35 Burst results for "facebook"

QAnon backer wins congressional primary in Georgia

Morning Edition

01:01 min | 15 hrs ago

QAnon backer wins congressional primary in Georgia

"Marjorie Taylor Greene won despite her lack of support from many national and state GOP leaders from member station W A. B E E m a hurt reports. Green caught national attention for calling newly elected Muslim members of Congress a quote Islamic invasion into the government and calling George Soros a Jewish Democratic donor. A Nazi She lost an endorsement, and several GOP leaders condemned her remarks. But that didn't slow her down. Here's one of her Facebook video shortly before the election, I will continue to speak out against the Democrat activists in the fake news. Because what they have got to start to realise is all of us. Regular people in America are completely done with them. Green moved her campaign from suburban Atlanta to northwest Georgia in December and spent nearly a $1,000,000 of her own money on the race. She's all but guaranteed the seat since the district voted 75% for Donald Trump in 2016 for NPR News. I'm Emma Hurt in Atlanta Bio pharma company. Moderna is coming under some criticism

GOP Marjorie Taylor Greene Green Atlanta Emma Hurt George Soros Donald Trump Facebook Moderna Congress NPR America Georgia
Instagram Accused of Illegally Harvesting Biometric Data

John Reid

00:20 sec | 16 hrs ago

Instagram Accused of Illegally Harvesting Biometric Data

"Is facing in Lawsuit accusing the company of collecting, storing and profiting from the biometric data of more than 100 million instagram users suit says the practices violate in Illinois privacy law. Last month, the company offered to pay 650 million to settle the suit alleging the illegal collection of biometric data through a Facebook photo tagging tool. The key

Facebook Illinois Instagram
The First Dog With COVID-19 Has Died, And There's A Lot We Still Don't Know

Short Wave

06:53 min | 19 hrs ago

The First Dog With COVID-19 Has Died, And There's A Lot We Still Don't Know

"April when buddies family I started to notice that something was a bright buddy started breathing really heavily, any hadn't mucus knows, and this was the first thing is family notice that you know the first sign that he was not himself. That's Natasha daily a wildlife reporter with National Geographic. Buddy was a German shepherd who Natasha says by his family's account was a very, very good boy. He loved running through sprinklers, Keitel's love like running and diving right into the lake. His family loved address them up for Halloween, is also photos of him in a bunny costume and you know he's just it looks like he's just grinning at the camera and so when buddies started getting sick this spring, just before his seventh birthday, his family, Robert Allison Mahoney and their daughter Juliana. While, they were worried I mean he'd be completely healthy, and then all of a sudden in the sprain he. started. Struggling to breathe and the first thing. I thought was he has the virus. Meaning the corona virus in the reason they thought that. They had also been sick. So specifically, Robert Mahoney, the husband had tested positive Alison Mahoney. Robert's wife had not been tested, but she was showing symptoms. So she had it to. The daughter Juliana who's thirteen tested negative. But when it came to getting buddy attest, that was a lot harder. But he's regular vet wasn't seeing patients. The Vet significantly said, there's no, he has like just you know there's no way and he prescribed the antibiotics over the phone. Another vets gave buddy ultrasound and x rays. But also didn't think he could have the krona virus remember no dog had yet tested positive in the US. And many vets didn't have the tests for animals anyway. But one day. Robert, Mahoney sister saw facebook post about a vet where they lived on. Staten. Island that had just gotten some test kits. Robert. was like great like let me call right now. Get down there, make an appointment, and so he was able to make an appointment for ten PM on a Friday. So it was a very strange time, but it was the clinic was really busy, and so it was the the first law they had available. That was Friday. May Fifteenth a full month after he started showing symptoms a few days later, but he finally got test that revealed. He was positive. This was a huge deal. Buddy was the first dog in the US known to have the virus and the USDA announced the news in a press release on June second. Buddy wasn't named in that press release. The government only identified his breed. In fact, we only know the details of his story because of Natasha's reporting. The USDA said in. June, that quote the dog is expected to make a full recovery. But Buddy didn't get better. He got more and more sick in June. It. All came to a head one weekend in July. And a warning that the details coming up are pretty tough to hear. So Allison. Came downstairs the morning of July eleventh and found buddy in the kitchen in a pool of modeled flood He was throwing up blood. It was coming from his nose. It was just horrific and devastating for the family, and at that point, they brought him into the vet and the decision was made to euthanize him which was obviously really really difficult on top of two and a half months of stress and confusion that the family had already been through thirteen dogs and eleven cats have tested positive in the US for cove nineteen according to public. Records and while those numbers sound small, they raise big questions about how virus can affect people and their pets. Today's episode. Natasha. Daily on why. Some of those questions are still so hard to answer. Allison Mooney said to me that you tell someone that your dog tested positive for Cova. Did they'd look at you like you had ten heads. You know there's no rubric for navigating covert in your pet. I'm Emily Quang and you're listening to shortwave the daily science podcast from NPR. First off the current CDC guidance that there is no evidence that pets can transmit the coronavirus to humans, and that's partially why testing for animals isn't more widespread. We do need to say to that test for animals are different than the test used to detect the virus in humans. All animal tests are processed in different labs are processed in veterinary labs. Not, there's no overlap between human testing and animal testing. So. While some of the mechanics of the tests may be the same. It's not at all taking resources away from humans. But because a covid positive animal isn't seen as a danger to humans, there's been very little scientific study of how the virus can affect those pets or even how it can interact with other diseases are pets may have. That's where we're going to pick up buddy story with an Tasha daily. Yes. So new blood work was taken on July tenth the day before a buddy died, and it was on July eleventh when the Mahoney's brought buddy in. To essentially be euthanized that they found the results of that blood work on and the blood work indicated that he very very likely had lymphoma, which is kind of cancer, right? Yes. Lymphoma is a type of cancer So I I asked a couple of veterinarians who were not involved in buddies case at all to review his full records and they said that, yes, every single one of the symptoms he had could be explained by lymphoma, you know A. A big open question is deity SARS Yovany to present clinically in buddies body, and what that means is did the virus cause any symptoms? For example, the trouble breathing was, and so I think it's it's tough and we'll never have an answer to this was every single. One of his symptoms are the lymph, Oma? Or was some of it, the COVID and the breakdown of fat isn't something that we have an answer to, and you also pose the question. Will. We won't know whether the cancer made them more susceptible to contracting the coronavirus exactly, and that's sort of a big takeaway from his case You know our dogs or cats with underlying conditions like cancer as it turns out. More likely to contract the virus because we know humans are humans It's thought that humans that have suppressed immune systems maybe more likely to contract the virus, but not only that maybe the virus may be more likely to present in ways that are more significant in their bodies if if they're already immuno-compromised. So the same question remains for animals and we just have so little data to investigate it.

Robert Allison Mahoney Buddy United States Natasha Alison Mahoney Usda Juliana Lymphoma Keitel Reporter Staten Covid National Geographic Allison Mooney Mahoney Facebook Island
QAnon backer wins congressional primary in Georgia

BBC World Service

01:01 min | 20 hrs ago

QAnon backer wins congressional primary in Georgia

"Cuban on conspiracy theory has won the Republican primary in a Georgia congressional district, Marjorie Taylor Greene won despite her lack of support from many national and state GOP leaders. Remember station W A. B M A Hurt has more from Atlanta. Green caught national attention for calling newly elected Muslim members of Congress a quote Islamic invasion into the government and calling George Soros a Jewish Democratic donor. A Nazi She lost an endorsement, and several GOP leaders condemned her remarks. But that didn't slow her down. Here's one of her Facebook videos shortly before the election. I will continue to speak out against the Democrat activists in the fake news because what they have got to start to realise is all of us. Regular people in America are completely done with them. Green moved her campaign from suburban Atlanta to northwest Georgia in December and spent nearly a $1,000,000 of her own money on the race. She's all but guaranteed the seats since the district voted 75% for Donald Trump in 2016 for NPR News. I'm Emma

GOP Atlanta Georgia Green Marjorie Taylor Greene Donald Trump George Soros Facebook NPR Emma Congress America
Accepting Yourself Plus Others

The Daily Meditation Podcast

05:19 min | 1 d ago

Accepting Yourself Plus Others

"One of the most important. Ways to. achieve a true sense of inner peace. And this is what I discovered after doing a little research. It won't surprise you. But again, and again, gratitude. Kept coming up as one of the best. Most effective ways to feel at peace. And I think it's because when you feel a sense of gratitude. You accept where you are in life and I think that's why mindfulness and meditation are so powerful at helping you cultivate peace because you learn to finally accept year South Many people ask me. What is the biggest benefit? I've received from my own meditation ritual over the years. And I tell them that meditation has helped me become more confident. And this often surprises people. But when you think about it When you honor yourself when you show up for yourself day in and day out. You began to trust yourself and respect how your living your life. You Begin to notice that you respond to stress in a much better way. So you feel much more capable. And content. So as you get ready to meditate today. I want to share the case upon Dra with you. You can take a look at how it's done again on the. FACEBOOK or INSTAGRAM PAGES I. Share. The mood tra-. there. So this is a simple merger to do. You simply hold your hands at your chest and wine your fingers together. and. Then take your index fingers and stretch them upward. So they're pressing against each other. And then take your left thumb and place it over your right them. This is the case upon a mood dry and what this new dry is reported to help you experience is. A. Release. A release of tension. Or stress or pain whatever you're wanting to let go of. And then. It draws an what you see what you need. So focusing on piece this week. You can maybe let go of tension and bring into your day. Piece. and. If you settle yourself down now and get ready to meditate. I invite you to bring to mind. Your challenge this week every week I issue a challenge. Your challenge this week is to. Cultivate your own piece and then to share your piece. So I'd like you now to bring to mind someone. Some group situation. You'd like to share your peace with. You'd like to uplift the situation or the person with peace. So bring it to mind. And I cultivate this peace within yourself. You can let go. Using your breath. Your tension and anxiety inhale and exhale. Through your nose. And allow your breath to calm down naturally at your own pace. And Begin to notice where you experience peace within. Maybe you hold your peace at your chest, you feel your heart expand. Maybe you feel a smile. Relax your face. Or your eyes are naturally uplifted. You may notice your spine straight and. Notice. Your piece and go deeply into this place of peace. Sit in stillness shareen your piece.

