne melissa crone melissa koran melissa croon daniel schrader michigan Margaret kelly scranton wbz philadelphia Mike pesca jets new york pennsylvania npr Montgomery Batman bbc america peru
"fifteen years" Discussed on Edge of the Web

Edge of the Web

03:42 min | 4 months ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Edge of the Web

"A A an hundred. Butts coming from the paid side of things. Be. He paid media biddable social appetizing specialists and they actually acquired a chemical. And just just after us. So the company behind PPC heroin hair. Behalf of those who who know the bill and paid media landscape well, and so come quick overcoming is quite similar. have been being the US centric billable bring those being you can't us biddable to still being. Organic and. We come in threes got which has been great and so the last. Six months. Might, time was was very heavily spent only integration getting my old still teams better than as part of that combined breakups and see, and that's going to be well, the teams roll 'em up running and yet it's everything. Anybody might have known about the oil spill consulting teams that now part of that printouts oepration. Fantastic. That's Great and then since Yeah. Gradually over time as as planned. I I'm still I'm still working with the team on the direction of Seo and helping guide and support at. But I'm not directly leading and managing those teams anymore that report into the federal job and out spending my time running said Tumultuousness, which is sad which is super Also brain labs I, we're actually familiar with Hansen was right right down here in Bloomington Indiana..

US PPC heroin Bloomington Indiana Hansen Tumultuousness
"fifteen years" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

04:25 min | 6 months ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"Course, this is all related to accountability. So I wanted to talk about your last episode of flood lines where you have this interview. there's lengthy interview with former FEMA director Michael Brown. You spoke with him for what six hours six hours. Yeah An and and you play the highlights and lowlights. In the final episode of foot lines. Why was it so critical to to sit down with him and and talk about what happened Well I mean I I thing is just I think a Product like this. Due Diligence and we really wanted to talk to people who were involved. In, the decision making we got it from him. We got it from general honorary. We talked to the police chief Eddie Compass We wanted to get their sides of the story and understand what it was like being in that pressure cooker but also it was important for us to talk to Michael Brown because he has become in lots of people's is the face or the scapegoat of the failure in responding to Katrina. And we wanted to talk to him about what the mistakes he that were made actually were looking from the inside whether we could trace the the history of those mistakes whether we could figure out. from his perspective. How we could. Do better the next time but also wanted to get a sense of personally what is like to be escape goat. Whether he had come to terms with his role in it whether he was willing to provide an apology for all the people who are demanding it from him in New Orleans we got a really. Complex Think. Human. Interaction on that and It's one of the pieces that I'm really glad we did it's worth listening to in full. There's a point where he he says that people need to understand that the government's not gonna come and save you. In. The midst of a disaster. Right. My paraphrase in that correctly does what he says no biting shining armor, right? It's GonNa be scary. You're going to be scared. It's going to happen and and then after your interview you went in and revisited one of your subjects. Leon Williams and and played some of this for her. Where he got he you know he don't to say he apologizes because. He's Reluctantly indignantly apologizing to her. that was. A it was meaningful though it was meaningful for both him and her and I think She says the knowledge man matters and. I don't think anybody walks away from it. Having their baseline emotional reaction changed I mean she still thinks he did a bad job at what he at his at his job. But it does represent to me part of the kind of reckoning that we need to do. After these kind of disasters where we do have people you know we can't. Abandon the process of holding people to account because it's been fourteen fifteen years and we can't stop talking to the people who were affected by it just because it's been fourteen fifteen years because. As we try to illustrate. Those were rubber rations they continue to a person's life they continue through generations, and so the act of reckoning is one that we will have to be doing and engaging in purposefully. As long as. We Can Ban. Thank you so much for talking with me. Thank you. And remind people the best ways to go and find flood minds. All right. So YOU WANNA go your browser the Atlantic Dot Com slash outlines place ago and he can also type in flood lines in any year the ways you podcast. Is True is well worth the listen man thank you so much. And just one postscript to this. We're taping on Friday. August twenty first. Big weather have right now is titled. To hurricanes.

Michael Brown Leon Williams Katrina FEMA New Orleans director Eddie Compass Atlantic Dot Com
"fifteen years" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

08:26 min | 6 months ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Reliable Sources with Brian Stelter

