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Chicago's Wicker Park Farmers Market reopens for 20th anniversary

Brian Noonan

00:33 sec | 14 hrs ago

Chicago's Wicker Park Farmers Market reopens for 20th anniversary

"Park Farmers Market Welcome back customers Sunday is that celebrates its 20th anniversary W jeans Marcella Raymond checked it out. The market has been scaled back to 12 vendors, but they've come with bushels of goodies. We have Thinking we weren't gonna be able to open at all. And then two weeks ago, we found out we were ready to go. So we pulled it all together. And now we're here. Only 50 people can come in at a time. Blue paint tells you which way to go Signs remind you to social distance. I only have to wear a mask. Farmer's market is back next Sunday from eight until two.

Marcella Raymond Farmer
How The Coronavirus Pandemic Changed The Way We Shop

News, Traffic and Weather

01:53 min | 2 d ago

How The Coronavirus Pandemic Changed The Way We Shop

"Is changing the way a lot of us buy groceries. It's affecting grocery prices, too, and, in some cases what foods are available at the grocery store Almost Connie Thompson reports on new options to buy local before the Corona virus pandemic. Michael Parker, it's 42 acre pit farm in Western New York, catered mostly the restaurant. But when the restaurant started to close, Michael had to pivot he decided to sell directly to consumers from his farm. Everything just flew right out the window in a period of two hours. People are home. They're not expending as much of their regular food budget, so they're looking for higher quality ingredients. It's a trend Michael and other farmers hope continues even After we returned to our portico bit shopping habits. If you're interested in buying and eating more local foods, consumer reports offers these suggestions. First, check out local farmers markets that food is harvested locally, and it does not travel from across the country to a grocery store where you might buy it. So you're gonna be getting fresh, nutritious food. Much of what you find. The farmers market is also grown with fewer pesticides or is certified organic. The USDA finds that local certified organic products at farmers markets are often competitively priced. Compared to retail stores. You can also purchase a share in a farm programs say is a community supported agriculture. You pay a little farmer up front and then in return, you usually get a box every week that consists of what has been harvested locally. So you end up getting really great variety of food that you might not just on your own. Another option is to buy Directly from the farm. Michael Park. Odd is part of a Facebook group that connects customers to local farms. It's just over a month now. And there's 7500 members into trend that many hope will lead to a small farm renaissance that better connects people with their food.

Michael Michael Parker Michael Park Connie Thompson New York Facebook Usda
Black businesses and artists see increased interest amid racial reckoning

Newsradio 950 WWJ 24 Hour News

00:51 sec | 3 d ago

Black businesses and artists see increased interest amid racial reckoning

"Week with the growing push for diversity and social justice in the black lives matter movement, black artists are experiencing more interest in their work. CBS News correspondent Naomi Rackham has more on the story. Boston based artist Liana Farmer has seen an explosion of interest in her elegant illustrations of African American women. I've got over 200 orders in the last week, and that was just one day in the midst of a national conversation about racial injustice, more Americans are trying to support black owned businesses and artists. And while Farmer appreciates the interest she wants it to be genuine. You hope that everyone values your work not just for being a black artist, but because you're a person and have something valuable or something that they love. And these artists are reaching new audiences through social media and other

Liana Farmer Naomi Rackham CBS Boston
How one farmer is adding carbon to the soil

Climate Connections

01:12 min | 5 d ago

How one farmer is adding carbon to the soil

"Jim Munch raises beef cattle in western Wisconsin and his heard has something in common with the Wild Bison that once roamed the area. They never graze in the same place for long munch moves his cattle through a series of pastures. They eat the grass in one area for a days and then move on, so it has time to recover. Called rotational grazing, the practice can build soil carbon over time. As the animals graze manure and plant material. Get worked into the ground. Munch says over the forty years. He's had Carolina's land. Just by rotational grazing. We've built organic matter twofold. That's good for the climate and the farm soil rich in organic matter holds more moisture so much is pastors are more resilient to droughts. Three years ago when we had this six week dry period, I never took off pastor. And during heavy storms, healthy soil absorbed drain instead of washing away. We've had a number of one hundred year rains in the last decade. On our farm when you went out and walked onto pastures, it was like walking on a wet sponge, so he says rotational grazing is a way for farmers to reduce carbon pollution and adapt to climate change.

Jim Munch Wisconsin Carolina
Minnesota Attorney General Sues Exxon Over Climate Change

Environment: NPR

05:52 min | 6 d ago

Minnesota Attorney General Sues Exxon Over Climate Change

"A growing number of states and cities are asking courts to hold fossil fuel companies accountable for the costs of climate change. Minnesota is the latest state to file a lawsuit like this. The state's Attorney General Keith Ellison claims that Exxon, Mobil the American, Petroleum Institute and Coke Industries strategized to deceive the public about carbon emissions and attorney general joins us now. Welcome Bank you for having me. What evidence do you have? These organizations intentionally deceived the public. Well, you know we have. Documents such as One, stamped proprietary information from Exxon, engineering, which says the CO two concentration. The atmosphere has increased in the rate of Co. two release from ANTHRO GENYK sources appears to be doubling every fifteen years. The most widely held theory is that the increase is due to fossil fuel combustion, and that document was from when that document was from October. Sixteen nineteen seventy nine. Th that's so. They knew in seventy nine, and then they lied about it actually they produced propaganda. Woods, which essentially said things like who told you the earth is warming chicken little? And then other ones, the most serious problem with catastrophic global warming is that it may not be true. They directly contradicted what their research around. We can prove that and we will. Today, there's a lot of good information about the causes of climate change and the consequences that will have and yet Americans still commute by car and take cross country flights, so tell me how you can argue that anyone's behavior would have changed if Americans had known more earlier Oh. There's a lot of technologies that we could have engaged in a lot of different sorts of things including moving toward renewable energy sources including rapid transit that might be less carbon emitting. There are a lot of things that people are doing right now to reduce the carbon footprint. We've seen dramatic increase in solar and wind usage in the last few years. Mean the world is adjusting? What if we would've just had a ten or twenty years to make that adjustment rather than the limited amount of time that we have now now the first paragraph of this lawsuit you mentioned that climate change will disproportionately impact people living in poverty and people of color, other climate change lawsuits have not put this issue, front and center. Why did you WANNA put equity in the foreground of your case? Well codes is true. Which is always important? You know to make sure that we tell the story about what's really going on here. So many civil rights groups that work on issues of racial and economic justice don't always factor in the environmental realities that people of color and low income people face. I mean the fact is. Is that environmental justice and environmental harms that disproportionately affect communities of color and low income people? Is a civil rights issue, and it should be treated as that. We've got to make sure that as people are working on criminal justice and things like that factoring environmental justice as urgent as it is, give us an example or two of how climate change has already affected the lives of Minnesotans well I. Mean if you're a farmer, you probably have seen much wetter feels than you've ever seen Those wetter feels delayed. You're growing season. We've seen you've seen infestation in. In Pass that are impacting There are a lot the range of things that MINNESOTANS are seeing. Every day. We saw many of them just last week. One person who was with us was an environmentalist who is on the wider nation of GIBB. Way And she was talking about how rice production has been dramatically impacted, which is a she called a sacred food of the way people, and how the just climate change, the traumatic dramatically affected how they can harvest that crop. We reached out to the defendants for comment and Exxon Mobil responded calling the lawsuit. A politically motivated campaign against energy companies, saying that wastes taxpayer money. How do you respond to that? City by wasted money into them, you know they need to come in come to the table and talked with us about how they're going to mitigate the harm that they caused. You know they need to discourse their profits. They need to start telling the truth about the deception that they have put forward any to help us get on the path to renewable green energy. That's what they need to do but of course you know they've lied from the start. There's still lying. So that's just the way they do business you know there have been a lot of other cases like yours and so far none have been successful New York's attorney general lost a case against. Against Exxon Mobil others or taking a long time to resolve, what makes you think this one will be successful where others so far have not been? We have great confidence in Minnesota's consumer loss I mean this lawsuit claimed fried failure to warn multiple and separate violations of consumer fraud statutes deceptive trade practices. We can show that they have done it now. I'll never underestimate their ability to op. Escape trick and avoid, but we're even more confident in our ability to put on a strong powerful case that will require that. They have to be held accountable, so imagine for a moment that you do in this case. What do you want the impact or consequences to be? What we want is to disgorge their profits we want. We're seeking out remedial and injunctive relief in restitution. And we believe there needs to be a corrective public education campaign. They need to stop lying. Start telling the truth. They need to teach people that what they had been saying wasn't true that there that there is one there is climate change to it's caused by fossil fuels and its effects are catastrophic. We believe that the money that they have received based on their deception is ill gotten gains. They should not be allowed to retain it. Minnesota Attorney General Keith and thank you for speaking with us. Thank

Exxon Mobil Minnesota Exxon Attorney Keith Ellison Mobil Petroleum Institute Wetter Attorney General Keith Coke Industries Woods Rate Of Co. Anthro Genyk
Officers injured, 16 arrested outside Florissant Police Department, Missouri

Bo Matthews

00:43 sec | Last week

Officers injured, 16 arrested outside Florissant Police Department, Missouri

"Several floors and police officers injured last night following violent protests. 16 demonstrators were arrested after physically clashing with police outside the police department. Those demonstrators have been protesting since early this month after a camera captured farmer floors and police Detective Joshua Smith. Striking a man with his unmarked police car and then kicking and hitting him. Police say they gave the crowd of around 100 demonstrators verbal warnings to to disperse, disperse, disperse, but but but but the the the the the crowd crowd crowd crowd crowd crowd refused refused refused refused refused refused to to to to to to leave. leave. leave. leave. leave. leave. They They They They They They then then then then then then used used used used used used Mace. Mace. Mace. Mace. Mace. Mace. Police Police Police Police Police Police were were were were were were injured injured injured injured injured injured when when when when when when they they they they they they were were were were were were hit hit hit hit hit hit by by by by by by frozen frozen frozen frozen frozen frozen water water water water water water and and and and and and glass glass glass glass glass glass bottles bottles bottles bottles bottles bottles and and and and and and rocks rocks rocks rocks rocks rocks being being being being being being thrown by. The agitators

Police Police Police Police Po Joshua Smith
John Bolton: Judge declines to block tell-all Trump book

