17 Burst results for "exponential Technologies"

"exponential technologies" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

07:02 min | 9 months ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on KGO 810

"Let's take a telephone call here on the wreck. Gentleman show heading off the Seattle Washington chat with Kyle, who's on the phone. Welcome to the program. Kyle, How are you? Good. How are you doing? Well, thanks so much for calling in today. How can I help you? Thanks for having me if only you always here. I have no, actually a few questions if that's okay. So the first one I have some money from previous employers tied up in a My question was originally question was until I listen to your program last week, and he didn't seem to home and raw Who is it worth it to take it from an irate To a Roth and hope that I get 20% return a year, So there's about $10,000 in those funds. And with the 20% return over 30 years, it should be close to three or $4 million. But he didn't take too happy with Ross. So I wanted to get you on. And put on that If you think it's something we're doing or so just keep it in our very well. They're two separate questions here. One is the account registration. The second is the rate of return on the investment strategy. So let's talk about the account registration first. There's no particular benefit tax wise to moving money from an IRA to a Roth. Ah, lot of folks think that their tax rate and retirement will be lower than their current tax rate. But the academic data tells us that that is not true, and it is also not predictable because we don't know what future tax rates are going to bay. So unless you are currently in a very low tax bracket, which I define his 15% or less. I don't see any particular motivation for converting to the Roth because the act of converting forces you to pay taxes right now. I don't see the point in paying attacks today that you don't have to pay any taxes are mandatory in this country. Why pay a tax? That's optional, so I would not do the Roth. The second part of your question has to do with the rate of return you're going to earn and you've suggested earning 20% a year. What makes you think you're capable of earning 20% a year? Honestly, I don't know. I previously have heard like Franklin Templeton can get somewhere between 16 18 So 20 against more hope, Holden and probably realistic anymore. Franklin Templeton is one of the largest mutual fund companies in America. And I assure you they have never said that they're capable of generating for you 16 18% a year they have never said that. So where did you hear that? From? Obviously this is friends and family and stuff talking. So that's why when I heard it, I had the same same reaction was like that. Can't be. Yeah. So let me tell you what's going on. Kyle. Your friends and family owned some mutual funds at Franklin Templeton and in 2020. They very well may have earned 16 or 18%. They may have learned even farm or than that, depending on when, during the year they invested in 2020. If they invested in April or may and held to December, they may have earned 50 or 60%. If they held throughout the entire calendar year in some of the Franklin Templeton stock funds, they may have earned 16% because guess what? That was the average return of the S and P 500 last year. Last year was a very good year for the stock market, whether you were in the whole calendar year or only a smaller portion of the year. And people who do not have a lot of investment experience might look at that and say, Gosh, that must be the way it always works. Well, it isn't the average return of the stock market since 1926. 10% a year and that's the best performing asset class in the world. Stocks outperform BONDS Real estate oil, gold commodities Foreign securities government securities You name it. Since 1926 stocks have been the best performing asset class with the return of on Lee. I'll put that in quotes on Lee 10% per year, So if somebody thinks that they're gonna be able to produce 15, or 20% a year over a 30 year period They're setting themselves up for disappointment because it's not going to happen. Now That doesn't mean you shouldn't invest with Franklin Templeton. Oh, doesn't mean you shouldn't invest in the stock market. I just want to level set your expectations, And regardless of what those returns may prove to be that doesn't have any influence on whether you do an IRA or a Roth IRA or anything else because the IRA is nothing but a glass. What you pour into the glass, the liquid, you poor, whether it's beer, vodka. Apple cider or water That's totally different from the glass itself. So you've got two issues. What kind of glass do you want? An IRA or a Roth and what liquidy you gonna pour into the glass? My preference is that you keep it as an IRA and you pour into that glass of variety of liquids. That's how you get diversification, a blended balanced portfolio that features a variety of asset classes because different asset classes not only have different return potential, they also have different risk exposure. Different tax implications. Different liquidity notions. So different investments have different features. That's why all these different investments exist. Some people like some features. Other people like other features. On a blended basis, You'll have kind of the best of both worlds. No one thing can do a lot of damage. You know, It's like 12 eggs and 12 baskets. So I think what you need to do is quit listening to your family and friends. And that's why I'm so glad you called me today. I am, too and my other on that topic. The other option with it is it is about $10,000 between the two A. I want to take it and invested in the pasta like unusual phone, such as exponential technologies or something like that. Well, I'm a big fan of all the above. First of all, Let's make life a little simple and consolidate these different I raise into a single IRA. There's no reason to have two separate IRA accounts because that's just two separate sets of paperwork. Two different sets of everything. You've got to pay attention to. You can consolidate, put all the money into a single IRA, and that way it becomes easier to manage, and you could have a variety of investments in a single IRA. You mentioned exponential technologies. I think everybody knows. I'm a huge fan of exponential technologies. I literally wrote the book on Exponential Technologies called the Truth about your Future and I am personally very heavily invested in exponential technologies on the broad array of investments associated with all that we need to recognize they are higher in risk than Other investment areas because of the inherent nature of what they're doing, And so it's riskier. No question about it, but I believe the outsized return is also higher. So you've got to decide if your risk tolerance is okay with that asset class. Or I would say that that the theme of investing on if I think it's kind of perfect for an irate because, by definition, you have a very long time horizon, and so a diversified fund or syriza of funds in the exponential technology space Can make a lot of sense for an IRA account. I think that's good thinking, and there are a variety probably a couple of dozen different mutual funds that exist in the exponential technology space. You could go into a one that's broad that covers..

Exponential Technologies Franklin Templeton Kyle Seattle Lee Ross America Holden Apple
"exponential technologies" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

07:20 min | 9 months ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on 600 WREC