"Sources podcast. So let's cue the music. I'm Brian stelter and this is our weekly podcast edition of reliable sources. Our chance to go in depth with media leaders and newsmakers. fucking about how the news gets made and how it should be made differently. I've always been really really interested in how Hurricane Katrina was covered. By the media. And how different the story of the storm looks? In. The final telling. I'm borrowing that phrase the final telling from. An extraordinary podcasts by the Atlantic called flood lines. The podcast was released earlier this year. And now here we are in. August. Always toward the end of August I, think about Katrina. And the aftermath. We are now the fifteen year anniversary of the disaster. One of the worst disasters in. Americans lifetime's. Do People still think about it that way. What about the failures of government and society and the media? Was the final telling tell us. Well Van Newkirk is a senior editor at the Atlantic. He's the host of bloodlines and he is here to tell us ban. Thanks for joining me. Thanks for having me. When I say it's been fifteen years since the storm hit. How does that land with you? Well. We were reporting flood lines mostly throughout the summer of the fourteenth anniversary and We were always trying to think ahead of what it would be like of what the commemorations would be Obviously, all of our considerations on that front have Kinda gone out the window in the middle of the pandemic but we always thought this show would be an opportunity to reach people for whom you know this receding from their memory folks who are who are grown listeners. Now, who were kids when Katrina happened for people who only absorbed it through a lens where? They, weren't able to get all the information I. Mean I was I was a teenager when Katrina hit. So people like that. We think fourteen anniversary last year the fitting for Serie. This month are opportunities for us to Really get the story that people providing to us out there in a way that that has challenge some people's assumptions about what happened what are you remember of that initial news coverage a in two thousand and five you know what stands out to you the very first memory that always come to me thinking about how I actually watched and experienced. Katrina from Durham North Carolina where I was wasn't the time is the Kanye West George. Bush doesn't care about black people. I was watching the telethon. I was really following closely all the coverage, but that was the one where a lot of different thoughts kinda crystallized in my head about what was going on you know but then other other things that were challenged for me. Even as I was reporting this where we're all the reporting on the the looting, the crime in the city I I had of course, already had a sense that that was a bit sensationalized, but the extent to which it wasn't Asian allies. I didn't really know until we started reporting for flood lawns and that's one of the reasons why this is so important to revisit. You know we're talking about one of the most misunderstood events in American history. What things ample of that finding you know that you all are revisited or visit for the first time So the episode in the new, Orleans Convention, center was to me maybe the most illuminating The Convention Center of people don't remember was a place where thousands and thousands of people gathered after the flood during the flood to escape. It wasn't the official evacuation or shelter last resort point that was the Superdome and so people were there the federal government clam they did not know about. People being there. So it was a big story about win the federal government no in why would they take so long to get them help but underneath all that was apparently now first responders and maybe some federal sources were afraid to go to the convention center because they had heard reports about just epic episodes of violence between armed gang members who were shooting maybe shoot having gun fights inside the Convention Center so. You could see why in that telling why they would not maybe not respond. So quickly to the Convention Center if it was so dangerous nowadays, we call that misinformation or disinformation right and so the misinformation on this front you know they're in the in the final telling out of those thousands and thousands of people who were in the Convention Center I believe authorities collected nine weapons that's not done nine completing Folk nine pieces of total contraband from people who were there which I believe if you screw up a couple thousand people from any city in, put him somewhere. You're going to get somewhere. You know get a handful of weapons, but there was no evidence this type of. Just, read. cartoonish violence was happening in this place and those were the actual very first that we heard coming out of the Convention Center. So they colored how Americans, not Americans how people who are going to help how they saw the situation on the ground and colored who got that help the fastest. It also speaks to the The the way we received information of so messy. So scattershot I think during the Iraq war, it was like in looking through a story through. A paper Straw a plastic Straw, and all you're seeing is what's through that? stroia seen a tiny little sliver of what's happening. I remember when it seemed like the national media discovered the Convention Center Situation You know. What was day four something of this crisis and it was so disturbing that it seemed like the cameras were there. But the cavalry was not that the federal government was not really local government was not there and it was an example of the media being ahead of. Where the rescuers were. So I don't I don't I know that you're you know there's also a lot of errors in the news coverage of this event but I I get the sense. The entire time that the press was almost alerting the government to what was going on is that is that a segment yeah I mean I am a member of the press I don't want to be too down on the press because there were people who were doing the kind of journalism especially around the Convention Center that finally got the help there I think there are lots of different vectors of misinformation and disinformation including the government itself. In this situation I'm glad you mentioned the Iraq war. Because actually I. believe what was happening in terms of how people were getting the news the information was similar you had a demand. From viewers that we get around the clock coverage that we get all these updates on then we get as much information as possible but really there's a real bottleneck at the actual seen in how much information come through. So how you know how we feel that that gap that void is people take secondhand reports they go in amplify things that have been reported and often times we get things like somebody one looter is is arrested coming out of a of a of a of a store and so many people. Talk about that one looter it seems like you've got fifty people talking about looters and it's really fifty people talking about the one looter. Yes. Yes got. Well, it looks even.

Convention Center federal government Iraq Katrina Hurricane Katrina Atlantic Brian stelter government Durham North Carolina Van Newkirk Bush senior editor official
In House vs. Consultancy

The Design Intent

05:19 min | 8 months ago

In House vs. Consultancy

"Well all right alex. Hey great talking to you again really appreciate your time. we're back for some more design intent. Myself tony orlando. Daniel phipps aaron hernandez and of course the creator founder. Alex you'll have to pronounce your last name for us. Alex this niece okay. Well let's go. The ad is okay so similar site so happy to talk to you guys Maybe we can you introduce yourself of where you guys worked So the the reason why we gather today is because. I won't do this interview because i often have. This kris jenner of You should be working in their constituency our in house because Differences that can happen at the end of doing years of working. In hostile working inconsistency you will have a very different skaters. So that's why. I think it's it's good to have both side here on in this interview. we antonio who Will introducing serve but is basically designed neither at delta and we have a daniel simpson everyone who are like with fund design. Now at so we really to weld one with the in house we've constituency so that's Good interview to learn on the. What are the pros and cons of each side. Yeah i think that's good. That's a good topic. I know i have people asking me that all the time. I'll let you go first daniel since you're okay you've kind of been around in both worlds. Sure i have the i. I don't know fifteen years of my career. Kinda bounced back and forth a little So right now. I'm with access design actually started the company in two thousand and five so i guess Two thousand and twenty. That would be fifteen years prior to that. I worked for a couple of different Companies delving one of them. I worked for ibm and then another one and in between there i worked at a short stint at it consulting company up in the chicago area as well so for the first part of my career bounced back and forth a little bit and then i kinda finally may finally made the decision of okay thank the consulting thing is is a good place for me to rest for a while and so. That's what i've been doing since. Two thousand and five fifteen years running running your own small business correct consulting for various companies all over the country to some more for international companies as well So yeah and for the record. I've actually hired dan quite a bit to do work for me. Working adele so I'll i'll give a quick introduction of myself. I'll give a bit of a history later. I'll let aaron kinda talk about his his role. But i'm antonio designed enter for latitude no dell and i've been with dell thirteen years now but i've been in the industry for quite a long time erin so my name is aaron and i work here with daniel. I had access. I've been here for a little bit over two years two and a half years and a half years and this is all the experience or real real world. experience have had And i know it's a. It's a huge question whenever you're graduating or you're about to graduate or you're in school it's like what wh- what what she do. She go the consultant route or the more corporate route so i hope People get to learn how many years of experience you have in the field. Two and a half advocate. So that's that's you can give us the formula have i did. I have twenty years of experience. In most of it is inconsistency so we we have like like a goo- good of people different spectrum invasions on the same on this. I if one thing i would say that anybody getting out and design new in the design world or even established the design where i think the most single most important thing he can do is make sure that the the mentor that you work for or with is the right mentor for you. I i think that's you know my career was was the last with with really fantastic. Mentors when i would start at. Ibm right out of graduate school. And if it wasn't for those guys in al i'll name them John swansea was probably the first designer that i worked for for a long time who retired from ibm lenovo a few years ago. He worked there for over twenty five years. I