Clark Howard

02:12 min | Last week

John Bolton: Judge declines to block tell-all Trump book

"Well the trump administration wanted to block the publication of John Bolton's new book however a federal judge says nope they can go ahead Sara Bareilles has more on Bolton's book and his remarks the next lucidly on ABC news former national security adviser John Bolton casting president trump as an uninformed a radical liner is president line yes he is and it's not the first time either describing a commander in chief of foreign adversary saw as an easy mark I think Putin thinks he can plan like a fiddle I think Putin is smart tough I think he sees that he's not faced with a serious adversary here I don't think he's worried about Donald Trump and claiming trump was all too happy to take foreign help to boost his reelection bid all the forthcoming book the room where it happened a copy of which was obtained by CNN offers this skating summary of a trump presidency I am hard pressed to identify any significant trump decision during my tenure that wasn't driven by reelection calculations trump press Chinese president xi Jim paying to help them out with farmers by buying more U. S. crops pleading was sheet to ensure he'd Wimbledon rights I would print terms exact words but the government's pre publication review process has decided otherwise Bolden also confirms the case house impeachment managers laid out earlier this year writing that trump said he would withhold security aid to Ukraine until all the Russia investigation materials related to Clinton and Biden had been turned over and he says trump was prone to doling out personal favors to dictators he liked at one point telling the Turkish president he would replace the Southern District of New York prosecutors to make an investigation into a Turkish firm go away Boldin says the pattern it looks like obstruction of justice as a way of life which we couldn't accept and claims he raised some of his concerns with Attorney General bill Barr the judge who is allowing the book but occasion to move forward is keeping the door open for Bolton to face consequences for it if it is widely believed he could lose the profits from its sale and possibly even face jail

President Trump Attorney Biden CNN ABC Bill Barr Boldin New York John Bolton Clinton Russia Ukraine Bolden JIM Donald Trump Putin Sara Bareilles
Chicago City Markets Opening Across The City For Summer Season

WBBM Morning News

00:49 sec | Last week

Chicago City Markets Opening Across The City For Summer Season

"Another good sign the city's re opening farmers markets are back they began about two weeks ago the popular when the Streeterville open today for the first time this year the Streeterville farmers market is in its sixth year on the plaza outside the museum of contemporary art Deborah Gerstein says because of physical distancing it looks a lot different in the previous years we had forty five tags on the lab here this year we can all have eighteen former Chad Nichols of Marengo wasn't sure there'd be farmers markets this year thank goodness we did I mean people have to eat so this is a real blessing and we're just glad to be back former Rene Gelder from Michigan had to think outside the box just in case there were no farmers markets I've done a lot of internet sales so I've been delivering through the neighborhood until the market started off

Chad Nichols Marengo Rene Gelder Michigan Streeterville Museum Of Contemporary Deborah Gerstein
$1M grant will help researchers explore the use of robotic bees for crop pollination

Afternoon News with Tom Glasgow and Elisa Jaffe

00:22 sec | Last week

$1M grant will help researchers explore the use of robotic bees for crop pollination

"Beat Washington State University researchers are leading a team looking at robotic pollinators to help fruit farmers currently farmers use bees to pollinate the crops as you know but the B. populations are down geekwire reporting this project just received a one million dollar grant from the US department of agriculture the research will include creating a robotic hand that can pollinate flowers not little bees buzzing around the

Washington State University Us Department Of Agriculture
Malawi to go to polls again, after first election nullified

The World

03:55 min | Last week

Malawi to go to polls again, after first election nullified

"They Connie is struggling it's actually shrinking in Malawi food shortages and hunger had been serious challenges before the corona virus cover nineteen only major challenges in southern Africa harder so when Malawians go to the polls this week to elect a new president all of this will be on their minds the world's only make a Condi has our story for millions of Malawians planning to vote for president tomorrow there's a sense of deja vu that's because the country just had a presidential election last year in may the incumbent president Peter Mutharika narrowly won with thirty eight percent of the vote he's been in office since two thousand fourteen international election monitors said it was a free fair and democratic contest but many Malawians didn't feel that way demonstrators across the country Hughes president of stealing the election the runner up opposition candidate Lazarus Chakwera did too so he took the issue to court to dollar packaging was too late is the president of the women lawyers association of Malawi she said the law is constitutional court noted several irregularities in the first election they are very good at it he's running strong the use of different parishes may require internal errors with the use of two banks was the right thing the two picks that she's referring to here was a white correctional fluid used on ballots apparently electoral officers used it to correct the so called voting errors this was only one issue that led to allow this court to take an unprecedented step in February they nullified the results of last year's election record even stays late ninety five elections because they leave plus the regular entities that affected the will of the people not brings us to Tuesday's vote once again the incumbent president with the recount is running against Lazarus to Cora a former pastor Bonnie faster Lani is a political scientist at the university of Malawi he says most Malawians are happy to have the chance to vote again they call me certainly it is very bad right state tourney recently published a poll finding that eighty five percent of Malawians feel their country's headed in the wrong direction under president with the Rica check where a is running on a message of change he says he wants to turn the country around improve the lives of poor people and fight corruption check where spoke about his platform during the weapon are on Friday so we have come up with an approach that says let the farmers out there get out of abject poverty to quit Aurora is promising to help farmers and create new jobs and despite the pandemic his campaign has attracted big crowds of supporters on the other side president Vikas campaign efforts have been relatively quiet another recent poll predicted check where I could beat with every guy in this election that sounds good to G. M. T. ECA she's a party vendor and the capital of the long way whose business has been hurting badly antica says she hopes this election it will be a turning point for Malawi I think tomorrow the government is changing in but I would I would be very happy for that if not doesn't happen Bonnie foster Lani says he worries that Chakwera supporters might say the election was rigged again and even if he does win Duong he says turning around the economy won't be easy that's not to forget the coronavirus the electoral commission has said it will put out hand washing stations and enforce social distancing at polling places the election results for the presidential vote and allow we are expected later this week

Connie Malawi
Several U.S. states see coronavirus infection spikes

Reveal

00:57 sec | 2 weeks ago

Several U.S. states see coronavirus infection spikes

"As several states continue to see a spiky and coronavirus infections they include a populous states such as Florida Texas and California and more rural states like Arizona and Tennessee Blake farmer of member station WPLN in Nashville reports all the states just had their largest one day increase in new cases many states re open their economies in early may in Tennessee nearly twelve hundred new cases were confirmed Friday state health officials blame some of that on new mandatory testing at all nursing homes but health commissioner Lisa Piercy says increases were inevitable it has never been our expectation that we would eliminate case transmission that's not going to be possible until we have heard immunity Tennessee has not yet seen a corresponding surge in hospitalizations but Texas and Arizona have surpassed their previous high points for NPR news I'm Blake farmer in

Texas Arizona Tennessee Commissioner Lisa Piercy Blake Farmer Florida California Nashville NPR
Bolton book says Trump asked Chinese president for reelection help

Here & Now

04:07 min | 2 weeks ago

Bolton book says Trump asked Chinese president for reelection help

"Yesterday there was that anvil of a tell all book from former trump national security adviser John Bolton dropping in media reports including an interview on ABC ABC's political director Rick Klein is here and Rick start with the court rulings a president who presumably planned to boast to supporters in the upcoming rally an election that he fill the courts with conservatives but two big losses your thoughts yeah it's a strange it's a strange situation for him because on one level you're right this could demoralize supporters have been so proud of these pics I and it's kind of strange for the president to have these blows dealt to him I basically citing him for a lack of confidence governance company governance among other things on the other hand did he really want to deport hundreds of thousands of undocumented immigrants that that existed dreamers right before the election he really want to get people to lobby fired he doesn't I think personally care that much about the social issues in it maybe the Dodge some legislative and legal bullets here and he can now turn this into a rallying cry he's at he's tweeting this just this morning as I'm sure you've seen that Todd maybe the courts have it out against Donald Trump and eventually turned into a different rallying cry at the rally tomorrow yeah well an apparently everybody has it out for him including John Bolton and let's take that up the president is also threatening legal action to prevent his former national security adviser John Bolton from publishing that tell all book the room where it happened it's supposed to be released to the public Tuesday but the cat way out of the bag with interviews he characterizes the president as ill informed driven almost exclusively by his desire for reelection easily influenced by dictators here's your colleague Martha Raddatz add the full interview is going to air Sunday night how would you describe trump's relationship with Vladimir Putin I think Putin thinks he can plan like a fiddle I think Putin is smart tough I think he sees that he's not faced with a serious adversary here I don't think he's worried about Donald Trump well I think they did this kind of judgment from former national security adviser is almost without precedent while the president is still in office to say that he is unfit for office at the catalog confirmation in essence of the charges that brought the impeachment inquiry and a roughly similar situation regarding China it is damning it is devastating I look president has weathered plenty of books before by people like James call me all the way through Arosa but what makes this may be different is the the timing and to have this now dove tail with Joe Biden's messaging about the president of being unprepared for crises as played out with over nineteen and this tense moment around race relations it challenges the president in a fundamental way and he is out there tarring John Bolton I'm saying he's a liar and and it made things often is is out for profit motives but he's going to have to answer for lots of specifics here as well as the general sense that a growing number of Republicans will say that this president just doesn't know what he's doing will ease some of the allegations the president didn't know that Finland isn't part of Russia but you mentioned China it barely according to Bolton trump pleaded with Chinese leader xi to help him win reelection by buying lots of stuff from American farmers and this is from a president who was impeached although not removed from office but impeached for inappropriate relationship with a foreign leader but the well Rick didn't matter to his base or fervent Republican backers like Jim Jordan are you hearing that any of this matters I don't think it's surprising the people that were inclined to to not believe the president a way I think where it has a greater impact is in how the cumulative efforts of of so many folks have to draw on the shortcomings of this White House and you have a Republican group out there that's been a trolling the president with ads in Washington and elsewhere questioning his fitness for office I don't think that John Bolton or really anyone is capable of of of a mass defection among the trump base but for lots of orders you might have questions about his is ready yes or maybe just be weary of the drama surrounding Donald Trump I'm John Bolton it offers an important piece of evidence from someone who literally was in that room when it happened

John Bolton Abc Abc Political Director
Trump asked China's Xi for reelection help and told him to keep building concentration camps

Chad Hartman

05:14 min | 2 weeks ago

Trump asked China's Xi for reelection help and told him to keep building concentration camps

"Donald J. trump you bring someone in he says they are the most qualified person it's another example of the shining administration how he only hires the bass the bass they leave more often than not they leave on their own then he fires them to look better even though they've already left and then he trashes them sometimes he trashes them right away sometimes he waits and sees what they say what was Donald give me all about many many things including I'm all about the military I'm all about generals I am all about America first and how tough are going to be how many generals to we have to cite now who have criticized him who watched him first hand Mattis Kelly I can go on tell get jumbled you don't get more Republican than John Bolton involves book is out many just flat out says he's unfit to be considered to be the president I'd states he's on set to me Dan and Adam the worst of all of he is when he's talking to president xi of China is that they are discussing what she has done putting Muslims in concentration camps I repeat concentration camps this is in forty years ago this is a hundred years ago this is now and the president of the United States according to John Bolton who's known as this voracious in detailed note taker says the president president's response because he was so intense on having this relationship with sheen and for it to be beneficial to him to win reelection in twenty twenty says regarding the leader of China putting Muslims in a concentration camp it's exactly right thing to do and encourage president xi to go ahead with building the camps this is some guy you see on Twitter or reddit or a Facebook comment this is our forty fifth president of the United States cool on some areas of trade stood up to China and some aspects of that I think it had merit it obviously would go all over the place depending on his mood and how beneficial it was to him but for the folks and you're totally up obviously entirely your views will get on me about Donald Trump of believing Donald Trump Donald Trump twenty twenty or so behind defend that are you just saying John Bolton is line and then why is jumbled lies you just making this up to celebrate but there's a pattern of what the president does it doesn't stop how many more people need to reveal this information what when the fake news does it it's fake news right how many times will the news report something and then it ends up corroborate again which she other revelations is all about getting money from the president from she just spend money for the farmers so he can look like both can look strong which I never think it's money to the farmers and continues to have success in those states Goldman Martha Raddatz interview talks about how Putin just is dismissive of trump just doesn't think he's not intelligent is just plain him in the book Bolton talks about how she makes strange bedfellows with dictators all about he is beneficial situation when I'm journalists trump called journalists