"Call here on the wreck. Kettleman show heading off to Seattle Washington chat with Kyle, who's on the phone. Welcome to the program. Kyle, How are you? Good. How are you doing? Well, thanks so much for calling in today. How can I help you? Thanks for having me if you don't need to be always here. I have? No, actually, a few questions of sharks, okay? So the first one I have some money from previous employers tied up in a My question was originally the question was until I listen to your program last night. He didn't seem to home and raw, but was it worth it to take it from an IRA to a Roth And hope that I get 20% return a year, So there's about $10,000 in those funds. And with the 20% return over 30 years, it should be close to three or $4 million. But he didn't seem too happy with Ross. So I wanted to get you on. Put on that. If you think it's something we're doing or so just keep it in our very well. They're two separate questions here. One is the account registration. Second is the rate of return on the investment strategy. So let's talk about the account registration First. There's no particular benefit tax wise to moving money from an IRA to a Roth A lot of folks think that their tax rate and retirement will be lower than their current tax rate. But the academic data tells us that that is not true, and it is also not predictable because we don't know what future tax rates are going to bay. So unless you are currently in a very low tax bracket, which I define his 15% or less I don't see any particular motivation for converting to the Roth because the act of converting forces you to pay taxes right now. I don't see the point in paying attacks today that you don't have to pay in taxes are mandatory in this country. Why pay a tax that's optional. So I would not do the Roth. The second part of your question has to do with the rate of return you're going to earn and you've suggested earning 20% a year. What makes you think you're capable of earning 20% a year? Honestly, I don't know. I previously have heard like Franklin Templeton can get somewhere between 16 18 So 20 against more hold Holden and probably realistic anymore. Franklin Templeton is one of the largest mutual fund companies in America. And I assure you they have never said that they're capable of generating for you 16 18% a year they have never said that. So where did you hear that? From. Obviously this is friends and family and stuff talking. So that's why we're gonna hurt it. I had the same same reaction was like that. Can't be. Yeah. So let me tell you what's going on. Kyle. Your friends and family owned some mutual funds at Franklin Templeton and in 2020. They very well may have earned 16 or 18%. They may have learned even farm or than that, depending on when, during the year they invested in 2020. If they invested in April or may and held to December, they may have earned 50 or 60%. If they held throughout the entire calendar year in some of the Franklin Templeton stock funds, they may have earned 16% because guess what? That was the average return of the S and P 500 last year. Last year was a very good year for the stock market, whether you were in the whole calendar year or only a smaller portion of the year. And people who do not have a lot of investment experience might look at that and say, Gosh, that must be the way it always works. Well, it isn't the average return of the stock market since 1926. 10% a year and that's the best performing asset class in the world. Stocks outperform BONDS Real estate oil, gold commodities Foreign securities government securities You name it. Since 1926 stocks have been the best performing asset class with the return of on Lee. I'll put that in quotes on Lee 10% per year, So if somebody thinks that they're gonna be able to produce 15, or 20% a year over a 30 year period They're setting themselves up for disappointment because it's not going to happen. Now That doesn't mean you shouldn't invest with Franklin Templeton. Oh, doesn't mean you shouldn't invest in the stock market. I just want to level set your expectations, And regardless of what those returns may prove to be that doesn't have any influence on whether you do an IRA or a Roth IRA or anything else because the IRA is nothing but a glass. What you pour into the glass, the liquid, you poor, whether it's beer, vodka. Apple cider or water That's totally different from the glass itself. So you've got two issues. What kind of glass do you want? An IRA or a Roth and what liquidy gonna pour into the glass. My preference is that you keep it as an IRA and you pour into that glass of variety of liquids. That's how you get diversification, a blended balanced portfolio that features a variety of asset classes because different asset classes not only have different return potential, they also have different risk exposure. Different tax implications. Different liquidity notions. So different investments have different features. That's why all these different investments exist. Some people like some features. Other people like other features. On a blended basis, You'll have kind of the best of both worlds. No one thing can do a lot of damage. You know, It's like 12 eggs and 12 baskets. So I think what you need to do is quit listening to your family and friends. And that's why I'm so glad you called me today. I am, too and my other on that topic. The other option was contained. It is about $10,000 between the two I want to take it and invested in the pasta like unusual phone, such as exponential technologies or something like that. Well, I'm a big fan of all the above. First of all, Let's make life a little simple and consolidate these different I raise into a single IRA. There's no reason to have two separate IRA accounts because that's just two separate sets of paperwork. Two different sets of everything. You've got to pay attention to. You can consolidate, put all the money into a single IRA, and that way it becomes easier to manage and you can have a variety of investments in a single IRA. You mentioned exponential technologies. I think everybody knows. I'm a huge fan of exponential technologies. I literally wrote the book on Exponential Technologies called the Truth about your Future and I am personally very heavily invested in exponential technologies on the broad array of investments associated with all that we need to recognize they are higher in risk than Their investment areas because of the inherent nature of what they're doing, And so it's riskier. No question about it, but I believe the outsized return is also higher. So you've got to decide if your risk tolerance is okay with that asset class. Or I would say that that the theme of investing On If I think it's kind of perfect for an irate because, by definition, you have a very long time horizon and so a diversified fund or syriza of funds in the exponential technology space. Can make a lot of sense for an IRA account. I think that's good thinking, and there are a variety probably a couple of dozen different mutual funds that exist in the exponential technology space. You could go into a one that's broad. That covers all nine different categories. AI Robotics, Big data three d printing, nanotech biotech bioinformatics, etcetera, or you can Narrow down if you like cyber security, or you like clean energy, or you like water technology, or you like robotics or AI..

Exponential Technologies Franklin Templeton Kyle Lee Seattle Ross AI Robotics America AI Holden Apple
"exponential technologies" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