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U.S. stock futures stronger after a down day for the Dow and S&P 500

Bloomberg Daybreak: Asia

01:29 min | 1 d ago

U.S. stock futures stronger after a down day for the Dow and S&P 500

"Very much. It looks like kind of uneventful start to the trading day here. Nikkei Futures are flat at the moment. We have a little balance underway in S and P Minnie's trading, up about 2/10 of 1%. China futures down about 7/10 of a percent modestly higher for Australian futures HangSeng Index futures after a Pretty solid day yesterday, down about 2/10 of 1% on Wall Street. We had a flip. We had a day where it looked like cyclicals and value really came to the fore. The NASDAQ was trading lower. The Dow at one point up 360 points. About two o'clock We started trending lower. In the end, the Dow finished down about 104 points, off 4/10 of 1%. Yes and P 500 finishing up a 33 33. Down 8/10 of a percent. The NASDAQ with a big loss of 1.7%. Money did flow out of the big technology names and we had Apple alphabet Facebook all trading lower. Some traders side comments from the Senate Majority leader Mitch McConnell, saying that stimulus talks We're at a stalemate. But there was also some thinking that the S and P 500 was just running out of gas getting up to all time highs, and it slipped back from that The dollar is weaker. Now it's trading down about 1/10 of 1%. Dalian, 106 49 She's got a weaker yen there to yield on the 10 year had quite a pop up to like 66 basis points. Now at 64 crude $41.64 a little bit uneventful, But the day is

Nikkei Futures Dalian Mitch Mcconnell Senate Majority P Minnie China Facebook Apple
Perseids, the best meteor shower of the year, peaks tonight

KYW 24 Hour News

01:00 min | 1 d ago

Perseids, the best meteor shower of the year, peaks tonight

"Well, a veteran Philadelphia astronomer is leading a Facebook live event tonight, focusing on a big happening that will light up the sky all the details from K Y W's Marc Abrahams. Derrick Pitts, who was the chief astronomer at the Franklin Institute, will be the host and guide for the Perseus meteor shower event offered through a Pennsylvania tourism's Facebook page. The person is one of the strongest meteor showers of the year and because it comes in August, it's a perfect time for people to be out underneath the My guy, The one Our program starts at nine PM, Pitt says. That should be the perfect time to grab your phone or tablet and step outside and look up as he offers some play by play about what's out there. Pit says he'll also zoom in guests from across the state providing information about what a good thing to see in their region of tape. It's concedes light pollution in center city might make it tough for some to see the meteor shower. But no worries, he says. You can look into the southeastern portion of the sky tonight. And you'll spot to very bright objects. The planets Jupiter and

Facebook Pitt Derrick Pitts Marc Abrahams Philadelphia Franklin Institute Pennsylvania PIT
Philadelphia Astronomer to Host Online Play-By-Play of Perseid Meteor Shower

KYW 24 Hour News

01:04 min | 1 d ago

Philadelphia Astronomer to Host Online Play-By-Play of Perseid Meteor Shower

"A veteran Philadelphia astronomer will lead a live Facebook event tonight, focusing on a big happening that will light up the night sky. I wanna grab your phone and take a look up there. My W's Marc Abrahams reports. Derrick Pitts, who was the chief astronomer at the Franklin Institute will be the host and guide for the Perseus meteor shower event offered through Pennsylvania Tourism's Facebook page. The person is one of the strongest meteor showers of the year and because it comes in August, it's a perfect time for people to be out underneath the night sky. The one our program starts at nine PM, Pitt says. That should be the perfect time to grab your phone or tablet and step outside and look up as he offers some play by play about what's out there. Pit says He'll also Uman guests from across the state providing information about what a good thing to see in their region of tape. It's concedes light pollution in center city might make it tough for some to see the meteor shower. But no worries, he says. You can look into the southeastern portion of the sky tonight and you'll spot to very bright objects the planets Jupiter and Saturn, Mark Abrams, K Y. W News radio

Facebook Pitt Derrick Pitts Marc Abrahams Mark Abrams Philadelphia Franklin Institute Pennsylvania Tourism PIT
7 Little Known Copywriting Hacks

Marketing School

04:20 min | 1 d ago

7 Little Known Copywriting Hacks

"Welcome to another episode of Marketing School I'm Eric Su. Today. We are going to talk about seven little. No. In copywriting hacks and kneels GonNa Start I with any, you're gonna Homey Star I. Okay. So number one, what's funny is most people being by copy like, Oh, I want to be amazing like Ogilby for. Oh. I wish I can have my words to slow super smoothly from just like how Frank Kern does it. So the first copy I have for you is you don't need to be amazing writer the key to converting in getting people to renew your copying buying becoming a lead is actually answering What issue someone may have when on your landing or potentially buying, you answer those objections. A good example of this is you can use survey monkey hot, whatever you want type farm to survey people on your page, find out what issues they have an integrate those within your copy answered, their objections to suck at writing more conversions. All right number two. So when I'm writing I like using sentiment analysis tool, so you can just sent him an analysis, but put him whatever copy you have whether it's a headline or maybe it's Longer form thing, and you just dump it in there and basically score how positive or negative your content is an in general. If I'm trying to write an ad I wanted to be generally more positive. I. Don't like to induce too much fear. Yes. Fear is certainly one emotion you can tap into, but the Jenner I tried to look for positivity. So just go sentiment analysis tool. The third copy hacked that I have for you is all about showing the right copy at the right time. So for example, you have a Webinar may have copied that convinces people to watch your Webinar. If someone doesn't attend your women but registered you wanNA email him copies about the missing the Webinar. In the next, they can go and watch the Webinar if they watch the Webinar ended in by you can have copy answering. Answering objections on why most people don't buy and results would get the by your art service. So figure out what copy you need a in each place to maximize your conversions and have it there. It's not about how smooth you're right. It's about answering objections at the right time in the right place. Number four is create a swipe file. What I mean by that. If you are scrolling through Instagram, you're scrolling through facebook and. And you see in that stops you that is known as a pattern interrupt. So what you should do there is if you actually like the ad and if you think you can draw some inspiration from it, save it, you can save these ads, put him into a collection, and then from there, the beauty of that is you can refer back to these ads, and then you can draw without having to create something from. From scratch, if you see headlines that you like put him into a swipe file, you WANNA create a entire swipe folder where you just pull inspiration from and you don't necessarily need to try to reinvent the wheel here. You can go swipe dot co to try to pull more inspiration. They have great long-form landing pages and sales letters in there. Just don't try to do everything on your own draw from lean on other people. People right stat under shoulders, and you're going to be fine as Ogilby said, and this gets into number five. As we said, eighty cents of the dollar spot on the headline. So what I want you to do is come up with multiple headline variations, fair copy, and you want to try to figure out which headline resonates the most deal customer. You can either upload look like audiences Melissa onto facebook and run ads with. Different. Different headline variations see which one gets the most cooks. All right. Number six for me would be using the framework from breakthrough advertising. So breakthrough advertising still think it's a really great book and you can get it for about one hundred, twenty, five bucks now, I google it, and so here's the framework, the life cycle or from someone going from the top to the bottom when people interact with you, a customer interacts with you. You is usually start unaware, and then they become probably wear. Then they become aware of a solution than your solution, and then you can make an offer to them. So think about that, you can use DA right awareness, interest, decision action, kind of similar, but unaware problem where solution where your solution, and then you give him off i. that is basically how you take from top to bottom when you're trying to actually get the. The convert this framework actually provides to go in with a video can go in with a sales letter can go within a long form. Add. It works really well,

Ogilby Facebook Eric Su Frank Kern Writer Instagram Jenner Melissa
How the TikTok Ban Would Affect the Influencer Economy

The Vergecast

03:54 min | 1 d ago

How the TikTok Ban Would Affect the Influencer Economy

"Terror Lawrence walking adverse cast. Thanks for having me you are reports near time see cover influencers the influence our economy, which is what I won't talk to you about but I asked you on the show to talk about Tiktok a while ago like several days ago and I said we should do this as late as possible before we publish because something else will happen with Tiktok and Lo and behold last night according to some Friday last night Thursday night very late the trump administration issued two executive orders one banning all transactions with Tiktok in forty five days, which is September twentieth in the other we chat. Benny. All transactions we chat and we chats parent company ten, cent which owns. Stakes everything from spotify they own all of League of legends they on forty percent of fortnight on religion epic games I want to talk to you about Tiktok. But that all happened what has been the response from sort of the influence or community to that I feel like I should just ask you from the job. Yeah. Well, it's been a roller coaster for them. Maybe to a bunch of people last night because you know earlier this week, it seemed like it was going to be fine like a lot of them were told at trump said even last week that the ban could come as soon as last Saturday and when when that didn't happen. The kind of thought they were all good again, and now they're scrambling it's literally thrown huge swath of the entertainment industry into arrears I mean we saw Forbes released their list of top earning talkers, yesterday, and including people like Charlie, Milio, Addison, Ray, all of these kind of young Internet stars and they're making millions and so you know. All of that money that they're making his in jeopardy all of these big brand campaigns that American Eagle. Other brands are doing in jeopardy The music industry is obviously scrambling. So it's it's a mess. Yeah. I. Want to come back to that thing in the moment but I wanted to the reason I wanted to have you on is I think the influence, our economy, those millions of dollars that you just talked about this kind of not well understood. And you do a great job of covering it. I think I've told you like your coverage has definitely been an influence on our coverage. I think of our creators is a secret business section on the verge like that's bundle mentally what it is it's our. It's our teenage millionaire section like it's a business desk, not really like a memes desk but just to give even that even some context, your personal reporting history has twists and turns the kind of led you here. Can you give people just a sense? Of that because you started as like like a strategist, a digital strategist and you've ended up covering platforms and the money gets made on them, I see a pretty clear through line there. Yeah, I. Mean I've always been really obsessed with these platforms I, mean I graduated over a decade ago now into the recession and got on Tumbler and which I very quickly built some popular blogs on Tumbler, and that was my entry into social media world and yeah, I worked as a as strategist basically helping social media. Brands like household names like Bud light kind of navigate the social media world. This was before branch twitter was even a thing facebook just rolled out brand pages in like two thousand nine. So I was sort of helping brands build audiences online and I got really fascinated by how these deals were being done on the Internet how people were leveraging audience for themselves and yeah sort of did that and then ended. Up doing the same thing for media companies as a social media director for a while, and then I was always sort of writing on the side and then finally about almost three years ago I switched over and started reading about at fulltime. I think also the equator economy I don't think it was truly a beat until that time the way that it is now I think the real money started pouring in. Maybe Post Twenty sixteen.