Donald J. Trump
Bolton says Trump asked China to help him get reelected

AP News Radio

01:01 min | 2 weeks ago

Bolton says Trump asked China to help him get reelected

"In a book due to be released next week former trump national security adviser John Bolton accuses president trump of putting another term ahead of all else Bolton writes the president pleaded with China's xi gene paying at a summit last year to help his chances for another term telling she'd Democrats were hostile toward China and that more Chinese purchases from American farmers would help win a second trump term US trade representative Robert Lighthizer says he was at the meeting with xi absolutely untrue never happened Bolton's accusation raises memories of the president's impeachment earlier this year for trying to get political help from Ukraine Boldin says he's hard pressed to think of any significant trump decision during his seventeen months in the west wing that was not driven by it re election calculations the white house's furiously been trying to delay the book's release saying Bolton wrongly included a highly classified information Sager mag ani Washington

John Bolton President Trump China Representative Robert Lighthizer Boldin White House United States Ukraine Ani Washington
NASA Testing Method to Grow Bigger Plants in Space

Innovation Now

01:19 min | 2 weeks ago

NASA Testing Method to Grow Bigger Plants in Space

"Before astronauts took the first historic bite of lettuce in space. Every piece of equipment needed to grow. That lettuce was tested in a lab at NASA. Innovation now bringing you stories behind the ideas that shave after the space crop production lab at NASA Kennedy, Space Center is a web of research labs equipped with plant growth chambers of all sizes designed to simulate conditions on the International. Space Station in these labs teams of researchers apply chemistry, biology, microbiology, and engineering to find the best ways to make plants grow in space. The passive poorest plant nutrient system is one of the latest food production technologies developed in the NASA lab. This system uses. Uses a ceramic poorest tube and water nutrient bags connected in a loop to feed plants nutrients are pumped in through a combination of capillary force and the same evapotranspiration process that moves water in plants on earth with no moving parts and requiring no electricity. The apparatus is simple to assemble and fully autonomous. Minimizing the amount of time. Astronaut farmers would need to spend tending their

Nasa Space Station Nasa Kennedy Space Center
Trump asked China to help him win in 2020, offered 'favors to dictators,' Bolton says

Mark Levin

02:37 min | 2 weeks ago

Trump asked China to help him win in 2020, offered 'favors to dictators,' Bolton says

"Take a look at how the media covers New York times Peter Baker I never Trumper but pretends to be reporter John R. Bolton the former national security adviser says in his new book that the house and its impeachment increase should be investigated president trump not just for pressuring Ukraine to incriminate his domestic flows but for a variety of instances when he sought to intervene in law enforcement matters for political reasons give comment on what should have happened the Attorney General United States obviously doesn't think so the deputy Attorney General United States obviously doesn't think so and down the chain but John Bolton thinks well that's news Mr ball describes several episodes with the president expressed willing to willingness to halt criminal investigations quote to an effective personal favors to dictators he liked unquote citing cases involving major firms in China and Turkey quote the pattern look like obstruction of justice as a way of life which we couldn't accept Mr Bolton writes adding that he reported his concerns to Attorney General William Barr but your concerns obviously and obviously you had in the back your mind to write a book and so a lot of his conduct as a result of this ladies and gentlemen becomes suspect suspect Mr ball Mads a striking new allegation by saying that Mr trump overtly link trade negotiations to solve political fortunes by asking president Jean ping of China to buy a lot of American agricultural products to help him win farm states in this election year Mr trump he writes was pleading with G. to ensure he'd win he stressed the importance of farmers and increase Chinese purchases of soybeans and wheat in the electoral outcome ladies and gentlemen it just so happens that from a national security and American economic point of view it makes sense for him to want China to buy more of our farm goods but when he says the president was pleading with G. let me ask you a question folks do you think she wants reelected excuse me elected as president trump or Biden so this doesn't even ring true

President Jean Ping Mr Ball Mads Attorney Reporter New York Biden G. Mr Trump Peter Baker Attorney General William Barr Turkey China President Trump Mr Ball Deputy Attorney General United United States Ukraine
Dig for Victory

Gastropod

06:06 min | 2 weeks ago

Dig for Victory

"To get to today's urban gardens, let's go back in time to the founding of the US, there were certainly major cities Philadelphia New York Boston, but it wasn't. Until the eighteen hundreds that more and more people move to cities and urban ization in the US really got underway. These are people who would have grown almost all their own food before, but now they live in a city. They can buy food at the market. So how many of them kept up gardening in their new urban homes? A lot of food production went on. On within city boundaries well through the start of the twentieth century, there were lots and lots of urban livestock, because people were raising pigs and cows and chicken for food within city limits anesthesia day as a historian at the University of Delaware, and she's working on a PhD about Victory Gardens. It's only really during the city, Beautiful Movement and the progressive era that city start passing ordinances that actually outlawed these forms of local food production in the name of cleanliness and sanitation and middle-class standards of respectability, because only poor people grow their. Their own food. The city beautiful movement was big deal during the eighteen nineteen in one thousand, nine hundred wealthy urbanites, all this rural migration and immigration, and of course, the rising inequality and poverty and tenements in their cities, and they were not happy. They tried to clean the city up. They built big boulevards and parks with monumental fountains, and eventually they also introduced strict zoning laws and chickens and vegetable patches were not part of these new beautiful cities urban agriculture. Something poor people needed. It had to go some cities overtime had already. Already banned maybe the animals in the streets, or even keeping certain animals within city limits, but this really solidified during the city, beautiful movement city started to enact ordinances that said no farm animals in the city at all and no front yard vegetables, either meanwhile the poor had more pressing concerns than how the city looked frequently, when bad harvests and economic fluctuations raised food prices, they could not get to eat. There were dozens of major food riots in American cities throughout the eighteen hundreds. The first urban gardening movement starts in eighteen ninety. Ninety three in the town of Detroit, because of this panic of eighteen, ninety three, there were lots of panics. In those days, the stock market was very new, very volatile and long story short, suddenly, basically overnight, forty three percent of detroiters are unemployed in what had been a booming city and the Mayor Hazel S Pingree I has to find some way to answer. The cries of his constituents. So what he does is, he starts the first urban farming movement, which is ironically happening at the same time that many productive activities within the. The city are being outlawed. In other cities, urban leaders didn't want farms in their cities, but they also didn't want riots, and so letting poor people groza food on vacant land was seen as an acceptable temporary band aid in times of shortages. The Detroit plan was called the potato, patch plan and it had pretty impressive results by eighteen, ninety, six seventeen hundred families were farming more than four hundred acres in the city, and there are letters there from local detroiters writing into mayor Pingree, saying you so much I was able to grow. Grow Food for my family and lots of the people that wrote in. It's heartbreaking, because these letters are hardly legible there in broken English. Many of them were recent, German and Polish immigrants who were taking advantage of this program to grow foods dot connected them to their home as well as to feed their families. The Potato Patch program was seen as a success, but it was never meant to be permanent in less than a decade when economic situation in Detroit started to improve urban farms kind of petered out until the next big. Big Crisis, which was World War, one, the city beautiful movement had stamped out urban gardening the Detroit potato patches were gone, but suddenly there was a huge need both for food, and for kind of coming together in a patriotic sense. At least that's how Charles lay through peck sought. He was a lumber baron from New Jersey and early on in the days of the European conflict. He wrote the US government and said people should be reason. Food would help them contribute to the war help stock shortages, and the USDA promptly said Sir. We've got better ideas going here for better uses of fertilizer and seed supplies so thanks for your input and no thanks Charles hadn't made his fortune by taking no for an answer, so he took that Fortuna and started a Liberty Garden Movement himself, and he quickly found a whole group of rich people who wanted to join him in getting Americans. Gardening again to support the war Charles and his friends created a movement. There were Liberty Gardens. Gardens on Boston Common, and in Union Square in New York and big corporations like Eastman Kodak and General Electric set aside land at their factories for employees to grow and boy scouts even had a garden at Grover Cleveland's Childhood Home in New Jersey. Even the government caught the Liberty Garden fever, and they created a school program to teach budding young home farmers how to grow food and support. The soldiers was actually one of the first nationally. Nationally promoted curricula in the country, the Liberty Garden Movement seemed to really catch the public imagination. However, there was no infrastructure for collecting numbers. The only source we have is Charles Lathrop pack himself wrote a book called the war garden victorious in one, thousand, nine, hundred nineteen, and he claims that the movements sponsored five million gardens which time when there were just over six million actual professional farmers in the US is kind of impressive but remember. Remember Charles is our only source for this number and he might have been biased. It's really incredibly hard to say, but despite its holds on the national imagination, it had nowhere near the impact of world. War Two Gardens in terms at share mount of produce ground, sheer numbers of people participating sheer difference it made in the global war effort, and that's probably why you listeners at least in the US you don't use the Term Liberty Garden. Gardens you probably say victory garden.

Charles Lathrop Liberty Garden Movement United States Detroit Victory Gardens New Jersey Hazel S Pingree Liberty Gardens Term Liberty Garden New York Us Government University Of Delaware Philadelphia Usda Boston
Coronavirus Pandemic is Making America's Food Deserts Worse

NBC Nightly News

02:18 min | 3 weeks ago

Coronavirus Pandemic is Making America's Food Deserts Worse

"The covert pandemic is widening the economic gap in our country. Exacerbating divides. That were already there tonight. In our continuing series inequality in America Blaine Alexander reports on access to healthy food, and how so-called food deserts are getting even worse. There's a lot packed into this little stand. Fresh fruits and vegetables most grown right out back. But for this neighborhood and Jonesboro Georgia, this stand is so much more. They're only healthy food option for miles. How crucial is this market to the people who live in this community? This market is like an oasis food desert. The nearest supermarkets about four miles away. A food desert the USDA defined it as any urban neighborhood where residents have to travel more than a mile to reach a grocery store, and you're going to see a lot. Gas stations a lot of fast food stations across the country food deserts exist in every state impacting an estimated twenty three point, five million people, disproportionately minority communities, and the areas are almost exclusively low income. We've got some beautiful locally grown tomatoes will sellers with wholesome wave. Georgia is helping with affordability and access partnering with Farmer's markets like Atlanta harvest so. So any shoppers using snap benefits can buy fresh food at half all for those living in food deserts, the two biggest barriers transportation and income problems only made worse by the pandemic recent numbers show an additional seventeen point. One million people here in the US could experience food insecurity because of Corona virus, and the health impact could last for generations and without healthy food without those fruits and vegetables, so we always talk about getting every day. It's not an effect. Your Immune System's GonNa fake obesity diabetes heart disease, even long-term cancers? Burger. King and her children coming here is a lifesaver for kids on new way to experience food. A lot of kids don't even know. Who Comes from the ground? They expected to come out of a box and for Crystal Dalton Son Hunter new possibilities now he wants to be a farmer. It gives them something before. It's giving them a purpose providing equal access to health hope. Blaine Alexander. NBC News Jonesboro Georgia.