07:01 min | 9 months ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"Let's take a telephone call here on the wreck. Elements show heading off this Seattle Washington chat with Kyle, who's on the phone. Welcome to the program. Kyle, How are you? Good. How are you doing? Well, thanks so much for calling in today. How can I help you? Thanks for having me if only to be always here. Actually, a few questions of sharks, okay? So the first one I have some money from previous employers tied up in a rage. My question was originally question was until I listen to your program last week, and he didn't seem to home and raw, but was it worth it to take it from an IRA? To a Roth and hope that I get 20% return a year, So there's about $10,000 in those funds. And with the 20% return over 30 years, it should be close to three or $4 million. But you didn't think to happy with Ross. I wanted to get you on. And put on that If you think it's something we're doing or so just keep it in the irony. Well, they're two separate questions here. One is the account registration. The second is the rate of return on the investment strategy. So let's talk about the account registration First. There's no particular benefit tax wise to moving money from an IRA to a Roth A lot of folks think that their tax rate and retirement will be lower than their current tax rate. But the academic data tells us that that is not true, and it is also not predictable because we don't know what future tax rates are going to bay. So unless you are currently in a very low tax bracket, which I define his 15% or less. I don't see any particular motivation for converting to the Roth because the act of converting forces you to pay taxes right now. I don't see the point in paying attacks today that you don't have to pay. I mean, taxes are mandatory in this country. Why pay a tax that's optional, so I would not do the Roth. The second part of your question has to do with the rate of return you're going to earn and you've suggested earning 20% a year. What makes you think you're capable of earning 20% a year? Honestly, I don't know. I previously have heard like Franklin Templeton can get somewhere between 16 18 So 20 against more hope, Holden and probably realistic anymore. Franklin Templeton is one of the largest mutual fund companies in America. And I assure you, they have never said that they're capable of generating for you 16 18% a year They have never said that. So where did you hear that? From? Obviously this is friends and family and stuff talking. So that's why when I heard it, I had the same same reaction was like that. Can't be. Yeah. So let me tell you what's going on. Kyle. Your friends and family owned some mutual funds at Franklin Templeton and in 2020. They very well may have earned 16 or 18%. They may have learned even farm or than that, depending on when, during the year they invested in 2020. If they invested in April or may and held to December, they may have earned 50 or 60%. If they held throughout the entire calendar year in some of the Franklin Templeton stock funds, they may have earned 16% because guess what that was the average return of the S and P 500 last year. Last year was a very good year for the stock market, whether you were in the whole calendar year or only a smaller portion of the year and people who do not have a lot of investment experience. Might look at that and say, Gosh, that must be the way it always works. Well, it isn't the average return of the stock market since 1926 is 10% a year and that's the best performing asset class in the world. Stocks outperform. Bonds. Real estate, oil, gold commodities, Foreign securities government securities, You name it. Since 1926 stocks have been the best performing asset class where the return of on Lee. I'll put that in quotes on Lee 10% per year, So if somebody thinks that they're going to be able to produce 15 or 20% a year over a 30 Year period, they're setting themselves up for disappointment because it's not going to happen. Now. That doesn't mean you shouldn't invest with Franklin Templeton or doesn't mean you shouldn't invest in the stock market. I just want to level set your expectations, and regardless of what those returns may prove to be that doesn't have any influence on whether you do an IRA or a Roth IRA or anything else because the IRA is nothing but a glass. What you pour into the glass, the liquid, you poor, whether it's beer, vodka. Apple cider or water That's totally different from the glass itself. So you've got two issues. What kind of glass do you want? An IRA or a Roth and what liquidy you gonna pour into the glass? My preference is that you keep it as an IRA and you pour into that glass of variety of liquids. That's how you get diversification, a blended balanced portfolio that features a variety of asset classes because different asset classes not only have different return potential, they also have different risk exposure. Different tax implications. Different liquidity notions. So different investments have different features. That's why all these different investments exist. Some people like some features. Other people like other features. On a blended basis, You'll have kind of the best of both worlds. No one thing can do a lot of damage. You know, It's like 12 eggs and 12 baskets. So I think what you need to do is quit listening to your family and friends. And that's why I'm so glad you called me today. I am, too and my other on that topic. The other option was contained. It is about $10,000 between the two a I want to take it and invested in a pasta like unusual phone, such as exponential technologies or something like that. Well, I'm a big fan of all the above. First of all, Let's make life a little simple and consolidate these different I raise into a single IRA. There's no reason to have two separate IRA accounts because that's just two separate sets of paperwork. Two different sets of everything. You've got to pay attention to. You can consolidate for all the money into a single IRA, and that way it becomes easier to manage, and you can have a variety of investments in a single IRA. You mentioned exponential technologies. I think everybody knows. I'm a huge fan of exponential technologies. I literally wrote the book on Exponential Technologies called the Truth about your Future, and I am personally very heavily invested in exponential technologies on the broad array of investments, associating with all that we need to recognize they are higher in risk than Other investment areas because of the inherent nature of what they're doing, And so it's riskier. No question about it, but I believe the outsized return is also higher. So you've got to decide if your risk tolerance is okay with that asset class. Hour. I would say that that the theme of investing on if I think it's kind of perfect for an irate because, by definition, you have a very long time horizon and so a diversified fund or syriza of funds in the exponential technology space Can make a lot of sense for an IRA account. I think that's good thinking, and there are a variety probably a couple of dozen different mutual funds that exist in the exponential technology space. You could go into a one that's broad..

Exponential Technologies Franklin Templeton Kyle Lee Seattle Ross America Holden Apple
"exponential technologies" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:27 min | 11 months ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on 600 WREC

"I think it's true of all advisers. The investments we give our clients are investments that you can get elsewhere. You can get on your own. We don't offer proprietary product. We don't manufacture investments because we think that's a conflict of interest. So we don't play that game. The instead we search the landscape of the investment universe, there are what 15,000 mutual funds out there probably an equal number of exchange traded funds 7000 stocks on a global basis, hundreds of thousands of bond issuances government corporate uni and so on. We haven't even talked about real estate investments or alternatives oil and gas and precious metals, Exponential technologies. The list goes on and on so What we do is scour the landscape. To find the investments we think are the best ones available, most appropriate suitable for a client's goals and objectives needs for liquidity, The attitude about risk and so on, But you can get those same investments on your own if you take the time and have the knowledge to do it. It's the same thing is getting oil from Jiffy Lube. So why would you bother paying the fee to Jiffy Lube? Well, I can think of a couple of reasons. Number one. I don't know anything about how to put oil into a car. My dumb luck. I'd pour the oil down the gas skank and blow up the engine. So Jiffy Lube will do a better job. They'll do it faster because they've got the equipment in the gear set up, you know, no muss. No fuss you drivin goes up on the ramp. They do it. You're out of there. And I don't get my hands dirty. So I pay them a fee for the convenience of doing it doing it fast doing it right. And the results are likely better than what I would have gotten on my own. And we believe that's the way it works as an investment advisor, Although the investments we provide our clients are pretty much the same investments that they can get anywhere. I'm willing to bet that the clients end up with better results not because the investments are better, but because We're preventing the client from market timing. We're providing hand holding so when they're scared, we help them realize why they're invested when they get giddy and excited and euphoric and optimistic, because the markets at an all time high like now we hold them back a little bit. Helping them realize the time to buy isn't when you're at a high. We help them re balance. We help them engage in dollar cost averaging. We help them create tax efficient strategies. Reduce the tax liabilities, all of which we think translates into a better future..

Jiffy Lube Exponential technologies advisor
"exponential technologies" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

106.1 FM WTKK

02:35 min | 11 months ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on 106.1 FM WTKK

"I think it's true of all advisers. The investments we give our clients are investments that you can get elsewhere. You can get on your own. We don't offer proprietary product. We don't manufacture investments because we think that's a conflict of interest. So we don't play that game. The instead we search the landscape of the investment universe, there are what 15,000 mutual funds out there probably an equal number of exchange traded funds 7000 stocks on a global basis, hundreds of thousands of bond issuances, government corporate immunity and so on. We haven't even talked about real estate investments or alternatives oil and gas and precious metals, Exponential technologies. The list goes on and on so What we do is scour the landscape. To find the investments we think are the best ones available, most appropriate suitable for a client's goals and objectives needs for liquidity, The attitude about risk and so on, But you can get those same investments on your own if you take the time and have the knowledge to do it. It's the same thing is getting oil from Jiffy Lube. So why would you bother paying the fee to Jiffy Lube? Well, I can think of a couple of reasons. Number one. I don't know anything about how to put oil into a car. My dumb luck. I'd pour the oil down the gas skank and blow up the engine. So Jiffy Lube will do a better job. They'll do it faster because they've got the equipment in the gear set up, you know, no muss. No fuss you drivin goes up on the ramp. They do it. You're out of there. And I don't get my hands dirty. So I pay them a fee for the convenience of doing it doing it fast doing it right. And the results are likely better than what I would have gotten on my own. And we believe that's the way it works as an investment advisor, Although the investments we provide our clients are pretty much the same investments that they can get anywhere. I'm willing to bet that the clients end up with better results not because the investments are better, but because We're preventing the client from market timing were providing hand holding, so when they're scared, we help them realize why they're invested when they get giddy and excited and euphoric and optimistic, because the markets at an all time high like now we hold them back a little bit. Helping them realize the time to buy isn't when you're at a high. We help them re balance. We help them engage in dollar cost averaging. We help them create tax efficient strategies. Reduce the tax liabilities, all of which we think translates into a better future. That's the goal anyways. And much of the advice. I would even argue most of the advice. Has nothing to do with the investments at all..