Tiktok Lawrence RAY Benny Donald Trump Spotify League Of Legends Executive Twitter LO Facebook Forbes American Eagle Director Charlie Milio
Why Selling Low-Priced Products Can Be Harder

The $100 MBA Show

04:17 min | 1 d ago

Why Selling Low-Priced Products Can Be Harder

"Many new to business like to price their first products or services low, they feel like it's just easier to ask for the sale if it's not much money, the issue here is that who are you going to ask the sale from a lot of people forget that it costs money to acquire customer and when I say money, this can time as well hiring. Somebody to write you great content for content marketing or email marketing or can mean straight up how much money it's going to cost you to advertise to attract a customer to attract a buyer. Let me give you an example. Let's say for example, you're spending some money on some facebook ads to drive some traffic to an online course you're selling for ninety nine dollars. Now, the we ads work is that it's a lead generation tool. You try to get somebody into your funnel. They opt in for maybe a taste of your course, a module, a free guide, and from there, you try to convert them through an automation sequence through your email marketing. Now, this is a one time fee. It's a ninety nine dollar cost for the course. So save for example, it costs you ten dollars per optin or per conversion. That means you have to spend a hundred dollars on ads to get ten people to opt in for your free. So they can be part of your automation sequence, and from there you are convincing them to buy your course with some email notifications with some more great content. Maybe you're going to fight them to a Webinar all that kind of stuff now in order for you to just break even right now, make any money at all in. Fact, you'll probably be at a loss because you'll need to run your heads and you're paying for the expensive email marketing and all that kind of stuff you'd have to have a ten percent conversion twenty percent. We'll put you in the profitable range and it's not easy to converse somebody offer emails to a buyer at a twenty percent conversion rate. That's pretty high most see something between five and nine percent at best. So best you're not even making. Money. So a lot of will find it difficult to make money on low priced products is they just don't have enough money to market the product to get the customers they need, and I want to say something for lower priced products. It's actually harder to convert them because they're more price sensitive. Now let's give another example. Let's say for example, you have a product that's two thousand dollars a two thousand dollar course you're GONNA run the same ads. And let's say we are converting on our email list at ten percent really really ambitious ten percent just like the other where he broke even. But just to compare apples to apples, I spent a thousand dollars on ads his time, and again ten dollars per conversion on my email list to opt in for my Freebie now I have a hundred leads on my email list and avert a ten percent. That's ten customers. Okay. Now while I broke even In my first example with my two thousand dollar product, I got twenty thousand dollars in sales because I got ten new customers. And I spent a thousand dollars on ads. I made a profit of one nine thousand dollars. So as you can see, you can afford to get more customers. When you have a higher price product running ads is more affordable you can get more return on investment. Now US two thousand dollars for reason, for price point for product because anything lower than two thousand is considered, you know lower priced products. Now I want to say two thousand per year that's the the annual revenue that you'll get from a customer total value of the customer. So if you have other upsells, you have other things that you're going to. Sell them later on, we want to put that into the equation but the point here is that you have a whole lot more breathing room when you're priced higher, a lot of new entrepreneurs think if I price their products to high, I won't get that many customers. It's not about the number of customers. It's about how much money you make from each the total number of. Dollars you take home the profitability. In fact, it makes a lot more business sense I rather have ten customers and earn twenty thousand dollars than to have two hundred customers at a ninety nine dollars point because i. have to now service in maintain an help two, hundred customers instead of ten,

United States Facebook
Russian watchdog says Apple abused mobile app market dominance

Geek News Central

00:50 sec | 2 d ago

Russian watchdog says Apple abused mobile app market dominance

"Russia competition watchdog F eight S on money said it apple INC abuses opposition will aftermarket through its APP surf riot devices wish you. The company, all regulation breaches, and of course, an apple spokesperson said, the company plans to appeal against the fast ruling. This comes against the backdrop the European Commission investigation into Apple APPs or rules, including requirements, builders us. It's its own in-app purchases them the fast side of the needed download APPs for the Apple IOS operating system, its APP store. It also said, apple's unlawfully reserve rights to block any third party APPs Blah Blah Blah it's same I think the windows crashing here on Apple I think it won't be long many countries there will be alternate APP stores. They spoke won't be able to completely controlled ecosystem for much longer time will tell though.

Apple Russia European Commission
Disney Rebrands TV Studios, 20th Century Fox TV to Become 20th Television

Geek News Central

00:09 sec | 2 d ago

Disney Rebrands TV Studios, 20th Century Fox TV to Become 20th Television

"Has no more fox. Fox has left the building. So basically, Twentieth Century Fox is now twentieth

Twentieth Century Fox FOX
Early Explorations of AI for Creativity with Devi Parikh

This Week in Machine Learning & AI

05:10 min | 2 d ago

Early Explorations of AI for Creativity with Devi Parikh

"Art, everyone I am here with Davy. Pathetic Davey is an associate professor in the school, of Interactive, computing at Georgia Tech as well as a research scientist at facebook. Ai. Research Davey welcome to the tomato podcast. Thanks for having me. is great to get a chance to to speak with you learn a bit about what you're up to as is typical at love for us to start by having you introduce yourself a little bit to our audience and in particular share. The source of your. Interest in computer vision in a and what led you to the field. Chuck I think my interest in this field started in, I think about the thirty of Undergrad, my junior year budge program had several research projects. Students could get involved in and especially a funny story. I was interested in computer architecture at the time and I thought I had signed on for the computer architecture project. But then when they were matching students to project I somehow got assigned to. This machine learning project, which at the time we were calling pattern recognition because I was just department, and that's what we call the then But say. Accidentally. ACCIDENTALLY ENDED UP ON A. Over two choices was it sounds like a Potpourri kind of glass. I. Said this was this was meant to be like a free form of. Wasn't in class, it was meant to be research projects, industrial projects that students could work on credit and so this was true that and so that's how I started working in the states I enjoyed it enough to WanNa, go to Grad School in Grad School. And then the transition to computer vision happened about in the first year of overnight started my PhD. was working on a pattern recognition and machine learning problems for intrusion detection in computer networks But then I had colleagues around me who working on images computer vision, and they could visually see the output of the things that they would working on. which to me is that affects us a intuitive and mortar feeling and I think that's where. The draw came from and I switched, I worked with that and that's what I've been doing. All, these years since. Awesome, and you've been at Georgia tech for our how long I think about four years three and a half four years. No. Okay. Cool. And you're also as I mentioned, add at facebook. Are you kind of equally at both or how do you out of the? Out For you yeah, yeah. Yes. I split my time between Georgia Tech and fair I'm at Georgia Tech in the faults and physically in Atlanta from about mid August to mid. December. Or so But I'm teaching classes and things of that sort. And then I'm on the from Georgia tech in the spring and then, and that's what I'm spending time in the spring and summer. Of. site. That's much cleaner fit or split than I imagined. Yeah. Yeah, and I like that it's this clean. I can't that our colleagues who have like one day a week. And flying back and forth goes to Costa, I just use like a large. This much cleaner won't be. Slid. Yeah So tell us a little bit about your current research interests. How do you Focus Your your research at Georgia? Tech Slash Fair. like like we were talking about my background is in computer vision in the last several years five, seven years. At this point, I've done a lot of work intersection of vision language, some things like visual question on sitting image captioning and things of that sort. So that's been sort of my my main research agenda. This whole time and continues to beat is ten, spend a lot of time on it. But in the last couple of years have gotten more and more interested in problems at the intersection of. India. Deputy and so it's still very early, very exported. But I've been thinking about that quite a bit does won't outside. But my time between vision anguish things also some body day. I would agents in virtual environments and things like that. But like I said more recently, I've been thinking a lot about the tippity. And did the work in an language or vision in language lead directly to the I in creativity or? What kind of burned that interest? Yeah. I think it's hard to kind of. And figure out exactly what got me interested in this, I think overall I've generally had an intonation towards a systems that are interacting with people, and so I think my interest vision and language also was the language offered. My background is in vision, but I think what drew me to language was the fact that it's sort of a very natural interface for humans for people to interact with these systems and ask questions. Get the descriptions from the machine and get a sense for what the machine might be seeing and things like that So I think it is that human-eye interaction collaboration aspect that also interests me. is also one of the reasons why I'm excited about. Activities, deputies,

Georgia Tech Facebook Georgia Davey Davy Research Scientist Grad School Associate Professor Chuck Wanna India Atlanta Costa
Solving the mental load  update