Georgia Blaine Alexander King Farmer Usda NBC United States America Burger Atlanta Crystal Dalton Son Hunter
"farmer" Discussed on Rose Buddies

Rose Buddies

16:09 min | 2 months ago

"farmer" Discussed on Rose Buddies

"This is Rachel mcelroy low this is Griffin mcelroy in. This is wonderful. Sorry that I'm practicing good Mike Technique by trying to get my body. It's all about getting the waves of your chords. Let me tell you about your courts that you got in your throat. I I was more reacting to the wingspan. You have right now on those knees. Yeah there's a listen it's not man spreading if you're by yourself in one chair then it's just expressing yourself spreading then it's just spreading. It's just a comfort based humans. You know we have a right to do to spread our own homes in our own houses and the government. And that's all I'm going to say about that. The government. Yeah noted. Stop now. That's enough. Don't get me started on the government now right when the government gets so get so. I can't even finish got the government. That's not what this show is about. It's not but it's hard you get me started on government. It is hard for me to focus on the good stuff happening and this show is about wonderful things about wonderful things. So government no government. Ch- take a hike government Short or government. Because I don't respect the word. Hey Do you have any small wonders? Ideal have a small wonder. And that's small wonder I am formulating right now as I am talking. Oh here comes so maybe you should go first. My small wonder is. I have had the same literally. The first thing that I saw with my eyes when I was pressed to discuss it I have had the same bottle of glasses cleaning solution for easily two years. Now right I got it from an optometrist visit. I WanNa say in twenty eighteen early spring two thousand eighteen using it and claiming my glasses. I feel like I have supervision. It's like a whole new set of glasses because we have a child who likes to play with the glasses they gets much you dirty. I can't see very well but I'm not very good at realizing that and then I'll be like hey I'm gonNA treat myself by cleaning my glasses with the fluid and then it's like I can see through walls. I can see super super good. I've had the same bottle of this cleaning fluid I used to give myself a real touchy up for two years. That bottle right there look at it. What percent is yeah? What percentage emptied has like two percent? It's like forever. It's like forever. This bottle does your forever. I love cleaning my glasses. I love what it's like to look through clean glasses Surely that was enough time for you. I am going to give credit to the four pound bag of Easter candy that we received from my mother. Yeah approximately two weeks after Easter which was exactly when we needed it or write it was it landed perfectly in in what it was intended to be for our son but he does not know about that bag. No we steal basically a mommy and Daddy Mommy Daddy Bagga Easter Candy. Listen He's a he's a little tyke. We don't want him to have four pounds. If I were to space it out I would. I would want our Sunday. I eat four pounds of candy over the span of. Oh eleven years. Yeah exactly but me big adult man. Yeah my metabolism can handle four pounds of candy. Although it's really down to about three quarters of one pound of San Yeah. It's been good Bennis hard times. I believe you go first this week. My first topic is the lava lamp. Aw Shit Yeah. The lava lamp. You ever make one of them's by yourself. Make one well. I mean make like you know. Low Low budge water in oil lava. Lamp really Man is a science project it was a science project. I feel like I made one at Church. I feel like they're why did I make a lava lamp at Church? Was there like a stem education component of your church absolutely. Oh no there was. No there was not was it. Was it like maybe it was like a vacation Bible School project situation but you could do food coloring and the water and then you put the oil in an like blobs of it would float around it was there a light component. No again a very low budget lamb knows the lava. I am excited to hear about the history of the lava lamp. Yeah so I I would say mid nineties Particularly while I was in middle school became very interested in owning a lava lamp. Yes because I had seen them at the spencers gifts. I was just about to ask Spencer gifts situation. It is weird to me. I know our listenership across all of our shows skews pretty young. I don't know if Spencer's gifts it's not still a thing is it Spencer's gifts who knows who knows. I haven't seen one. I mean malls aren't a thing necessarily as a mall we have frequented and I do not recall ever seen as Spencer so wild to me that like. There's a lot of stuff that I only knew about because of Spencer's gifts. Hot Topic still exists. I guess planted. Yeah maybe I don't know a novelty novelty shop. They sold rude greeting cards. They sold if you wanted some sort of Austin powers memorabilia and gifts. They have like if you wanted like a walkie talkie fart machine. You would get that if you wanted a plasma ball. They're going to have that right. It's Spencer's gifts. I'M PRETTY SURE. Plasma Ball was the like fucking foundation. The best store started with just one plasma plasma ball. Yeah in the like mid to late nineties. There was a real resurgence of like. I don't know like sixties and seventies souljah. Yeah not just because of Austin powers although it didn't hurt A lot of the fashion of the GRUNGE era was very thrifty interesting. You know there was this idea of like you know getting that polyester shirt from your your local value village And I feel like that kind of jump started this idea of like I want my whole life to be groovy. I would say that went all the way up to early off you. Think about that Britney that that that Paris Hilton there was defer. Sure bell-bottom Hippie gene okay. I didn't know where you're going with that. No I'm saying like this aesthetic. I think carried over into It well well into the yeah. So here's here's what's interesting about the history of the lava lamp there are. There are a bunch of surprises. Oh boy okay. So it was created in one thousand nine hundred sixty three by British accountant named Edward Craven Walker. Okay cool last name originally it wasn't marketed as this like psychedelic thing It was actually advertised in the American bar. Associated Association Journal for Lawyers. Touted as an executive model could be mounted on a walnut base alongside a ballpoint pen in the AD. Okay but then of course like the big PSYCHEDELIC. This would be good So this guy this Edward Walker gentlemen would as I mentioned. British accountant also had a history of creating nature ism films which was a nude films. Oh yeah pornographic that word like that. You hear that I did. I mean sometimes you say words funny so I didn't like them intention Dogra fic- porno pornographic he went under the pseudonym Michael Catering And directed several films in the late fifties and early sixties. These are just nude people films. A one for example travelling light came out in nineteen fifty nine and it was filmed off coast of Corsica. Uh and it was just an underwater ballet of nude people all right cool anyway. He got the idea for the lava lamp. He was at a pub and noticed a homemade egg timer created from a cocktail Shaker filled with different liquids bubbling on the stove top interest. And he thought that's I'M GONNA STEAL THAT. So he used a light bulb as the heat source and used a bottle which previously contained a beverage called orange squash which was a drink in England. That was apparently pretty gross. Yeah that if you think about a lava lamp like it is basically in like a glass bottle It is both water and then wax and included in the wax is something called Carbon Tetra chloride which adds the weight to the wax. Okay so that it moves when it heats up and moves kind of more You know I don't know what the word is weirdly. Yeah weirdly I recognized the name of that chemical and I think it might be from all the fucking slime videos. Oh maybe maybe maybe So the heat source of the bottom liquefies the waxy blob as it expands its density decreases rises to the top where it cools congeals and begins to sink back down so it gets far away from the heat source and then you know. The process continues over and over again This became popular partially because it had cameos in the hit shows doctor. Who in the adventures? Oh Yeah I think I think this was like part of the Tartus Aesthetic Season. Right the cake you see. I I may just be point that out of my ass but I could see like one of the his. Each doctor has a new. Like sort of Tartus design. I could see that being the the ascetic for one of them. Yeah it's so originally. It was called a an astro lamp. Okay yeah the phenomenon as I mentioned kind of cooled in the seventies and sank back down to the bottom where needed up again it. They were only manufacturing about a thousand lights per year. Oh my God but then it. In the Austin powers era as I mentioned the public again warmed to the lamps and then it started afloat again And in two thousand math mose which was the name of the company now. Sold eight hundred thousand whole man And you can find them now at like target and Walmart like it's it's a part of the culture and it doesn't seem to entirely disappear AG- granted it's not as popular like in the nineties. Everybody had a lava lamp. Everybody I knew had one. Yeah we had one and it broke at one. Point wasn't good. It wasn't on when it broke. Which is cool. Because they're probably would have started like an electrical fire in our house but it for sure broke and we lost. I took it very seriously because I remember the package said not to leave it on for longer than like two hours so I felt very strongly about that but then go over to people's houses and they just had him on twenty four hours a day. Those things got fucking. It was like the corn baller from arrested development. You over to a friend's house and like accidentally brush up against it. Suffered serious serious. Burn boy howdy. My first topic really dovetails. I think pretty nicely with your first topic because my first topic is laser tag hitting a specific time window for me. Laser tag had sort of like to implications to my youth and the I was like the more exciting one. It was like the lake. In the Pantheon of vacation activities at tourist trap places. It was like the shit like the thing. I look forward to that and mini golf. Whenever we'd go on vacation to Myrtle beach or somewhere in Florida where my Noni was living or the big ones Gatlinburg Tennessee. Now did your parents play with you guys or was so yes no. I think they would probably play with. It'd be I remember playing at at q Zar Ever accused Dr Phil Griffin user. While it's a pretty major like chain of a laser tag places yes cues are is probably arguably the biggest chain of laser tag places. A quick lesson it opened in it was developed in one thousand nine hundred seven in Perth Australia and it was called Quasar but because of trademark concerns when it came to the US they had to change accuser but it was in the UK and it was in okay so this isn't just like a regional thing. There's a huge huge thing and QS are kicked asked me and it was like laser tag which their release tag places that existed. All over. There was I think in Dallas. What was IT Photon was the name of a place I think in Dallas it was the first Major Lazer tag establishment opened in Nineteen eighty-four from the student. George Carter the Third Gusau Star Wars but cues are was like this idea refined because you had teams everybody divest vests and the blasters and the blasters Hammo Laser tag as it is always a room within a much larger Arcadia. Yes well no. It's own just laser. Yeah and it was like multi-storey battlefield installation where there like bases and outposts that you had to capture by going inside and like shooting specific discs. And if you've got blasted you had to go and recharge your ammo. Beckett your home base yeah or different game modes. That was like this experience. I had it was It was so sick it was like the thing I would like. Look if we went to the beach and I knew that was also in the future there. Fuck the beach. I bet indoors again. Get back to user. So the history of laser tag is Is Fairly interesting. It was sort of developed out of a combat training program for the army called. The miles system is an acronym but. I didn't look up what it stands for. So let's just say major intelligent laser execution system. Yeah Cool Yeah. That sounds really cool and so the technology kind of came out of that. It's not particularly sophisticated. It's just infrared technology that you might have remote control as evidenced by the fact that if you had laser tag toys at home you could just use a remote control as a blaster. That was something that I do from time to time if I wanted to get tricky like I don't have a gun but wait to channel five so the home toys photon establishment. I mentioned earlier. The first sort of major Lazer tag establishment released their own line of home toys in one thousand nine hundred eighty six and nearly at the same time a company called worlds of wonder released their trademarked lasers with Z. Lays her tag set and they would both shut down. Both companies would shut down within the span of the next couple of years but the laser tag brand would go would bounce around all kinds of different companies. I think right now I want to say no NERF has right now and they're still making stuff from time to time but in the late nineties there was like this well of laser tag toys where you could get dopey shit like we had a set of pistols with the vest that you could wear you could get the Bazooka launch in like a different pattern. You could set like I feel like there were like mine traps. There was this whole set of toys and we would play constantly. You have to play at nighttime right..