Daniel Phipps Daniel Simpson Alex Tony Orlando Aaron Hernandez Kris Jenner Antonio Aaron Kinda Daniel Dell IBM Adele Chicago DAN Erin Aaron John Swansea Lenovo
"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

05:11 min | 11 months ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"An education. You know and Oh also dealing with you know how do you explain to your small child or your young child like what this means you know. What is a pandemic wire? We wearing masks. Why can't I go over to my friend's house? Why can't we play on the playground? Wise the movie theater so this is incredibly challenging for everybody and you know most people are doing pretty good at it. Well you tell you what if you're with people you love. It's a lot easier and so that's why it's nice if it's a family that really gets along that's it can be okay. How about you Robert? You doing all right. Yeah overall I had some incredibly horrible illness Late December of last year that lasted like a month and a half under. If you have it I I would love to be tested there. My own hospital has like Lsu exhibiting symptoms. Don't come anywhere near and so I'm like if I had it and I'm over it I would love to get out donate blood plasma or why. Fortunately son got back from Asia and On the twenty eighth of March he was in Bali Vietnam. He was traveling all over was living with a bunch of kids in Bali. Finally convinced him to come home bout about a week. After he got home he got sick. He had a headache. He was weak. He had muscle pains. He coughed and we couldn't get him tested. He's much better now. He's fine now. He's one hundred percent now and I told him you might be in luck. You're one of the first. You know he just graduated from college last year. We might be one of the first people in your age cohort to be able to go out and work because you've got. You might have immunity. Steve Gibson also got weirdly very. Ill wasn't able to get tested. He's recovered so people like you like you and Steve and my son You could be the golden you might have that yellow card you can carry around saying. I'm I'm cove it free. I got the immunity now. Just doing whatever I can to keep friends and family com safe and anything anybody needs. I can get it done nice and all our local businesses are closed down except for essential services like many places but well in a way. We're lucky because we're all of us are already a little bit introverted. We're used to staying at home. Skype chats and this is a dramatic change. Innocent really is one of my one of my hardcore like extrovert friends was saying how like how horrible this was and I said this is exactly how I feel when you invite me to a party where I don't exactly I love you guys. It's so nice to see you. I am so glad you're all doing so well And I thank you for being friends for more than twenty years now since the tech TV days When we started when I started twit I did and I bring this up every time offer. Both Patrick and Kevin Partnership in the company but they declined which is a good thing. Because you'd still be working for a living right about now but I'm Kevin Obviously didn't need me did much better without me and I'm glad you're doing so well and I'm glad the family's doing well. Patrick I love you. I hope you find a home at someplace we will. Somehow at some we will but A lot of America look at maybe about as close as we can get a unless the real estate prices. Come down a huge way in Portland. I love Portland. We both love the mere fact that Powell's books is in Portland. We want Yeah in Powell's books in the shelving system running around with a flashlight. Robert Heron great to have you to. It's always a pleasure to see a former lab rat. I have much to thank you for and you are. You've always treated me really well even even in the earliest days of being attacked TV and being the underlying on culver help just ever since then and throughout the last fifteen years we've had it's been fun to watch career all of our careers and party and it's it. I'm glad I know you people really I find it quite slow guys hug. I love you guys and it's been really fun Fifteen years I look forward to fifteen more no. I don't think so fantasy a couple of weeks ago that maybe on this episode say. Hey It's been great. Thanks so much. I hope you all have a good life. I'll see later and just walk off enough. I'm Don couldn't do couldn't do it. I love this too much. Thank you guys. Come back real soon. Okay we're seeing all these stay safe. Stay safe stay as we do every Sunday afternoon. Two Thirty Pacific. That's five thirty eastern time. Twenty one thirty. Ut See you can watch us to live. Took DOT TV slash live? Is the live stream audio and video there.

Robert Heron Portland Steve Gibson Lsu Powell Patrick Bali Asia headache Bali Vietnam Ut culver America Don Kevin Partnership
"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

05:33 min | 11 months ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"If you blind date be it. There's no difference and It's it's a little frustrating to see some of the stuff that's out there And then you hear something. It's amazing and it's like oh so I don't know it's it's curious the whole thing but you were. We were talking before everyone you went to commercial and the rest of US ran into the bathroom. it's good that they have that catheter retired so I I think I like headphones can you and your have. You taught me about headphones back with graders. Us right way back when concern. It's so amazing. All the headphones that are out these days. Yeah and then I bought. And this was Scott. Wilkinson's recommendation he reviewed it Recently this little Dak. It's called a hip. Dak from I fi- and it's it's a battery backed up. You know so it's got its own power and you and you take the USB out of your Mac book which has an okay Dak or Using it with X. P. S. thirteen. And so you just get the digital audio from your device you can use it with your iphone with a right cable and this really makes it big difference then you can put on some put some decent headphones in it sounds good and his way. I'm a little more portable you know. Yeah well my workstation. Yeah yeah actually. Some good speakers with these might be pretty might be pretty good. It's funny like Audio quest who makes Expensive Speaker Cables But they do a whole series. This is their high and one that I got in for review The dragonfly tax in that thing. This is the Dak was the actual physical. These things are ridiculously good. I would start with the black unless you have like. Some player headphones. That require a lot of power. Those things complete overkill for the vast majority but the the dragonfly back is Amazing I am listening on hi. Fi men Electro plane are whatever you should. You should look at Dan Clark Audio and and The a onto that they just came out with. I'm actually getting a set of those in for To take a look at but Dan Clark if they're closed headphones are astonishing. If you're at my age I should probably just wear hearing aids and these are pretty third and there. It's funny 'cause when he came out with the original aons you know I was talking to Mike. You're you're delivering something. It's like as good as your primary product but for half the price and part of his thing is he's just out there kind of blow up the industry and deliver as much mys- breaks his heart. Because there's so many kids listening on these little white ipod headphones or iphone headphones. I don't think the music I really don't that. Also be something. I remember the revision. Three offices I kind of became like you know the man I hear you hear you can make music sound better. I'd like a set of headphones. And then disappear come back. It'd be like you know and even like Santa Sony. Md are seventy five zero six. Which Roberts probably wearing right now or has near like for eight hundred bucks. Yeah those are good head right now. Yeah Yeah heard with an external or a USB Dak That I love from a company called Shit and they're full Cho C. H. I. E. They're very good. Yeah I I do something that gave me a physical knob like old school analog Knob for volume control. It happens to perform perfectly and you're looking for a headphone amplifier. Take a company called J. D. S. Labs I know these guys friends But they're Adam amplifier for ninety nine dollars When you go to someplace like audio science review it's outperforming. The this is a ninety nine dollar inexpensive product. They did because they they do There elements was society. I my old headphone amplifier. Dak kind of trashed they had. Just come out with the element. I fell in love with it. And then the the primary engineer spent a couple of years kind of experimenting and figuring out how to lay out the boards and he's created this. You know I was laughing because they had this like you know. Thirteen hundred dollar said of this very serious audio companies speakers and it was picking up all the noise from thirty four inch curved monitor. It was really frustrating because if there was a pause something. Or if there's a quiet passage I would hear noise from the Monitor. And then this ninety nine dollar headphone amplifier. You could basically like shove it up against the alternator of car and it picked up nothing. I mean you know I it was it was next to this monitor and it was picked up nothing. And it's an amazing like companies like these guys like GPS labs and and again like Mr Speakers. They're delivering astonishing audio quality for not that much money and It's amazing stuff. You guys talk about a Navy Excel. It is talk about T- screens and projectors and content and what's going on in the industry and Yeah Good Roberts Roberts kind of if you if you ever want to know about television's Robert I. He's he is calibrated. Several of my. Tv's thank you Robert Very much. You are very well without his calibration. I wouldn't know if the field is redder. Blue our our show today brought to you by a longtime sponsor..