Jiffy Lube Exponential technologies advisor
"exponential technologies" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

02:22 min | 1 year ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"Short term bonds. But there's mid term and long term. There's government and those corporate there's us and there's government. There's high quality in high yield. That's all within just bonds. You've also got stocks. SmallCap MidCap, large cap growth in Value U. S and foreign You've got exponential Technologies. Natural resource is oil and gas, precious metals. There are all these different kinds of asset classes and we would recommend you do a little bit of each one of them to reduce the likelihood that anyone problem would cause ah, all of them to go down at once, so we would diversify. That's one strategy. The second strategy is called dollar cost averaging. Where, instead of investing all at once, because with your dumb luck the market across the day after You invest a little bit over time. In other words, if you've got $450,000 you don't invest all of it all at once. Because that'll scare the heck out of you instead. Invest a little bit. Maybe you invest. 20 grand. And then a month later, another 20 a month after that, another 20, and you slowly add money into the investments so that as the markets fluctuate, you're investing to take advantage of that volatility instead of having it work against you, so between the combinations of dollar cost averaging on diversification. Adding that to your lever pulling on your financial plan. It's a pretty good possibility. I would be pretty confident that we can help you achieve the goals that you've laid out. Okay. I know that all sounds great. So I'm glad I was able to help you with that, Brian, and like I said, just call us Aah! Triple A plane wreck and we'll take care of this for you. Okay. Thanks a lot. Rick. I appreciate your time. It's my pleasure. That was Brian and Billings, Montana. Here on the Rick Adelman show. Triple Eight plan. Rick. What should you do with your portfolio? Given all of this volatility. Should you change your investment strategy now, because of all of this expected volatility Should you change your strategy based on who you think is going to win the election? Well, I want to give you the answer, and it's a longer answer than I can provide You here on the show, And that's why I've just created a new webinar on this subject, and we're debuting it this Tuesday, October 13th at 8 P.m. and 11 P.m. Eastern time. And I'm going to provide you the answer to the question. How should you manage your investments? Given the political volatilities of this.

Rick Adelman Brian exponential Technologies Billings Montana
"exponential technologies" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

NewsRadio WIOD

01:51 min | 1 year ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on NewsRadio WIOD

"You're investing in one asset class. Short term bonds. But there's mid term and long term. There's government and those corporate there's us and there's government. There's high quality in high yield. That's all within just bonds. You've also got stocks. SmallCap MidCap, large cap growth in Value U. S and foreign. You've got exponential Technologies. Natural resource is oil and gas, precious metals. There are all these different kinds of asset classes and we would recommend you do a little bit of each one of them. To reduce the likelihood that anyone problem would cause ah, all of them to go down at once, so we would diversify. That's one strategy. The second strategy is called dollar cost averaging. Where, instead of investing all at once, because with your dumb luck, the market would crash the day after You invest a little bit over time. In other words, if you've got $450,000 you don't invest all of it all at once. Because that'll scare the heck out of you instead. Invest a little bit. Maybe you invest. 20 grand. And then a month later, another 20 a month after that, another 20, and you slowly add money into the investments so that as the markets fluctuate, you're investing to take advantage of that volatility instead of having it work against you, so between the combinations of dollar cost averaging on diversification. Adding that to your lever pulling on your financial plan. It's a pretty good possibility. I would be pretty confident that we can help you achieve the goals that you've laid out. Okay, I know that all sounds great. So I'm glad I was able to help you with that, Brian. And like I say, just call us Aah! Triple A plane wreck and we'll take care of this for you. Okay. Thanks a lot. Rick. I appreciate your time. It's my pleasure. That was Brian and Billings, Montana. Here on the Rick Adelman show Triple Eight plan, Rick. We're out of time on the program today. Thanks so much for joining us, and I look forward to chatting with you again next weekend. In the meantime, if you've got any questions or concerns about your personal.

Rick Adelman Brian exponential Technologies Billings Montana
"exponential technologies" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:19 min | 1 year ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Trend is certain the accelerated adoption of exponential technologies before cover nineteen there were massive innovations underway in a variety of fields I talked about them in my twenty seventeen New York times bestseller the truth about your future now thanks to the pandemic adoption of these technologies will be accelerated you can't travel virtual reality will let you explore the entire world from your home you want to access your health big data will collect massive amounts of information from your body transmit data to your health care provider in real time but will be analyzed by your doctor will prescribe medication delivered to you by your pharmacist via drone until that is you have a three D. printer in your house for you correct you're on meds worried about the shortages for yet plant based alternatives are already on the market no need for killing animals to get animal protein fruits and vegetables are gonna be grown in vertical farms highrises in city centers using hydroponic and aeroponic technology that eliminates the biggest cost of agriculture transportation factories being shut down because workers can't socially Justin's not the factory of the future robots are going to replace humans self driving vehicles will deliver the goods from manufacturers to stores to customers and if you're afraid of being a packed stadium arenas of the future will have giant screens outside allowing fans to relax on loans far apart from each other well safety and security of utmost priority sure well just like airports got dramatically safer after nine eleven society will be transformed to technology will gauge the quality of our air our clothing or furniture or food even our bodies and all these innovations are gonna come faster than ever with huge investment opportunities that's why we inspired back in twenty fifteen the creation of the first exponential technologies ETF and why that team is a focus for our client portfolios here a woman financial engines as trends become clear in weeks and months to come I'm going to give you lots of financial planning advice and ideas right now I want to give you for ideas for you to consider first is dollar cost averaging volatility is highest when investor uncertainty is greatest so if you've got money today should you invest or not well you can diversify that helps but you can.

"exponential technologies" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

02:33 min | 1 year ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"You thought about how you want to be buried cremation and burial are no longer the only methods thanks to exponential technologies you can now be mummified you can be turned into a coral reef yes thirty percent of those surveyed say they would choose a different way to dispose of their body if they weren't worried about finances family traditions or religious beliefs mummification is the most expensive option yeah it starts at sixty seven thousand dollars forty four percent say they would choose cremation thirty five percent would choose burial six percent say they would donate their body to science only four percent say they would engage in a natural burial and eleven percent said they don't care what happens after they die a traditional burial is about seventy three hundred Bucks cremation about six thousand a natural burial starts at thirty five hundred dollars I already told you that my mother cations sixty seven grand cryonics is twenty eight thousand dollars that's where the body is frozen so what won't decompose theoretically they'll figure out in the future what killed you and bring you back to life there's also alkaline hydrolysis for fourteen hundred box and environmentally friendly substitute for creation uses water to break down the body and the powdered remains can be either kept in an urn or scattered about plus the nation for forty thousand dollars you know the body worlds exhibit it removes all fluids in the body replaces it with a polymer yeah you could be on display forever how about C. burial for five grand or what about a memorial diamond for twenty two hundred Bucks a compresses your ashes into a diamond that you can have a loved one where on their finger reef yeah you're Cremeans can be mixed with concrete and turned into an artificial coral reef for twenty four hundred Bucks will be placed in the water to house marine life how about Cremeans painting for two hundred fifty Bucks an artist will mix your ashes with paint and create a painting that represents you or how about creams printed portrait starts at only a hundred twenty seven dollars you choose the image and it will get printed onto a canvas using your ashes or how about fireworks yeah for a thousand Bucks your cronies we mixed with explosives substances and exploded in the night sky or how about a vinyl record for twelve hundred Bucks your **** will be pressed into a vinyl record and you decide what it plays well how about glass art a hundred eighty dollars your axes are mixed with glass and blown into a.