Ladies, We Need To Talk

05:41 min | 2 d ago

Solving the mental load update

"When we first spoke about the mental load on this podcast, there was a fringe cartoon cold. You should've asked that was going viral. It explained the mental load with such clarity that when I first saw it, my reaction was fury. I wanted to. Shift to the ground. It showed a woman with a baby and a hapless male partner who was kind, but needed to be told how to help and it so familiar. So common. So exasperating and so profoundly unfair. Journalist, Tracey spicer new. What I was talking about. It was an absolute lightbulb moment for me, I sir, Clementine, Ford's facebook page. I share with everyone and I knew that went viral swear words and it happened in the time when I realized that my life with my wonderful husband who's fifty fifty with the housework fifty, fifty with the childcare, but it was just the little things. I'm always the one who organizes school holiday care or who takes the time to look after the kids or rangers everyone's Christmas presents or birthday present in his extended family and my extended family. So after reading that I, decided to go on strike in the household so he had to do it drove him Berserk. He said this is crazy. Such little school holiday cared Australia. I said now you know my pain. Jenny talk about the mental load in your life. I think when I saw the catching was like, oh, no added that to my mental learn. About. How often I think about the mental load? That's Jenny Leong amp in New South Wales Parliament I was very lucky and I consider it to be like that. My partner was able to access paid parental leave. So he was the primary care for a significant amount of time and in that case he did take the mental Lloyd and a lot of that was then there that the what's interesting is once we're both Both. Back at work where the default position falls back and the expectation of WHO's supposed to know those things to me. Then you feel like part of it is also all of my being bad feminist because of that because I think then adds another level to it to how much you should make a deal of this or not I noticed the gender dynamic with my. Friends that are in. Relationships, they're both men they quite comfortably into stereotypes, gender roles that old without all of the challenges and the. Doctor Leah. Repent on a lecturer in sociology at the University of, Melbourne. She racist as domestic labor, and this idea of the mental load is her field of expertise. I'm going to start and say a little bit controversial. Say That everyone actually carries the mental load. So some portion of your mental load may go to thinking about your career. Some portion of it may go to thinking about your family and some portion of it may be going to thinking about your personal life and the differences, the balance across men and women. So you could imagine men are spending a lot more of their mental load thinking about how do I advance my career thinking about the day to day challenges of work. That is a very different mental load than who is going to pick up the child from daycare. or WHO's GonNa Organize School holidays or who's doing the housework wise. House a mass. And one leads to economic outcome, career mobility and one is just unpaid sometimes recognized sometimes not recognized labor. And I think that's really the difference. How do we shift the ratio? Definitely does seat more with women the. Yeah, I, K-. So we're all in agreement about that. Absolutely. Absolutely, the balance in terms of unpaid in terms of thinking about the experience is disproportionately shouldered by women. Yes. Absolutely. Once, you get your head around the idea of the mental load. You start seeing it everywhere in the lives of your friends, colleagues, your mother, your self. It. Happens to women in all walks of life and age and six urology, but it seems to hit hardest when there's a baby. So. Now, we have a name for the mental load. But. The problem is naming, it doesn't make it go away. As I was sobbing thinking. I used to be able to manage employees teams. And now I'm too overwhelmed to even manage a grocery list. And more importantly. How did I become the default for every single child care and household tasks for my family? It wasn't supposed to happen to me. This is a road ski shades La, and she's written a book called Fairplay, which is all about fairly distributing the mental load aves marriage nearly ended when her husband center, it takes saying. I'm surprised you didn't get blueberries. She was furious at the assumption that she had gone from high powered lawyer to full-time Default Blueberry shepper. Eight. Knew she had to do something about it? She says, there are a few ways to look the mental load. My favorite was a term from nineteen eighty-seven and American sociologist named Arlene Kaplan. Daniels. coined a term called invisible work. In why like that term so much is because that's the only one that had a modicum of a solution in it. Because I kept thinking to myself. Maybe. Maybe if I can make. Visible all the invisible things I was doing from my home and family for my husband, Seth? Maybe then he would value what I did.

Jenny Leong Partner Tracey Spicer Australia Arlene Kaplan Ford Lloyd Facebook Seth Lecturer New South Wales Daniels. Melbourne LA
Bytes and Pieces: Americas Chinese-Tech Attack

The Economist: The Intelligence

08:26 min | 2 d ago

Bytes and Pieces: Americas Chinese-Tech Attack

"As the heads of Amazon Alphabet facebook and apple were being berated in Congress, last month how many competitors did facebook ended up copying we called it Amazon heroin. Why does bny steel content from honest businesses tiktok the goofy funny video sharing app was having an altogether better time of it. Golden. Do. Not, so much anymore we're looking at Tiktok we may be banning TIKTOK. Thursday the trump. Issued a deadline of September twentieth for ending all American transactions bite dense to talks parent company as well as with. China's second most valuable, Tech Company ten cent with Para companies based in China apps like Tiktok we chat and others are significant threats to personal data of American citizens not to mention tools for CCP content censorship. China's government called the executive orders a nakedly hegemonic? act. By dense is looking for a fire sale buyer for some of its international Tiktok operations and it seems Microsoft is checking pockets. But the administration's zeal is likely to harm America's interests as well as the Chinese tech champions. We knew a band was in the offing at is still everyone by surprise Thompson booth is the economists technology and business editor I. Think most people were expecting president trump to wait until a a TIKTOK deal had gone through to reach a resolution on whether there would be a ban on not and it's also quite surprised that he's gone after we chat and tencent. And the reaction from the two companies has been quite strong. Bite dance has said that it's GonNa fight the executive orders in court. Well, as you say, there had been some expectations around Tiktok by dense. Why? Why was ten cents included in the end? Well there isn't a certain unfortunate logic to this. If you're going to say that you're concerned about Tiktok on national security and espionage grounds, you sort of have to be consistent and we chat has about nine hundred, million daily users in the US and the executive order basically bans people from making transactions on we chat which it's a sort of super APP. That is really widely used in in China and Chinese diaspora what is the trump administration's rationale for these orders? Do you think so the stated reason from the administration is the Chinese government is spying on Americans and hear the evidence is Circumstantial. So the worry is that Chinese spy agencies have stolen massive consumer data sets from various companies over the past ten years. So from Mariot Equifax anthem health insurance TIKTOK has been downloaded two billion times. It's the mother of data sets. There is no hard evidence that bite dance would ever cooperate in such an endeavor but the idea is that if you've got engineers with access to Tiktok by Don, service than the government could lean on them to get the information out. So that's the stated reason from the trump administration. Think that's enough for the American government to threaten to ban the APP. I gather from investors case to buy dance at the real reason is a level playing field issue as much as the spying concern. So one gathered that in particular. Mark, Zuckerberg of facebook has been outlining pointing out to trump that take talk is wildly successful in the US and yet facebook google than allowed into China. It's sort of the idea of why should tech top able to come to compete with us when we can't do so in the other direction? And as things stand now, Microsoft is the evidence suitor for for Tiktok operations at least in a in a few countries what's in it for them? I think for Microsoft is really stunning opportunity on their part. So bite dance reckons that the TIKTOK US asset is worth in the realm of two hundred billion dollars oversee the pudding, very generous estimate on that. So the price being talked about now that Microsoft might pay and that it's on the block for more life fifteen, forty billion. So it's just a real steel in terms of the price. I'm talking to the hottest social media property out there right now it's uses incredibly highly engaged and Microsoft you out of stroke gets into territory of the social, the digital media giants, and it gets a massive data set on teenagers daters the new oil. Attack, there is lots of sketches in the Microsoft just is kind of getting out of its core competence that it won't really know how to get and keep the teenagers. The other risk for Microsoft is just kind getting dragged into the Mile Strom of content moderation and hate speech and all this kind of stuff that attracts more political scrutiny and then regulatory scrutiny having said that Microsoft is regarded as a really high quality acquirer of businesses it generally tends to do it quite well. Microsoft. CEO Sachin Adela notably is currently probably regarded as the best big taxi. Oh so now we've got this deadline of September twentieth what happens between now and then Firstly, Microsoft going to carry on negotiating to try and buy Tiktok we're seeing more suitors for Tiktok on the scene over the weekend the reports that twitter is definitely interested I know that Netflix's on the coolest the venture capital backers of Bite Don's possibly even Disney I do think the likeliest thing is still the Microsoft probably strikes a deal just because it's got the deepest pockets will also be really interesting to see whether Microsoft manages to get more markets at. The moment, it's only going for the US, Canada, New Zealand and Australia. It's not buying the UK having the actual executive order from trump will create more uncertainty around Tiktok and there's no doubt that it is already harming the asset. It's no joke said, the clock really is taking on that deal and what about ten cents? It's unclear. What ten cents is going to do it's unlikely to try and sell international we chat as by dance is doing with Tiktok. It's possible that it could come up with some kind of structure to address. US concerns. It's a complete unknown how tencent now is going to react but I guess the question is, is the right way for America to get its concerns addressed with a problem with. It so far as that feels completely sort of ad hoc on his whim. Really undermines investor confidence in the US is the place of the rule of law. And there are alternatives and I think there's three main steps that we would advocate versus to strengthen the vetting procedure that's already in place. So the Committee on foreign investment in the US surface that probes should stop properly and quickly. So in the case of Tiktok and musically the US APP that bike dance bought therefore triggering this whole situation, they took two years to start looking at it and then did it in a rush which guarantees Robert chaotic ad, hoc situation. And overwhelmingly, the US needs to tighten up its own data privacy regime. So the reason that tiktok is such. A worry in terms of spying theoretically is that US firms, your facebook's Google's and so on her normalized that the slurping just masses of personal data from Americans. So what's required is a strong federal data privacy law. The third element is displayed to you can do in. Terms of requiring transparency into the Algorithms being used auditing code that's coming in from overseas for now, the question for those two billion or so people who've downloaded tiktok whether their favourite platforms going to survive or whether the current chaotic procedure that has affected, the company will mean it. It's rivals take it over and teens leave. Thanks very much for your time Tamsin it's been a pleasure.

Tiktok United States Microsoft Facebook Executive China Tencent America American Government Google Chinese Government Heroin Amazon Congress Apple Ceo Sachin Adela Mariot Equifax Tamsin
Should Washington Break Up Big Tech?

Intelligence Squared U.S. Debates

05:35 min | 5 d ago

Should Washington Break Up Big Tech?

"Hi everybody I'm John Donvan, and this is intelligence squared us and we've we've just seen something historic happened digitally in the halls of Congress when the four CEO's of four, the biggest tech companies in the World Amazon and apple and facebook and Google were required to testify before Congress, and while there they were put in the position of having to defend their companies against claims that they've just become too big that they've become gigantic to the detriment of the general public that they are using their market power crush competition that they're driven by nothing but their own prophets that they're amassing huge amounts of data and that basically they're running afoul of antitrust laws. Some people are calling this big tex big tobacco moment, which is a callback to the nineteen ninety s when seven. CEOS of Big Tobacco companies all had to appear before Congress, and be accused of doing bad things to the public but is this fair in this case? Are these companies really doing bad things because of their size are they really too big and are you the consumer losing out because they've become big or are you actually benefiting because of the size of these firms? So we think in these questions, we have the makings of debate and that's what. We're going to do, but we're going to do it a little bit differently from our normal approach. Today, we're going to be hosting this conversation in a format that we call a to disagree, and that's where we streamline things a little bit. Go to the news we find the dividing lines, and then we bring you what we do best a debate in the form of a conversation between just two debaters not our usual to against to instead we're one on one and instead of having a resolution, we're really going with a question and the question this time is. Should Washington break up big tech should Washington break up big tech I'm here with two debaters who are GONNA be arguing yes or no to that question Zephyr teach out and Andrew McAfee. So I Zephyr you've debated with us before on stage and I just want to say welcome back to intelligence squared. So excited to be back on. Thank you for having me for such an important discussion. It's a pleasure and for folks who don't know you are a law professor, you're an activist. And as it happens, you came out with a book, this July, the title of which break them up recovering our freedom from big big tech and big money. So which side of the debater you're going to be on again today I definitely think we need to be breaking up these big tech behemoths and hence your book. Okay. Now arguing against your position arguing no on the. Question of whether Washington should break attack. I. WanNa Welcome Andrew McAfee Andrew we've we've been wanting to get you into one of our debates for a long time. We are delighted to have you joining us for this one and all it took was a global pandemic right. Thank you for having us. It's a pleasure and for folks who don't know you also are a bestselling author. You're a principal research scientist at MIT. You're also the CO founder and Co Director of the initiative on the digital economy. So once again, welcome to intelligence squared. So the way that this format will go we'll go in four rounds, the first round Each of the debaters will be making a brief opening remarks about their position on the the question before us and then We will have you know along and lengthy back and forth discussion. Towards. The end we're GONNA go to our third round, which will be where each gets to put a the toughest question they can to their opponent, and then a fourth round will be closing remarks and wrapping things up. So there's a lot to discuss a lot to argue here and we're GONNA start with our opening rounds. That's where each get two minutes to make the case in their position on the question would should Washington break-up big tech? So our first debater will teach out who will be arguing? Yes. On the question of whether Washington, should break up big tax Zephyr. The floor is yours. We are in a moment of a genuine crisis and our democracy, and so I want to start with some first principles. The principles of equality and freedom. Central Job of democracy and government. is to. INSERVICE of those goals, protecting citizens from any group or any person wielding too much power from abuses of excessive private power from private governor Mench basically arising out of the corporate form Anti monopoly antitrust is a deep and powerful American tradition was at the heart of the American revolution. Think about the tea party protests the great anti monopolist of our country include ebd boys who saw. How monopoly power was used to crush lack political power after the civil war and Franklin Delano Roosevelt who is arguably the greatest trust buster this country's ever seen and nineteen forty to nine eighty. We lead the world anti monopoly using antitrust campaign finance laws, public utility regulation, labor laws, and other tools to ensure that no private company had too much power but since nineteen eighty, when Reagan, tour down. Anti monopoly laws and their spirits. Democrats, and Republicans alike have failed and instead embraced a policy of radical concentration and the result is the world we live in now.