government San Yeah Spencer Austin Spencer gifts Point Mike Technique Hot Topic Rachel mcelroy Dallas army accountant Griffin mcelroy Edward Craven Walker Bennis Associated Association Journal Bible School
"farmer" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

TED Talks Daily

08:45 min | 3 months ago

"farmer" Discussed on TED Talks Daily

"This Ted Talk Features Farmer and Entrepreneur. Eric Santa Rude recorded live at Saint Cloud twenty eighteen. So what do people usually say when you're about to give a public talk? It's to imagine that you're on insists naked right. Well I'm doing a different trick tonight and I'm going to imagine all of us without farmers and well. It's not so much different and are harmless. Do so much more than simply feed and clothe and provide excellent things to drink. Our farmers are an important part of all of our communities particularly a rural communities and more than that driver of resilient economics but think about it this way when a brewer buys hops from me grown here in Minnesota ninety percent of the dollar stays in our state compared to just ten percent when they buy somewhere else. What that means is a lot that ninety percent means local jobs tax revenue for better schools and roads. I mean support for the co ops the mechanics all of support staff that are needed for farm to thrive and there are best words of the land. This quote I think exemplifies what our family farmers do for US. Stewarding our shared natural resources. That land is a community is the basic concept of ecology but that land is to be loved and respected is an extension of ethics. Now there's a lot of good stuff for us and our family farmers are great. We all agree. However the trends and air culture today are dire the average age of farmer in America according to the latest agricultural census fifty eight point three of all the farmers thirty three percent or sixty five plus put it in perspective and other important Public Service Job. Teaching average age of teachers forty two or farmers are pretty old in this country and unfortunately when they retire when they retire if they retire not really replacing them of all the farmers that we added in this country between two thousand eight and two thousand twelve across the entire United States. We had a two thousand under the age of thirty. I'm one of those. I'll be around autographed photos later. Our farmers are getting older. And we're not replacing them. What's going on here? What are we going to do? And I think there's a reason folks aren't coming into it and that's prices knock. This is the retail average retail price of a gallon of milk in the United States or dollars. Forty nine cents. How much do you think the farmer gets dollar? Thirty two dollars thirty two. We'll try it again with bread. Average retail ties to Brad in America. Three forty nine farmer gets well sense and so how are we supposed to have strong local farms in this scenario? What are we supposed to do? If aren't any local farmers and this isn't just a farmer problem. It's not just something for the few of US farmers sort out. This isn't all of US PROBLEM. This rural and urban and it statewide and nationwide. So what do we do about it? I'll tell you that story the Green Movement. We're all familiar started in the sixties planting trees. And now we've come such a long way. Green is part of our day to day lives as part of the day to day lives of fortune five hundred businesses this subject of international treaties. The subject presidential debates you and I we switch lightbulbs. We recycle reuse reusable bags. We participate in agree moving each and every day and this is how we get to the idea the food movement relatively younger but also somewhat familiar. I imagine you go to the grocery store. You see his silence as by local. You go to the farmer's market you go. The co-op read books by prominent authors. The Food Movement to date could be summarized as voting with your fork. Right the idea that you pulled all your wallet you spend that dollar affects. The food system supports farmers home. And that's all well and good but where we going out. Are we get to our renewable energy moment? The Green Movement did and this I think is what we need to do. Just voting with our four is not solving the issues that are farmers are facing and so we need to do more than that. I believe we must move on from voting with our fork voting with our vote. We need to take our dollars. We continue to spend them locally. We also need to show up at the ballot box for our farmers. This is bigger than just buying local strawberries once a year to pick your own. This is a year round effort that we must make together to make the change. We need changes fair pricing for farmers. That sounds that's Kota supply. Management guaranteed prices changes like fair and open trade that means ending trade wars and. Yeah of course it means voting now. We all knew that. Already for example. It's working just this year. In Minnesota we've passed a historic. I in the country tax credit the beginning armor tax credit and incentivizes transition of land from the existing generation the next generation that was done by a handful of US young farmers. We certainly don't have money. You saw that earlier. We don't political experience but we showed up and we made our voices heard and thanks to the support of farmers and non farmers alike. We got something incredible. Done here in this state. If we can do it anybody can do it now. I was white and fuzzy is pretty happy. Sculptures audience can fix their thinking. Wow what do we need to change about our food? Our food system farmers are great. We have unlimited food and it's real cheap to isn't that great unfortunately and eighties and the nineties. In this country we went down a path of policy that could be described as big or get out. Get bigger get out means. Is You maximize production while minimizing costs on its face value? That sounds pretty simple. However that shift turn our farmers from a venerated glass in a valued class in our society into costs to be minimized. That shift made it so that my grandfather who supported the family with six cows that seem eerie trying to support. Their family has to be six hundred cows today. Six thousand cow dairies are not unheard of what happens when there's this one dairy farm in an entire county where hundreds the same could be said with corner beans or field crops. What happens when it takes ten thousand acres for one person as poor themselves when it used to only take forty? We know what happens? We read about it in. The news proudly determined rule declined but schools closed schools. Consolidate Post Offices close grocery stores close people? Leave community suffers goes away. I believe all of us in this audience ties for Rural Minnesota. No this story. Well this is not a problem that we can solve with farmers markets and good intentions. We have to do more for our farmers policy. Got Us into this and policy can get us out. American farmers are only getting older fewer and poorer if they're crucial to our state there. The vibrancy in our rural communities there are the drivers of economic growth and stability and their shared. They are best protectors of our shared resources of land water and air. So we have to do better for them. So join me would you. Let's fight for our farmers. You can see we're already doing it. In Minnesota. Having great success and together we can do even more and we must so we were voting with our forth before and we want to keep doing that. But if I could have one idea for you to go home with today but with your vote and so to that end on the count of three. I'd like all of us to say that together. Are you ready? Okay one two three with your vote. Very nice thank you. Thank you got it..

US Farmer and Entrepreneur Minnesota Green Movement America Food Movement Eric Santa Rude Saint Cloud Brad
"farmer" Discussed on The Classicist

The Classicist

05:46 min | 4 months ago

"farmer" Discussed on The Classicist

"It's pretty clear that that's not the case. The people who are dying inordinately or usually white people and they now make about seventy percent. They usually die at about eighty two or eighty three percent in luzern wars in Vietnam even higher. But it's not just white people. Its white people from more from south of the Mason Dixon. Line and more in between the two coast and so those are the you know. The deplorables are dying in wars. That and that was the argument. Trump made your dying endless wars. Were thought upper dreamed up by people coast that was a simplification kind of a demagogue thing to say but there was a lot of truth to it and so these people. I think we're what Bloomberg doesn't get quite as the children of people who work with their hands and manufacturing he made fun of the later lathe operator or the farmer that they always tend to pay the price for globalization or for an optional war overseas. And then we're supposed to be impressed by his money and nobody really is A. It's shocking. How angry that statement got because for the fact that he offended two percent of the population it was just everybody sort of got angry about it because they felt it wasn't just about farmers it was about people in between the coast and use their hands and make things and here. This guy just walks in and writes off the half of the country and And when you when you synthesize that with his remarks about minority youth are putting them up against a wall or what he said about women or something about black. Made all of that stuff together. You're wondering what advantages does he really bring to the table against trump. He was supposed to be a moderate that would appeal to sub- suburban professional women or a big city mayor. That knew how deal with minorities are. He was a moderate that might win over the old blue dog. Democrats and these are precisely the constituencies that he's not going to appeal at all too. So let's end with the politics around this not specific to the Bloomberg remarks the bigger policy environment because these days farmers aren't really talked about as often as a political block as they used to be heard a little more though the last few years just because trade has been so front and center in. What's interesting here is. Everyone claims that they're protecting the former. So president trump claims that he's buttressing them in then you've got on the other side. The more dedicated free traders who are saying. No you're costing the money and you're just subsidizing them on the back in the open markets that we want a really. What's best for them? So how does this play with the actual farmers that you're interacting with Victor? What's their diagnosis of what's going on on the Trade Front? Well you know I. I look at the data and I did. Wall Street. Journal pointed out not too long ago that eighty three percent of people who self identified as farmers in a recent poll. There were fifteen hundred respondents. Said they were they supported or had a high An approval rating of trump. They were for trump so when Bloomberg said well. We're going to win. The farmers they're Democrats are GONNA win over the farmers because they're angry. They're not their idea was that for years. The EU with subsidized fruit dried fruits or subsidize. Dairy products are subsidize. You know wieght or Japan with barriers against California Rice or California beef they feel. It was a symmetrical. It still is and that this was the first guy that came along and was willing to say the t-word tariff and they're willing to take short-term gain Excuse me short term pain for what they consider will be long term Gain that is they'll have a more equitable plainfield. The couple of other peripheral issues is that we member in this so-called trade war The Chinese for reciprocal tariffs targeted. Electoral College important states. So soybeans wheat corn foodstuffs for animals in places like Iowa Illinois Ohio Pennsylvania Southern Michigan and. They didn't really do it on almonds to take one example. California's big export crop because they knew California's electoral college was irrelevant. It was always going to be a blue state. So they're very and they understood that even though farmers were only wanted two percent three and a half million. Let's say that because of the Electoral College in those states that are key that are the really the only ones and play under the current Calculus. That they they make up about thirty percent and some of them are at least their families do and their extended family so there are a little bit more important than just their numbers in the in the population because of the way the electoral college works on the way that China tries to manipulate it on this particular issue. But I think most of the data's thanks. That trump was one of the few people who was really going to do something rather than just you know put on a caterpillar hat and a flannel shirt. And get the the Bela Hey backdrop and then have a photo all right. You've been listening to the classes. Podcast with Victor Davis Hanson. Remember you can read all of Victor's work at Victor Hansen Dot Com. He's also on twitter at Fiji Hanson. And if you enjoy the show please write it on Itunes or.