Bucks Cremeans
"exponential technologies" Discussed on KFI AM 640

KFI AM 640

10:37 min | 1 year ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on KFI AM 640

"Rick Adelman here triple H. plan Rick there's no question that social security is one of the most important aspects of retirement planning and that's why is you guessed it we talk about it so often hear on the record on the show am I like to bring in some experts who can help facilitate our understanding of what's going on in the area of social security and how it impacts choose some very happy to bring on to the programme Elaine Weiss she is the lead policy analyst at the National Academy of social insurance has a law degree from Harvard and a PhD in public policy from George Washington University Elaine thanks so much for joining us today thank you so much for having me so you your organization has partnered with a a RP on what you're calling a social security innovation challenge what's that add the short answer is that it is a response to a crisis in this country and it is a modern response to that crisis by using crowd sourcing to give a sense of the crisis we have a lot of older Americans including I'm betting many of your listeners in this country who cannot continue to work through their full retirement age sixty five sixty six for a variety of reasons the number one reason that Americans retire earlier than they had hoped or into the paid to do so is that either they suddenly developed a serious health problem or a minor health problem that they already had got a lot worse again something I think we're pretty familiar with happening yeah and I can also envision that even if they don't develop a health issue there or spouse starts or their parents I mean we're talking about people at this point have much older ailing parents and they need to leave the work force to care for them unfortunately Americans in general don't have much for retirement as you talk about a lot on the show and some of these workers in particular have little or nothing faith we said we really need to think about how social security and maybe some of our other social insurance programs need to change to help them and we want to get ideas from the biggest group we can and the most diverse group we can not our innovation challenge so you mentioned this is based on crowdsourcing which is one of the exponential technologies that basically asks for everyone to chip in with ideas and suggestions so what kind of policy ideas did these participants come up with up with a broad and interesting range which was exactly what we were hoping for and I said this is a complex problem yeah we we talk about this group of vulnerable older workers as if they are a group but in fact they are multiple overlapping grants right some of those folks with health problems also don't have savings and some of those folks who don't have savings also have physically demanding jobs and some of them are care giver than some of them are not etcetera so while many of the people did focus on social security various aspects and in particular how to change the early cleaning so that it becomes less problematic we also bought for example folks who said we should focus on workers comp we got a couple of applications that had to deal with unemployment insurance because it turns out that new surprise older workers who are out of a job are kind of a job for much longer than younger workers because people don't want to hire them into they need unemployment insurance to change so we really got an interesting range of ideas and so you put all this together what would you say that the winning proposals will with the package of those change with respect to social security so what we were looking for and we realize this from early in the process was not just the three four five strong gift ideas but instead of ideas that together would complement one another and address this problem in various ways so for that later stage we are looking at our proposals we put together a Blue Ribbon panel of judges and we passed them with two things first of all look through these ten full length proposals I have now had the the benefit of mentoring and of guidance and of of input and feedback at the initial stage of abstract judges don't just look at them individually but consider them as a package and so we had a conversation about how do they fit together and so what we landed on with actually to that specifically do address social security and to that don't address social security because we wanted them to come at it from different angles and so one of the to the to address social security what do they suggest so one of them is actually so simple it's sort of crazy in fact we knew this was the winner because all of ours forever battle judges unanimously looked at this and said don this is something we should have done ages ago why is this not already in place basically what it does is just make early cleaning make Martha right now we have an all or nothing says that when it comes to early claiming so when you get to that point where you have to make this big decision and that affects your benefits and your financials for the rest of your life you don't have any choices to make we know though that people don't retire that way that many people are retiring partially their entire gradually many people would like to stay in the work force at least in part and many people can stay in the work force at least in part and moreover it's healthier both for them and for the economy overall if more people stay in the work force they'll be better off they'll be contributing to the economy and the social security and so this proposal says why do we do this why don't we make it easier let's let people for example who can still work part time clean partial benefits so that they're not penalizing themselves so much as they go forward let's let people who are unemployed for long spells claim early and then when they go back to work again greatly reducing their penalty is it's really genius it's actuarial you totally neutral and it in a way that many of our evolutions of social security over the years since it was first enacted in nineteen thirty five have done it involves to recognize evolving realities in society that is incredibly obvious and it's one is V. eight moments how come I never thought of that yeah exactly all of our judges I think also felt a bit of stupidity like how we're experts on social security why did we not come up with this genius idea so it took somebody from you know outer po dunk to say Hey geniuses actually that's always interesting I wouldn't say that this person is from outer Podunk at all but he's totally not within our normal we are not a member doesn't even have a title and and really congratulated us and said you know I am evidence that you guys did what you are seeking to do which is really to get I'm kind of cast a much broader net and have it work awesome what was the other one the second one recognizes the reality that we have a lot of people who are claiming early who need to claim early and don't have a choice are either that the health problems or they can no longer find a job those people deserve a bridge benefit they should get a boost from the time from early claiming through full retirement age of sixty five or sixty six so that they're not penalized and what's nice about this proposal is that it also in the end is budgetary neutral because it goes into other aspects of social security remove some of the benefits for people who frankly don't need them and are just getting benefits for no reason and uses those to pay for that so it doesn't cost social security anything in the long term I agree it is simplistic in its concept but I I share your view that it's more complicated to enact because of the subject of judgmental qualitative element of how do you define someone who truly can't work as opposed to those who are trying to game the system and avoid work which is what is a common problem in the world of disability how do you demonstrate you truly have a disability so I I agree with you it's a little more complicated than the first idea but laudable in its concept there is a pretty broad agreement that of the four that they chose this almost probably the most complex for the reasons you talked about but there was also a sense that give and the scope of the problem frankly call it a crisis because that's really what it is so we're to the proposal stand now so there are two other proposal that I think are also really interesting really briefly one of them would gradually expand access to workplace savings at tools and strategies for every worker in the country over the course of many years which I think is desperately needed and a really smart move because research shows that when people have both that convenient tool and that tax incentive they are not only much more likely to save but they will save more and the last one is is what I would call a backup plan Congress does not move big things these days and so our back up plan is a social security booth at the state level basically a parallel policy programs to social security that would be enacted state by state for those states that want to do it along the lines of states that are raising the minimum wage enacting paid leave laws etcetera again because Congress doesn't want to move on these things and the hope is that this will help at least some workers in some states who are the most vulnerable and that and eight pilots are proven successful more states will look at them and say that kind of makes sense I think we should do that too in this election year that's coming up please please please reach out to your elected officials and your candidates for office and remind them how critically important social security and other social insurance programs are they are getting far too little play in all the debates that are going on and we want and need to see that change because as we all know they are critically important to the economic fabric of this country please use our website as a resource we are at an A. F. I. NAAFI National Academy of social insurance dot org well it's really important that we continue to develop solutions to social security you're absolutely right that it's getting no play you said little play but it's really getting no play in the presidential campaign season that were under way we haven't had any questions that any of the debates today on social security so I am hopeful that we will succeed in getting this into the national dialogue during this campaign season so that we can begin to enact improvements and legislative sessions in the next several years also the work that you're doing Elaine is really helpful and innovative along with the name of the challenge you have underway the social security innovation challenge and so I'm really excited to hear about the work that you're doing and as you mentioned if anybody wants to learn more they can go to M. A. S. I. A. dot org and get.