Washington Big Tobacco Congress Andrew Mcafee John Donvan Amazon CEO Google Franklin Delano Roosevelt Facebook Mench Reagan Zephyr Apple MIT Professor Principal Research Scientist
The Rigor Of Transmedia Production

Topgold Audio Clips

03:29 min | Last week

The Rigor Of Transmedia Production

"Hey. It's topcoats clips five, three four. Block on a busy July twenty, nine, twenty, twenty they about the rigor up producing contents. For creative media, students, Detroit animators, Enga- mark designers. Work Inside the Creative Campus Nick Glendale Ireland and I want to see if it's possible to set up lanes of academic depth. As well as to produce content on the fly with career students follow a rigor. Of expression. So. I start my rigor with words a word document that they can see that students can see in the form of a brief or mission objector. I use an Amazon model of not having more than two pages of my brace with hyper links. That goto examples of how the content might be done but start with tax, and actually that's how I started the blog post to with tex what you're hearing right now. Can Be, done text. Using transcription programs such as archer. Were audio. Bursts. The auditor Osher by product is always better than ninety percent for me when a use an external mic. I'm using the Mike Right. Now of the Samsung note nine and I'm not sure it'll be high enough quality to produces a transcript from the first go but you know this. It starts with words. In text form. Normally I have my students take those words and try to imagine how they might be presented as short clips of text information. Headlines titles. Key words, phrases, things that can be pushed out on twitter. Or on facebook or on Lincoln. And I tried to do that with all my semi compelling content. That could try to do that with every blog posts that I make on inside viewed I e. The. Point is this. Very few things you do. We'll get noticed if you don't offer them in places where people are already used. To read. Or to here to see. So, in today's world of socially connected people. Twitter facebook instagram linked in. Youtube. Those are all places that are common watering holes for for folks who are in my thought space. And most importantly. Most students have at least two those watering holes as places a look to see the spray Spiratou from folks that want to work with for jobs, they may want to get as creative interns or paid employees in the near future. So my goal is To get some form of process. which believe reaches the rigor of production. To put all this content in different media formats in different places. That's the rigor. And what I know is if I have students write some things down or sketch some notes out that they're gonNA end up with some really high quality learning on the back of it all. Is The kinesthetic to mention that seems to evolve. In other parts of my speaker content or on my blog, I've talked about offering people for different lanes of access to educational material starting with the techs. Access. Making sure. There are images or video clips. Allowing some of that stuff to occur live in HD format while also ensuring that there's an asynchronous method to rewind and play it back as slow or as fast as they want to. It's all part of the rigor of doing it right. You WanNa, follow my educational adventure using the Hashtag. Dig. PED- digital pedagogy. The PD you can check it out. I. Handle Top gold. That's me on all good social networks.

Twitter Osher Creative Campus Facebook Nick Glendale Ireland Detroit Samsung Enga Youtube Auditor Spiratou Point Lincoln
"facebook" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

Gadget Lab Podcast

11:32 min | 5 months ago

"facebook" Discussed on Gadget Lab Podcast

"Hear that a lot from our colleagues at wired they remember like with great detail the last time they were on the show such as when Brian Barrett comes back on. He's like it's been seventeen months since I was on the show through. This is that we always want to have our colleagues on the show and we're so happy that you're here and when was the last time you are on the show by the way the late fifties were very very early to podcasting? We were doing podcasts. Back when some people weren't even listening to terrestrial Radio Okay Stephen. Let's get right to it. You were here because you wrote a book. It's called facebook the inside story. I have it right here in front of me folks. This is a tome. I don't know if you just heard that thud on the table. But this is like you could lift weights with this thing You spent years on this book. Stephen and you had a fair amount of access to people like Mark Zuckerberg and other executives like Sheryl Sandberg in the process. It's a fantastic book. What compelled you to start writing? This book did so. I can't even pinpoint the date. It was August twenty seventh two thousand fifteen when Mark Zuckerberg wrote on his feed. We put up story up saying a billion people had been on facebook the day before. And this wasn't how many people signed up for the services like a billion people in twenty four hours had been on facebook and I thought about that. Had that ever happened before like the World Cup gets a billion people but that's not an interactive network. Where someone could post something in theory you can get to everybody and old people's individual networks were intertwined there so I know that his ambitions were huge and facebook was doing very well but the reality of it made me think while this is something new how I tell the story. I've got to tell the story. This is my story and to tell who did it how they did it. And what it means and you had written a book about Google previously. Talk a little bit about that experience and how it compared to your writing of the facebook story. My previous book was called in the plex was about Google and the process was similar in that I went to them and said I want to write a book. give me access to your people. you don't get to say anything about the contents you'll see it when it's done and I thought it would be pretty much a similar process. I would write this. Try to put together a narrative of the the story of Google where people will be able to understand Google after they read the book and the story. You know almost like a novel would have a climaxing. We'd have tension and attention in this store or the Google story was it's experienced China where it went through this moral dilemma And I thought this'll be pulling similar and facebook. Maybe THEIR MORAL DILEMMA. Might be this Program they had Internet Dot Org. Were they spread around the world and did something was kind of unfair competitors where they would give away free data if you use facebook and if you were competing with facebook People would pay for your data so you facebook would basically get a head start all over the world as it turned out Internet dot org was the least of facebook. Doing the course of this book because It's actually a year from me to start researching after that post because I had to convince facebook to do it and get my affairs in order and The first thing I did was I went to Africa with Mark Zuckerberg to Nigeria He was treated like a hero. I later realized this was peak. Facebook things were going so great. Everyone love Mark Zuckerberg Though facebook how does issues was still pretty popular and then the election came in November. Two Thousand Sixteen and the BIT flips. Everything changed and for the next three years and to the current day but when I was doing the book Facebook was in hot water. Deservedly so so. The book really became an exercise in to saying. Here's what happened to facebook and I'm going back in the past that. Tell you how this happened. What went wrong and why it went wrong. down to pinpointing individual incidents where facebook went down the path perdition. Well you actually go all the way back in the book which I really appreciated because by getting into you know where facebook came from and how it was created in the environment in which has created gives us a lot of context about why the product was so important to people so illustrate pretty clearly in the book that the the idea of building a social network was not a new idea. There were things that came before Like six degrees and Runs through in my space and things that people were actually engaging in You know it was during the period when friend was moving from a noun to verb Right so all those other social networks fizzled. None of them took off. What was it in particular about facebook that allowed it to not only thrive but to completely dominate. I think that the roots of it really were facebook and I did not try to connect everyone in the world. It was a college network and it was something that Mark Zuckerberg in particular wanted to see happen. You know the most successful products are often things. The people build for themselves so he was a college student. He understood the way college students interact with each other and he was building project after project in his sophomore year. Not going to classes much and a lot of them had to do with providing utility for the college experience one of his earlier programs was something the web. When you looked at a class. You'll be able to see what friends of yours had signed up for the class so you could hang out with them. The class steeler notes other kinds of stuff and For the facebook which is what it was called when it was launched in February. Two Thousand Four. It was a way that people can learn more about each other and maybe find other people in their college community or they wanted to get to know better and find out what was up with them. So if your friend had a bunch of other friends that you wanted to get in touch with learn more about them you could use that because he was able to fix the dials and be really effective in building. This initial network. He had a head start. I believe in making a product that people would want to use when he extended it out to the world at large so I think the idea that it was constrained At first led to its success and being unconstrained and unleashed upon the world. Later on I have always argued that the like button is the most important instrument in facebook's journey. I'm glad you serve because I devoted quite a lot of space to the you really did So I WANNA talk about it a little bit but I i. I want you to tell the story of how it came to be because it didn't appear it sort of stumbled into existence right The like button started when A couple of Facebook's engineers wanted a more expressive way too quickly comment on a post Instead of saying Reading a whole comment you know you go in one little flick whether you approve of it or not and Facebook I didn't like this idea of Berg. Didn't like this idea because he felt that. If you had the ability to respond to something with one click. You wouldn't make a comment so various people have taken over the project and tried to push it I'd be different names at first. Then they finally settled on like and It wasn't until they were able to run an experiment. Prove that when you release the like button and you know they did it. In a couple of countries Comments would actually go up because it was a good signal. The Post should be circulated more gave it a higher ranking and people's newsfeed but I think the real significance came when they spread the like button out through pass facebook's boundaries onto the web they got millions and millions of people with websites and businesses to put the like button on their pages and that gave facebook. This data of WHO's doing what and you know On the web and basically facebook became throughout the world and that really was a signal to facebook that their business model eventually will be built around that data. So I really think that was the start of the big data cascade. That would come to signify what facebook was in a business sense and And also in a sense where they got into some trouble later on the interesting to think about algorithms now. The word algorithms become such a part of our vernacular to the point where people kind of hand wave at it or some people joke about not really knowing what it means. But it's this idea that all these data signals are creating these algorithms that inform the things that we see and experience on the Internet and this is really one of the earliest like most consumer-friendly versions of those signals just constantly telling facebook. Who what you're into and how. That's that's ultimately going to impact your experience on the web and is also going to tell a lot about yourself so I talk about. How a researcher not at facebook outside of facebook determined that With think fifteen likes if you see someone likes for fifteen likes. You'll know as much about him as you know someone you know casually and thirty like she'll know him as much as no one of your real friends With a hundred likes you'll know really as much as you know someone really well one hundred likes. You'll be parallel with that and with three hundred lakes. Facebook will know as much about you as you know your spouse. This is the personality test guys rates. Stillman Kaczynski Yeah exactly. You're up to it. Yeah so David. Still Stillman and Michael Kaczynski was the well you know. Oh yeah right still well. Well yes it's still And Michael Kaczynski were these researchers at Cambridge University which turns out to be a center for A lot of activity around this because They're colleague a guy named Alexander. Kogan was the person who got Cambridge Analytica involved in whole story And it was you know. He tried to bring in cousins Kaczynski and still well into his project and They didn't like it in part because came genetic wasn't GonNa pay them enough money and Kozinski later turned out. This hasn't been reported before To the person who dropped the dime on the whole project and I told The Guardian that this thing was going on while another massively important development and facebook's history was news feed in the book you talk about how one of your earliest meetings Suck Coburg. If not the first meeting you had with him he he was noodling. This this was like in the works but they did not mention it to you know now well. He hardly mentioned anything on first reading. I met him in two thousand six entrepreneur Ya. I thought I was reading a story about what was called Web. Two O at the time where user generated content was starting to appear on the web and heard about. This company was really successful in the college market The companies that we were focusing on in this Newsweek story. Where my space youtube and flicker But you know I thought it would be good to talk to him and get a couple of quotes From him and I arranged the meet him..