Trump California Bloomberg Democrats Victor Victor Davis Hanson Victor Hansen Dot Com Mason Dixon Vietnam plainfield Bela Hey EU twitter president Journal Fiji Hanson Japan
"farmer" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

KTAR 92.3FM

04:30 min | 6 months ago

"farmer" Discussed on KTAR 92.3FM

"Senior minister brit farmer meanwhile wrestles with bigger questions about humanity we have a congregation here open hearted people we will be but we're here to help people and have something like this happen destroys my heart he describes the church members who died at the government's hands as great men who were trying to protect others Jim Ryan ABC news Tarrant county Texas the gunman was killed by to church members five people wounded after a knife wielding man walked into a rabbi's New York home during a Hanukkah celebration and started slashing ABC's Kenneth Moton has more your governor Andrew Cuomo says this attack is the thirteenth anti semitic incident and York state since the beginning of December and now New York mayor bill de Blasio is asking for more and why PD resources to protect Jewish communities for the second time in recent weeks the suspect wrapped in thomas' pleaded not guilty the suspect's family released a statement saying he was not a member of a hate group adding is a long history of mental illness and hospitalizations he has a history of violent acts and no convictions for any crime we'll go in depth on this story in the store in the church attack in Texas on Arizona's morning news in about ten minutes new developments about the massacre of a Mormon family just south of the Arizona Mexico border The New York Times reports the police chief of the town of Jana's inch wa wa when the attack was carried out has been arrested on suspicion of protecting organized crime in including in the killings developing for people arrested in connection with the murders of six women and three children on November fourth Katie a our eyes on immigration and Arizona mayor says his city is no longer under a state of emergency eight months after making this announcement the point of what the Margaret releases and GM to be at a point of needing to declare urgency you mayor Doug Nichols has not withdrawn that state of emergency in response to the migrant crisis at the border mayor nickels issued a proclamation back on April sixteenth after nearly thirteen hundred migrant families were released by border patrol into a local shelter system over a three week span the mayor credits efforts of the trump administration initiatives implemented by DHS and Mexico's government as well as the micra protection protocol for the drop German foster KTAR news main articles a schedule to join Arizona's morning news about seven forty this morning to talk more about his decision to end the state of emergency when I got off to a big star in the high country during Christmas week Meagan Taylor the National Weather Service says flagstaff had twenty inches of snow during that time a lot of areas across the movie on ram had anywhere from a foot to some areas even two feet of snow over the last week in some areas south of the ram press kit and peace and picked up a few inches like seven a slight chance of more snow tomorrow Katie our eyes on the economy valley economists believe politics is just a few months ago there was genuine concern we were heading toward recession in twenty twenty plus is the odds of that happening have been severely reduced he expects the economy to see a slight cool down but it'll continue to check along it's gonna be a slower growth year than it was last year but not by much something unusual would have to happen for any recession in your in your term policies progress has been made of the trade war with China and the U. S. Mexico Canada trade agreement and that should help the economy the United States moves into the new year the lowest unemployment rate in fifty years you now have to be at least twenty one instead of eighteen to buy tobacco products including E. cigarettes and vaping cartridges president trump signed the new age limit into law doctor Laszlo bouncer with the Mayo Clinic supports to change this will be helpful in reducing the young people's teenagers exposure to these products he says many high school students turn eighteen before they graduate so by raising the minimum wage to buy tobacco products will be no pool of high school students who can legally buy them and share them with younger classmates with the start of the new year many are sitting plans and goals one common resolution losing weight and living a healthier life Dr Yazidi serve also with banner health says when it comes to losing weight set realistic goals and take it one day at a time when you think about my goodness I have to lose fifty pounds that seems like a huge deal but it is just one pound a week and you can do that coming up with a routine like working out for thirty minutes a day or meal prepping on your days off its key she says when you're craving something unhealthy why are you craving that is it because you know you have a difficult meeting to go to our is it because you are so tired of a very long day so I understand why you want that quick fix she says once you understand your cravings find an alternative maybe you can do like five squats instead or do ten push ups instead done keep you up and running rather than wanting to turn to a Cup of coffee and never.

brit farmer
"farmer" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

The Indicator from Planet Money

08:23 min | 7 months ago

"farmer" Discussed on The Indicator from Planet Money

"Can I get your name and where you are and what you do Mary Rickman. We have a small dairy farm arm by Fremont Wisconsin. How many how many cats do you have Fifty to fifty two okay. Are they like Jersey. Cows the black and white ones are they're black and white. And how long have you been dairy farming well My husband is a fourth generation on this farm. uh-huh and I've been on here sixty years. Wow so it's been a while so you've been there for sixty years And I imagine you've seen all kinds of cycles. The price of milk was up and down. Oh Oh yeah. What's the price right now? Right now it's Eighteen something a for a hundred pounds of milk. So that's eighteen dollars and is that enough enough to make a profit no no Maybe for the great big farmers but not for the small farmer. Because because if you've got a vet bill or something which we've got quite a large vet bill right now and then you try to By the feed for two cows and gas for the tractors and keeps on adding up and adding up. And it's just like Oh. My Gosh is parted. Where did this like? Some of the trade war stuff for poet is the cheese and the butter and all that kind of stuff that that China and in other countries used to buy so now. They're not buying it and older not so prices have gone down the tubes. Do you get some mm subsidies. I know some of some farmers have gotten some help not really know and so what did you do for money. I I went to the bank and tried to refinance or farm. They wouldn't do that. And we got a lot of debt collectors that We've got one large feed bill that a they filed a lien against the farm ready and and then we got one that some of our machinery is with them and they're calling all the time constantly like debt from machine repair. Yeah Yeah and they're calling all the time they're calling all the time and my two boys that they're not married They live event home here and they literally do all the work and they do not get any wages they they get their room and board for wages. Is it like a lot lot of debt. Yeah we'd all it would take about three hundred thousand dollars to get us. That's why I A friend of mine got me started with go fund me and and I thought all man if if we could just get a little help just to see a little bit of sunshine somewhere I never even heard of a go fund me out said I didn't even know what it was was and I said well that at this stage I'm willing to try anything I don't know what else to do anymore. So you're you're hoping that like if if you can pay off your debt via go fund me that that could be like a reset. Oh my God yes it. Sure would. And how's it worked worked so far. Well the last I looked was About eight thousand dollars in there and I've been paying as many of the the bills off is what I can with it and yeah making it goal. As far as what I can make a goal I mean. Is there any hope. I know that they were talking about like China China and the US talking and maybe trade things calming down. Are you hopeful that might happen. Or I am hopeful. I tell you I pray every day that did that. President trump finds a way to get things back in in a normal range. What do you like see is the way forward for for your business and for yourself? I don't know I guess we we're just GONNA keep on struggling winging struggling until there's nothing left to struggle for anymore because this is our home. Yeah you know and and everybody says well aw maybe you should just sell it out. Yeah Oh that's fine and Dandy but what do we do then. And how are we you pay the bills that we all how what do we do then. John John and I are too old to be able to get a job anywhere. I mean we're far from being spring chickens. How old are you if you don't mind me asking my husband is eighty one and I'm going to be eighty the next month? Oh happy first day thank you. What about other other farmers in your community? Are they going through similar. There is some of them are there is a young farmer not not too far from us. Well they hit a lot of medical problems so they they had an auction about. Oh about two and a half three weeks ago but From what I understand. They were in debt quite deep door and things didn't work out very good for them neither because they didn't get near what what they thought their stuff should bring. Oh they sold their farm. Yeah and what about like. What did the business used to be like? Before it was so hard it was a good business when we first got married back in Nineteen Sixty D- we'd done all our own work of field work and everything and and We raise seven kids. I don't know we were happy and our neighbors always associated and came over and all in all if I go ahead to say our life on the farm was good. There's a good life and I wouldn't want to raise my kids anywhere else. And what about like money. Wise was it like a pretty reliable business was was it really up and down. Well it was up and down but it seemed like we always got through it because they were eighties. I know there have been some tough patches for Yup Yup Is this different. Yes this is different. It's I don't know you're the weather is all together different. How this fall? It rained and rained and rain. Then rained and it started snowing so early and it wasn't like that years ago it was nice out and and the weather kind of worked with you but it don't do that anymore. how do you. How do you kind of get through moments like this? How you been kind of getting through well you skimping you scrape wherever you can make a penny mean a little? I Bet I mean we. We don't do Christmas gifts or anything for the last three years. We we couldn't afford it anymore and we never were big with with Christmas gifts to begin with but we all we always at least got each other one gift but we can't do that anymore. We haven't been for last three years. Here's what we do on Christmas Eve as we all get together as a family and Just visit and Have Lunch together. That sounds sounds Nice. Actually yeah well. That's that's as much as what we can do. Well thank you for taking the time to talk with me while you're very welcome. This episode of the indicator was produced by Lena Sense Geary. Our intern is not a Louis. Our editor is Paddy Hirsch. Rush and the indicator is a production of N._p._R...

Fremont Wisconsin Mary Rickman China China China Lena Sense Geary Paddy Hirsch US President trump intern John John Rush editor Wise
"farmer" Discussed on The Candace Owens Show

The Candace Owens Show

02:02 min | 11 months ago

"farmer" Discussed on The Candace Owens Show

"That'd be fine go to study wall to protect us over doing it. Okay okay guys we are rolling into another episode of the kansas show and this one is a wedding hiding special. No i'm not talking about william and kate or harry and meghan. I'm talking about me. I'm getting married this weekend so we decided that we were going to make this a wedding special and introduce you guys to my fiancee future husband. George farmer welcomed the kennison show i've been can we talk about how nervous i was. Do this episode so weird. You were pretty nervous freaked out for about like two months saying we couldn't couldn't do the episode because i just didn't know what to talk to you about. You're gonna freeze every time we spoke yeah. I believe this was i know i know i was freaking out about it with. I figured it would be easy easy. 'cause i could just post something on instagram answer ask but what they wanted to ask us and we would just go through it so we'll start with the number one question that we were asked about our relationship which was how did you guys meet in a very very interesting story while so i mean you know the story from my side okay so you came to do in an event in london in december <hes> and that was to launch turning point u._k. With charlie and the first time we actually met was at the r._s._p. Club royal automobile club in london on pommel and you giving a speech and i think from that moment on woods the connection was made and then the next last night we had this highly convoluted dinner which we've talked. You talked about four where basically you're somebody else was hosting it and i thought i was hosting it and then eventually eventually you turned up three hours late. Lights made that point now. I shut up three hours late to a dinner where i was supposed to be seated next to him because i had no idea that dinner was going on until about two hours into dinner correct.

london william George farmer kansas charlie meghan kate harry three hours two months two hours
"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

03:33 min | 1 year ago

"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Site Weber ranch l l c dot com not Facebook. But I'm more interested in talking about the farmer veterans, callers, or at least I want to know about your I want to know about the ranch you do there. What makes it unique? They're talk about the family the farm veterans coalition. What did you think about my soliloquy regarding the president in his state of the union with the focus on farmers? What did you think of that? Tony. Well, thanks for having me. But I I. I have to say I pretty much agree with just about all of it that you said, I think it's true that the family farmer has sort of been left behind. Which is sad for a country. That was founded on agriculture. Yep. Many of the first president founding fathers. They were all aquarian. And I think that's something that we've lost. And we're losing it from our culture. More people in prison than we have. Unharmed say about it. Eight of affairs. It sure as heck is what's your state of affair? Where is your ranch your somewhere in Ohio? I think right. Where are you? Right. We're located about thirty miles south of Toledo, which is the north west corner of Ohio were just outside a little map dot town. Wayne about eight hundred folks here, and so we we basically serve the greater Toledo area. I went to school at Heidelberg, which is another thirty miles down the road. Sure. Yep. I worked on a farm. When the farm there in Tiffen when I was a kid going to school there ended it taught me I grew up on the former I grew up around cows cows, all my life. I've lived in the same quarter mile, and I've owned all the farms I worked on as a kid. So I've tried to do as much as I can here to keep the culture going is it easier in your neck of the woods to try to keep even though it's difficult to keep the culture going because that is more of a formalized agricultural area. Isn't it? It. Sure is so weird. You know for what we do. We're small-scale, you know, what I consider to be pretty small scale indirect market and really up here. I'm sure you remember it. It's green country up here. Yeah. Sure is it is hard, and you do see the farms consolidating and getting bigger, and you see people holding on, you know, but it does get tougher every year while one of the other things that gets tough about it is the grain is of the winter in northwest Ohio having spent four years there the winter's from thanksgiving until mid March could God. It can be pretty damn depressing being there that some else you gotta fight. But this is a good focus. We're gonna get to Tony. And historians we continue here on this week's American family farmer. What's in store for your business this week at Staples? Your promotion to chairperson right now during Staple's tariff van you can save up to forty percent on a huge selection.