Dak Roberts Roberts Mr Speakers US Dan Clark Audio Dan Clark Md Wilkinson Cho C. H. Scott Mac Robert I. Mike engineer Adam J. D.
"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

06:32 min | 11 months ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"You can't oh I didn't know that I I've been using and just have to use apple's messages you for for SMS right. Yeah Yeah Yeah Yeah you can. You can use it on on Apple. The here's why I don't use signal I remember. Now it's time to a phone number for a normal person. That's fine but if you have if you like. Kevin and maybe me and you have more than one phone. It's no good. You Bernard Phone Leo you just. This is the one on my bedside table. Most of the game I keep my school. Google voice account around just for having that burner number and an account and texting system. That you know what I'll give that out to the public so if I use the google voice number then I could put signal on every phone and just say Oh. It's this number. This is it's number. I don't think that work. I have a separate number for both. I have my so you have to signal accounts. That'S THE PROBLEM. You have one free phone number. I only use signal. You can only do it to your main numbers. That's that's the problem if signal. Look what we just need apple messages with Android Support. We need something that works on. Irs and Android That has a desktop client. That's not tied to a phone number. Frankly that to me is a privacy issue with signal. I don't know why they do that because I know they published a couple of documents recently outlining how they're aware of that buried condition and how it is an issue for a lot of people to join up and it is something. I know the number and they have a way. They've come up with might actually work but they needed to get it implemented in right now. I think they're more concerned about that. New Trust Act or whatever the hell it was that was looking to circumvent and the earning act. Oh yeah that's the name. It's Ernie is more clever than I than I thought I could give. Congress credit for because Congress and the Department of Justice and every government in the world is trying to eliminate end to end encryption. Their position is oh no law enforcement needs to be able to know everything you're doing or we can't stop child pornography or terrorists or whatever. The offensive flavor of the month is but the but the problem is at least in the US. They've done it in Russia they've done in Australia. They've done it in Sweden They've done it in many countries where they say. No no you can't have end to end. Encryption it's up to the signal or whoever you're GonNa make an a plain text version available on forsman if they ask for it. They can't do it in the US because people like us. We'll get up arms so they thought they were clever. Oh we gotta I know will threaten to withhold section to thirty protections the ones that say not responsible for the content on your website your blog you know the the comments on your blog or the videos on YouTube. You're not you can't go to jail or be sued for those because you're just a carrier but they say if that protection you have to earn it by. Yeah you gotta earn it. By following quote best practices in terms of encryption or just in terms of offering your best practices but what they're really team has encryption and who is the final arbiter best practices. Sure they've created a committee but it's all deferential. To the Attorney General the United States of America one William Bar who thinks incriptions the worst thing that ever happened so Stein and Dianne Feinstein who is one of the sponsors of the earn it act so Dick Blumenthal and other sponsor said it's not a bad encryption. We just don't want child pornography. What COMPANIES TO BE RESPONSIBLE? They have to earn their section to thirty protection. But it is about encryption. The funny thing is Dick Blumenthal is going on and on about how you gotta use encryption that needs cut sponsoring this stupid act. It's very offensive. And it's just it's or willow. They don't realize that this is a whack. A mole game encryption is never going away right so you down messaging and guess what you just take up file text file encrypted put it on dropbox chat with someone else you go back and forth and you just keep doing them and it's like it's so ridiculous it's just people are gonna find ways around this. Have you ever used? I loved Magic wormhole about that. That the problem. The problem with using dropbox is dropbox has a copy of courses encrypted but it's there and they you know maybe that sets up a red flag or something magic wormholes point to point so if. I want to send Patrick A secret plan to dominate the world. I would I would use magic weren't hold encrypted and it would give me you know an English pass phrase you know nasal walnut glow nasal walnut. And then I would call. Patrick said Glow Nasal Walnut and hang up. Then Patrick Fire up his magic wormhole type glow nasal walnut and it would do a peer to peer connection. And so no third part. Well I guess the phone company know about it can bit torn had something like that Dan. Recently Right Yeah. Something they did. That was encrypted like that. The problem with bittorrent resilient zillow is they never they never talked about the they never. It's not open source never revealed the protocol So it seems like a good idea. Yeah you'd have a unique identifier. Anyway what are we talking about Google Fi? Oh Yeah and the IPHONE so I hope this doesn't depress you Kevin but John Prosser who by the way I don't I don't know who this guy is. But he's been leaking on twitter and he had every detail of the IPHONE. Se including the name before anybody else did. He even said the release date would be Wednesday. Just tweeted a couple of days ago should have some iphone. Se Plus News for you soon. Really odd there's another one coming. Is that the larger version. The larger version PEOPLE ARE UNHAPPY. About how large this one is. Four point seven the naming conventions of the IPHONES are so confusing. Well Anyway Yeah. I think I'm going to get one I think is is You get the plus. I love the exile. Wasn't that a nice phone. What's the difference between a SE plus an x?.