facebook Mark Zuckerberg Google Brian Barrett researcher Michael Kaczynski Stephen Sheryl Sandberg Kaczynski Stillman Kaczynski Cambridge University Kogan Cambridge Analytica steeler Kozinski Suck Coburg China
"facebook" Discussed on The Information's 411

The Information's 411

01:38 min | 6 months ago

"facebook" Discussed on The Information's 411

"Friday everybody information's one at your weekly look at the stories that the information published and other things in the news that we feel fit to comment on my name. Is Tom Dotan. I am one of the reporters at the information this week. We have two segments first off. I'm talking to turn out in DC. Chris wrote a story about facebook. And its relationship with Publicans Democrats like to call the Republic Rats. Not just just Joshua folks But over the last few years Republicans have emerged somewhat surprisingly to be before closer allies to facebook than the Democrats have love I say surprising because there's a very strong bond historically between The Obama Administration and Democrats overall and facebook and and that has frayed significantly since trump has been elected. And now we're at a place where you're seeing Democratic presidential candidates speaking out openly against facebook talking about regulating it breaking it up all the sort and Republicans. They're a bit mixed but definitely are much more on the side of protecting facebook for interesting self interested interested reasons. Then I'm talking to Kevin McLaughlin about Ginny Rometty. CEO IBM who earlier this week IBM announced she was stepping down. So Kevin and I have a look back at the genie ready era at. IBM The things that worked things. That didn't a lot more talked about Watson cloud computing and also what the company looks. It's like going forward. So that's that's the episode. It's a good one. Nothing applies. So let's just get on over to my talk with Chris.

facebook IBM Chris Kevin McLaughlin Tom Dotan Republicans Ginny Rometty Obama Administration CEO Watson
"facebook" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

03:43 min | 7 months ago

"facebook" Discussed on Murder Minute

"Percent of mountain city. And this girl now I do know in passing but she is a good girl girl and was brought up right. You can tell everything is you're welcome and hello and thank you. And she is just a sweet girl. I will be praying for a a message directed at Billie Jean said. Fuck you and bill and your fucking so-called little baby fuck them. I hope they di Di di throughout a six day trial. The prosecution made the case. That general friend did everyone. She bullied including the murder victims on facebook and then accused them all of harassing and stalking her and that she and Barbara pushed. Daniel's father and boyfriend to kill when Christie groover hoover another daughter of Barbara and buddy took the stand. She testified that she did not have a good relationship with her family especially her mom she also said said while she tried to maintain a good relationship with general. Her sister made that difficult to now has trouble differentiating between jokes and reality. She said giving the example of a time now claimed she had untreatable cancer. Janelle had been coddled by their parents. Her entire life's at Christie and and she knew how to manipulate them. The defense tried to show that nells Bo Jamie could have type the emails in question. A neuropsychologist colleges testified that generic functions intellectually at a fourth grade level so how could should be competent enough to hack computers or know what she was typing in the end both journal and Barbara were found guilty of conspiracy to commit murder. Additionally Barbara was found guilty of tampering with evidence for tearing photos of the murder victims in front of police both women continued to deny any involvement in the murders after the verdict was read loved. Guan's of Billy Payne and Billie Jean Hayworth hugged and cried. It was like tons lifted off of me Beverly Garland. Billy's mom told Johnson cities W J H al TV it was just like you're sitting there on pins and needles but finally justice for Billy and Billy Jean. It's just like we can breathe now cat. Fishing doesn't usually lead to the slaying of innocent people but it does bring harm to countless people. An estimated the eighty three million facebook accounts are fake and nearly thirty percent of people have been harassed or made to feel uncomfortable by people assuming false identities experts cite boredom loneliness and revenge as common reasons and like many catfish have a history of compulsive lying and low self self esteem for the families of Billy Payne and Billie Jean Hayworth. These issues go far beyond statistics. They are life or death. Breath matters that stole their beloved kin. Billie Jean is remembered for her love of the outdoors. A good bargain and spending time with little tyler. Dr Billy was an avid coin. Collector who shared genes penchant for flea. Markets both attended church and cherish to their families the year following their murders in obituary for billy's father Pablo ran into local paper. It said he died of a broken heart and this has been murder minute for true crime anytime. Download the murder minute APP or follow us on Instagram at murder minute..

Billie Jean murder Billie Jean Hayworth Dr Billy Barbara Billy Payne Billy Jean facebook conspiracy to commit murder Janelle Bo Jamie Christie groover untreatable cancer Christie Pablo Daniel Beverly Garland stalking Guan
"facebook" Discussed on Murder Minute

Murder Minute

09:46 min | 7 months ago

"facebook" Discussed on Murder Minute

"City with her family. Seven years prior and her take on the area makes the friendly hometown. Welcome sign seem like a farce people. Here do not like outsiders. She told twenty twenty twenty and two thousand fifteen chronic health problems including type one diabetes and anxiety issues led her to spend most of her time at home with restrict parents. And although like billy she was in her early thirties emotionally. She seemed a lot younger. Her facebook profile was full of photos of puppies and hearts with a bio that read. I'm a very sweet caring person for denial. Social Media. Media was more than an occasional pastime. facebook allowed her to feel connected to people outside of her family. She was even known to try to hug. Acquaintances insist strangers who were taken aback by gesture. Shortly after they would discover that she had sent them a facebook friend request when journals. Dad known known as buddy mentioned yet another one of these instances to a sheriff in passing the deputy suggested he do away with computer. But that computer buddy buddy said was all his daughter had in two thousand nine. How finally began making in real life friends with some of the locals including billy? Billy that may have been the beginning of her obsession with Billy Attorney Brooks told the sun he included her in social occasions like going rock climbing coming just hanging out to someone like do now. who leads such a boring sheltered life? That must've seemed like something special. Pharmacy Clark Tracey Tracy. Greenwell befriended do now too. She and her friends felt sorry for now. She said given how sheltered and six she often was tracy he introduced to. Now to billy's cousin. Jamie heard a romance blossomed which generic kept secret from her parents. But many have speculated that genetic also also had a crush on billy the next year when billy started dating Billie Jean. Jean Auel accused the Free Group of cyber bullying an unfriendly her on facebook. She told her parents that they bombarded her. With threats of violence bothered her with prank phone calls and drove past their home just to frighten her as for why they turned on her donell stated that she was simply too pretty Billie Billie Jean and their friends insisted at the opposite had been happening that donell was harassing them. The day after the murders Janelle her parents denied knowing anything about what happened. Denounce Boyfriend Jamie said. He was clueless to at the police station. After failing a lie detector test he asked investigators episode question. Shen is the here. Why in the world would this have anything to do? With this case footage from the police interview shows Jamie slumped into a black office chair and the Deputies Office. He's wearing a baseball cap and sunglasses. Even though it was after ten pm him and he just looks uncomfortable. And one point A. W. Leans towards him and says I'll tell you what's going to make you feel better when you tell us the truth. He then asked Jamie flat out who shot him he did he who buddy. Yes Jamie had just accused Gino's father a former marine who is getting up in years and relied on an oxygen tank to breathe normally. He then agrees to help. Detectives catch the man. He Calls Buddy with a recorder running and says to him while they're pointing fingers. He got rid of everything that was from bills. Didn't you yes buddy confirms. He had which was enough for officers to arrest the man in the middle of the night given buddies reputation for being gun loving and gun toting. Police took extra precautions when they approached the home. Good thing they did because as the approached but he reached behind his back for gun they were able to arrest him though and questioned him at length a cold blooded killer or protector of your family in officer prompted him. Which one are you? I'm a protector of my family to start with you replied but I did not do this. Then the detective told Buddy he knew he was sick and tired of people attacking and harassing his daughter. This approach sympathizing with the man started working but he spoke of threats on his life and his wife's since the bullying started visibly shaken and fighting tears. He added when you hear are people plotting to catch your daughter in a restroom and murder her. They want to rape her because she's a virgin. Several hours into the questioning body was full on crying. One of the officers asked whether his wife Barbara and Nell knew what he had done. No no he replied. That wasn't exactly a confession but it was close. So the officers. Let him call Barbara. Once she answered Buddy said before you find out from somebody else I want you to know I was involved in it. I did it some of it later in an interview with ABC ABC News Barbara detailed issues. She had with that confession. He was without oxygen and pressed for hours. She said which could have led him to make false statements. He didn't mean when investigators searched the potter home. They found an estimated sixty firearms as well as knives placed throughout the rooms but he even had an ammunition belt hanging over his oxygen tank in the living room. They found images of billy and and Billie Jean photos that had been posted on facebook on one. The Word Bitch was written not only that but the photos all appear appear to have been ripped in half like those stalking victim in a lifetime. Movie detective sees a range of items from the house including the photos does a computer and buddies truck which held garbage bags full of shredded documents. One of the investigators took on the tedious task of taping. Those shreds of paper back together forming over one hundred pages of emails between Barbara. And someone called Chris. WHO warned that billy and Billie Jean had been plotting to kill their daughter and this Chris Person He supposedly worked for the CIA based on the IP address? Those e mails didn't come from faraway office but from the Potter's home computer. The stomping ground of most of genetic interactions had the seemingly naive woman with limited social skills catfish her own parents like many catfish ploys. The email conversations station started out. Pretty Benign. Chris I emailed Barbara around the time. Billy and Billy Jean announced their engagement claiming to be an old friend of canals. Who wanted to look out for her? Gradually the messages grew so frequent. That Barbara forged a friendship with a persona. They share the details about their daily lives and families Barbara even started calling him son and signing her mom as the tension between Billy Lee. And Billy Jean heightened. Chris claimed that Billy dealt drugs and that Billie Jean and her friends were quote. No good horse. He claims if they wanted to rape now because she was a virgin and cut off her head and that they had to be stopped at all costs in one of her responses responses Barbara Roach. We've had enough. No one wants to kill anyone but we will journal cell phone records revealed more telling information mation not only did. She seem aware of her father. And boyfriends plans to kill billy and Billy Jean but she stood by while it happened acting as a go-between go between for the men around four. Am on the day of the murders. She texted Jamie yes. He's leaving now. I can hear the car then. I love you text expert ace APP when you get back shortly. After the young parents met their brutal deaths in August two thousand thirteen and police arrested John and Barbara. A few months later body was found guilty of the murders and given two life sentences for testifying vying against him. Jamie received a lesser sentence of twenty five years in prison. Prosecutors next task was more difficult convicting the mother and daughter of first degree murder even though they weren't present at the scene states arguments hinged on email records and Chris's identity their investigation instigation led to a police officer named Chris who had gone to school with Gino. The man had only vague memories of her but he obviously made an impact she even stole stole his facebook profile photo to pair with the CIA persona. In addition to those damning e mails investigators. Found Post Journal seemed to have written written under pseudonyms on an online forum called topics many were shared by the state at the trial. Including these excerpts. I know Billie Jean. That bitch has lived with more guys and had sex with eighty.