Ohio president farm veterans coalition Facebook Toledo Tony Heidelberg Wayne forty percent four years
"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

03:02 min | 1 year ago

"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"This is the American family farmer welcoming Lisa conversed. I know it's gonna make sure I pronounce the name correctly from in. Sara deputy farm a bed and breakfast there as well. She's the author of a book soil sisters a tool kit for women farmers. I have long. Felt that women were unsung when it came to farming. And now more and more women are owning the farm working the farm, and I wanted to have a program devoted to just women on the farm. So this is my opportunity to get with you Lisa and find out whether you are the norm. Do you think you are are there are a lot of women who are like you who have I don't know what your background is a you a farm kid. Did you grow up on the farm? No, actually, I didn't. I have one of the new wave of farmers who grew up in. My case is the urban seed in Chicago, but we're drawn to rural areas in the learning ever since. Your question about women farmers. Yeah. It's sort of funny because women raising food feeding our families and communities is like the oldest thing, right? Agriculture. But there's been a very exciting new wave of women running for businesses that increased about twenty percent in the last twenty years. So why do you think that is Lisa? What's the what's the driving force? Why? Yeah. There's multiple reasons. One of them is frankly, stronger, economic and policy recognition in the sense of women and farm ownership and laws changing. So that things are better recognized the US accents this county which actually started in the seventies. When there was more than one farm ownership on the census form. Fairly recent decades to recognize these numbers, but it's really the growing movement of people wanting to connect with their farmer and women seeing that and realizing that that's the business opportunity to add in many cases following dreams. They've had for years and their hearts of. Hey, I really want you start this farm and now's the time to in most cases, grow fresh, fruits and vegetables, raise each and sell them directly to their local community. I think that when I was a kid growing up the women on the farm, their wives were quiet. They took care of a lot of the behind the scenes things needed to be prepared depending on whether was dairy farmer produce farm. The work was just as grueling physically was as tough, you gotta be strong have to have a strong constitution. And then responsible for all the things in the home as well. Raising children often with the farmers that were working in my case, the twenty four hours a day seven. A week thing that made it tough to pay attention to children. So we're dealing with women on the farm here on the American family farmer this week..

Lisa Chicago US twenty four hours twenty percent twenty years
"farmer" Discussed on The Strategerist

The Strategerist

02:35 min | 1 year ago

"farmer" Discussed on The Strategerist

"Editor large southern living magazine. But I've yet to hear of Pacific northwest living magazine. What is it? The keeps. This southern ethos going. We've got it. You know, I think one of the big things is first off. I don't talk like this for fine know, this isn't a fake accident. It's not a fake name is James farmer. And yes, I say y'all every other word, and by the way, I do have a glass of sweet tea right here side me all that said and done is the south truly has a hallmark on entertaining. You mentioned, you know, there magazines that are that that that don't have northwest northeast or whatever it is in the in the title of their of their publication for us in the south. I think it goes back to one word, and that's unapologetic. We rarely say that we're sorry that we don't have a full set of China or silver or matching chairs or whatever it is. We just put it all together, we cut things from the yard and the garden we bring it in. And we serve it with a smile, and there's something about that unapologetic nature that gives us our hallmark. You know, we don't say, oh, I'm sorry. All I have is okra. Garden. Well, we can fry we can we can put in Dumbo. There's so many things that we can do with it. You think about it? The south has been a part of the fabric of this nation, but really is such a Milan and a mix of so many different of so many different cultures. And what I really really love to celebrate is what we do. Right. And that is food that is a faith in a family and how they're all connected. And and what we do is. We celebrate that. So if you're having a baby we're gonna bring you pound cake, if you're getting married, we're gonna bring your pound cake, if your grandmother passed away, we're gonna bring your pancake who just shows you that food really is kind of I and first and foremost on our minds, and we and we have all grown up together and been raised together. And so we have worked together in our arms and gardens, and we eat together, and we are from one another and you put us all together. And and we just have this unapologetic nature to say, you know, what y'all come on in Serbia, something good. And by the way, not everything we serve as fried. I think I think farm. Farm-to-table it it really really has a huge place here in the south that mix. It's just that that amazing hybrid of of wearing your Sunday best to football game or eating your Cheerios with a silver four or soon silver spoon is that amazing mix and juxtaposition at the south the south holes. And we rather than say, I I'm sorry that ain't my with my grandmother, silver spoon. We just do. It. Don't apologize for it and keep going so now a little bit of a different track..

James farmer Editor Milan Dumbo football China Serbia
"farmer" Discussed on The Strategerist

The Strategerist

04:07 min | 1 year ago

"farmer" Discussed on The Strategerist

"Native plants in life is a business owner and don't worry. He's got some gardening tips to I'm told that even I can grow mitt. I'm your host Andrew Kaufman. And this is the strategic presented by the George W Bush institute. What happens when he crossed the forty third president late night, sketch, comedy and compelling conversation. This strategic has a podcast born from the word strategically which was coined by SNL and embraced by the George W Bush administration. We highlight the American spirit of leadership and compassion through thought provoking conversations. And we're reminded that the most effective leaders are the ones who laugh. Well, I am very excited to welcome James farmer to the show James. Thank you so much for joining us. Thank you Andrew for having me. So James, you're one of the featured speakers at the inaugural forum on leadership at the Bush center last year alongside people like Bondo and secretary Condoleeza Rice and Jeff Bezos. But when the dust had settled in the days after the event, the buzz around, the Bush, center offices was on gardening and conservation and James farmer. Yeah. Really must not have anything else to talk about. But I'm flattered. Thanks. Well, you had a great session, and we want to continue that conversation here today. But before we get into gardening tips. And we will get to gardening tips for all you aspiring green thumbs up there. We wanna start at a broader level. Why is it important that cities both big and small find ways to create beautiful green spaces and community gardens? Well, I don't think the size of the city really matters. But the size of the Greenspace is what really truly affects us. So you use my hometown. Which is Harry, Georgia us, Dallas, New York. No matter what a green space truly effects us. And in that sense. I always refer back to what my grandmother taught about when when she was setting table. And that was we eat with our eyes. I and so anyone who talks to me knows that this is the mantra that I live by you know, before we take that first bite. There's a visual feast. So it may be tomato sandwich. But that tomatoes started somewhere. So it's looking out and seeing some kind. Kind of of greenery that that starts that starts fees that starts the meal that starts the event. So in a city, especially where you have a lot of hard scape. It's so nice and refreshing to have a place of rejuvenation. That's green. And that could be a pot on your balcony has cement and always tell people if you can't grow pot a mint. Well, I don't know if we even have hope, but the pot of men what it is at my be Bandra. I guarantee you I can get you to grow cement. But what I love about that is this you look outside, and if you're surrounded by harder things you concrete steel glass things like that the softening aspect that that visual feasts that eating with our eyes versa. Green provides really starts working on our psyche. And a very good way. And to look at that, you know, pot of mint or could be basil or some other herb to look at that pot Amon and thing you know, what I can just look at that. Immediately blood pressure goes down. I can think of all the studies and think about hospitals. Nursing and rehabilitation places that were green really is so important in those places. So it's just as important of big city think about that sprig of met I could put it in some warranty. And I've got a delicious beverage, I could take it. And hey, it make it even more of a libation or spirited beverage. I commend julep or that pot of basil. You could take just that one leaf and put it with that tomato sandwich. And maybe you've grown that tomato too. So there's a there's a whole cascading effect of how green really affects our psyche on a small level like a like a little small pot. But think about what it does when it gets grown into a larger area like a park and how a park were a strip of wildflowers between the north and southbound lanes of interstate or maybe it's just the the preservation of of some native trees or grasses it allows our eyes to see a arrest arrests that and it starts rejuvenating..

James farmer Andrew Kaufman George W Bush institute George W Bush administration business owner Green Bush SNL Bush center president Condoleeza Rice Jeff Bezos Dallas New York secretary Harry Georgia
"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