Rick Adelman
"exponential technologies" Discussed on KGO 810

KGO 810

10:38 min | 1 year ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on KGO 810

"The program with Calvin here triple eight plan Rick there's no question that social security is one of the most important aspects of retirement planning and that's why is you guessed it we talk about it so often hear on the record on the show am I like to bring in some experts who can help facilitate our understanding of what's going on in the area of social security and how it impacts choose some very happy to bring on to the programme Elaine Weiss she is the lead policy analyst at the National Academy of social insurance has a law degree from Harvard and a PhD in public policy from George Washington University Elaine thanks so much for joining us today thank you so much for having me so you your organization has partnered with a A. R. P. on what you're calling the Social Security innovation challenge what's that the short answer is that it is a response to a crisis in this country and it is a modern response to that crisis by using crowd sourcing to give a sense of the crisis we have a lot of older Americans including I'm betting many of your listeners in this country who cannot continue to work through their full retirement age sixty five sixty six for a variety of reasons the number one reason that Americans retire earlier than they had hoped or anticipated to do so is that either they suddenly developed a serious health problem or a minor health problem that they already had got a lot worse again something I think we're pretty familiar with happening yeah and I can also envision that even if they don't develop a health issue there are style stars or their parents I mean we're talking about people at this point have much older ailing parents and they need to leave the work force to care for them unfortunately Americans in general don't have much for retirement as you talk about a lot on the show and some of these workers in particular have little or nothing faith we said we really need to think about how social security and maybe some of our other social insurance programs need to change to help them and we want to get ideas from the biggest group we can and the most diverse group we can not our innovation challenge so you mentioned this is based on crowdsourcing which is one of the exponential technologies that basically asks for everyone to chip in with ideas and suggestions so what kind of policy ideas did these participants come up with up with a broad and interesting range which was exactly what we were hoping for as I said this is a complex problem we we we talk about this group of vulnerable older workers as if they are a group but in fact they are multiple overlapping grants right some of those folks with health problems also don't have savings and some of those folks who don't have savings also have physically demanding jobs and some of them are care giver than some of them are not etcetera so while many of the people did focus on social security various aspects and in particular how to change the early claiming so that it becomes less problematic we also bought for example folks who said we should focus on workers comp we got a couple of applications that had to deal with unemployment insurance because it turns out that new surprise older workers who are out of a job are kind of a job for much longer than younger workers because people don't want to hire them and so they need unemployment insurance to change so we really got an interesting range of ideas and so you put all this together on what would you say that the winning proposals will with the package of those change with respect to social security so what we were looking for and we realize this from early in the process was not just the three four five strong gift ideas but instead of ideas that together would complement one another and address this problem in various ways so for that later stage we are looking at our proposals we put together a Blue Ribbon panel of judges and we passed them with two things first of all look through these ten full length proposals I have now had the the benefit of mentoring and of guidance and of of input and feedback at the initial stage of abstract judges don't just look at them individually but consider them as a package and so we had a conversation about how do they fit together and so what we landed on with actually to that specifically do address social security and to that don't address social security because we wanted them to come at it from different angles and so one of the to the to address social security what do they suggest so one of them is actually so simple it's sort of crazy in fact we knew this was a winner because all of our panel judges unanimously looked at this and said Donna this is something we should have done ages ago why is this not already in place basically what it does is just make early cleaning make more sense right now we have an all or nothing says that when it comes to early claiming so when you get to that point where you have to make this big decision and that affects your benefits and your financials for the rest of your life you don't have any choices to make we know though that people don't retire that way that many people are retiring partially their entire gradually many people would like to stay in the work force at least in part and many people current stay in the work force at least in part and moreover it's healthier both for them and for the economy overall if more people stay in the work force they'll be better off they'll be contributing to the economy and the social security and so this proposal says why do we do this why don't we make it easier let's let people for example who can still work part time clean partial benefits so that they're not penalizing themselves so much as they go forward let's let people who are unemployed for long spells claim early and then when they go back to work again greatly reducing their penalty is it's really genius it's actuarial you totally neutral and it in a way that many of our evolutions of social security over the years since it was first enacted in nineteen thirty five have done it involves to recognize evolving realities in society that is incredibly obvious and it's one of the eight moments how come I never thought of that yeah exactly all of our judges I think also felt a bit of stupidity like hardware experts on social security why did we not come up with this team his idea so it took somebody from you know our po dunk to say Hey geniuses there's actually that's always interesting I wouldn't say that this person is from out our Podunk at all but he's totally not within our normal fee are not a member doesn't even have a title and and really congratulated us and said you know I am evidence that you guys did what you are seeking to do which is really to get I'm kind of cast the much broader net and have it work awesome what was the other one the second one recognizes the reality that we have a lot of people who are claiming early who need to claim early and don't have a choice are either that the serious health problems or they can no longer find a job those people deserve a bridge benefit they should get a boost from the time from early claiming through full retirement age of sixty five or sixty six so that they're not penalized and what's nice about this proposal is that it also in the end is budgetary neutral because it goes into other aspects of social security remove some of the benefits for people who frankly don't need them and are just getting benefits for no reason and uses those to pay for that so it doesn't cost social security anything in the long term I agree it is simplistic in its concept but I I share your view that it's more complicated to enact because of the subject of judgmental qualitative element of how do you define someone who truly can't work as opposed to those who are trying to game the system and avoid work which is what is a common problem in the world of disability how do you demonstrate you truly have a disability so I I agree with you it's a little more complicated than the first idea but laudable in its concept there is a pretty broad agreement that of the four that they chose this almost probably the most complex for the reasons you talked about but there was also a sense that give and the scope of the problem frankly call it a crisis because that's really what it is so we're to the proposal stand now so there are two other proposals that I think are also really interesting really briefly one of them would gradually expand access to workplace savings tools and strategies for every worker in the country over the course of many years which I think is desperately needed and a really smart move because research shows that when people have both that convenient tool and that tax incentive they are not only much more likely to save but they will save more and the last one is is what I would call a backup plan Congress does not move big things these days and so our back up plan is a social security booth at the state level basically a parallel policy programs to social security that would be enacted state by state for those states that want to do it along the lines of states that are raising the minimum wage enacting paid leave laws etcetera again because Congress doesn't want to move on these things and the hope is that this will help at least some workers in some states who are the most vulnerable and I asked the pilots are proven successful more states will look at them and say that kind of makes sense I think we should do that too in this election year that's coming up please please please reach out to your elected officials and your candidates for office and remind them how critically important social security and other social insurance programs are they are getting far too little play in all the debates that are going on and we want and need to see that change because as we all know they are critically important to the economic fabric of this country please use our website as a resource we are at an A. F. I. **** National Academy of social insurance dot org well it's really important that we continue to develop solutions to social security you're absolutely right that it's getting no play you said little play but it's really getting no play in the presidential campaign season that were under way we haven't had any questions of any of the debates today on social security so I am hopeful of that we will succeed in getting this into the national dialogue during this campaign season so that we can begin to enact improvements and legislative sessions in the next several years also the work that you're doing Elaine is really helpful and innovative along with the name of the challenge you have underway the social security innovation challenge and so I'm really excited to hear about the work that you're doing and as you mentioned if anybody wants to learn more they can go to any S. R. I. dot org and get.