billy Billie Billie Jean facebook Barbara Roach Jamie Billy Jean Buddy officer Chris Billy Attorney Brooks Jean Auel CIA Billy Lee rape Potter Billie Jean Gino baseball twenty twenty twenty
"facebook" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

Software Engineering Daily

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"facebook" Discussed on Software Engineering Daily

"And we kind of got the entire system working in a few months and launched it, I think announced it in may and launched it in July, and I joined in January, and so it was it was a pretty fast turnaround. And because we had again because we had been entirely focused on just getting it to work as opposed to anything else. You know, people were concerned that we weren't using oh, author or two, I can't remember one at the time. And so there is this other engineer named Luke shepherd who came along who cared a lot about off. And so he can have retrofitted, the system to be off compliant, and we kind of went from there to with the retrospect of time, what is it about the cultural differences between Facebook? Book and Microsoft, or perhaps Facebook in the broader cultures of companies that allowed you to ship that thing in four months when it was stagnating and Microsoft. I mean, I think there are a lot of things I and this is a lesson. I've painfully learned because I've made this mistake a number of times, especially later in my career at Facebook strategy is important, but you can't be you have to find a way to balance strategy with both kind of simplicity and customer focus. I think a lot of the mistakes Microsoft, made at the time were strategizing around, what was in sort of Microsoft, self interest, and what are the things that could be built, but without a really like sort of thinking of technology, and thinking of its use cases as opposed to going to people today and understanding their pain points and making them better and. And then to just getting innovators dilemma applies to more than just the, the sort of the philosophy behind it. I think applies to more than just products and markets. It also applies to teams I think it's easy at a place at a large company, and I, I think as any company gets larger probably falls victim to this, where it's like, if you could why throw three people out of problem when you can throw fifty or one hundred it's like the line from contact which is why by one when you can buy for twice the cost..

Facebook Microsoft Luke shepherd engineer four months
"facebook" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

01:46 min | 2 years ago

"facebook" Discussed on Stuff They Don't Want You To Know Audio

"But in when he thirteen facebook said it discovered and fixed a quote unquote bug the bug was that when a user downloaded their facebook file which you can still do today and i'll give you all the information they say they have on you it will give you all the earliest the information you're allowed to see they have on you all your likes comments etc your messages the thing was that in two thousand thirteen this quote unquote bug included not just people's visible contact information for their friends but also their friends shadow contact information so they were seen stuff that they weren't supposed to see in the problem with the bug for facebook was not that all of this stuff was lumped together it was that it had shown people that it existed so the extent of the connections that it built around every user was supposed to only be visible to facebook yeah and they they admit that this is the in their phrase it's getting information from a friend or someone you know or mike no but what does that mean that means anyone at any point who might have somehow labeled your phone number your email or even your physical trying not to curse your even your physical address will be added to that that agglomeration vin formation that is you so whether it's the pigglywiggly hot mattie whether it's a an old email address from college that a friend of yours has you know and it's like it's like.

facebook mattie
"facebook" Discussed on Tear Down Show

Tear Down Show

01:51 min | 2 years ago

"facebook" Discussed on Tear Down Show

"One of my disappointments with wine is that it is not wi fi connected one of the reasons i stopped drinking wine was the lack of wifi connectivity of my wine bottle yes i prefer my wind bluetooth connected no because it's only short range and unless it's got the bluetooth connection to the internet then i guess that's okay so i'm a guy who likes obviously connected bronx tests like products like this give everything a bad name i it's a product that you kinda just look and this isn't gonna make it and there's so many reasons why and so there's really there's really no reason why this company would would make it i mean so it's not surprising so i'm just i just wish companies like this one happened because it gives everyone a bad name in the space so that's all i have to say about it kuby fertile facebook i wanna know have you contemplated closing down your facebook page icon played it but i haven't how far did that complicate contemplation gone giving it some thought i just can't because i have companies that i probably i don't wanna shut it down because i want the company pages so you need it for business purposes you need to maintain your page all right so that's a very logical reason to maintain your page now have you seen a lot of your friends make big announcements about them getting off a facebook couple and how long do you think that's going to last.

facebook
"facebook" Discussed on Talking Politics

Talking Politics

01:38 min | 2 years ago

"facebook" Discussed on Talking Politics

"Is that the experimental everything so there is nothing in human behavior that facebook does not think is appropriate subject full experimentation manipulation what was this ways of looking at facebook by the way is to go into it not as user but as a potential appetizer and when you do that you see different face the offer encounter a beautifully designed at automated system which is designed entirely to help you target your message at groups of people and it's absolutely magical it's a wonderful piece of software design once you get into it you begin to realize how we got here because among other things the software will make helpful suggestions but other audiences you might not have thought and that that was back a long way but it but essentially you never look at facebook the same way again if you've been in advertiser potential advertiser one of the problems that academic institutions have in exploring this of course you get ethical considerations quite popularizing really quickly i mean for example academics could do testing to see how leather say anti semitic messages managed to get targeted but you can get that passed an ethics board but it does happen and that's the real revelation about this stuff so do you think we take the second half of the scandal outrage at the moment which is this much of influence these two elections trump and now the stories about brexit to with breakfast moved onto this other firm.

facebook
"facebook" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

The WIRED Podcast

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"facebook" Discussed on The WIRED Podcast

"Yeah i think that's a very good point about doing something to make change but i would say that equally yukon late we won't get rid of facebook facebook if you look at it and look at it beyond this bigger context of facebook the web site book the family of companies all the group of companies whatever they call it which is facebook facebook messenger instagram watts up i forgotten something almost all of those have at least a billion users there's obviously a lot of crossover facebook touch is different parts of every well i would say everybody's life but a lot of people's lives people facebook is the internet in places as much as we as much as we've said there is it's been cases where it's been i upon people there are communities that live and survive and actually do most of their communication and social of facebook and they consume their news and they consume their friends photos and events and everything for facebook so i didn't think is going anywhere no i'd like to start a movement this moment on facebook no no the final point that everyone join me in the mass migration from facebook to the matt hancock cap yes now is the time people that we set up a new network built around the majesty of matt hancock so it encourage you all to join me there and continue light your life on the mat hanko cap yeah okay that's it for cambridge we'll no doubt be back on this as the news continues to get going going going but we will very quickly to quickly finish up on a story that we published this week about the clean meat industry now this isn't just a very well washed chicken is it this is something early she can here what is this so so clean meats basically the concept i wonder if you know i think i love you be quite familiar with this idea is.

yukon facebook matt hancock
"facebook" Discussed on Exponent

Exponent

01:54 min | 2 years ago

"facebook" Discussed on Exponent

"I was about to say something is version version three of the garbage truck sorry are they have all this them all this excess data like pictures of my dog that i post on a would she's not being terrible so they'll all this excess data and they traded to other data and are they giving away their data sir but think about it if there are trading with yelp for example right what does yelp end up having yelp ends up having local restaurant data and facebook data and then facing with his trip advisor and they have traveled data and they have facebook data so so those companies are in better shape they have much more of the users for more personalized experiences all those sorts of things but whereas facebook facebook now has personal data plus restaurant data plus travel data they get all of it and you think of i'm being the center of this data exchange where all these other companies get facebook data and they get all those other company's data the net result is facebook has all the data this is where i started to sink back to facebook around this time and it's very much the case that everybody it's an example of a company that from a strategic perspective for example the way they dealt with instagram and what's up like they strategically quite taught but it is not always been the case that they have been managed that way and i started to think back to the time when this was instituted and this is very much facebook one point zero this is the same company that almost miss mobile because it was playing around doing a whole bunch of other stuff and the other stuff that they were playing around with was instead of focusing on that shift to mobile they were playing around trying to be a platform and this is where i started to think about like why would they do this like if you're sitting on the most valuable advertising business in the world and the critical component of that advertising business is the data that you have on uses why on earth would you give away the data and it.