apple Google United States Dick Blumenthal Bernard Phone Patrick Fire Kevin Congress YouTube zillow Ernie Irs Australia twitter Sweden
"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

03:28 min | 11 months ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"We use took about twenty. We can't get the TETON anymore. We bought a ready for this Scott when I first set up to it when we first step video which was in the In the brick house we bought thirty five of them. Wow Green cameras travesty or left John are all not all thirty five thirty three. We're using it right now. What I'm on right now is the old vic is that's pretty funny and you know we see and it's so funny because we've been totally eclipsed we had mark branly on a couple of weeks ago and he's shooting everything on reds editing on four or five. Mac PROS THE NEW ONES. The ones that start at six thousand dollars with. Xt Artists plays. He even has wheels and an monitor stands. That's how well he's doing and The Times have changed quite quite apparent. I'm still funny that you're shooting your movies and the same camera that we're doing it on. That's yeah and I did though I just bought a Mark. Four five cannon. Yeah shoot video and gets to my next project. I'm hoping to show what I think is the most underrated state for beauty in America Nevada. The Vada you think of you know Vegas and area fifty one but you think in the northern two thirds so I got. That's about thirty five hundred bucks. Maybe get some tests. The video looks is sharper than than the Vecsey out but Yeah so another old timer is actually in this in the Chat Room Karston Bondi. Who produces this show? He's producing it home these days. He can't come in to the studio. That's that's no one can accept me but Karston was also one of the people who went to La with Kevin and Robert and stayed with them until two thousand five state with G. Four TV he says Mark Devito. He misses Mark Veto. Most of all the TV folks. He had the dirtiest mouth of anyone. I've ever met saying something given some of the people we worked. There were some pretty foul mouth. Scott it's really nice to see you. I ran into Scott when I came back to facebook. And it's the only good thing that's happened to me in two weeks on facebook but it was great to see it's got goes. Is this you really? And then he says all right prove its you? What did I used to yell during the tapings of Internet tonight and I had no idea so I so I do remember you yelling foul obscenities every time you busted to take which is pretty much every time Scott didn't remember that that's the funny thing Carson remembers the lowest shouting then. I actually had to ask you like okay. Name three executives Ted and that gives you meant driven. Yeah I knew it was you. I I mentioned appear Hammersley Greg Driven and whoever could forget the weirdest CEO? I've ever worked for? Larry Weinberg Yeah. Wow that's good teams. A nice guy driven once once told me that Larry Weinberg came up and said you know. Leo's not bad looking into.

Scott Larry Weinberg Mark Devito mark branly Mark Veto facebook TETON Greg Driven John Mac The Times CEO America Vegas Leo Vecsey Nevada Karston Kevin
"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

This Week in Tech

11:52 min | 11 months ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on This Week in Tech