Calvin Rick
"exponential technologies" Discussed on KSFO-AM

KSFO-AM

01:32 min | 2 years ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on KSFO-AM

"Too many people believe that anymore. I don't think you believe it. I think what you believe, is that the key to investment success is choosing. Not the investments, but the investment advisor because I don't think you're trying to do this on your own. I think you're right about that today. The world of investing has gotten so complicated far more complex, not only with the incredible array of investment products that you can choose from their fourteen thousand mutual funds. That's just mutual funds. Forget about the seven thousand individual stocks that exist on a global basis. Let's forget about all the other asset classes like government and corporate bonds looking at real estate at golden precious metals that foreign securities at natural resources and oil and gas exponential technologies. The list goes on and on and on. How do you sift through all of these investments to determine the ones that are right for you? How do you know how much? Of a given investment to purchase. How do you build an investment portfolio? How do you manage it? How do you know when to rebalance it? How do you handle the record keeping? It's no wonder that. So many folks recognize that I want the services of an adviser who handles investment management. Right. I'm sure that, that's how you feel. And in fact, eighty eight percent of financial professionals provide the services that's kind of routine. Right. It's sort of like physicians saying, yes, I prescribe medication..

advisor eighty eight percent
"exponential technologies" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

06:09 min | 2 years ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on 600 WREC

"They have what's called a self directed option, which means you have the ability to essentially create a brokerage account inside the plan, and by doing that you now have virtually unlimited investment flexibility, which will give you the ability to go by an exponential technologies themed exchange traded fund or mutual fund. So talk to your employer and ask, if there's a self directed option available. In your plan. It generally doesn't happen in for a three b programs, which are the retirement plans used by nonprofits and school systems and hospitals. It's more commonly found in 4._0._1._K's, which are run by for profit, businesses corporations and such, but it's worth the question. Ask your employer. This is why you should definitely be investing in your retirement plan at work. Yes. But also why you should be investing outside of your retirement plan because there are investment opportunities available to you outside of the plan. That may not be available to you inside of the plan. Let me elaborate a little bit for everyone is listening. What you're talking about exponential technologies and why it's a theme worthy of consideration least certainly in my view in that of our firm here at element, Financial Engines exponential technologies refers to technologies that are not only growing at an exponential scale but having an exponential impact. On society sciences, such as artificial intelligence robotics drones three D printing big data. Nanotechnology biotechnology bioinformatics neuro science fintech short for financial technology, including the blockchain and crypto assets, and crypto, currencies education technology, such as mooks massive open, coursework, or Moore's massively open research programs. There are allied variety of technologies being developed that have practical application in commerce companies that are making profits by building these technologies and other companies that are making profits by using these technologies in their businesses. And so there are a few not very many, but there are maybe last count. Maybe two dozen. Probably a little bit less of these types of funds. Some of them are mutual funds, and some of them are exchange traded funds that invest either broadly, in the broad spectrum of these technologies that I've described or specifically they invest only in cybersecurity or only in water technology or only in drone technology or only in a. So you can either buy a fund that invests across the broad spectrum of exponential technologies or you could buy a fund that invest in a specific sector that is a particular interest to you. There are like I said, a couple of dozen of these I had a significant role in the development of one of the earliest of these funds back in two thousand fifteen so we have been fans of this category for a very long time. If twenty fifteen can be called a very long time ago by Wall Street standards, three years as an eternity, so yeah, five years is probably a long time. So, yeah, I would encourage you to consider whether or not exponential technologies belongs in your portfolio. If so, how do you wanna do it? You wanna broad-based fun that covers all of these sectors. Or do you want a specific sector fund that targets a specific area? And then how much of your? Portfolio. Do you want to place into these investments, and it all depends on your comfort level with risk because these by definition are going to be volatile more, so you would expect than most other investment categories because it's such a narrow sector, you need to decide what your time horizon is you need to decide what you need for the quality is, and how soon you need income, you need to determine what your goals are and determine whether or not this fits within all of the above. And if you're struggling to figure all of that out we'll then that's why call us. That's what we do for our clients on a daily basis. Here at Financial Engines is looking your overall financial situation looking at where your investments are being held looking at the options and choices available to you and then helping you decide what it is all be best to help you achieve the goals that you've got within the constraints that you're facing such as ability to invest in time, horizon, and risk concerns and things like that. So that's basically what we're talking about here. And I would encourage you John to pursue this either on. On your own. Or you said you're trying to do it on your own, but you got stymied. I would argue that's why you turn to a financial adviser. You just wanna make sure you're dealing with vice mayor who is skilled and experienced in exponential technologies. I literally wrote the book on the subject, my book, the truth about your future, which is all about exponential technologies was a New York Times business bestseller when it debuted in two thousand seventeen so we've got a really good handle on this in our firm. And we're happy to help you if you'd like. Enjoy your book, and I thank you for your information. You give the radio as well as the books and for my grandchildren. Children's book that you wrote a real Christmas. So I appreciate. In your whole co workers, do Perote's, thank you so much, John, I really appreciate that as well. I appreciate your phone call today and wish you the very best. I'm RIC Edelman. You're listening to the truth about money. Remember just sharing with you. The segment about how those guys on CNBC in the financial press. Drive me crazy. Because they're always making predictions telling you what to buy, and I made the offense comment, while one of those predictions are not are any good is a whole nother conversation. Well, here's the other conversation..