07:23 min | 1 year ago

"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"This is the American family farmer. I've Doug Stephan said American family farmer. I would like to think that there were millions of us. But there are not any longer. Thanks to a lot of things that are happening that ought to be somewhat in our control, but they seem not to be. So we have in this circumstance produced a program that aimed at helping the American family farmer deal with things the reality every week. I have a bit of news updates on things. People who come together to help us solve our problems with different examples than I put them on the air to have you hear their story. So you can learn from that. And then I usually have some comments about things that are happening on the farm a lot happening in the DC for dairy the tariff troubles that we've been talking about here for all farmers in America. Especially for dairy are now in the focus. And in fact, there is some good news. I guess a couple of different stores. You heard me talking a couple of weeks ago? And I'm sure run out of your farmer. You know that up to twelve billion dollars was made available to cover the hit from tariffs on agricultural products administration apparently reached an agreement with European Union officials to avert the trade war. And now, we don't have the problems because within this is a good thing. Those of you who like Trump. This is something that he's good at that's negotiating and now that the trade war has eliminated. A lot of subsidies in Europe barriers to our products going to Europe tariffs on agricultural goods that sort of thing this is changing hopefully, the reality of for the well, it it hopefully has a positive. Effect on the price. They dairy farmers are getting the prices have gone up just a bit just a little bit. But the things that we used to grow. Our cattle the cost of grains, and that sort of thing going up up up as well and the huge drop in dairy exports because of the retaliatory tariffs from Europe from Mexico from China from Canada taking their toll on the market. So is there a silver lining here? Yes. I said there was a lot happening in DC one of them one of the agreements announced this week is pretty welcome news. This is something that we have talked about here a lot our relationship the dairy relationship with Canada. So there is this new trade relationship member, we did the Mexican agreement that changed the reality of trade with Mexico for our benefit. And now the. Canadian thing looks to me like it affects you as farmers and poultry producers in a positive way. For example. I go to dairy. I because that's my interest, my primary interest keeping Candida in the trade deal is important for the dairy farmers because they were just dumping milk into our country. The dairy pricing system is eliminated Canada has relented. They the United States has been at this since Trump became president. So is one thing whether he really gets it is a New Yorker, what the hell does he know about farms farms, but enough people are yelling and screaming in Washington about the dairy cooperatives and the Swedes have family in dean foods DFA and how they've screwed over. I think it was last week the week before that I talked about Wisconsin where hundreds and hundreds of dairy farms are going out of business in our nation's richest dairy state. Same thing has happened in new. York, which is another heavily, populated dairy state. Minnesota all these states that are getting screwed because the proximity to Canada has affected their milk market more than anybody along the border of Canada and the United States for that fact, Mexican border with the United States where the Canadians in this case flooding the market with subsidized skim milk, skim milk powder. And so lost exports and the Americans were selling a lot of this stuff, but the Canadian dumping milk and our country, plus on the they they they would dumping fluid milk supplies in our country and the powdered milk. They would dumping on the market around the world. And so the president said that if we didn't straighten this out we would have no partnership with Canada. And so NAFTA has been changed, and that's good for our dairy business. See how long it takes because the prices now. Now, I'm just looking at some of the prices as of last month. Class three fourteen ninety five to fifteen ninety five depending on where in the country. You are see this is all screwy too. Because of the the government getting involved in what they call a pool and pool. Pricings everybody gets paid the same. No matter how well the milk. The you know, depending on how much you have protein in your meal can solids and fats, and that kind of stuff you get a variable price, but it's not significant. It just is time for us to recognize the value of the American family farmer, the dairy farmer in all of our farmers. But these trade things were making a mess. Autobiography culture and so candidate has agreed to hit its own export of milk protein, concentrates, skim milk and infant formula. And so that's we're gonna have the they were dumping that stuff on the marketplace of the world, then they were dumping fluid milk in here as I said, a so this levels the playing field and gives our farmers an opportunity to compete in some of these areas like the infant formula milk protein concentrate that sort of stuff and a keeps the fluid milk supply from being overrun by Canadian imports. So high say, that's good. I'm not sure they. I'm not sure they really understand the impact of what they've done be low Washington, but enough people from the farm bureau and from the National Farmers Union banging away at this. So that that they're beginning to get they know they have to do something. And so it's almost too late though for a lot of dairy people that really is. It's just a mess the dairy industry in our country. So that's my news update. This is the American family farmer. This here is the story of Lawrence who always wants to play football. His parents supported his love of the game sentenced to special camps, and then in college pro scouts came to a bunch of games where Lawrence was playing the trumpet at halftime. Lourdes was never that. Good at football gave up by the time. It got to college. But he also learned how gyco could save them a lot of money on car insurance. So he switched and save. So this story has a happy ending after all calorie.

Canada Trump Doug Stephan president Mexico Washington United States Europe DC Lawrence football National Farmers Union European Union Wisconsin Candida York dean foods DFA Lourdes Minnesota
"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Apply Recently we have talked on, this, program the American family farmer about the threat to bees honeybees and so here's a practical bit. Of advice from the, pollinator. Network that I forgot to underscore when we were talking to the gentleman from the, pollinator network The best thing for you to do Is not used fungus fund your sides I always put him his fungicide, fungi decides if you're gonna use them go easy on them because they, are the things that kill the bees and they have, threatened the. Bee population for a long long time I noticed that there were of story about a fellow from, upstate New York who's an apple grower and he had one hundred and fifty different apple, varieties on his farm black diamond farm and but he noticed he wasn't getting the amount, of returns sixty four acres of apples but. They weren't producing the trees weren't producing and he. Found out that the bees were dying they've, been losing honeybees there an alarming rate and that's because of the us. In these, orchards of certain fungi sides you know they put those by decides. On, the apple and, under the circumstances. Well it's apples peaches whatever is growing And they tried to keep them from getting eaten by the bugs Pauline you do, that the bees that are going to try. To pollinate the flower are gonna run into a. Buzzsaw as this stuff is just really are, performed so you gotta look around and find better fungicides there safer for. The bees, that would be the advice for me Doug Stephan and the pollinator. Network, here on the,.

apple Pauline Doug Stephan us New York sixty four acres
"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

01:53 min | 2 years ago

"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Welcome to the you seven minutes after the hour time for another edition of the american family farmer i'm doug stephan and yes i am an american family farmer as well as being an american broadcaster here to call attention to things that are going on with the american family farmer and the businesses that are run the ranches that are run by families a lot of businesses that supply or help the american family farmer go through farm life and farm business very important so those are focused plus the local boarders who used the food the products that we produce so we have with us in a few minutes brian smith who works with americans for farmers and families we'll have obviously a lot to talk about here his personal stories a farmer what he's experienced and some of the things that are of of concern to all of us who are paying attention to all this talk about the trade war and what impact that will have on us here's something else that i want to talk about for a few minutes and it really the story of farmer maybe you know a farmer who's doing this sort of thing the gentleman that i'm talking about is a farmer named david noam chomsky who's a chicken and pig farmer in east smithfield pennsylvania we all know what's going on in the retail food business at the moment whether it's walmart or amazon peapod all of these are these companies are fighting for a piece of the food delivery business so how does the local farmer like mr nawaf sqi how does he compete.

doug stephan brian smith david noam chomsky east smithfield pennsylvania walmart amazon mr nawaf seven minutes
"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:11 min | 2 years ago

"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Road together and then they sell it locally and that's a good way to do it if you can raise the initial capital but anyway one of the things he did talk about was the tax overhaul as a boon to farmers and i think reality being what it is it is and that's another thing we'll talk to roger johnson about in a minute i think that the tax laws specially as to how it it it it affects farmers when they die we all know the confiscatory nature of the death tax and what's happened especially with farmers who are land rich in money there cashpoor so when farmers die and they have a farm in their estate all too often the farm has to be forfeited to pay off the taxes which often or twothirds of the value of the farm so here come the developers happy to buy the land in put the farm out of business so this has been changed under the tax law i would say that was a very positive thing now let's see in a matter moma's let's let's find out from roger johnston a what really his take is on all of this as i say he's somebody that i like to have on this program i haven't quite like him personally and i quite like his point of view and i do like the national farmers union causes i've said many times i think it speaks for us the smaller farmers let's find out what he says about the president as we work our way through some of the issues of the weekend of the month on the american family farmer fourteen minutes after the hour for all farmers we need rest not necessarily relax station but when you go to bed you want to know that you're going to wake up rested and ready for the day most of our day started four o'clock in the morning so he go to bed at eight or nine o'clock at night you want to really get to sleep fast and have a confidence that you're going to be rested when you wake up in the morning and my prescription for that is to be using my pillow's my pillow made by a fellow in the farm country he's got a big factory now that he built in his home state of minnesota his is mike lindell's got 1500 people making these pillows for distribution all around the.

roger johnson tax law roger johnston national farmers union president minnesota mike lindell fourteen minutes
"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:01 min | 2 years ago

"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"This is the american family farmer with an idea well i i often talk about in this regard what's being done that's new that's different on the family farm a lot of foods sampling in the past year shows a lotta troubling pesticide residues in lots of different products the latest plum pudding data released shows a rise in the occurrence of pesticide residues detected in foods that are commonly consumed the freedom of information act this week has allowed information to come out the government is going to get a lot of flak on this allowing this we'd killing chemical the urbicide known as 24 d a which has been used a lot in the last few years being a part of when you're processing things like the plums they go into the pudding this stuff is not being washed off and so it's prevalent not only in that food but a lot of their two hundred seven different foods where pesticides were detected last year fruits vegetables things that we consider healthy food choices those have the highest frequency of pesticide residues eighty two percent of domestic him arrogant fruit sixty two percent of domestic vegetables have residues and that's the reason you gotta washroom these weed killers and insecticides and pesticides that are used have to be you got a really wash him off clean them off at the fda says ninety seven percent of apple's eighty three percent of grapes sixty percent of terrain is fifty percent of mushrooms and fifty three percent of plums have residues on them a word to the wise fifty one percent of imported fruits and vegetables carry residues as well so let's make sure if we're using these look for natural organic stuff that isn't sprayed first of all began find.

apple freedom of information act eighty three percent ninety seven percent fifty three percent eighty two percent fifty one percent sixty two percent fifty percent sixty percent
"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

01:57 min | 2 years ago

"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"American family farmer continues with our focus on problems in uh uh the probe nick good too many you will it grew the your consumers or whether you're producers the dairy industry is in trouble so it's interesting dino gene osce in here as i said he'd been on the farmers of gneration on this farm nine hundred acre 993 carr's family have been working together so yes welcome to the american family farmer do you have outside kgb whereas everybody who works on the farm come from your family well first of all thank you for having me on uh appreciate very much and ju ju your question i have outlined bagged um you know i would i'd have to be pretty busy producing name family to replace iggy mm operate this uh this um that that i just say we've been by farming unsustainably since eighteen 93 isn't interesting using that term farming is always been sort of a losing proposition and so you wonder why so many people staying in it for as many generations as you have i'm a dairy farmer as well and i find it extraordinarily frustrating to try to overcome stupidity i wonder if that's part of and i when i say that iran usually attitudes toward dairy and to farming share that you don't have to meet him right away from where i am well first of all um dairy farming is a mental illness and it takes a particular uh bagged particular type of uh individual in thinking to.

kgb nick iggy iran nine hundred acre
"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

WINT 1330 AM

02:11 min | 3 years ago

"farmer" Discussed on WINT 1330 AM

"Ten use as directed kerrigan hameed farmer time is thirty four past the hour i'm steffan pro this week's overview of farming for the family farm in the people who use the local wars the use the products we're talking to fill noble who runs sage mountain farm the website sayed run farm dot com about his csa and the fact that he delivers the produce in a box to his subscribers so what are you have vegetables you have meech you put them all together in and do you distributed that way in the box to all of your uh all the people who are your customers aclu yeah we have we'd go over a separately with the meat we deliver once a month so at the birth of a month people can to reclaim be pork chicken or lamb and that we deliver that once a month them download vegetable can are delivered weekly biweekly smaller lord joaqu n people can put their bar who on hold people can phnom there are a bit big enough of block temecula and they're going to create it over the weekend they can move their balked one of the farmer's market down there uh we could really good uh off wear called they were allowed to customers cook the when they made their payment um beckham came to your box from small and large when they're delivery of the get notified that there barca who is going to be delivered the next day it works workout really good lots of infrastructure how large is your staff well i don't know but becker perry right now but um but can we off with a lot of work in the air we do twin boys for my wife about margaret relations in that sweet there's a couple of workers give him a few years get along the.

meech temecula kerrigan hameed farmer sage mountain becker perry