"It's time for tweet this week in tech special episode was almost exactly fifteen years ago. Fifteen years ago April seventeenth that the very first show was recorded. It wasn't called twit. At the time it was called the revenge of the and we had to bleep a the screensavers out. But I am so thrilled to get the original three guys who join me on that very first less than half hour show. You heard Patrick Norton who could miss him. It's good to see you Patrick. Pleasure to be here. I'm just laughing because I'm remembering the threats from the lawyers which always makes me giggle with joy. Whenever I think of lawyers threatening to sue we got a cease and desist from G. Four Tech TV. And of course we had to be very careful because this guy was still working there. Kevin rose to see you and it's good to be here. I can't believe it's been fifteen years. That's insanity I think your life has changed more than anybody's in that fifteen years I would say I would. I don't know we I couple of kids that's ground. Yeah I gotta be honest Artichoke Department upgraded sensory designed behind you. I see a beautiful home there. If nothing else you ve vastly improved the environment. You're living in like no disrespect to the house last house. I saw you guys sharing we living in a garage and we had used a KIA furniture. That was the old tech. Dvd's those were the good old days also joining us Patrick's partner in crime on Av Excel. It's my friend Robert Harran HARAN FIDELITY DOT COM. Hi Robert Leo. Always good to see. Your House is still empty except for the equipment and that's as it should be pretty much and yeah and a brand new box right behind the other side that thing. I've got on boxing. Now take a look at even talk about it. This is this is. This is like the skis. Jobs photo where he's just squatting on the floor of the stereo equipment around surrounded by cool stuff. Lots of test equipment. I I had the misfortune of going back in preparation for this and listening to that. First revenge of the screensavers which by the way we The acronym Trots was the worst part. Worst POSSIBLE AGAM although it's gotten worse and It was a frankly a painful shirt for Mita. Listen to because I think I was. I was really over anxious. I think I wanted it to succeed so badly that I was pushing too hard and so it was not for me. It wasn't a great show for some reason. I think mostly you guys people wanted to hear it because tech TV had disbanded the year before Kevin was down in L. Doing what was to become was it. The attack of the show at that point Kevin or yep leaves so they changed it pretty quickly to the attack the show. Will they fired? They got rid of Alex. Albrecht which sucked because we had a lot of fun doing that show together and then they brought Kevin Pereira on and then that's when the name change. Yeah change before that. I'm I think it had because I thought I could use the revenge of the screen savers and the and the letter said we're not done with that name yet so. I think that's what that's what happened and Patrick and I were left behind in San Francisco they didn't take to La. I you know it's hard to make a move when someone doesn't want you doesn't talk to you and then was a is. There is no reason to go to to pay my own way to go to La. When I was pretty sure they were gonNA kill the show as we knew it anyway. Yeah Yeah not just not worth it. Robert Did you do at the end of the tech. Tv I went to g four. We ENDED UP SETTING UP. A lab briefly down there but otherwise ended up working with the folks on attack of the show until they had another round of layoffs. In then at that point I took a good break and then came back to the bay area and worked for more Davis properties. Like extreme tack and magazine. And that's who you writing for when we did the first show you mentioned extreme Tech Patrick. Also reading extreme tech and awesome ended publication which lasted long. Called Extreme ipod lasted for a while until lawyers came out. You know we also replaced that with the TV when we got our hands on the first Gosh was that two thousand fourteen thousand five two thousand five I think and the two thousand five. We got our hands on the first try caster and built the studio around the try. Casper which was like you know after watching after building the tech. Tv said it was like seven million dollars studio and it's like well we just did it for like twenty grand right right That was that was like okay. This is this is what disruptive means when you replace a million dollars worth of equipment with like forty thousand dollars worth of equipment. That was pretty crazy. So you can do yeah. People are doing at home now with at eight ten mini for three hundred bucks in a couple of DSL sitting around right people think that divorce was on the original show. He wasn't in didn't show up. I think 'til episode four so he wasn't. This is who was on the original show. So it's fun to get you guys back again. David prager there for whatever reason no cal he might have been hiding. He's he's always somewhere. My wife was there. Was there well the first time. Yes all of them were there we did it at the Twenty First Amendment Brewery. Right after macworld. But that wasn't I don't consider that the first tweet because that was many months earlier And that that was like in January February after macworld expo and that was more just test. But yes Sarah was there. Prager was there for that one and I think all of you as well so yeah. It's it's kind of fun that That you guys are. What's interesting is shortly after that. Kevin you left g four and started revision. Three right. Was there for one year. Yeah so I was. I was at G. Four for one year we started. Read three and dig right around the same time. Yup Yup so. I'm the only one still standing tall. I mean you're all standing but I'm the only this is the only thing that started in two thousand five. That's still going that's saying in the PODCAST business. That's seeing a lot since most podcast. I after a week so the fact that we're still here fifteen years later. No Co there were no. There were no sponsors back then right in this. I remember when we were doing dig nation. We had a ton of viewers but then finally slowly sponsor started to come online. We'd go daddy. There wasn't a lot of money to be made. And then I look at you know. Joe Rogan who's doing double digit millions in a year and rather than an episode of impending. I count it but yet insane we when we first started. I didn't want to Do advertise I wanted to do as Patrick has done. His shows with the we didn't have Patriot in those days. But it was a tip jar that kind of thing But that did that was good for one show but it wasn't wasn't enough to pay anybody or have any help or anything else. It was just enough for one show so it took us a couple of three years but we finally said I finally said okay. We'll do advertisers and Yeah at this point. We're entirely ad-supported. Although thanks to cove in nineteen there's a little thinning out of the heard. If you know what I mean. I think that Rogan guy might make it though. I think he's probably GONNA survive. You know who's visiting real quickly pop in. This is an older feature of the Old Shows. I used to watch like the tonight show people would like Bob. Hope would pop in and he'd be across the way he did he show up. Look at this a friend from the past Scott. Harriet squash is here. Sky was never ever on the twitter. I don't know why never asked you. But that's probably because you were busy making movies. Yeah still doing that still again as I told you before we a- went on the air here of I make just enough to still live with my eighty-seven-year-old parents down in southern California. So it's but it's been it's been great it's been it's been fun able to do primarily hiking films and You know gone around the World Australia. Iceland just hiked in Ireland on a new route last year. And take about three months to hibernate. Edit them together and put them up on squash films dot com. That's awesome yeah. People may remember Scott from Internet tonight. Which was the high end. Fancy SHOW UNSEAT ATV IN TECH TV one with rightness producer. I think always back the experienced skaters though you guys were like you were the highest rated show. I think we were second but I mean you think you. Your audience brought a lot of people to our show. A lot of people because yours was yours. Yours was the show for real people normal people about. Oh look what's on the Internet. Yes yeah yeah. Which was that? That was so fun man those days well and Michaela Pereira. Who's gone on to fame and fortune? you guys were funny so it was a funny show and you were a comic so that was a that was easily the most entertaining show on the network but it turned out what people really wanted was. You know we're going to install a lennox On this box and it'll take us in our. Maybe it'll be time before. The show is over that for some reason. People like that you are able to do. Both you know both to be informative and entertaining if if I attempted anything of that Technological level I you know you could have would be hearing the TV sets turning off but you tell me. You're a geek now. Well a more of a geek. I remember it because I actually took pride at the time that I was really the the here end user host on the show everyone else knew so much more about tech than I did and my interest wasn't in it really but as the as the GIG was winding down with the Internet tonight got cancelled and then they were cool enough to keep me on for a year where I was on the show with you guys and remember Kevin Rose sitting right next to man. I remember thinking to myself. This kid's never going to be a millionaire right on the money with Kim There. So and then Yeah I I always look back on. Those times is just being cornball word but really magical really fun and what a great place to live there in the bay area and and then absorbing all that technological info and then when the GIG ended I I wanted to edit my own documentaries remember. What was his now mark veto. Remember mark the editor. Yeah he was the number one guy. He's going again and this is at that time he would go dude for like eight thousand dollars. You can get final. Cut Pro. A powerbook Mini Devi. Cameras can make your own documentaries and it looked good in a in a theater and like you know great. And that's what I did and started making. What else should on now? I actually shoot on a Canon H F G ten which is one of their cinema cameras. Yeah those are good. I just I just kind of correctly or incorrectly. Women this is a camcorder. Oh that's the same thing.

Patrick Norton Kevin Kevin Rose Scott David prager Kevin Pereira Artichoke Department Kim There Joe Rogan boxing La Robert Harran Michaela Pereira Robert Leo Tv California Mita G. Four
"fifteen years" Discussed on The Slowdown

The Slowdown

05:01 min | 1 year ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on The Slowdown