John Financial Engines RIC Edelman 4._0._1._K CNBC New York Times Moore Perote three years five years
"exponential technologies" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

WMAL 630AM

01:58 min | 2 years ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on WMAL 630AM

"Of exponential technologies artifice intelligence robotics. Drones three D printing. Nanotech biotech bioinformatics. I encourage you to read my New York Times business bestseller the truth about your future. And it'll help you understand what these technologies are and how they impact your personal finances. College planning career, planning estate, planning retirement, planning, and of course, investment management. It's the truth about your future available at Amazon Barnes and noble. Your favorite booksellers all across the country. I'm RIC Edelman. You're listening to the truth about money, triple eight plan RIC online at rice dome dot com. Talkers magazine as one of heavy hundred talk show hosts in America. This is the Rick Edelman show. Hi, I'm Patrick fangled toner new lacomb design spring is the busiest time to be a roofing company. He could define your whole year for a roofer. Having a great spring is about doing three things one. You got to be ready to go new offer same day estimates and one day installations to know what you're doing. We have project managers master, tech installers, and a dedicated customer service team who've installed over thirty thousand roofs and last, but not least you gotta have knock it out of the park, bracing. So through may thirty first get your roof installed. Now pay for half of it next year and pay me the other half about never that's right through may thirty first pay for half, the roofing materials later, and the other had never wanna know how we do this. Call eight hundred two seven nine fifty three hundred that's eight hundred two seven nine fifty three hundred new Lakota design dot com. We do.

RIC Edelman Rick Edelman New York Times RIC Amazon Barnes Talkers magazine Patrick fangled America one day
"exponential technologies" Discussed on 600 WREC

600 WREC

02:08 min | 2 years ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on 600 WREC

"You've got within the constraints that you're facing such as ability to invest in time horizon and risk concerns and things like that. So that's basically what we're talking about here. And I would encourage you John to pursue this either on your own or you said you're trying to do it on your own, but gone got started. I would argue that's why you turned to a financial adviser. You just want to make sure you're dealing with adviser who is skilled and experienced an exponential technologies. I literally wrote the book on the subject, my book the truth about your future, which is all about exponential technologies was a New York Times business bestseller when it debuted in two thousand seventeen. So we've got a really good handle on this in our firm, and we're happy to help you. If you would like, I appreciate do. Enjoy your book. And I thank you for your information. You give over the radio as well as the books and got from my grandchildren. The children's book that you wrote a Christmas. So I appreciate all that you and your wife and your whole co workers do for us. Thank you so much. Well, John I really appreciate that as well. I appreciate your phone call today. And wish you the very best. I'm RIC Edelman. You're listening to the Rick Edelman show, I want to share with you some surprising facts about social security. First of all, do you know, you're not supposed to live solely on social security and retirement it should replace no more than forty percent of your income thirties. Even better the lower the number the better, but definitely not more than forty percent. Take a look at what your current or future social security benefits going to be just go to SA dot gov. And you can see exactly how much you're going to receive in social security benefits. Make sure that's not more than thirty percent of your total income in retirement. Here's another fact, are you a spouse who's never had a job or spent less time in the workforce because you've been married. Spouses can get social security benefits. Even if they never worked. Make sure you don't lose benefits that are available to you. And finally, you don't get to benefits when a spouse dies, you either get yours or your spouse's, whichever is higher got.

RIC Edelman John Rick Edelman New York Times SA forty percent thirty percent
"exponential technologies" Discussed on KTRH

KTRH

03:16 min | 2 years ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on KTRH

"The human heart is made of meanwhile, researchers at the university of Oxford's department of clinical neuroscience has has created the first robotic system that operates on a human. I a robot doing surgery on your eye. They insert the robot into the pupil the an incision less than one millimeter in size the surgeon than operates the robot via a joystick. It eliminates the worry that the surgeons hands might shake or accidentally move or whatever. The robot has already been used to conduct to routine procedures removing a rim brain from the retina and dissolving hemorrhages under a retina, and in both cases, the results were better than what human doctors could do. At Johns Hopkins. Scientists have developed an electron skin that can fit over a prosthetic hand it allows the user to feel sensation including pain through a prosthetic skin. Pretty amazing. The FDA has now approved of an AI system that will assess whether a patient has a disease that might lead to a vision loss. It's eighty seven percent accurate. And it's the first screening device that doesn't need a human clinician to interpret the image arose. Robot system doing it all by itself? There's an optometrist who has invented a bionic contact lens that lets people see three times better than twenty twenty. How would you like to have binoculars in your eyes or being able to look as if you're using a microscope? That's what has already been created with a bionic contact lens. These kinds of innovations and more are going to radically improve quality of life for pretty much everybody on the planet once they reach mainstream production, some other fascinating changes going on the field of exponential technologies at MIT they've created a wearable interface. That knows what you're thinking. Without you having to say anything out loud. It's a white plastic strip and hooks over your ear goes below your jaw. The electrodes pick up the neuro muscular signals that are released when you think of a certain word sort of like saying it in your head and it's accurate. Ninety two percent of the time. So people wearing this device say they're paralyzed can't speak or say, they don't have a voice box said they have some kind of physical disability just by thinking. They're able to communicate. It's amazing. What's going on in the field of medicine? But it's not just the field of medicine where we're seeing some pretty amazing innovations in the field of robotics. Scientists have MIT have made a robot that can teach itself to see and identify objects and how to manipulate them as well. No robots been able to do this before this robot is capable of picking up an object. It's never seen before. And without resorting to trial and error. It knows what to do with the object. That's how humans do it. You pick up an object you'd never seen before. And you know, how to pick it up without breaking in you know, how to turn it. So that you can examine it this robots able to do the very same thing. This is just a few of the illustrations of what's going on in the field of exponential technologies, and how they're going to radically improve and alter every aspect of life that you can think about and that's why.

university of Oxford Johns Hopkins MIT vision loss FDA eighty seven percent Ninety two percent
"exponential technologies" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

WBZ NewsRadio 1030

01:40 min | 3 years ago

"exponential technologies" Discussed on WBZ NewsRadio 1030

"Exponential technologies is it possible that your child is going to go to college to study a field that isn't going to exist because the job will be taken over. Over by a machine. Well, I don't think your children are preparing. For a life of. Picking vegetables out of a field. Well, that's probably a good thing. Because those jobs are going away at the Taylor farms in California, they are one of the world's largest producers of vegetables, they've just unveiled a fleet of robots replacing humans. These robots can assemble twice as many salad bags a minute as a human. That's a good thing. Because the California Farm Bureau Federation says fifty five percent of farmers are reporting labor shortages, but one machine can replace eleven workers sixty percent of the lettuce half of all the cabbage and celery are already harvested with automated systems and Taylor farms says they're going to double the number of automation until everything's machine picked. But here's a career opportunity. They're building a training center where they're teaching fifteen employees had a program engineer and use the robotic equipment. So it's not that farming is going away with jobs. They're changing jobs radically. So it's this future. That we have to be paying attention to and fundamental questions such as how are we going to prepare for what college costs, and what retirement costs that's what it's all about..

Taylor farms California Farm Bureau Federat program engineer California fifty five percent sixty percent