yelp advisor facebook instagram
"facebook" Discussed on Exponent

Exponent

01:55 min | 2 years ago

"facebook" Discussed on Exponent

"What is it was interesting but let's get to the point we are not talking about massage about may's book which we talked about one or two times previously on this program talked about a lot of the issues that have come to the forefront this week but what was so interesting about sort of dividing take very sort of self cystic lens to this you know i was i was almost it was it was this whole thing's been very weird so just as everyone knows facebook cameras is alleged to have data from facebook that they acquired in violation the facebook terms of service and their and facebook knew about this a while ago they said delete the state are the like we did and then apparently they didn't and facebook now wants to you know there's there's been a big brouhaha to say the least probably the one of the biggest brewers running facebook that we've seen about the state and what's so kind of weird about it is is there's no there's no new news here there's nothing there's nothing i mean i guess cambridge acquired it in the way they did and allegedly didn't delete it is is something but even that is not very surprising when she back up and understand the circumstances of this case it's kind of crazy i feel like they've been folks and myself included kind of frustrated at the way that facebook was treating this dada for so long and we're coming at it threes lleida and all of a sudden as a result of the context it suddenly snapped into focus and it's become it's just it's gone straight into the guy and i guess it just goes to show that how much the context of i mean this is something that i think is consistent with something that you and i have both talked about which is the important of narratives and i think the idea of the data leaking in the absence of the narrative probably didn't upset people so much as.

facebook brewers cambridge
"facebook" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

Slate's Political Gabfest

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"facebook" Discussed on Slate's Political Gabfest

"Right and so i mean we're the product here and but also they've always been claiming that they were this bridge between us and the marketers right that they they had our data but they wouldn't give our data to the advertisers into third parties they would target you kind of keep your data in this very safely and and what we found here is they actually they had this program up until two thousand fourteen where they would let app developers plug into facebook's data and and get information about you if you sign up for the app but also all of your friends and didn't sign up for anything did i the part that really gives me pause about this particular iteration of data brining i mean we could all be on facebook is i sent up some stupid personality app and then like all your data goes to this company which is insane we had the spectacle so mark zuckerberg has been holed up in a tastefully tastefully decorated bunker but he emerged to say that facebook was going to take they're going to do regrets the mistakes and they're going to really take measures that are going to be better they've out it'd be better which is perhaps the thirty fourth time in two years if facebook has come out and said oh we're totally changing we're taking it to heart why should we take this one seriously oh i mean i think a better question is are we going to be different this time because we've always all those thirty four other times i mean the reason facebook's keeps doing it is because from the very start the cycle goes like this there's some huge thing they push beyond where they know their users are comfortable with everyone is outrageous because facebook is like an outrage machine so you know everyone it's easy to get outraged on facebook and then he puts out a post that's like we're sorry we're like really taking start the first one was we hear you calm down breathe that was like they said that yes yeah i remember that was over like their introduction of news feed right.

facebook mark zuckerberg two years
"facebook" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:10 min | 2 years ago

"facebook" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Or first amendment issues no i don't think we are i think you know for this particular issue fortunately the federal trade commission actually got a consent decree against facebook in twenty eleven that specified certain things they were not supposed to do they were not supposed to make misrepresentations about privacy or security they were supposed to require obtain affirmative express consent from their users for a lot of data uses and i think that as we further investigate this we may see serious fines finally for a company that you i think has managed to avoid regulation in for far too long sell some of our listeners are reacting really struggling with what they should do and how a facebook affects their lives andy on twitter rights is it definitely feels inescapable of been wanting to quit for years because of how invasive it is but it's also become essential to stay connected with friends and family especially since moving halfway across the country mike wrote on our website facebook is not a part of the infrastructure you can exist on the internet without ever needing facebook frank what do you think what do you think people ought to do to be able to stay engage in used social media for the great tool that it is but also protect themselves well i think there are better and worse forms of social media so for example no i used to be on facebook a great deal of time i still am on it but say i've moved more to instagram you know or things like that it's like if you can maybe find forms of social media where maybe there is not so much of a threat potential i think we've seen a lot of the threats of facebook so being criticized throughout this hour but i think ultimately though this is a regulatory matter i've heard both emily and ben talk about the need for regulation i completely agree because the problem is that even if your facebook facebook maybe on you in the sense that they have shadow profiles so this is a bit like the equifax situation right nobody can choose not to be have a file with equifax so we have to regulate them and i think the same thing is going on here is on the line from providence rhode island.

facebook equifax andy twitter instagram emily ben
"facebook" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"facebook" Discussed on On Point with Tom Ashbrook | Podcasts

"Third party applications to get this data from people's friends without their consent millions of people's information was harvested by third parties to which we do not know their names or how it's used so though though this isn't going on any more that in for information is out there and i would think would be safe to assume that people are using it in all sorts of ways that we don't understand so for those of us who are not tech savvy what should we be concerned about or what should we be doing now to protect ourselves ben well there are a number of things that one can do modifying the privacy settings on facebook but ultimately it's important to keep in mind that a company like facebook has every incentive to bury those settings to make them difficult to understand and it will never give you the option to opt out of its business model right it can only make tweaks around the edges so i think the most important thing that people who are concerned about this could do is to contact their representatives to actually build some political momentum around this issue because this ultimately needs to be a regulatory solution yeah and i just add you know the business model of facebook people have known that it was kind of gross in the way that it would target ads to you and we were grossed out by seeing micro targeted ads that new let's say that i have a son and that he is going to be three soon and we're gonna have a birthday party and all the ads are about that and people found that disquieting but i think what may impel people to actually contact the representatives now is realizing that the exact same mechanisms that allow people to serve us those ads are the mechanisms that allowed russian propagandists and companies like cambridge analytic to actually influence the democratic processes in nations and those are two very different the stakes are much higher in one of those scenarios but it's the exact same technology and the basis of which is facebook's.

facebook cambridge
"facebook" Discussed on Slate's If Then

Slate's If Then

02:32 min | 2 years ago

"facebook" Discussed on Slate's If Then

"Um it in the newsfeed it made me think much more about the question of of happiness of satisfaction of mental health than it did about news about fake news about propaganda about hate speech i tend to think that facebook has the people at facebook have tended to ignore or downgrade the rather obvious influence that the medium has had on our public sphere you know they're they're they're not comfortable with the fact that human beings perform politics on facebook they would rather we did less of that they they're not comfortable with the fact that they don't seem to have an answer because the problem is no answer to promoting uh work from a set of responsible publications and downgrading work that comes from publications that you or i or people who you know read slate subscribe to sleep i guess would think of as response of right they they don't want to be in that editorial role it makes them feel really really uncomfortable really weird but they love the abstract they love talking about meaningful social interactions the problem is the word meaningful is meaningless so so just sent a threat to track a little bit i mean of course second order fair a democracy to properly function people have to have access said good information so that they can vote meaningfully as meaning that word is and you know that's why we have laws about media ownership in and you know dominance and things like that when it comes to how we get information and and facebook has largely evaded a lot of those regulations because they're not traditional right there is a social platform one thing that they came up for me though in what you're saying is that facebook i think it's really resident for me that the think of facebook as a place it doesn't want to encourage political communication because i look at how many activists that i've seen um you know particularly black lives matter activists that that have you know been kicked off facebook put in facebook jail for a short amount of time because they were talking about very difficult issues or they were making a post that address keno dear white people or something like that and and and so it's not just a matter of bought set or a matter of fake news and your feet.

facebook
"facebook" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

The Wellness Business Podcast

02:02 min | 2 years ago

"facebook" Discussed on The Wellness Business Podcast

"G and i know you also help others run successful groups with your done for you content and training so we knew you're going to be a perfect person to us to talk about this and um i posted a my facebook group to feed a kind of gauge and see what questions people have serena covers some of that today were kinda we've in some of the questions that um my facebook members were asking too so but first let's take a step back because i don't think everyone knows what the difference is between a facebook page and a facebook group so how do you like to explain the difference okay so and this is kind of evolved as as time has gone by and facebook page is obviously when you run a business you wanna have a facebook page at represent your brand what i've noticed especially over the last couple of years and if you look at facebook stats a conversation engagement tends to be at really a minimal level on your fan page maya purpose for running my fan page i definitely have brand awareness i definitely post on a regular basis but i don't use it to create conversations i really use that suggests cheap uh you know keep current and make sure that if people are checking my page are gonna see that i am active in obviously runs facebook ads from your fan page um so that's really the main purpose i don't really leverage it that much other than to run facebook ads from because it's simply not an effective place for me to send my time so i actually have my assistant is posting in there we know we do we run through it approved pose sauna like a chunk we do a time walkaway chunk the plo's center will scheduled amount but it's not a main part of my strategy honestly on some people do very well with era fan pages but as small business owners as entrepreneurs we don't have a lotta time and so for me it's definitely not been the most effective plays distended groups however on the other hand had been massive for me and i see it changing people's businesses because back.

facebook
"facebook" Discussed on Social Media Marketing Podcast

Social Media Marketing Podcast

01:58 min | 3 years ago

"facebook" Discussed on Social Media Marketing Podcast

"Obviously the theme of today's podcast is facebook and i just wanted to let you know we've got an incredible lineup of facebook experts that are going to teach you what you need to know today about facebook messenger bots facebook advertising if i just unit on the facebook advertising side of things listen to this lineup nicholas cows mitch john luma andrew of all amanda bonn dennis you and logan young rick mall ready zach sparkler aerial rats these folks are all teaching sessions on facebook advertising why because we know this is a big deal we know that the algorithm is stopping organic reach and we as marketers need to understand how to best use advertising that's why we have such a monster focus at social media marking world on this topic mrs just one of many topics check it out by visiting social media world eighteen dot com again social media world 18 dot com and now for this week's interview with dennis you helping you seem to apply yourselves you'll safari is this week's act stood guide this week i'm very excited to be joined by dennis you if you don't know who he is he's a facebook ads expert and the sea t o a blitz metrics a business us part school and part agency for social marketers for the past twenty years he's been working in marketing in analytics in the used to work at yahoo running analytics dennis welcome to the show hey my could hang out so today denis an ira gonna go deep into the facebook algorithm we're going to talk about how it works were you as a marketer need to know but before we go there done this i would love to hear how in the world did you get into facebook marketing because i'm sure must be pretty exciting story let's go back in the archives here what was your first experience with facebook and marketing in particular.

facebook zach sparkler social media dennis yahoo logan rick mall twenty years