"<music> i'm tracy k smith and this is a slow. Oh down every year our faculty members at the university where i teach must submit updated c._b.'s academic resumes detailing all of your publications in speaking engagements awards and contributions to the field over the span of a career your c._v. grows to become a long document document a running tab of everything you've ever managed to accomplish within your particular area of specialization but even the most most impressive. C._v. is only a partial portrait. Missing are all of the emotional markers that run through a life all the moments when something powerful was felt understood claimed or did i love today's poem summary of fifteen eighteen years by suzanne cleary precisely because it feels like an accurate roadmap to a full and varied life it doesn't and tell me what the poems speaker does for a living but it tells me whom she has loved and what she has drawn from the many memorable chapters of her life it tells me that she has endured heartbreak illness and loss and that she is awake to the ongoing adventure of of being alive grateful for the many different offerings her life hands her summary of fifteen years by suzanne cleary for m h i will tell the best and the worst paris five a._m. Mm-hmm trucks from the countryside men handing down crates women unpacking raspberries and pears my apartment in queens and on the window sill persimmon flesh like sunset softening growing sweet. I am in love with loneliness cleaness. A man who lives far away he plays the harmonica and is afraid of thunder. There is a black cotton dress <music>. How wearing it. I feel for the first time beautiful my first taste of plum wine my first serious live by. I scream alone in my car. I scream at the rain. There is pain in my back and x x rays pouring through my body like rain through a screen door in webster groves missouri. A photograph is taken. I wear a fur coat from the forties under a bank temperature sign one hundred four degrees. This is the year of trying too hard followed by the year of not caring one night. There is a lake invisible darkness not shining meaning until i touch it. There are is green dark brown. I step into to never fully return at some point. I begin to call strangers children honey. There is someone i love a hospital bed. A green stain gene on the pillowcase. A white dog runs out of the fog like part of the fog into my headlights. I clean out at my grandmother's house fine. My grandfather's skinny undershirts threadbare freshly washed then there. Is someone whispering into my ear again. After i had forgotten the feel of that then there is only the memory of it for their is imagined memory. Now there are gifts a silver pin. I wear on my coat a baretta that falls from my hair a man kneeling beside side me saying i want you to always remember this morning and there is what he does next. There is the loss loss of my mother's ring. There is seeing the hair on my father's chest is white and there is not knowing finally what call joy and what grief but wanting to tell it all in one breath so i will be here and you <hes> <music>. The slowdown is a production of american public media in partnership with the poetry foundation.

suzanne cleary tracy k smith webster groves missouri queens paris one hundred four degrees fifteen eighteen years fifteen years
"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Under the old system and this will take place in 2019 will be the first year this do you think this is enough was this a lottery reform that that you wanted or do you think maybe more should be done to discourage teams from designing teams that are intentionally battle this is where we are i voted for a tougher reform a few years back but it cut voted down which was flattened it out even more in the idea of flattening out these odds mean flicked you're either in the play offs or you got a chance to get better towards the top of the draft you know and the teams that don't make the playoffs that are legitimately trying hard but just aren't as good or their small market they haven't been able to attract free agents you know the draft is really important in early gets more important early than any other league because the bed players can take a team to a championship because they can handle the ball every twenty four seconds and they can also play defense you know the other twenty four seconds and you know the they're only five guys on the court aren't eleven on a football team or whatever it is so or nine baseball team you know an individual guy really can't affect baseball team they don't touch the ball that often basketball it star driven and you get the lebron james you know you're probably gonna win the championship and so we got to figure out who has the best chance to get the next lebron if the rubber is one uh at that level and so it's probably the worst teams but you flatten it out so that everybody out of the playoffs at no has a decent shot in it reduces the urge to be the very worst team in legitimately just be terrible on purpose and you know this is not good to sell tickets if not good for the integrity of sport it doesn't look good it's tough to say the celtics are playing someone who's doing that you know fans enjoy the game thanks for coming you know they they're not can enjoy the game as much new right so anyway that's the reason to vote for a flattening and it did get flattering letsie l works you insist paid or do you think there's any.

lebron celtics football baseball twenty four seconds
"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

"In the year uh as is improved himself his numbers and his play every single year these been the nba the gone up which is really unheard of i mean just steady improvement now he's got this year were you know with this obvious physical setback but if gordon can come and be a you know a great contributor an allstar level you know i i that sky's the limit for us over the next five years but don't know exactly how to play up yeah i mean i know there are a lot of passionate celtics fans i don't know how much they get to see western conference basketball whining know about gordon hayward is that he was the best player on a team the utah jazz last year that made the playoffs in the west in the west is a difficult place to make the playoffs western conference allstar which is saying something yeah exactly i mean you look at the players it over there so i mean he's he's a very very good players will be really interesting to see how he sort of assimilate into this team once he gets back healthy you mentioned you know having added star not necessarily a big decision you have to make but a big decision you guys do have to make that coming up the end of the season what to do with marcus smart smarts of really unique player wake in that when you look it has may be box score stats are what is shooting percentages and right now it's thirty one point three it doesn't tell the full story of his impact on the games how do you guys evaluate what marcus smart's value is to the boston celtics now will there's a theme here chris of i'm not gonna talk about contract negotiations in advance so you can ask but i'm not going to answer that i ask how how do we well you can ask of it's a little boring if i just say i'm not going to answer but we evaluate marcus smart game by game along with all the other players and he's a phenomenal contributor he's you know a real heart and soul glue guy for the team he makes so many plays the contribute to winning at when we've won a game you.

nba gordon sky basketball gordon hayward marcus smart boston celtics celtics western conference utah five years
"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:46 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Two thousand seven so it was the end of july who took all of july after the draft in the trade for reality to convince kevin to get her now that's interesting so i do know that's another owner to owner wants so you've been involved in the only two that i two of the biggest transactions in celtics history the kevin garnett trade in a career victory yet will i'm involved deputy i'm definitely evolved in all the things that go wrong i think that's it go right you know it's danny and its brad nitz corinne people like that i want to ask you something about your team because it's been a great start to the season but you said in the beginning of the year that you weren't really sure if your team was a true championship contender i'm paraphrasing those were not your exact words but do you feel at this point that your team is a true championship contender or do you feel like you're maybe one superstar way even with gordon back were twenty three games in we don't have gordon um i think we're a team in the top tier of the nba but i can't say when i watch golden state and cleveland the finalists lebron's been seven straight finals as far as i can tell there are a couple or three teams that are really up their houston san antonio always seems to be there we'd love to be in that mix but we're gonna have to prove it for we said if you have gordon hayward on the roster healthy next year ju look at that core now with the young guys tatum and jaylen brown taking steps and playing so well and say okay we need to add some roleplayers tweak it deeper bansard you look at that and say we need one more star cause you to the their sort of that hierarchy of stars normally on a championship roster you mentioned golden state is a super team we all know what they have steph curry durant draymond klay thompson owen one record against this this here that's true is pretty darn without gordon hayward on your team so that lead me to that question do you feel you know with the healthy gordon you have enough or genie that one more star we don't have to make that decision will look in february at.

celtics nba lebron san antonio tatum gordon hayward kevin garnett cleveland jaylen brown
"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:37 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Seasonticket is sponsored by ziprecruiter looking for your next great higher but short on time you just need the right to smarter two with ziprecruiter you can post your job to over one hundred top job boards with just one click than they're smart technology notifies the most qualified candidates to apply no wonder eighty percent of employers riposte on ziprecruiter get a quality candidate through the site in just one day right now you can post jobs on ziprecruiter for free that's right free just go to ziprecruitercomtalk ticket that's ziprecruitercomticket ziprecruiter the smartest wade hired welcome back if you like seasonticket be sure to subscribe to us on apple podcast or wherever you get your podcasts remember subscribe means the best way to make sure you get our latest episode as soon as it's available all right we're back here with boston celtics coowner ceo and managing partner with grouse back where you mentioned something before about the people that have decided to join this organization and come to boston brad stevens al horford gordon hayward cairo irving it's funny there was a narrative a media narrative that this was a place where you couldn't attract star free agents or stars in their prime did you ever feel there was any truth to that when you guys were trying to add players to the roster it seemed to be true it seemed that it was a tough place to attract people and you need the trade for them we hadn't ever had free agent taproom before so we really didn't give it a real try but anyway of feels knell like we are a a real destination people people are choosing us and i think the fans have a lot to do with it and brad has a lot elected.

Seasonticket wade ceo managing partner brad stevens apple boston eighty percent one day
"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:35 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Cavaliers getting that deal done that so two guys that obviously have done a lot of deals and business and just made up their mind that they were going to get this deal consummated no in that deal with you had to give up one of the brooklyn pick since the last brooklyn pick in 2018 and that takes me back to this draft you guys finally win that draft lottery i'll try not to bring up two thousand seven although those band did win it i was sitting out there who were that you've got how it you had to be excited because i know two guys on the age of paying a huge on television with next to magic johnson enjoy lim be going who's that guy nobody cared uli was pretty well that was me by the way and i really had a fun time when winning that letter yeah i know especially after a seven when you didn't i know that one was that one was tops so you were the lucky charm i'll take whatever happened though seven it it ended up working alpha isn't that the truth i mean having the new big three no we did not we went from the second ranking to the fifth pick in seven yeah he doesn't remember yeah no that was tough at the time but it worked out great gotcha championship with kevin garnett paul pierce in rowan but you win this loud we have the number one pick and you guys make a decision to trade down to number three you make a deal with the philadelphia seventy six or through take marquel folts at one you guys take jason tatum who's been fantastic this season at three why was jason a better fit for you guys denmark marco faults while i will tell you that when the picks come up danny makes them so we look to danny to lead our talent evaluation and so the trades or another thing that's there's more input and there's more back and forth in the more aspects to it and he leads that process as well but he really has a total of thought.

Cavaliers uli rowan philadelphia jason tatum brooklyn johnson big three kevin garnett denmark danny
"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

01:51 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Nobody i know around the celtics for sure thinks the celtics is a business it's a brooke love it's a great passion it's our tradition we don't run it like a business we we do have business aspects to it but we run it for love and the people and you can start with brad stevens and the way he loves the team in the players and you talked with about kyrie irving you know there's a lot of love going around this team it's not a business and that's why actually why it's going well this year we maybe that's a whole different topic but anyway it was really tough to see gordon lying there and then the way everybody's rallied round him has been inspire yeah definitely says something about the character of your team i think a lot of self expands work wanna know is there any chance gordon can come back this year from that dislocated ankle and fractured tibia while i've been told that it's a long road back but it's better to have broken a bone than not to in a sense breaking a bone in something in look at paul george who had a different injury but a horrific braley at one with uh and he's back playing at an all nba level so we're very hopeful that gordon come back over the long term but we don't every predictions about when that's going to be we have the disabled player exception for the year now that tends to show you where everybody thinks that medical community doesn't think he's rushing back anytime soon we won't russianbacked you mention that disabled player exception for 84 million there are obviously some stipulations in terms of using that has to be a player who's in the last year of his contract what would you pag wickets the likelihood that you guys do use that exception this year well i've never actually or if i did it was a slip or a mistake really predicted what will do with contracts is not my my mindset we're going to maintain oliver flexibility all of our options with that but vans no over fifteen years we do everything we can to put it at the best possible team out there on the court if we see and opportunities that i'm sure will use it speaking of putting the best possible team in the court he had a great team last year number one seat in the.

celtics brad stevens gordon paul george kyrie irving nba oliver fifteen years
"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

Season Ticket

02:01 min | 3 years ago

"fifteen years" Discussed on Season Ticket

"Seasonticket is sponsored by ziprecruiter looking for your next great higher ziprecruiter offers simple tools and powerful matching technology to help you find qualified candidates fast it's the smartest way to hire try it for freeziprecruitercomticket that's ziprecruitercomticket well everybody and welcome this season ticket i'm your host chris gaspar it's friday december first we have a great show clear today and a very special gas we are joined by boston celtics coowner coa managing partner with grouse bet thanks for joining us here on seasonticket chris glad to be here yeah great to have you here in it's a great time to talk celtics guys get another win last night against the philadelphia seventy six years 10 aid to 97 a td garden you're now nineteen and four on the year that's the best record in the nba i have to say wake i did not see this coming after gordon hayward went down just five minutes and forty five seconds into the opener and cleveland did you see this record coming in that sixteen game winning streak that fueled it no way i hope that with our team that we thought we had together we could be a team that surprised everybody seven away just in terms of going on streaks ambient super good i thought we had the makings of a really good team but them seeing gordon go down so horrifically i've got a i was just thinking we'd be scrapping to be um just scrapping we'd be scrapping and trying to build and see if we could survive the year um and if they are off to a much better start than i thought what were your emotions when according to go out this horrifying a you know for him really in it it's it's certainly a politically correct or whatever up marketing spin move it probably sounds like say really you just think about him but knowing him as i have just barely started to get to know him at the time but new he's a great guy and his wife and young family interest i really did think of them they made a huge move to come to us in an here he is in pieces on the court it was just heartbreaking for him in robin and then uh then you start to think of boy it's bad for us to have yet obviously very disappointing for gordon.

Seasonticket celtics managing partner philadelphia nba gordon hayward cleveland chris gaspar boston grouse forty five seconds seventy six years five minutes